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Folder icon  A BOOK of the PLANTATION of ULSTER.  MS 613, p. 93  28 March 1619

These documents are held at Lambeth Palace Library

Former reference: MS 613, p. 93

105 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. V, document 211.

Contents:
Ulster.--A brief view and survey made in several places, in the counties within named, between 1 Dec. 1618 and 28 March 1619, by me Nichollas Pynnar, &c., by virtue of a commission under the Great Seal of Ireland, dated 28 Nov. 1618. Herein are set forth the names of the British undertakers, servitors, and principal natives, with their proportions, and the undertakers of towns in the several counties of Armagh, Tyrone, Donegall, Cavan, and Fermanagh; how they have performed their buildings and plantations; and other matters, answerable to articles in the said commission annexed, together with the works performed by the city of London and city and co. of Londonderry.
Co. Cavan.--Precincts of Clanchie, alloted to Scottish undertakers. The Lord Aubignie, first patentee, 1, 3,000; Sir Ja. Hamilton holds these lands by the names called Keneth, 2,000 ac.; and Cashell, otherwise Castle Aubignie, 1,000 ac. Upon this proportion is built a strong castle of lime and stone, called Castle Aubigny, with the King's arms cut in freestone over the gate. This is 5 stories high, with 4 round towers for flankers; the body 50 foot long, and 28 broad, the roof set up and ready to be slated. Adjoining one end of the castle is a bawn of lime and stone 80 ft. square with 2 flankers, 15 ft. high, very strongly built and surely wrought. In this castle he himself, his lady, and family dwells. It stands upon a meeting of five beaten ways which keep all that part of the country. Planted and estated upon this land of British birth and descent are: Freeholders, 8; viz., one having 480 acres, 2 of 144 apiece, 2 of 192 jointly; 1 of 108, 2 of 120 apiece, 1 of 96, and 1 of 48. Leaseholders for years 5, viz.: 1 of 102, 2 of 96 apiece, 1 of 168, 1 of 100 ac. Cottagers 25, viz.: each man a tenement, a small quantity of land and commons for certain number of cattle. In toto, 41 families, which consist of 80 men armed. 36 of the heads of these have taken the oath of supremacy. Good tillage, and husbandry in English manner.
(2.) John Hamilton, 1,000 acres, called Killochan. Has built a bawn of lime and stone 80 ft. sq. and 13 ft. high, with 2 round towers for flankers, being 12 ft. the piece in diameter; also begun a stone house, now one story high, and intended to be 4, being 48 ft. long and 24 ft. broad; besides 2 towers, which are vaulted, flank the house; another bawn, near adjoining former, built of stone and clay, 100 ft. sq. and 12 ft high. Here are begun 2 houses of clay and stone, one to be 80 ft. long, the other 60, and each to be 20 ft. in breadth. Also a village of 8 houses joining the bawn, being inhabited by British tenants, a watermill, and 5 houses adjoining it. Estated upon this, of British birth and descent are 2 freeholders of 120 acres apiece. Lessees for years, 6: of 148 apiece. Cottagers 7. Each of these have a house and garden plot and commons for 4 cows. In toto, 15 families, 40 men armed. These 15 principal tenants have taken the oath of supremacy. Good tillage, after the manner of England.
(3.) Wm. Hamilton, 1,000, called Dromyck. Has built a bawn, 80 ft. square, of lime and stone, with 2 round towers for flankers, 2 stories high, vaulted; wall itself 13 foot high within the bawn, a house of lime and stone 36 foot long and 20 ft. broad, and near, a village of 5 houses, all British families. Estated upon this, of British birth and descent: 2 freeholders, of 120 ac. apiece. 2 lessees for 3 lives, 1 of 42 ac., 1 of 54. 4 lessees for years: 1 of 128 ac., 1 of 84, 1 of 48, 1 of 36. Cottagers that hold for years 6: 1 of 30, 1 of 20, 1 of 15, 1 of 12,1 of 11,1 of 10 ac. In toto, 14 families, 30 able men to serve the King. 12 of the heads of these families have taken the oath of supremacy. Tillage, &c., after the English manner.
(4.) Wm. Bealy, 1,000 ac., called Tonregue. Has built a bawn of lime and stone 90 ft. square, with two flankers, and in one of the flankers a castle, which is already above the first story and the length 30 ft., the breadth 22, vaulted; another house at one corner, 20 ft. square, vaulted, both one story high. In this himself, with wife and family, now dwell. Estated upon this, of British birth and descent are 2 freeholders, 1 of 144 ac., 1 of 48. Leaseholders for years 4: 2 of 96 apiece, 2 of 48 apiece. Cottagers for years 4: 2 of 20 ac. jointly, 1 of 5 ac., 1 of 4. In toto, 10 families, 28 men armed. These ten have taken the oath of supremacy. Good tillage, after the English manner.
The precinct of Castlerahin allotted to servitors and natives, Sir Wm. Taffe was first patentee.
(5.) Sir Tho. Ashe, Kt., 1,000 ac., called Mullagh. Upon this is an old castle, newly mended, but all the land is now inhabited with Irish. Sir Edm. Phettiplace first patentee.
(6.) Sir Tho. Ashe holds 1,000 ac., called Carvyn. Upon this is a good bawn of lime and stone, 70 ft. square, with two flankers, and 12 ft. high, all the land inhabited with Irish. Lieut. East, the first patentee.
(7.) Sir Tho. Ashe, Kt., 500 ac., called Miermode. Upon this is a bawn of sods, all the land inhabited with Irish. Capt. Ridgwaie first patentee.
(8.) Capt. Culme, 1,000 ac., called Logh-Rammarals, manor of Chichester. Upon this is a bawn of lime and stone, 180 ft. square, with two flankers, and 14 ft. high; a house in it of lime and stone, which is in building now about the second story. The roof ready to be set on. Has 4 English families, and this bawn stands upon a passage, which is able to do good service. Capt. Culme is to build a town called Virginia, for which he is allowed 250 ac. Upon this he has built about 8 timber houses, and put into them English tenants, of which town there is a minister who keeps school and is a very good preacher.
(9.) Sir John Elliott, Kt., 400 ac., called Muckon. Upon this is a bawn of lime and stone, 60 ft. square, and a small house, all the land being inhabited with Irish.
(10.) Shane McPhillipp O'Ralie, 900 ac. Upon this is a small bawn of sods and an Irish house, wherein he dwells.
The precinct of Tullagh-garvy allotted to servitors.
(11.) Capt. Hugh Culme and Arch. Moore, 1,500 ac., called Tullavyn. Upon this is a bawn and towers thoroughly finished, roof of the house framed and ready to be set up. It stands in a place of great strength. The said Archibald, with his wife and family, dwell in it. 4 English families about him, the rest of the land is inhabited with Irish.
(12.) Sir Thomas and John Ashe, 750, called Drumesheele. Upon this is a bawn of clay and stone, another of sods, 120 ft, square, all inhabited with Irish.
(13.) Mullmorie McPhillip O'Reyley, 1,000 ac., called Ittery-outra. Upon this is a very strog bawn of sods, with 4 flankers and a deep moat, a good Irish house within it, in which himself and family dwell. He has made no estates.
(14.) Capt. Reyley, 1,000 ac., called Liscannor. Upon this is a bawn of sods and a house in it, in which he dwells; he has made no estates, but from year to year, and all his tenants plough by the tail.
(15.) Mulmorie Oge O'Reley, 3,000 ac. Upon this is a bawn of sods, and in it an old castle, now built up, wherein he and his family dwell. Has made no estates to his tenants, and all plough by the tail.
(16.) Capt. Rich. Terrill and his brother William, 2,000 ac., called Iterrery. Upon this is a strong bawn of lime and stone, 80 ft. square, 12 ft. high, with 4 flankers. Has made no estates.
(17.) Mawric [Maurice] McTelligh, 3,000 ac., called Liscurcron. A bawn of sods, and in it a good Irish house, in which he and his family dwell.
The precinct of Toghtee.
Freeholders, 7, viz.
Lessees for years 7.
Cottagers in fee.
(18.) The precinct of Toghtee, English undertakers. John Tayler, 1,500 ac., called Aghteduff. Upon this is a castle, and bawn thoroughly finished, wherein he and his family dwell. Estated upon this, of British birth and descent: 1 of 288 ac., 1 of 264, 1 of 96, 2 of 48 apiece, 2 of 24 apiece. 1 of 192 ac., 2 of 48 apiece, 2 of 24 apiece, 2 of 48 ac. apiece. 3 of 60 ac. apiece, 3 of 31 apiece, 2 of 30 apiece, 1 of 4, 1 of 2.
In toto, 24 families, besides divers undertenants, 54 men armed. All these have taken the oath of supremacy, and dwell most of them in a village of 14 houses, in which there is a water mill, but no great store of tillage.
(19.) Tho. Waldron, son and heir to Sir Rich. Waldron, Kt., deceased, 2,000 ac., called Dromhill and Dromollan. Upon this is a bawn of sods 200 ft. square with 4 flankers, but much is fallen down. The castle or stone houses is finished, and he with his mother, the Lady Waldron, and family, dwell in it. Has built a town of 31 houses, all inhabited with English, a windmill, a thoroughfare and common passing into the country. A little tillage. Estated upon this, of British families of birth and descent; are
Freeholders, 5, viz.
2 of 96 ac. apiece, 1 of 192, 2 of 48 ac. apiece;
Lessees for years 17.
3 of 96 apiece, 2 of 48 ac. apiece, 1 of 72, 9 of 24 apiece, 2 of 33 apiece.
Cottagers, 31.
All these have a house and two ac., and commons for 12 cattle apiece. In toto, 57 families; 80 men very well armed.
(20.) John Fisher, 2,000 ac., called Dromany. Upon this is a bawn and castle long since finished, very strong, and he himself, with his wife and family, dwell therein. Has also built 2 villages of 10 houses each of lime and stone, and two good innholders, for they stand upon a roadway. Estated upon this, of British families, are as follows;
Freeholders, 4.
2 of 192 ac. apiece, 1 of 144, of 130.
Leases for 3 lives, 4.
2 of 150 apiece, 1 of 120, 1 of 144.
Lessees for years 14.
4 of 92 apiece, 4 of 48 apiece, 2 of 24 apiece, 1 of 30, 2 of 40 apiece, 1 of 20.
Cottages, 14.
Each of these have a house and garden plot and commons for four head of cattle.
This is now in the hands of McAdwick.
In toto, 22 families, besides cottagers; 60 men well armed.
