In Place of Strife

Extract from the appendix of ‘In Place of Strife: A Policy for Industrial Relations’ by Employment Secretary Barbara Castle, 1969 (LAB 44/288)

Transcript

2. The number of stoppages in industries other than coal-mining has increased steadily over the last few years as the following table shows:

UNITED KINGDOM: NUMBER OF STOPPAGES DUE TO INDUSTRIAL DISPUTES, 1957-1968

Number of stoppages-

 Number of stoppages: 
Year Coal-mining In the rest of the economyAltogether
19572,2246352,859
1958 1,963 666 2,629
1959 1,307 786 2,093
1960 1,666 1,166 2,832
1961 1,458 1,228 2,686
1962 1,203 1,246 2,449
1963 987 1,081 2,068
1964 1,058 1,466 2,524
1965 740 1,614 2,354
1966 553 1,384 1,937
1967 394 1,722 2,116
1968
(Provisional figs.)
219 2,131 2,350

Source: Department of Employment and Productivity

3. One important feature of the strike pattern in the U.K. is that the great majority of strikes (about 95 per cent) are unofficial (that is, not sanctioned or ratified by the union or unions concerned) as illustrated by the following table:—

OFFICIAL, UNOFFICIAL, AND OTHER STOPPAGES OF WORK DUE TO INDUSTRIAL DISPUTES
The Average Annual Figure for stoppages in the Period 1964-67

Type of stoppage No. of stoppage No. of workers involved No. of Working Days Lost
Official Strikes 8284,700 643,000
Partly Official 2600 6,000
Unofficial 2,125 663,3001,857,000
Others: Lock-outs or strikes by unorganised workers unclassified 243,20024,000
All2,233 751,800 2,530,000

Source: Department of Employment and Productivity

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