Frequently asked questions

  1. How long does the application process take?
  2. What is the ‘business case’?
  3. What will the Delegation cover?
  4. How long does the Delegation last?
  5. If we need to add extra material to our Delegation, do we need to restart the process?
  6. Who can apply for a Delegation?
  7. Can my Delegation be revoked or cancelled?
  8. Who should sign the Delegation agreement?

How long does the application process take?

There is no average time from application to final countersignature, as there are stages in the process which can last a variable time, dependent on the type of material to be licensed, including the creation and approval of the business case.

What is the ‘business case’?

The business case is the requirement for the applicant to set out the justification for charging to license Crown copyright information, or to use terms other than the Open Government Licence (OGL).  There is a template form with questions to be answered in order to complete the business case, and these responses will be assessed to determine whether or not a delegation can be given. The template for exceptions to the OGL is presently in pilot stage and is available upon request from the Information Policy team.

What will the Delegation cover?

The Delegation is an agreement between the Keeper, who is responsible for all Crown copyright under Letters Patent granted by Her Majesty the Queen, and the Crown body concerned, to enable it to license Crown copyright material other than via the OGL.

How long does the Delegation last?

The Delegation is reviewed every two years to ensure that all requirements are being met.  It is usually renewed, and there is a requirement that the renewed documentation is re–signed by both parties.

If we need to add extra material to our Delegation, do we need to restart the process?

If, when reviewing your Delegation, it is decided that there is a requirement to add extra titles to your schedule, it may be necessary to make a new application, and to produce a new business case.This will depend on the nature of the additional material or product.  The decision will be made by the IP team, but it is rare that the holder of a long-standing Delegation will have to repeat the original process.

Who can apply for a Delegation?

In most cases, applications for a Delegation of Authority are made by government departments or agencies, but applications can also be made by non-Crown bodies such as some museums or archives that hold Crown copyright materials in their collections, for example English Heritage, the British Film Institute and Historic Environment Scotland.

Can my Delegation be revoked or cancelled?

Yes:

  • if there is substantive change to the status and/or responsibility of your organisation
  • if you are not meeting your responsibilities under the Delegations agreement
  • if we are unable to accredit you to the Information Fair Trader Scheme.
  • if you are no longer authorised to operate exceptions to marginal cost pricing

You may cancel your Delegation if it is no longer required, for example if you no longer need to charge for information, or become able to license it under the OGL, due to a change in circumstances.

Who should sign the Delegation agreement?

The final Delegation documents are usually signed by the most senior member of the organisation or by a nominated representative.