(21.) Sir Hugh Warrall, Kt., 1,500 ac., called Monaghan. Upon this there is no bawn, but he is building a house of lime and stone, which is but two stories high, so it has been these two years. And now he has made it away to Mr. Adwick who is in possession. Estated upon this, of British families are:
Freeholders, 3.
2 of 96 acres apiece, 1 of 48.
Lessees, 5.
2 of 48 apiece, 1 of 72, 2 of 24 apiece.
Cottagers I saw not any, nor any counterpane to make it appear, but they said they have eight, whose names they gave me. These eight families with the eight cottages, are able to make 26 men, but for arms I saw not any, neither is there any place to keep them.
(22.) Sir Steph. Butler, Kt., 2,000 ac., called Clones. Castle and bawn finished, of great strength. Has built 2 corn mills and 1 fulling mill. He is also able to arm 200 men with very good arms, which are within, besides others which are dispersed to his tenants for their safeguard. Estated upon this, of British familes, there are:
Freeholders, 15.
1 of 144 ac., 2 of 96, 6 of 48 apiece, 6 of 24 apiece.
Lessees for 3 lives.
1 of 264, 1 of 144, 9 of 48 ac. apiece.
Lessees for years 15.
1 of 144, 5 of 48 apice, 6 of 24 apiece, 3 of 12 apiece.
In toto, 40 families, besides undertenants, able to make 135 men armed.
(23.) Sir Step. Butler and the undertakers of the precinct are to plant a town at Bolturbutt, and for that is allowed 384 ac., and to build a church. In this town there are 35 houses built of cagework, all inhabited with British tenants, and most are tradesmen, each having a house and garden plot with four ac. of land, and commons for certain number of cows and garrons.
Reginald Horne was first patentee.
(24.) Sir Geo. Mannering, Kt., 2,000 ac., called Lisreaghe, Upon this is a bawn of lime and stone 44 ft. long, 12 high. with two flankers, a brick house the same length, 20 ft. high, all of good work and strong, also a village of seven houses, all inhabited with English families. Estated with British families as follows;
Freeholders, 3.
Lessees for years 21.
1 of 144 ac., 2 of 192 apiece, 4 of 48 apiece, 1 of 51½, 8 of 24 apiece, 4 of 48. Jointly, 3 of 20 apiece, 1 of 30. In toto, 24 families, besides undertenants, able to make 48 men, as they say, but I did not see them.
William Snow was first patentee.
(25.) Pet. Ameas, 1,500 ac., called Tonagh. Upon this is a good bawn of lime and stone 75 ft. square, 12 high, with two flankers, a stone house within it 60 ft. long and three stories high, strongly built, and a village not far from it of seven houses. Estated upon this, of British families, there are;
Freeholders, 4.
3 of 480 ac. jointly, 1 of 48.
Lessees for years 7.
3 of 96 apiece, 7 of 96, 1 of 68, 2 of 96 ac. apiece. Total, 11 families, besides divers undertenants, able to make 30 men.
Precinct of Clonemahowne allotted to servitors and natives.
Capt. Lyons and Joseph Fennes were first patentees.
(26.) The Lord Lambert, 2,000 ac., called the Carigg-Upon this is a large strong bawn and a stone house finished long since, inhabited by an English gentleman, resident with family.
(27.) The Lord Lambert, 1,000 ac., called Tullacullen. A bawn of lime and stone 200 ft. square, 14 high, and a deep moat and two flankers. A small house in which dwells an English gentleman and other English families, who hold land for 21 years.
Lieutenant Atkinson and Lieutenant Russell were first patentees.
(28.) Arch. Moore, 1,000 ac. A strong bawn with two flankers, in which is an Irish house and one dwelling in it.
(29.) Capt. Flemming, 500 ac. A small bawn with two flankers. An Irish house and one dwelling in it. A house of lime and stone very strong.
Natives.
(30.) Mullmorie McHugh O'Reley, 2,000 ac., called Commett. A strong house of lime and stone 40 ft. long, 20 broad, three stories high, a bawn. No estates.
(31.) Phillip McTyrlagh, 300 ac., called Wateragh. A bawn and an Irish house, in which he is now dwelling.
Precinct of Tullaghconchoe, allotted to Scottish undertakers.
Sir Alexr. Hamilton the first patentee.
(32.) Jane Hamilton, late wife to Claud Hamilton, dec., 2,000 ac., called Garotobber and Clonkine. A strong castle, bawn of lime and stone, finished, she and her family live therein. Planted and estated upon this, of British: 1 of 288 ac., 1 of 144, 1 of 96, 3 of 48 apiece. Lessees for years, 2 of 144 apiece, 3 of 96, 14 of 48 apiece, 4 of 96. Jointly, 2 of 24 apiece. In toto, 31 families, with divers undertenants, 52 men, 14 of the heads of these have taken the oath of supremacy.
Sir Claud Hamilton was the first patentee.
(33.) The said Jane, 1,000 ac., called Clonney. No castle built, but a town of 22 houses. The inhabitants, have no estates as yet. Her son being under age, ten of the principal have taken the oath of supremacy. Each of these have a house and garden with four ac., and commons for cows.
Alexander and John Aghmootie were the first patentees.
(34.) Sir Ja. Craigg, Kt., 2,000 ac., called Dromheda & Killagh. A strong bawn of lime and stone 75 ft. square, 16 high, with four round towers. A strong castle, length of bawn 20 broad within, five stories high. Another house is building in the bawn, now built to the top of the wall, and to be a platform for two small pieces. British tenants, planted and estated who are resident:
Freeholders, 5.
1 of 96 ac., 3 of 48 apiece, 1 of 24.
Lessees, 7.
1 of 168, 2 of 48 apiece, 3 of 24 apiece.
Cottages, 21.
Each have a house with commons. In toto, 32 families, resident, 100 men armed.
John Brown was the first patentee.
(35.) Arch. Atcheson, 1,000 ac., called Corrodownan. Bawn of stone and clay 100 ft. sq., with four flankers 9 ft. high, standing on a mountain. Planted with English and Scottish, but they have not taken out their leases which I saw drawn and signed. Of the tenants there are;
Freeholders, 2.
1 of 144 ac., 1 of 120.
Lessees for years 19.
4 of 50 apiece, 2 of 48, jointly; 5 of 30 apiece, 3 of 36 apiece, 2 of 48, jointly; 3 of 48 apiece.
In toto, 21 families, 28 men. Eight have taken the oath of supremacy. The rest refused till they have their leases.
Precinct of Tullagtha, servitors and natives.
(36.) Capt. Culme and Walt. Talboott, 1,500 ac., called Balleconnell. Have built a strong bawn 100 ft. sq., 12 ft. high, with two flankers, and within a strong castle of lime and stone, three stories high. Stands in a convenient place for the strength and service of the country.
(37.) Sir Rich. and Sir Geo. Grimes, 2,000 ac. Have built a bawn of stone and lime 60 ft. sq. and 10 ft. high, with a little house in it.
(38.) Wm. Parsons, 1,000 ac., called Larga. It is between divers men, for it was granted for concealments, and they were not bound to build at all.
(39.) A native's 1,000 ac., called Magauran. A strong and good house of lime and stone with a ditch.
County Fermanagh precinct of Knocknyny, allotted to Scottish undertakers.
The Lord Burleigh was the first patentee.
(40.) Sir Ja. Belford, Kt., 1,000 ac., Carowshee, otherwise Belfed, and 2,000 ac., called Legan, but the one is in a remote place.
Building began at Castle Sheagh, foundation laid of a bawn of lime and stone, 70 ft. sq. of which two sides are 15 ft. high, also a castle, same length, one half two stories high, and is to be 3½, numbers of men at work, and are bound to finish it speedily. All materials in place, both strong and bountiful, a plot laid out for a church which must be 75 ft. long, and 24 broad, now in hand and to be finished this summer. A school 64 ft. long and 20 broad, and two stories high, of good stone, &c., roof ready framed and shall presently be got up. Near to the castle is a house in which Sir James and family now dwell adjoining a town of 48 houses of timber work and mud walls, inhabited with British, and is the only thoroughfare into the country. I find planted on these two proportions, 82 armed men, which I saw, but not any one of these have any stalls [...] estates as yet, as they told me, or leastways they did not show me any.
The Lo. Kinkell was the first patentee.
(41.) Mr. Adwick, 1,000 ac., called Aghalane. A bawn of clay and stone, rough cast over with lime, 50 ft. sq. and 12 high, 2 flankers, a poor thatched house within. Planted upon this, of British, 10; but I saw no estates more than by promise, which are here named, &c.:
Freeholders, 6.
Leesees, 4.
1 of 180 ac., 1 of 60, 4 of 120, jointly; 2 of 60 apiece, 1 of 30, 1 of 40, 10 families, the rest are Irish.
James Fraile was the first patentee.
(42.) Mr. Adwick, 1,000 ac., called Dristernam. A bawn began of lime and stone, 60 ft. sq. with 2 flankers, but it is not as yet above 5 ft. from the ground. No English tenants, but all inhabited with Irish.
The Lord Mountwhany was the first patentee.
(43.) Sir Steph. Butler, 1,500 ac., called Kilspena. A bawn of lime and stone, 60 ft. sq., 12 ft. high with 2 flankers. Within a house of lime and stone. Planted and estated, of British: 1 of 180, 3 of 120 apiece, 1 of 140, 1 of 90, 6 of 60 apiece. In toto, 12 families of 15 men who dwell dispersedly; not one freeholder but many Irish.
Lessees for years
Sir John Whisher was first patentee.
Lessees for years 17.
Cottagers in fee, 45.
(44.) Sir Steph. Butler, Kt., 1,500, called Leytrim. A bawn of lime and stone, 70 ft. sq. and 12 high with 2 flankers 3 stories high, a good stone house in building, now 1 story high. Planted and estated, of British: 3 having 240 ac., apiece, 3 of 120 apiece, 1 of 90, 6 of 60 apiece, 3 of 30 apiece, 1 of 10. Each has a house and 10 ac., and dwell most of them in a town adjoining to the bawn, 8 of these have taken the oath of supremacy, making 66 men with arms.
George Smelhome was the first patentee.
Lessees for years 3.
(45.) Sir Stephen Butler, Kt., 1,000 ac., called Derryanie. A small bawn of clay and stone, 60 ft. sq., with 2 flankers, a little house in it. Planted and estated upon this, of British; 1 of 500, 1 of 250, 1 of 60. In toto, 3 families, besides under-tenants, making 15 men, many Irish on this.
Precinct of Clancally, English.
