What you need to do

The Cold War was a strange conflict. It had political, military, media and civilian elements to it. You need to come up with your own Cold War Exhibition to show people exactly what the Cold War was and how it worked. It will be a sort of cross between a museum exhibition and a history essay.

You are going to look at a lot of documents in this Gallery, and maybe use the web for further research. There is a table in each Case Study Worksheet which will help you keep track of what you have looked at. Once you have looked at the Case Studies, you will have to select relevant source material and explain how you can use the source material to demonstrate how the Cold War worked.

We suggest you note down sources you think you might use, then look at your worksheets again and narrow down your final choice of sources for your exhibition. We have provided a framework below which you might like to use to structure your exhibition.

Alternatively, you might want to create an exhibition on each conflict which shows its political, military, media and civilian dimensions. Your teacher may want you to concentrate on only one theme or conflict, so make sure you know what you are being asked to do.

You could create your exhibition by

To start your investigation, look at the four case studies.

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An example exhibition framework

A political conflict

The Cold War was a political conflict. At the centre of the Cold War was the fact that the USA and USSR had completely different political and economic systems. Each side was very powerful. They did not want to go to war. As a result they clashed in other ways. A common way was political arguments at major meetings or in places like the United Nations Organisation. Here are some examples of political clashes.

Source

Caption

INSERT YOUR TEXT OR PICTURE SOURCE HERE

Source:

Date:

Context (what was happening at the time this source was created):

Why it is a good example of political conflict:

Why historians need to be careful to use other sources as well as just this one:

Why I chose this source:

[If you want to add more sources just copy this framework and paste it in after the last source you put in].

 

A military conflict

Sometimes the Cold War did involve military conflict. US troops and Soviet troops saw action, but not against each other directly. Here are some examples of military action in the Cold War.

Source

Caption

INSERT YOUR TEXT OR PICTURE SOURCE HERE

Source:

Date:

Context (what was happening at the time this source was created):

Why it is a good example of military conflict:

Why historians need to be careful to use other sources as well as just this one:

Why I chose this source:

[If you want to add more sources just copy this framework and paste it in after the last source you put in].

 

A media conflict

An important aspect of the Cold War was the use of the media. Sometimes the governments controlled their media. More often, the media of each side was happy to criticise the other side. There was the odd occasion when Western media criticised their own side. This was unheard of in the USSR, although it did sometimes happen in soviet controlled Eastern Europe. Here are some examples.

Source

Caption

INSERT YOUR TEXT OR PICTURE SOURCE HERE

Source:

Date:

Context (what was happening at the time this source was created):

Why it is a good example of media conflict:

Why historians need to be careful to use other sources as well as just this one:

Why I chose this source:

[If you want to add more sources just copy this framework and paste it in after the last source you put in].

 

An unfair conflict

Almost all conflicts are unfair. In all the wars of the 20th century there have been many more civilian casualties than military ones. The Cold War was no exception. Here are some examples.

Source

Caption

INSERT YOUR TEXT OR PICTURE SOURCE HERE

Source:

Date:

Context (what was happening at the time this source was created):

Why it is a good example of civilians suffering in the cold War:

Why historians need to be careful to use other sources as well as just this one:

Why I chose this source:

[If you want to add more sources just copy this framework and paste it in after the last source you put in].

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Working with the interactive exhibition creator

You work on your exhibition by choosing sources from any of the four case studies and then typing in the title, date, topic and caption for your exhibit.

Press the "Start" or "Add" button to go to the case studies and choose a source. All the sources in the case studies have a link that adds the source to your exhibition (look for the add to the Big Question links above each source image).

Type text into the boxes to give your chosen source a title and date. You also choose which topic your source illustrates and write a caption that explains why you chose the source, and why it is a good example of the topic you are illustrating.

You can edit any of the sources you've chosen at any time. Simply change the text in any of the boxes, use the "Change this source" button to pick another source image, or use the "Delete this source" to completely remove a source. (Careful! Deleting a source will permanently delete all the text you have typed into the caption boxes.)

You can also change the order of your sources by moving them up or down on the page. Your sources appear in the same order in the final exhibition.

You can work on your exhibition for as long as you like during a single session, but you will need to sign in if you want to save your work and come back to it another time. You can sign in at any point during your session by clicking the "Sign in" button. If you saved some work previously, it will be retrieved and added to the work you have done during this session.

You can see how your exhibition will look at any time by pressing the "Create" button. You can then print out your exhibition by pressing CTRL and P (if you're using a PC) or Apple Key and P (if you're using a Macintosh).

Once created you can also save your finished exhibition on to your own computer by pressing CTRL and S (if you're using a PC) or Apple Key and S (if you're using a Macintosh). Note that you may have to be online to see the sources in your saved exhibition. This depends on whether your computer allows you to save the complete exhibition web page (including images).

Important! You may lose your work if you are not signed in and you do not use the exhibition for more than 20 minutes - this is done automatically by the computer. Remember to save your work by signing in if you leave the computer, or if you want to come back to your work another day!

Notes:

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Learning Curve accounts

The Learning Curve introduces a new way of working through our exhibitions. Now you can create your own account online, save your work and then resume working at a later stage, at home or at school.

In order to do this, you need to sign up for a Learning Curve account. You can still use the exhibition without signing up, however, your work will not be saved after you stop using your computer.

Signing In
If you have created an account you can sign in by entering your e-mail address and password on the sign-in page.

Signing Out
Once you have completed working on the exhibition, click on the Sign Out button to end your session. Note that leaving the exhibition page does not sign you out and you can resume working by opening the page again.

You will be signed out if you do not use the exhibition for more than 20 minutes - this is done automatically by the computer - remember to save your work by signing in if you leave the computer!

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