TUDOR HACKNEY
The Daniells
Ch1 | Ch2 | Ch3 | Ch4 | Ch5 | Ch6

Chapter 4: Fair Recompense

Yorke House 1599

*
Lady Essex examines the copies of the letters John has returned Lady Essex examines the copies of the letters John has returned
Scene 1: The letters are exchanged

Lady Essex examines the copies of the letters.

Her Secretary stands at her shoulder, mirroring his employer's disdain.

She hands over money to John.

*
John is given £1,720 John is given £1,720
Scene 2: John is given his money

"One thousand seven hundred and twenty pounds."

"There were many interested parties at court who offered me far more."

"This was all my jewelry could raise."

*
John asks for some more security before he releases the letters John asks for some more security before he releases the letters
Scene 3: All is not what it seems

The secretary has been examining the letters more closely.

"These are but copies, your Ladyship."

Lady Essex looks up at John.

"I require some security before I relinquish my investment."

*
Lady Essex protests that the letters are not originals Lady Essex protests that the letters are not originals
Scene 4: John demands more

Lady Essex makes to protest.

"A simple letter promising that I will not be troubled further by Lord Essex or yourself and that no action will be taken against us."

"And you will return the originals."

Scene 5: Lady Essex agrees

"With pleasure your Ladyship. All I seek is fair recompense."

"Very well, John. I’ll see that recompense is yours."

*
Jane, much happier now, returns the letters to Lady Essex Jane, much happier now, returns the letters to Lady Essex
Scene 6: The exchange is completed

So when my husband bid me return the original letters - I did so with a lighter heart than I had known for many weeks.

 

 

*
Lady Essex refuses to speak to Jane Lady Essex refuses to speak to Jane
Scene 7: Jane is rebuffed

"Her Ladyship thanks you for the letters and sends in return this letter for your husband as requested."

He gives the letter to Jane, who receives it awkwardly.

"I - thank the Countess for her kindness."

"If her honour permits may I humbly take my leave of her?"

Jane hurries away, hurt and humiliated

"Her Ladyship is indisposed."

"Dear man, I have been one of my Lady’s closest companions these past ten years –"

"And as I said, her Ladyship is indisposed."

"If I cannot see her now, then when?"

"Good day."

*
Lady Essex stares at Jane from a window with contempt Lady Essex stares at Jane from a window with contempt.
Scene 8: Jane leaves

Jane hurries away, hurt and humiliated. She turns to look back at the house.

Standing at the window is Lady Essex, with the Secretary as always, at her shoulder.

She stares back at Jane with contempt before turning away.

*
Jane writes at a table Jane writes at a table
Scene 9: Jane realises her mistake

How foolish I was to believe that my faithfulness would ever be rewarded with the favour she had promised.

And I knew then that my duty lay forever with my husband.

 

*
About the Site | Contact | Credits

This site, developed with funding from the New Opportunities Fund as one of the projects within Sense of Place, London, forms part of the National Archive's Education site. It was developed as a partnership between Hackney Archives Department, Immediate Theatre and the National Archive's Education Team