(46.) John Ledborrow, 1,000 ac., called Latgar. A poor bawn of sods, of a round form, much of it fallen down, nobody dwelling in it, and a pound for cattle. Planted and estated upon this, of British: 1 of 420, 1 of 240, 1 of 240, 3 of 60 apiece. Freeholders, 6. 12 others whose estates I saw not, for many of these dwell in other countries. Of these 18 families, 1 took the oath of supremacy. Able to make 24 men.
(47.) Th. Flowerdew, 1,000 ac., called Lisrisk. A large round bawn of lime and stone, a little house of stone within, a small village adjoining of 6 houses inhabited with English, of cagework. Planted and estated, of British: 1 of 180 ac., 1 of 60, 1 of 90, 3 of 60 apiece, 2 of 60, jointly; 2 of 40 jointly, 5 of 30 apiece, 10 of 20. In toto, 16 families, now resident; 9 have taken the oath of supremacy, and make, with under-tenants, 40 men.
Freeholders, 2.
Lessees for years 14.
Robert Boges was the first patentee.
(48.) Edw. Hatton, 1,000 ac., called Clamcarn. Upon this is an excellent strong house and bawn, well seated for the King's service and strength of the country. Watermill for corn, and within half a mile, 4 good timber houses, and 6 more building. The town stands in a common road into the country. Is a minister and a good teacher of the word of God. Planted and estated upon this, of British: 1 of 120, 1 of 130, 1 of 240, 4 of 60. Each have a house and garden plot and 4 ac., 2 have taken oath of supremacy; 20 men in all, well armed.
Freeholders, 2.
Lessees, 5.
Cottagers, 8.
Thomas Plomstead was first patentee.
(49.) Sir Hugh Wirrall, Kt., 1,000 ac., called Ardmagh. Upon this is a bawn of lime and stone, 66 ft. sq., with 2 flankers and a little stone house within standing waste, no freeholder nor leaseholder, and but 3 poor men who have no estates, for all the land at this time is inhabited with Irish.
Peter Calvert was the first patentee.
(50.) Geo. Ridgway, 1,000 ac., called Gutgoonan. Upon this is a bawn of lime and stone in building, 60 ft. sq., and not above 8 ft. high, tenants dwell dispersedly. Planted and estated on this, of British: 1 of 100 ac., 1 of 480, 3 of 240, jointly; 1 of 160, 1 of 120, 1 of 60. In toto, 8 families, 12 men armed, and many Irish.
Freeholder, 1.
Lessees for years 7.
Precinct of Clinawly, servitors and natives.
(51.) Sir John Davis, Kt., 1,500 ac., called Lisgowelly. Upon this abbey land is built, a sure stone house but no bawn, and on this proportion not anything built.
(52.) Mrs. Harrison late wife to Capt. Harrison, dec., 500 ac., called Gurtin. Has built nothing at all.
(53.) Pierce Mostion, 300 ac., called Moycrane. Nothing built, he himself dwells in Connaught.
Precinct of Lurgie and Coolemckernan, English undertakers.
Thomas Burton was first patentee.
(54.) Sir Gerard Lowther, Kt., 2 small proportions, Drumynshin and Necarne. Upon Drumynshin is a good bawn of clay and stone, 60 ft. sq., 2 flankers, but no house. Planted and estated, of British birth and descent: 1 having 120 ac,. 1 of 200, 3 of 40 apiece, 1 of 60. Three of these have taken the oath of supremacy.
Freeholders, 5.
Leaseholder, 1.
Harrington Sutton first patentee.
(55.) Sir Gerard Lowther, Kt., 1,000. Has built upon Necarne, a strong bawn of lime and stone and a house in it, and near a village of 10 houses and a market house & a watermill. Planted and estated, of British &c.:
1 having 120 acres, 1 of 90, 1 of 73, 2 of 40, jointly, 1 of 60, 6 of 20 a piece, 1 of 18, 1 of 4.
Freeholders, 2.
Lessees for years 12.
In both proportions 16 British families, besides under-tenants, making 28 men with arms. 9 have taken the oath of supremacy.
(56.) John Archdale, 1,000 ac., called Tullana. A bawn of lime and stone, 3 flankers 15 ft. high, a good lodging, slated, with a house 80 ft. long and 3 stories high, with a battlement. Himself, wife, & family resident. A watermill, and in two several places of his land 2 villages of 8 houses a piece. Planted, &c., of British, &c.:
Freeholders, 6.
1 of 200, 1 of 120, 2 of 40 a piece, 2 of 30 a piece.
Lessees for years 10.
4 of 240 jointly, 2 of 30 a piece, 1 of 60, 1 of 20, 1 of 40, 1 of 15. Cottagers, 4. Each a house and 1 ac. of land. Abel to make 42 men, and 11 of these have taken the oath of supremacy.
(57.) Thos. Flowerdewe, 1,000 ac., called Reseguire. Nothing at all built. 2 gentlemen placed, as he thought, upon his land, but it proves to be glebe, and this is the reason he has not any English. The rest inhabited with Irish, a great number.
Hen. Humings first patentee.
(58.) Edw. Sabthorp and Hen. Flowre, 100 ac., called Dowrosse. A bawn of lime and stone 60 ft. sq., with 2 flankers. No house in it, but stands waste. Now a pound for cattle. Near is built a village of 14 houses, inhabited by English, but I saw not their estates, for the undertakers were forth of the country. All that I could see was 1 of 60 ac.
(59.) Tho. Blennerhassett, 1,000 ac., called Edernaghe. A bawn of lime and stone, height 75 ft., breadth 47, and 12 high. 4 flankers within. A house of the length thereof and 20 ft. broad, 2½ stories high. Wife and family dwell therein. Begun a church, also a village of 6 houses of cagework, inhabited with English. Planted, &c., of British: 4 freeholders,: 1 of 80 ac., 1 of 46, 1 of 22, 1 of 26. Lessees for years, 3: 1 of 60, 1 of 26, 1 of 8. In toto, 7 families, with undertenants, making 26 men, but I saw them not, for undertakers and many tenants were absent.
John Thurslon's first patentee.
(60.) Sir Edw. Blennerhassett, and Tho. Blennerhassett, 1,000 ac., called Talmackein. Nothing built, and all the land inhabited with Irish.
(61.) Fran. Blennerhassett, son to Sir Edw., 1,500 ac., called Bannaghmore. Here is a strong bawn of lime and stone 80 ft. long and 60 broad, a stone house 3 stories high, all finished. Himself and family dwell in it. A village near the bawn of 9 houses of good cagework. Planted and estated, of British: 1 of 120 ac. and a tenement, 1 of 120, 1 of 60, 1 of 50.
Freeholders, 4.
Saw no freeholders. Undertakers' in England, when I came suddenly upon them. By a jury I found the land to have 22 British, with undertenants, able to make 40 men, and store of arms, and I saw not one Irish family upon the land.
The precinct of Goole and Tyrcanada, servitors and natives.
(62.) Sir Wm. Cole, Kt., 1,000 ac., called Cornegrade. A bawn of lime and stone 68 ft. long, 56 broad, and 12 high, with two flankers. Planted and estated on this land.
Lessees for 3 lives, 7.
3 of 60 ac. each, 4 of 30 each, all have taken oath of supremacy and are able to make 18 men armed; there is also a good watermill.
(63.) Sir Hen. Folliot, Kt., 1,500 ac., called Newpurton. A strong bawn of lime and stone 150 ft. long, 120 wide, and 12 high, with 3 flankers within. A strong house of lime and stone 3 stories high. Himself, with lady and family, dwell in it. Near by is a town of 11 houses inhabited with Scottish and English. A watermill for corn.
(64.) Capt. Paul Gore, 1,000 ac., called Carick. A strong bawn of lime and stone 60 ft. sq. with 3 flankers, with a house in it inhabited by an English gentleman. On this land are 8 English families.
(65.) Capt. Rog. Atkinson, 1,000 ac., called Coole. A strong bawn of lime and stone 60 ft. sq. with 3 flankers, a strong stone house in which his wife and family dwell. 2 freeholders and 8 leaseholders, all resident, 2 watermills, a corn, and a tacking mill.
(66.) Con. McShane O'Neale, 1,500 ac., called Clabby. A little bawn of sods, and a house within of lime and stone very strongly built. 3 leaseholders, 60 ac. each for 21 years. Tenants plough after the Irish manner.
(67.) Bryan Maguire, 2,000 ac., called Tempodessell, and and 500 which were his late brother's. A large bawn of sods and a good house of lime and stone. 5 leaseholders, 60 ac. each for 21 years. Tenants plough after the Irish manner.
The precinct of Magheriboy, Scottish undertakers.
Ferremy Lynsey was the 1st patentee.
(68.) Sir Wm. Cole, 1,000 ac., called Dromskeaghe. A bawn of lime and stone 60 ft. sq., 13 high, with 4 flankers. A stone house or castle, 3 stories, strongly wrought. An excellent windmill. Planted, &c, upon this, of British, &c.:
Freeholders, 2.
2 of 120 ac. apiece;
Lessees for years, 10.
1 of 120, 2 of 90 jointly, 7 of 60 apiece, 1 being a tenant at will. 13 families have taken the oath of supremacy and have 11 tenants under them, making 34 men armed.
Sir Robert Hamilton was 1st patentee.
(69.) Malcolme Hamilton, 1,500 ac., called Dermiefogher. A strong castle of lime and stone 54 ft. long and 20 broad. No bawn to it, nor defence for succouring his tenants. Planted, &c., of British birth and descent, &c.:
Freeholders, 3.
1 of 384 ac., 1 of 120, 1 of 60.
Lessees, 11, viz.:--
3 of 180 jointly, 3 of 120 apiece, 2 of 40 apiece, 2 of 80, 1 of 20. Of 14 tenants 6 have taken the oath of supremacy, and these have divers undertenants, able to make 77 men with reasonable arms. Good store of tillage, and no Irish.
James Gill was the 1st patentee.
(70.) John Archdale, 1,000 ac., called Drumragh. Upon this is a bawn of lime and stone 60 ft. sq., 12 high, with 2 flankers; a house is now in building, and is about the first story. Planted, &c., of British, &c.:
Freeholders, 6, viz.:--
1 of 240, 1 of 120, 1 of 100, 2 of 40 apiece, 1 of 4, and a tenant.
Lessees for years, 5, viz.:--
1 having 120 ac., 1 of 140, 1 of 80, 1 of 20, 1 of 40. Cottagers, 4; each has a tenement and 4 ac. with common for cows. In toto, 14 resident, who have taken the oath of supremacy, and make 26 men armed.
Alexander Humes was 1st patentee.
(71.) Geo. Humes, 1,000 ac., called Dromcose. A bawn of 80 ft. sq. of lime and stone 12 high. No house in it. But few appeared before me, for the undertaker was out of the country, but the land is well planted with British and good store of tillage. No Irish that I could learn of, but I saw
Lessees for life, 3, viz.:--
1 having 300 ac., 2 of 60 jointly, who have taken the oath of supremacy. Rest of tenants have no estates, but promises.
William Fuller was 1st patentee.
(72.) Sir John Humes, 1,500 ac., called Moyglasse. Planted, &c., with a number of British. No estates, but promises.
Freeholders, 3, viz.:--
3 are nominated for freeholders, but are not resident, viz.:--
Lessees, 12, viz.:--
2 of 120 ac. apiece, 1 of 90, 9 of 60 apiece. These 15 have undertenants able to make 30 men. Good tillage and no Irish.
(73.) John Dunbarr, 1,000 ac., called Drumcro. A bawn of lime and stone 80 ft. long, 45 broad, and 14 high, 2 watermills. Himself, with wife and family, on the land. Planted with British, &c.:
Freeholders, 2.
2 of 120 a piece.
Lessees for years, 7, viz.:--
1 of 180, 3 of 120, 3 of 60 apiece. Nine families have undertenants, but all save one are estated only by promise, making 60 able men. 8 ploughs going. No Irish.
(74.) Sir John Humes, 2,000 ac., called Carrynroe. A bawn of lime and stone 1,000 ft. sq., 14 high, 4 flankers for defence. A fair strong castle 50 ft. long and 21 broad. A village near, in which dwell 24 families. Planted, &c., with British natives:
Freeholders, 4, viz.:--
2 of 120 ac. apiece, 2 of 200 apiece.
Lessees for years, 9, viz.:--
1 of 240, 1 of 120, 6 of 60 apiece, 1 of 40.
Cottagers, 11, viz.:--
1 of 30, 2 of 6 apiece, 1 of 5, 2 of 4 apiece, 1 of 3, 4 of 2 apiece.
In toto, 24 families resident, and most have taken oath of supremacy, making 30 able men with arms.
COUNTY DONAGALL.
Precinct of Boilagh Bainagh, Scottish undertakers.
(75.) John Murrey. Has all Boilagh and Bainagh, being 10,000 ac., and has planted as follows, viz.:--
The Lo. Bombe was first patentee.
(76.) Capt. Tho. Dutton, 2,000 ac., called the Rosses. But newly come into it, and has not his assurance from Mr. Murrey. A bawn and a small castle, built long since, of lime and stone, himself with wife and family dwell in it; has 6 English families, but they do but little as yet, till they have estates.
Sir Patrick McKill was first patentee.
(77.) John Murrey, 1,000 ac., called Cargie. A bawn of clay and stone, 60 ft. sq. and 12 high, and built upon a rock. Divers planted, but no freeholders, and they upon the land have no estates but "mynnytts," in number 23 families, and make 40 men of British birth, but dwell dispersedly.
Patrick Vans was first patentee.
(78.) John Murrey, 1,000 ac., called Boilaghoutra. This is let to William Hamilton and others. A bawn of lime and stone, 70 ft. sq., 12 high, with 2 flankers, in it a castle, very strong, no freeholders. There are 28 families of British, as I am informed, able to make 50 men with arms, these hold their land by promise. I saw but very few, for they dwell far asunder, and had no time to come to me.
(79.) John Murrey, 1,500 ac., called Dunconnally. Ja. Toodye and others have taken this for certain years. A bawn of lime and a castle, now inhabited. Planted with British, &c.:
Lessees, 11, viz.:--
1 having 200 ac., 2 of 100 jointly, 5 of 200 jointly, 3 of 120 apiece. 30 families, able to make 40 men with arms. I saw but 10 that had estates.
Alexander Dunbar first patentee.
(80.) John Murrey, 1,000 ac., called Kilkeran. Let to Rowland Congell and others for 15 years. A bawn and castle of lime and stone, inhabited by a Scottish gentleman. Not one freeholder, and but two leaseholders, one a lease for 15 years, the other for 5, and under them 10 British. Here are many Irish.
The Lo. Broughton first patentee:
(81.) John Murrey, 1,000 ac., called Ballagheigtra. Nothing built, and land inhabited with Irish.
(82.) Alex. Cunningham, 1,000 ac., called Moynagan, for the said John Murrey. A good strong bawn of lime and stone, 2 flankers, very few British tenants, but many Irish upon the land.
(83.) Ja. McCulloghe, 1,000 ac., called Mullaghvegh. Neither bawn nor castle, and very few British. Mostly inhabited with Irish.
Precinct of Dortloughe, Scottish undertakers.
(84.) John Cunningham, 1,000 ac., called Donboye. A bawn of lime and stone, 70 ft. sq., 14 high, 2 flankers, 3 stories high, good lodgings, a good house in bawn, in which he himself with his wife dwell. Near he has built a town of 26 houses and good watermill, all inhabited with British. Planted, of British:
Freeholders, 2, viz.:--
1 having 120 acres, 1 of 100.
Lessees for years, 12.
2 of 130 ac. apiece, 4 of 90 apiece, 1 of 48 apiece, 2 of 50 apiece, 3 of 100 apiece.
Of these 14 families most have taken the oath of supremacy, making with undertenants, 50 men armed. Great store of tillage, and no Irish on the ground.
(84.) Ja. Cunningham, 1,000 ac., called Moyegh. A bawn of lime and stone, 60 ft. sq., 2 flankers, walls 14 ft. high, within a good stone house, 3 stories high, himself and family dwell therein. Planted, of British:
Freeholders, 2.
1 of 200 ac., 1 of 66.
Lessees for years, 6.
2 of 100 apiece, 2 of 200 apiece, 2 of 240 jointly. Cottagers 15. Each has a house and garden plot and 6 ac., with common for cows. In toto, 23 families, with undertenants, make 42 men armed. Good store of tillage, and I saw not one Irish family on the land.
(85.) Sir Ja. Cunningham, 2,000 ac., called Darastrosse and Porthloghe. Upon the bawn there is no more built than there was 3 years past, a little bawn of lime and stone, and small house in it, in which the lady and her daughters dwell. Near is a village of 12 houses, British, 40 able men. Good store of tillage and no Irish.
Sir James Cunningham must answer for this.
(86.) Cuthbert Cunnington, 1,000 ac., called Dromagh, otherwise Coole McTreene. Nothing built by him, but peopled sufficiently with tenants, who build after their manner. The said Sir James must build and answer for both propositions. I have put them both together, for otherwise they cannot be distinguished. Planted upon both, of British:
Freeholders, 6, viz.:--
3 having 200 ac. apiece, 1 of 140, 1 of 120, 1 of 100.
Lessees for years, 9, viz.:--
2 of 200 ac. apiece, 2 of 200 jointly, 3 of 100 apiece, 2 of 360 jointly.
Each has a tenement with a backside, with some common for cattle. In toto, 30 families, with undertenants, making 80 men. 5 have taken the oath of supremacy.
(87.) William Stewart, Ld. of Dunduffe, 1,000 acres, called Coole Laghie. A bawn of clay and stone, 70 ft. sq., 2 flankers, 3 stories high, with necessary lodgings, not yet finished. A good house in it, in which he himself with his wife dwells. Planted with British:
Freeholders, 2, viz.:--
1 having 200 ac., 1 of 60.
Lessees for years, 8.
2 of 200 apiece, 2 of 100, 3 of 200 jointly, 1 of 66 ac. 16 families, with undertenants, making 40 men with arms. Most have taken the oath.
(88.) Alex. McAwley, otherwise Stewart, 1,000 ac., called Ballyneagh. A bawn of lime and stone, 70 ft. sq., 4 flankers, and a stone house in it. Planted upon this, with British:
Freeholders, 2, viz.:--
1 of 200, 1 of 60.
Lessees for years, 9, viz.:--
3 of 200 ac. apiece, 2 of 180, 1 of 120, 2 of 60 apiece, 1 of 40. In toto, 11 families, with undertenants, making 30 men armed, who have taken the oath. Good store of tillage, and not one Irish family.
(89.) The Ld. of Lusse, 1,000 ac., called Corgaghe. A bawn of clay and stone, 60 ft. sq., 10 high, 2 flankers, a good house within, thatched. Planted with British:
1 of 300 ac., 1 of 100, 1 of 330, 1 of 300, 1 of 195. Each has a house and garden plot. In toto, 10 families, with undertenants, making 26 men, whereof 5 have taken the oath. Good store of tillage.
(90.) Sir John Stewart, 3,000 ac., called Cashell, Kethin, and Littergall. Here is built a strong castle of lime and stone, a flanker at each corner, but as yet no bawn nor freeholders made. The Duke of Lennox is to answer the King. I saw the land well inhabited and full of people. What estates they have I know not, neither would he call the tenants together, but showed me a counterpane of one lease, and says that each tenant had the like.
(91.) Sir John Stewart aforesaid, 1,000 ac., called Lismolmoghan. Neither castle nor bawn, but land well inhabited with British tenants.
Precinct of Liffer, English undertakers.
(92.) Pet. Benson, 1,500 ac., called Shragh-miclar. A bawn of lime and stone, 100 ft. sq., 13 high, 4 flankers. In it a good house of lime and stone, in which himself, wife, and family, dwell. There is also a watermill. Planted upon this with British:
Freeholders, 5, viz.:--
5 of 120 ac. apiece.
Lessees for years, 10.
1 of 200, 1 of 120, 4 of 40 apiece, 3 of 25 apiece, 1 of 150, 4 of 11, 5 of 160 jointly, 24 families, with undertenants, making 68 men with arms, who have taken the oath. A village of 10 houses, and no Irish.
(93.) Wm. Willson, 2,000 ac., called Aghagalla. A large bawn and a castle, standing on a high mount, all thoroughly finished, he with his wife and family dwell therein. A village of 10 houses, well built. Planted with British:
Freeholders, 6, viz.:--
6 of 120 apiece.
Lessees for 3 lives, 14, viz.:--
4 of 200 jointly, 4 of 50 apiece, 2 of 200 jointly, 3 of 200 jointly, 1 of 66 ac. These 20 families have 50 other families under them, which dwell many together, and making 106 men, great store of tillage and no Irish.
Sir Thomas Cornwalle was first patentee.
(94.) Tho. Davies, holds from his brother, Robert Davies, 2,000 ac., called Corlackyn. A bawn of stone and clay, 2 flankers and stone house in it. Planted upon this, of British:
Freeholders, 4, viz. :--
1 of 220 ac., 1 of 120, 2 of 160 apiece.
Lessees for years, 28 :--
5 of 100 apiece, 6 of 75 apiece, 2 of 40 apiece, 4 of 30 apiece, 4 of 20 apiece, 1 of 25, 2 of 16 apiece, 4 of 11 apiece. 32 families dwell and have taken the oath. Divers undertenants make 54 men armed, and dwell together in villages, some of 12 houses, others less.
(95.) Capt. Mansfield, 1,000 ac. Killenegardon. Bawn finished, and a good stone house 3 stories high ready to be slated, he with his family dwell there. Near to this is a village of 9 houses, on a passage, commodious for service and good of the country. Planted upon this with British:
Freeholders, 2, viz. :--
1 of 260 ac. 1 of 200.
Lessees for years, 16, viz. :--
3 of 240 jointly, 1 of 220, 1 of 120, 1 of 124, 2 of 60 apiece, 3 of 62 apiece, 2 of 40 apiece, 1 of 6, 2 of 10 apiece. In toto, 18 families on land making with undertenants, 46 men with arms, and 9 of the principal have taken the oath.
Capt. Russell was first patentee.
(96.) Sir John Kingsmill, 1,500 ac., called Acarnie. A bawn of lime and stone 100 ft. sq., 2 flankers, two stories high with good lodging, and a very strong stone house, 3 stories high; himself, wife and family, dwell therein. Near is built a village of 30 houses, all inhabited with English. Planted with British:
Freeholders, 5.
1 of 200 ac., 1 of 120, 1 of 110, 2 of 100 apiece.
Leases for lives.
1 of 400 ac., 4 of 120 apiece.
Leases for years.
2 of 40 apiece, 1 of 10.
In toto, 13 families who have divers undertenants and make 36 men armed, all resident.
Sir Robert Remington, the first patentee.
(97.) Sir Raphe Bingley, 2,000 ac, called Tonafocies. A strong castle with 4 large towers, now 3 stories high, roof framed, but all at a stay through controversy with Sir Ro. Remyngton's heirs. Yet I found planted, of British,
Freeholders, 4.
2 of 200 ac. apiece, 1 of 120, 1 of 67.
Lessees for 3 lives.
Lessees for years, 11, viz. :--
1 of 300, 1 of 200, 4 of 120 apiece, 3 of 360 jointly, 4 of 100 apiece, 2 of 200 jointly, 2 of 120 jointly. In toto, 21 families, who with undertenants make 60 men with arms. Many dwell together and have taken the oath. Castle seated upon a river of Fyn, where is a ford, and the only passage into the country, and principal place for the King's service.
Sir Maurice Bartley was the first patentee.
(98.) Sir Raph Bingley, 2,000 ac., called Drummore and Luegagh. Bawn of brick and a house of stone thoroughly finished, himself and family dwell therein. Well seated for service and within a mile. Has made a village of 6 houses, a mill ready built, and more is building in a place a continual passage. Planted with British, who have taken the oath:
Freeholders, 7.
4 of 120 ac. apiece, 1 of 67, 1 of 60, 1 of 200.
Lessees for years, 12.
2 of 120 apiece, 4 of 67 apiece, 3 of 100 apiece, 3 of 40 apiece.
Cottagers, 10.
Each has a house and 6 ac., and common, for grazing a few cows.
In toto, 29 families, with undertenants, making 64 men with arms.
(99.) Sir Th. Goache, 1,500 ac., called Lismongan. A strong castle, [...] a trench cast up with a hedge upon it, environed by a small brook, in which there is a house of cagework, wherein, he with his lady and family, dwell. Materials ready for building of bawn and house; place very convenient for the king's service and good of the country. 6 good houses near, inhabited with English; this had long since been done, but that he was grievously troubled with sickness. Planted with British, who have taken the oath:
Freeholders, 4.
2 of 200 ac. apiece, 1 of 200, 1 of 70.
Leases for years, 9.
5 of 120 apiece, 1 of 70, 3 of 66 apiece.
Cottagers, 6, viz.:--
Each has a tenement and garden plot, with 4 ac., and common for cattle.
In toto, 19 families making 56 men with arms.
Sir Wm. Barnes first patentee.
(100.) Sir John Kingsmill and McWillson, [...] Mr. Willson 1,500 ac., called Monester. Bawn and house thoroughly finished, divers houses built near, all inhabited with English. Planted upon this, of British: 2 of 120 apiece, 3 of 100 apiece, 1 of 96 apiece.
Freeholders, 6.
1 of 140 ac., 2 of 120 apiece, 1 of 200, 2 of 40 apiece.
Each has a house and garden plot, with common for 4 cows.
Lessees for years, 6.
Cottagers, 5.
In toto, 17 families, with undertenants, making 46 men with arms. 11 of these have taken the oath.
Precinct of Killmacrenan, servitors and natives.
Captain Crayfood was first patentee.
(101.) Sir Geo. Marburie, 1,000 ac., called Littekenny. A bawn of lime and stone 60 ft. sq., 2 flankers, 12 ft. high, and standing waste. Near is built a township of 40 houses, wherein he dwells; all inhabited with British, making 50 men; a great market town, and stands well for the King's service.
(102.) Sir John Kingsmill, 1,000 ac., called Ballamalely. A bawn of stone and clay standing waste, and not one English man upon the land.
(103.) Sir Wm. Stewart, 1,000 ac., called Gortavaghie. A bawn of stone and clay 80 ft. long, 70 broad, and 14 high, a good stone house within, inhabited by a Scottish gentleman and family. 8 British families upon the land, who use tillage and husbandry, making 20 men with arms.
(104.) Sir Bazill Brooke, 1,000 ac., called Edonecarne. A round bawn of lime and stone, in it a house in building, in which dwells an English gentleman.
Sir John Vaugham was first patentee.
(105.) Sir Tho. Chichester, 1,000 ac., called Radonnell. A bawn of clay and straw with some stone amongst it, now fallen down and waste.
(106.) John Wray, 1,000 ac., called Carnegille. A good strong bawn of lime and stone, 40 ft. long, 15 high, 4 flankers, good lodgings, 2 stories high, a stone house length of bawn, 2 stories high, inhabited by an English gentleman and family. English undertenants. Stands in a good place for the King's service.
(107.) Arth. Corry, 1,000 ac., called Mons. A good bawn of lime and stone, 2 flankers, and a good house in it, inhabited by an English gentleman, wife and family. 6 English families, making 10 men armed.
(108.) Capt. Henry Hart, 1,000 ac., called Ballenis, and 256 ac. of concealment. A strong fort and a house in it, all of lime and stone, in which is an English family.
(109.) Sir Wm. Stewart, 1,000 ac., called Rumalton. A large and strong bawn, 80 ft. sq. and 16 high, 4 flankers, fair strong castle of same materials, 3½ stories high. A large town of 45 houses and 57 families, all British, some having estates for years. A church begun of lime and stone, built to setting on of roof. A watermill for corn. This is a market town, and stands well for the good of the country and the King's service.
(110.) Sir John Vaughan, 1,000 ac. [Sic in MS.] A bawn of lime and stone, 60 ft. sq., 12 high, 4 flankers, within is a stone house, inhabited by an English gentleman and family.
(111.) Capt. Paul Gore, 1,000 ac. [Sic in MS.] A bawn of lime and stone, 60 ft. sq., 2 flankers, 2 ft. high, a timber house of cage-work within it, inhabited by an English gentleman and family.
(112.) Lieut. Parkins, 172 ac., called Facker. Never had any more, and not bound to build.
Lieutenant Ellis was first patentee.
(113.) Nath. Rowley, 400 ac., called Lough-nemick. Upon this nothing built.
Lieutenant Brown.
(114.) Nath. Rowley, 528 ac., called Crancrasse. Upon this nothing built.
Lieutenant Gall.
(115.) Wm. Lynn, 108 ac., called Cororeagh, and 240 ac., called Lageonagh Larganrack. Nothing built on either.
Sir Richard Bingley was the first patentee.
(116.) Capt. Samford, 500 ac., called Castell-Doe. A bawn of lime and stone, 40 ft. sq., 16 high, a castle within it, very strong. He with his wife and family dwell therein, with 4 other English families on the land.
(117.) Sir Mulmorye McSwyne, 2,000 ac., called Moynt Mellan. A bawn of lime and stone, a good house, in which he dwells with his family. Has made no estates to his tenants, who use Irish ploughing.
(118.) McSwyne Bannagh, 2,000 ac., called Leamagh and Corragh. A bawn of lime and stone with a house in it, wherein he dwells with his family. Has made no estates, for his tenants will have no longer time but from year to year.
(119.) Tyrlagh Roe O'Boyle, 2,000 ac., called Caroghbleagh and Clomas. A good bawn, and a house of lime and stone, in which he, and his family, dwell. No estates, and tenants use Irish ploughing.
(120.) Donell McSwyne Faine, 2,000 ac., called Royndeherg and Caroocomony. A good bawn, and a house of lime and stone, in which he dwells with his family Tenants have no estate but from three years to three years, and these use Irish ploughing.
(121.) Walt. McRaughlin McSwyne, 896 ac., called Ballycany and Ragh. A fair bawn and a good strong house, all of lime and stone, with family dwelling in it, being a justice of peace and conformable to his Majesty's laws. A true subject since the first taking of Loghfoile.
COUNTY of TYRONE.
Precinct of Strobane, Scottish undertakers.
(122.) Earl of Abercorne, 1,000 ac., called Strobawne. A fair castle and very strong, but no bawn, a school house of lime and stone, also a church in building, walls about 5 ft. high, but has been at a stand ever since the late Earl died. Also about the castle is a town of 80 houses, many of lime and stone, strongly built, and many other good timber houses. In these 120 families, make 200 men, each having arms. 3 watermills for corn. Planted with British:
Freeholders, 6.
1 of 120 ac., 5 of 60 apiece.
Lessees for years, 6.
1 of 120 acres, 2 of 60 apiece, 3 of 40 apiece.
Townmen, 53.
Townmen 53. Each has a house and garden plot, with some land, mostly merchants and tradesmen with some cottagers.
In toto, 65 families of 180 men.
(123.) Earl of Abercorne, 2,000 ac., called Doaghlonge. Neither castle nor bawn built, but upon places 3 or 4 good houses of lime and stone by tenants. Planted with British:
Freeholders, 6,
1 of 260 ac., 1 of 120, 4 of 60 apiece.
Lessees for years, 14.
2 of 120 apiece, 6 of 180 jointly, 1 of 120, 2 of 60 apiece, 3 of 60 jointly. In toto, 20 families, with undertenants, making 106 men with arms.
Sir Th. Boid first patentee.
(124.) Earl of Abercorne, 1,500 ac., called Shean. A large bawn of lime and stone, 80 ft. sq., 4 flankers, as yet not thoroughly finished, also a large strong castle begun and to be finished this summer. Planted with British:
Freeholders, 3, Lessees for years, 10.
2 of 120 ac. apiece, 2 of 240, 2 of 120 apiece, 4 of 60 apiece, 2 of 30 apiece. In toto, 13 undertenants, making 100 men armed.
(125.) Sir Geo. Hamilton, 1,500 ac., called Largie, otherwise Cloghogenall. No more done upon the bawn and house than was done when Sir John Bodley surveyed it. Has made a village of 30 Irish coupled houses. Stands in a roadway and convenient place. Planted with British:
Freeholders, 4,
1 of 120, 3 of 60.
Lessees for years, 11.
1 of 120, 10 of 60. Each has a house and garden plot, with a small quantity of land to feed cows. These 27 tenants make 50 men armed.
(126.) Sir Geo. Hamilton, 1,000 ac., called Derrie Woone. A bawn of lime and stone, 60 ft. sq., 14 ft. high, 4 flankers, whereof 2 have very good lodgings. In them and near to the bawn is a village of 10 houses, inhabited with British. Planted with British:
Freeholders, 2,
2 of 120 ac. apiece.
Lessees for years 14.
4 of 60 apiece, 5 of 40 apiece, 1 of 30, 4 of 15 apiece. In toto, 16 families, with undertenants, making 43 men with arms.
(127.) Sir Claud Hamilton, dec., left this in charge with Sir Geo. Hamilton. Upon this 2,000 ac., called Eden and Killiny, is a bawn of lime and stone, 70 ft. sq., 14 ft. high, a good castle in it, strong and beautiful. Near the bawn are 6 small houses and others on the land, all of which are inhabited with British. Planted by promise upon this, of British:
Freeholders, 6.
4 having 120 acres apiece, 2 of 60 apiece.
Lessees for years, 14.
5 of 60 apiece, 9 of 30 apiece. 20 families, with undertenants, make 50 men. Have no estates, for the children are under age.
Sir James Haige was the first patentee.
(128.) Sir Geo. Hamilton and Sir Wm. Steward have jointly 1,500 ac., called Terremurrearth, otherwise Moynterlemy. Nothing at all built, but the Lord Abercorne and Sir Geo. Hamilton are bound in a bond of 1,000l. to Sir Wm. Steward to perform the buildings this summer. No British tenants, but I am told there are 8 British families, and the rest is inhabited with Irish natives.
James Clapham was the first patentee.
Sir Ro. Newcomen 2,000 ac., called Newton and Lislapp. Have newly come into it and rebuilt the castle, now 4 stories high, ready to have the roof set up, and two sides of wall of bawn finished, 16 ft. high, other two sides in progress. A good town building before castle, wherein are 14 houses, inhabited with English and Scottish tenants. Planted with British:
Freeholders, 4.
3 of 120 apiece, 1 of 6 apiece.
Lessees for years, 9.
2 of 180 apiece, 2 of 120 apiece, 4 of 60 apiece, 1 of 21.
Cottagers, 12.
Each a house and garden plot and common for grazing cows. In toto, 24 families, making 48 men armed.
(130.) Sir John Dromond, 1,000 ac., called Bellemagnegh. A bawn of lime and stone, 100 ft. sq., 4 flankers, in it a timber house of cagework, in which he dwells with his family [...] In a village a quarter of a mile off, are 10 houses. A watermill for corn, many tenants without estate. They, knowing that I was in the country, came and complained that for many years they could never get anything but promises, and for the most part are leaving. I desired the lady to show me their counterpanes; her answer was, that her knight was in Scotland, and that he could not come to them; but upon examination I find 30 British on the land.
Precinct of Eny (Omy), English undertakers.
This is the Countess' jointure.
(131.) Earl of Castlehaven, 3,000 ac., called Fuagh and Rarone. No building either of bawn or castle, nor freeholders. I planted some few English, but they have no estates; for since the old Earl died the tenants cannot have their leases made good unless they will give treble the rent paid, and yet must have but half the land which they enjoyed in the late Earl's time.
Lessees for years, 8.
1 of 120 ac., 6 of 60 apiece, 1 of 30. Cottagers, 3. Each has a small piece of land to keep cows. These dwell dispersedly upon their own land and cannot dwell together in a village because they are bound to dwell upon their own land or the lease is void. These 12 tenants can make no more men, and the rest is inhabited with Irish.
(132.) The said Earl has other 2,000 ac., called Brade. Nothing built.
Sir Fred. [Ferdinando] Audley first patentee.
(133.) Also other 2,000 ac., called Fentonagh. Upon this likewise nothing built.
Mr. Blunt first patentee.
(134.) Also other 2,000 ac., called Edergoole and Carnew Rachaw. A large house was begun, but is now plucked down and made but half so great, of 3 stories, and finished. The agent for the Earl showed me the rent roll of tenants on these 3 proportions, but the estates are so weak and uncertain, that all are leaving, in number 64, and each holds 60 ac., which they term a town land. The rest is let to 20 Irish gentlemen as appeared by rent roll, which is contrary to articles of plantation. These Irish men have under them about 3,000 souls of all sorts.
(135.) Sir John Davies, 2,000 ac., called Gavetagh and Clonaghmore, also Castle Dirge and Castle Curlews. 2 strong and fair castles of lime and stone, but no bawn. Planted with British:
Freeholders, 4.
1 having 120 acres, 3 of 60 apiece.
Lessees for years, 12.
3 of 60 apiece, 2 of 60 jointly, 2 of 60 jointly, 3 of 30 apiece, 2 of 60 jointly. These 16 families, resident with undertenants, make 30 men. The rest is inhabited with Irish, in great numbers.
Precinct of Clogher, English undertakers.
(136.) Lord Ridgwade, 2,000 ac., called Portclare and Ballicilgrie. A bawn of lime and stone, 140 ft. sq., 4 flankers, a castle 3 stories high, and a house with bawn of lime and stone. Planted with British :
Freeholders, 2.
1 of 120 ac., 1 of 60.
Lessees for years, 9.
1 of 200, 1 of 180, 2 of 120 apiece, 4 of 60 apiece, 1 of 40 Lessees for years, 3: 2 of 80 apiece, 7 of 60 apiece. These 2 families with undertenants, make 50 men with arms. The said Lord has 315 ac., at Agher, for which he is to build a town and has performed, viz :--there are 15 houses, whereof 2 are of lime and stone, the rest of cagework and copples. Each of the principal burgesses have to their houses 2 ac., and single burgesses one ac., with common. The whole number of burgesses is 20.
(137.) Geo. Ridgwaye, gent., 1,000 ac., called Thomas Courte. Has a bawn of lime and stone, 80 ft. sq., 4 flankers, but no house in it. Planted with British: 1 freeholder of 120 ac. Lessees for 3 lives, 6: 5 of 120 apiece, 1 of 60. Lessees for years, 4: 1 of 60, 1 of 120, 1 of 40, 1 of 30. In toto, 11 families, making 26 men, with arms.
Mr. Turvyn was the first patentee.
(138.) Sir Gerrard Lowther 1,000 ac. A bawn of clay and stone, 2 flankers, 8 ft. high. This is let to Mr. Pringle, who dwells on the land in a poor cabin. What tenants there are I know not, for he refused to show them to me. He brought a list of 20 tenants. If they have any estates, the list does not mention, or what they hold. I passed over the land, and saw divers ploughing.
Captain Eney was the first patentee.
(139.) Lord Burleighe, 1,500 ac., called Laghmaguiefie. A bawn of 140 ft. long and 63 wide, 3 flankers 14 ft. high, a house within, and a castle begun, all of lime and stone, built to second story, inhabited by a Scottish gentleman. Planted with British:
Freeholders, 5.
1 of 220 ac., 2 of 200 apiece, 2 of 67.
Leasholders for years 10.
2 of 60 apiece, 3 of 200 jointly, 1 of 100, 4 of 66 apiece.
Cottagers in fee, 4. Each a house and garden plot and grazing on common for cows and garons. In toto, 19 families, with undertenants, making 60 men with arms.
Sir Francis Willabie was the first patentee.
(140.) John Leigh, 2,900 ac., in Fentonagh. A bawn of lime and stone, 2 flankers, and a good large stone house within it, in which he dwells. Near is a village of 8 houses. Planted with British:
Freeholders, 8.
3 of 120 apiece, 2 of 60 apiece, 2 of 45 apiece, 1 of 60.
Lessees for years 12
4 of 100 apiece, 2 of 66 apiece, 1 of 120, 3 of 60 apiece 2 of 40 apiece.
Cottagers, 21. Each a house and garden plot, and most of them 2 ac. commons. In toto, 41 families, making 48 men, who have taken the oath.
Edward Kingsmill was the first patentee.
(141.) Sir Wm. Stewart, 2,000 ac., in Ballenecoole and Balleranally. A large strong castle in building, of lime and stone, now 3 stories high, and when finished will be the fairest castle in the whole precinct. Is making a bawn 240 ft. length and 120 breadth, 4 flankers of clay and stone, and a village, now 9 houses and more building. Good store of tillage, all Irish put from the land. Planted with British:
Freeholders, 5: 1 of 180 ac., 2 of 120 apiece, 2 of 130 apiece Lessees for years, 9: 1 of 160, 2 of 120, 4 of 60 apiece, 1 of 20, 1 of 40.
Cottagers, 8. Each a house and garden plot, with commons.
In toto, 24 families, who, with undertenants, make 64 men armed.
Sir Anthony Cope first patentee. (142.) Sir Wm. Cope, Kt., 2,000 ac. in Derribard. A bawn of clay and stone, pointed with lime, 80 ft. sq., 2 flankers, a little house in it, all waste, and no Englishman dwelling on the land; all inhabited with Irish.
(143.) Wm. Parsons, 1,000 ac. in Balleneclogh. A bawn of lime and stone, 60 ft. sq., 13 high, 2 flankers, a large stone house 2½ stories, in which his brother, with wife and family, dwell. Planted with British:
Freeholders, 2: 2 of 120 ac. apiece. Lessees for 3 lives, 1 of 180.
Lessees for years, 8: 2 of 180 apiece, 2 of 120 apiece, 4 of 60 apiece. Cottagers, 3.
Each has a house and garden plot, with commons. In toto, 14 families, with undertenants, making 38 men armed, who have taken the oath, and most dwell in a village of 9 houses.
Precinct of Mountjoy, Scottish undertakers.
(144.) Sir R. Heyborne, 1,800 ac. in Carraghan. A bawn of clay and stone, walls not above 7 ft. high, a small house within, of lime and stone; near adjoining bawn, 10 small houses together, inhabited by British. Planted with British: Freeholders, 6: 1 of 660 ac., 2 of 240 apiece, 3 of 180 apiece. Lessees for years, 3: 1 of 180, 1 of 60, 1 of 30.
In toto, 9 tenants, with undertenants, making 12 men with arms.
(145.) Lord Uhiltree, 3,500 ac., in Revelin outra Eghera. No more done now than at last survey, castle thatched, and Lord absent. Near this castle are a great many poor Irish [houses] inhabited with British families. Planted with British tenants: Freeholders, 7: 2 of 180 ac. apiece, 5 of 120 apiece.
Lessees for years, 12: 5 of 120 apiece, 7 of 60 apiece. In toto, 19 tenants, with undertenants, making 80 men with arms.
(146.) Capt. Sanderson, 1.000 ac. in Tullylegan: A good bawn of clay and stone, 2 flankers, a good house of lime and stone; himself, with wife and family, dwell therein. About him are some houses inhabited with British. Planted with British; Freeholders, 5: 2 of 120 apiece, 3 of 60 apiece. Lessees for 3 lives, 8: 2 of 120 apiece, 2 of 60 apiece. Cottagers, 7, holding 120 ac. among them for 21 years. In toto, 17 tenants, making 36 men with arms.
(147.) Mrs. Linsey, late wife of Ro. Linsey, 1,000 ac. in Tullaghoge. A good strong bawn of earth, with a quickset hedge and a ditch, a timber house within, in which she and her family dwell. Planted with British: Freeholders, 2, of 120 ac. apiece. Lessees, 8, 1 of 120, 1 of 60, 6 of 120 jointly. Cottagers, 12, holding among them 120 ac.
In toto, 22 tenants, making 30 men with arms.
Barnard Linsey, first patentee.
(148.) Alex. Richardson, 1,000 ac. in Creighballe. A bawn of clay and stone, rough cast, 90 ft. sq., 4 flankers, and a timber house, where the family dwell. Planted with British: Freeholders, 2: 2 of 120 ac. Lessees for years, 4; 1 of 120, 2 of 120 jointly, 1 of 60. Cottagers, 11.
Each has a tenement, a garden plot, and commons for cattle.
In toto, 17 families, making 29 men armed.
Robert Steward first patentee.
(149.) And. Stewart, son to Lord Ucheltree, 1,000 ac. in Ballenekevan. In building, a small castle 20 ft. sq., now 2 stories high, bawn laid out to be 60 ft. sq., of that but one of the sides begun 8 ft. high, the workmen are hard at work, and have promised to make haste. Planted with British, viz.: Freeholders, 2: 1 of 240 ac., 1 of 120. Lessees for years, 8; 2 of 240 apiece, 3 of 120 apiece, 1 of 60, 2 of 120 jointly. In toto, 10 families, with undertenants, making 32 men with arms.
(150.) Dav. Kenedaie, 1,000, ac. in Horteville. A good bawn of lime and stone 80 ft. sq., 3 flankers, a house of timber within, in which he dwells, about the bawn 12 houses, inhabited by British. Planted with British; Freeholders, 2;2 of 120 ac. apiece. Lessees for years, 5; 1 of 180, 2 of 120 apiece, 2 of 60 apiece. Cottagers, 9. Each has a house and garden plot, and commons for cattle. In toto, 16 families, with undertenants, making 36 men armed.
Precinct of Dongannon, servitors and natives.
(151.) Lord Chichester, 1,140 ac. in Dungannon. A fort of lime and stone, 120 ft. sq., 4 half bulwarks, and a deep ditch about it 20 ft. broad and counter-scarped. A castle to be built by Capt. Banford, contracted to be finished this summer. Without the town are 3 English houses inhabited with Englishmen.
(152.) His Lordship is to build a town in Dungannon for which there is laid out 500 ac. Upon this is now built 9 fair stone houses, one with a stone wall about it, and 5 more now ready to have the roofs set up, also six strong timber houses, of good cagework, and other 6 framed and ready to be set up, and is contracting for the finishing. There are British tenants for these houses, when they are built, that dwell in the town in small cabins. Also a large church with a steeple of lime and stone, now ready to be covered. Besides these British within the town are 30 English families. There are 36 Irish which come to the church and have taken the oath.
(153.) Lord Ridgwane, 2,000 ac. in Large, A bawn of lime and stone 160 ft. sq., 14 ft. high, 4 flankers and a house in it of timber, 3 English families dwell near the bawn.
(154.) Sir Tobie Callfilde, 1,000 ac. in Balledonnell. Whereunto is added, besides what was certified by Sir Jonas Bodley, a fair house or castle, the front whereof is 80 ft. long 28 broad, 2 cross ends 50 ft. long and 28 broad, the walls 5 ft. thick at the bottom, and 4 at the top, good cellars, and the windows of hewn stone. Between the two cross ends is a wall 18 ft. high, and makes a small covert within the building, which is at this time but 13 ft. high; a number of men at work for the sudden finishing of it. A strong bridge over the river, of lime and stone, with buttresses, to this is joined a good watermill for corn, all built of lime and stone. This is the fairest building I have seen. Near unto the bawn is built a town in which are 15 English families, making 20 men, with arms.
(155.) Sir France Roe, 1,000 ac., in Manor Roe. A good bawn of earth 80 ft. long, and 60 ft. sq., with a quickset upon it, and deep ditch. Within a small house of brick and stone inhabited with British, who have estates for years, and have taken the oath.
(156.) Wm. Parsons, 1,000 ac., called Altedesert. A bawn of lime and stone, 70 ft. sq., 2 flankers, a house within, wherein dwells an Englishman with family, rest inhabited with Irish, for he has it as a servitor, and is leased for a certain number of years.
(157.) Sir Francis Ansley, 480 ac., called Clannaghrie. A bawn of sods, entrenched.
(158.) The Lord Winfald, 2,000 ac., called Benbarbe. A bawn of lime and stone, 120 ft. high, 2 flankers, in each a good house 3 stories high, inhabited by an English gentleman, with wife and family, a church in building 70 ft. long, 24 broad, with 8 large windows, ready to have the roof set up, also 20 English families on the land making 30 men with arms.
(159.) Tyrlagh O'Neale, 4,000 ac. A piece of a bawn, some 5 ft. high and has been so a long time, no estates to tenants, and all plough in Irish manner.
COUNTY ARMAGH.
Precinct of O'Neilan, English undertakers.
(160.) Wm. Bromlowe, 2 proportions, Dowcoran, 1,500 ac., and Ballenemonie, 1,000. Upon Ballenemony is a strong stone house within a good island, and at Dowcoran a very fair house of stone and brick, with good lime, a strong bawn of timber and earth with a palisade; in readiness, lime and stone, to make a bawn to be done this summer. A very fair town of 42 houses, all inhabited with English, and streets all clean paved; 2 watermills, and a windmill for corn, and a store of arms in his house. Planted with British:
Freeholders, 5; having 120 acres apiece.
Lessees for years, 52: 1 of 420, 1 of 300, 1 of 240, 3 of 200 apiece, 1 of 120, 13 of 60 apiece, 8 of 50 apiece, 6 of 40 apiece, 9 of 20 apiece, 1 of 100, 1 of 11, 1 of 5, 6 of 30 apiece. In toto, 57 families who have divers under them, all have taken the oath, good store of tillage, and no Irish.
(161.) Sir Oliver St. John, Kt., 1,000 ac., called Kernan. Two bawns of timber mounted very strongly, in each an English house of cagework, and 2 English families in them; near one bawn, 5 houses, inhabited with English, rest dispersedly, 3 or 4 families together. Planted with British:
Freeholders, 5: 5 of 120 apiece.
Lessees for years, 8: 2 of 120 apiece, 3 of 100 apiece, 2 of 60 apiece, 1 of 40. Cottagers, 4. Each has a tenement and a garden plot, with commons.
In toto, 13 families, with undertenants, making 30 men with arms, of whom 13 have taken the oath.
William Powell first patentee.
(162.) Mr. Obbyns, 2,000 ac., called Ballenevoran. A bawn of sods with palisade of boards ditched, within is a good fair house of brick and lime, himself dwelling therein; near 4 houses, inhabited with English. Planted with British: Freeholders, 5: 3 of 120 apiece, 2 of 100 apiece. Lessees for years, 15: 4 of 100 apiece, 2 of 60 apiece, 3 of 66 apiece, 2 of 40 apiece, 1 of 30, 3 of 100 jointly. These 20 tenants, with undertenants, make 46 men armed.
The Lo. Saye was the first patentee.
(163.) Mr. Cope, 3,000 ac., called Derrycrevy and Dromullie. A bawn of lime and stone, 80 ft. sq., 14 high, 4 flankers, in 3 of them he has built very good lodgings, 3 stories high, also two watermills and one windmill; near to bawn, 14 houses of timber, inhabited with English. Planted with British:
Freeholders, 6: 1 of 200 ac., 3 of 120 apiece, 2 of 60.
Lessees for years, 30: 3 of 120 apiece, 4 of 100 apiece, 2 of 80 apiece, 3 of 60 apiece, 1 of 55, 2 of 50 apiece, 2 of 40 apiece, 7 of 30 apiece, 2 of 25 apiece, 2 of 23 apiece, 1 of 44, 3 of 20 apiece, 2 of 11 apiece.
Cottagers, 7, viz.: 3 of 3 ac. apiece, 2 of 2, and 2 of 1 ac. apiece, with commons. 47 families, with undertenants, making 80 men with arms; 18 have taken the oath.
(164.) Ri. Roulstone, 1,000 ac., called Temore. A bawn of sods, with a palisade, moated, a little house in it inhabited by English family; near to bawn 9 houses, inhabited with English. Planted with British: Freeholders, 2, having 120 acres apiece. Lessees for years, 8: 6 of 100 apiece, 1 of 20, 1 of 12. In toto, 10 families, with undertenants, making 24 men with arms.
(165.) John Heron, 2,000 ac., called Aghivillan. Two small bawns of earth with palisade, and a small ditch; near each bawn 10 houses, inhabited with English. Planted with British: Freeholder, 1 of 180 ac. Lessees for years, 12: 1 of 120, 2 of 30, 3 of 20 apiece, 2 of 15 apiece, 3 of 10 apiece, 1 of 60. In toto, 13 families, with undertenants, making 26 men, with arms.
(166.) Wm. Stanhowe, 1,500 ac., called Kanna-Goolan. Nothing built, himself in England the past 7 years. 3 or 4 poor Englishmen upon the land, all of which is inhabited with Irish.
(167.) Fran. Sarrevill, 2,000 ac., called Mullalelish and Lagacorrye. A bawn of 180 ft. sq., of stone and clay, rough cast with lime, 4 flankers, and a good house of lime and stone in it, inhabited by an English gentleman, with his wife and family; near to bawn 12 houses, inhabited with English. Planted with British: Freeholders, 3: 1 of 150, 1 of 120, 1 of 100. Lessees for years, 12: 1 of 220, 5 of 100 apiece, 1 of 95, 1 of 80, 1 of 74, 4 of 60 apiece, 2 of 40 apiece, 1 of 12, 1 of 15, 1 of 30. In toto, 21 families, with undertenants, making 50 men with arms.
(168.) John Dillon, 1,500 ac., called Mullebane. A house begun some 3 years since, but not half finished, of brick and lime, and a very fair building, no bawn, great store of tenants, who have made 2 villages and dwell together. Planted with Irish: Freeholders, 3, his sons having 120 ac. apiece. Lessees for lives: 18, 3 of 100 jointly, 4 of 100 jointly, 2 of 100 apiece, 2 of 80 apiece, 1 of 70, 5 of 60 apiece, 1 of 50, 1 of 47, 2 of 30 apiece, 1 of 40, 1 of 30, 1 of 23, 1 of 20, 1 of 10. In toto, 29, with undertenants, making 40 men with arms.
(169.) Precinct of the Fewes, allotted to Scottish undertakers.
Hen. Atcheson, 1,000 ac., called Coolemalish. A bawn of clay and stone, 120 ft. long and 80 broad, 4 flankers, in this a house the one half of lime and stone, the upper part timber. Has planted a great number of tenants, no estates, but by promise, and yet they have been many years upon the land. There is nominated to me 2 freeholders and 17 leaseholders, all which were with me; they took the oath and petitioned for leases, which Mr. Atcheson seemed willing to perform presently, making 30 men with arms, good tillage.
James Craig was the first patentee.
(170.) John Hamilton, 1,000 ac., called Magharientrim. A bawn of stone and clay, 60 ft. sq., 12 high, 2 flankers. Planted with British: Freeholders, 2: 1 having 200 acres, 1 of 100. Lessees for years, 6: 1 of 120, 2 of 60 apiece, 1 of 96, 1 of 60, 1 of 50. Cottagers, 12. Each has a tenement and garden plot, with commons for cows. In toto, 22 families, making 30 men with arms, all have taken the oath.
William Lawder first patentee.
(171.) John Hamilton, 1,000 ac., called Kilruddan. A bawn of stone and clay, 60 ft. sq., 12 high, 2 flankers and a house in it; near to bawn 7 houses, inhabited with British. Planted with British: Freeholders, 2, 2 of 120 apiece. Lessees for years, 5: 2 of 120 apiece, 1 of 60, 2 of 66 apiece. Cottagers, 10. Each has a tenement and a garden plot, with commons.
In toto, 16 families, making 30 men armed, who have taken the oath.
(172.) John Hamilton, 5,000 ac., called Edeneagh. The other 5,000 acres were had from him by the Dean of Ardmagh. A bawn of stone and clay pointed with lime; near it are 6 houses, inhabited with British. Planted with British:
Freeholder, 1 of 120 ac. Lessees for years, 4: 1 of 120 1 of 100, 1 of 80, 1 of 30. Each has a tenement and a garden plot with commons. In toto, 10 families, with undertenants, making 22 men with arms, all of whom have taken the oath.
Sir James Douglas was first patentee.
(173.) Arch. Atcheson, 2,000 ac., called Clancarnye. A bawn of stone and lime 100 ft. long, 80 broad, 10 high, 4 flankers, 2 stories high, and 13 ft. wide, within the walls, which serve for good lodgings; a castle begun, 80 ft. long, 22 wide, now 2 stories high; near to bawn are 7 houses, inhabited with British, and in the bawn are arms for 129 men. Planted with British: Freeholders, 4: 1 of 200 ac., 3 of 100 apiece. Lessees for years, 20: 1 of 200, 2 of 180 apiece, 1 of 120, 4 of 60 apiece, 6 of 60 jointly, 2 of 60 jointly, 4 of 60 jointly. Cottagers, 5. Each has a house and garden plot, with commons. In toto, 29 tenants, with undertenants, making 144 men with arms. Has also built a town called Clancarny, wherein dwell 29 British tenants, each having a small parcel of land, in the whole making 173 men armed.
Precinct of Drier, servitors and natives.
(174.) Sir John Davies, 500 ac., called Cornechino. Nothing built, nor an English tenant.
(175.) Sir Oliver St. John, 1,500 ac., called Ballemoore. For building more cannot be spoken than formerly by Sir Josias Bodley. Town increased in building, inhabited with English. 9 Irish families in the town, who come to church and have taken the oath.
(176.) The Lord Moore, 1,000 ac., called Ballemonehen. A bawn of lime and stone, 100 ft. sq., 2 flankers, in one a small house inhabited by an Irishman.
(177.) Hen. Bowcher, 200 ac., called Claire. A large bawn of lime and stone, 100 ft. length, 80 depth, 14 high, with 2 flankers. Now in building, a good strong stone house now 2 stories high and workmen labouring for finishing thereof.
(178.) Capt. Ant. Smith, 1,000 ac. A bawn of stone and clay formerly begun by Sir Tho. Williams. The said captain has begun another bawn of lime and stone, in a more convenient place, to be 80 ft. sq., 2 flankers, and a good stone house 30 ft. long, 20 broad, to be finished by July, for there are many men at work.
(179.) Lieut. Paynes, 200 ac., in Curriator. A bawn 80 ft. sq., the lower part of stone and clay, the upper all of clay, with a house in it. Not liking the seat he has begun a bawn of 100 ft. sq. with 3 flankers, and a large house, all of brick and lime, which is now in the place, with workmen, to be finished by August.
(180.) Hen. McShane, 1,000 ac., called Camlogh. Lately deceased, now in the hands of Sir Tobie Callfield, who intends to do something, as yet nothing built.
CITY AND COUNTY OF LONDONDERRY.
(181.) City of Londonderry is compassed with a strong wall, excellently made and neatly wrought, of good lime and stone, circuit 2842/3 perches, 18 feet to perch, the 4 gates contain 84 feet, the wall is 24 foot high and 6 thick. Gates battlemented, but to two there is no going up, so they serve to no great use, there are no leaves for the gates, but 2 drawbridges serve for 2, and 2 portcullis for the other two. 9 bulwarks very large and good, and 2 half bulwarks; upon 4 can be placed 4 cannons or other pieces, the rest are not quite so large. The rampart within the city 12 foot thick of earth. All substantially done, saving a house for the soldiers, and a continual house to stand in in the night to defend them from the weather, which is most extreme in these parts. Since the last survey there is a school built 67 ft. length, and 25 in breadth, and 2 other small houses, no other building within the city. Number of houses within the city, 92, containing 102 families, far too few for defence of such a circuit, and scarce able to man one bulwark, neither is there room to set up 100 houses more unless they are made as small as the first, and each room named as a house.
(182.) Fort of Cullmoor.--This fort or blockhouse is now in the hands of Capt. John Baker, the walls are finished and the castle built, all strong and neatly wrought, with platforms for artillery, it is the only key and strength of the river that goes to the Derrie.
(183.) Colerane.--The town of Colerane is at the same stay as at the last survey, but 3 houses are added to the building, done by other men, the city allowing them 20l. apiece. The part unbuilt is so extremely dirty that no man is able to go into it, especially that which should be and is accounted the market place. Walls and ramparts built of sods, filled with earth, decay and moulder away, with ramparts so narrow they cannot stand, and bulwarks so exceeding small that any piece of artillery cannot be placed, if occasion should require it. Two small forts of timber and boards which serve for houses for soldiers. Town so poorly inhabited that there are not men to man the 6th part of the wall.
(184.) Goldesmiths' Hall.--John Freeman has 3,210 ac. A bawn of lime and stone 100 ft. sq., 16 high, 4 flankers. A large castle or stone house in building within, two stories high, and workmen at work to furnish it with all haste. Six houses of stone and 6 of timber, strong and well built, and seated in a convenient place for the King's service. Planted with British: Freeholders, 6, viz: 1 having 180 acres, 5 of 60 apiece.
Lessees for years, 24: 2 of 300 apiece, 2 of 120 apiece, 1 of 100, 10 of 60 apiece, 1 of 50, 4 of 40 apiece, 2 of 30 apiece, 1 of 46, 1 of 20.
In toto, 30 families, with undertenants, making 90 men armed who have taken the oath.
(185.) Grocers' Hall, otherwise Muffe, 3,210 ac.--Edw. Rone had this, but being dead, there is no one to oversee the building. Upon this is a bawn in building, 100 ft. sq., with 4 flankers, walls now 5 ft. high. By this are 4 good strong houses of lime and stone, and well slated, and 4 others further off. Other houses of lime and stone dispersed, built by tenants, who as yet have no estates, and likely to be removed. Some have spent upon building 100l., and this through the slackness of the company, which has made no estates to the undertakers. For most part inhabited with Irish.
(186.) Fishmongers' Hall, otherwise Ballikelle, 3,210 ac.--In the hands of James Higgens a merchant of London, whose agent is resident. A strong bawn of lime and stone, 125 ft. sq., 12 high, 4 flankers, a good house within, 50 ft. sq., finished and inhabited by agent with good store of arms. Near to castle, 15 houses, whereof 3 of stone and lime, rest of timber, rough cast and slated. In a convenient place for service. A church new built, 43 ft. long, 26 wide, neatly made, and a good preacher. Planted with British: Freeholders, 6: 5 of 160 ac. apiece, 1 of 120. Lessees for years, 28: 1 of 240, 2 of 180 apiece, 4 of 120 apiece, 8 of 60 apiece, 1 of 90, 6 of 20 apiece, 3 of 60 jointly, 3 of 30 apiece. In toto, 34 families, with undertenants, making 40 men with arms.
(187.) Ironmongers' Hall, 3,210 ac.--Geo. Cammynge, agent for the company, resident, has no order to make estates to any tenants who have come hither to dwell, notwithstanding divers have disbursed money and built good houses. These can get only articles of agreement for 31 years, and fear that this may be altered by others after. But they pay for every town land which they account to be but 60 ac., 5l.10s., or 5l. per annum. Uncertainty is a great hindrance of the plantation. The castle is strong, formerly begun, is now thoroughly finished. A bawn of brick and lime, but 3 sides done, without flankers, a place of no strength. 8 dwelling-houses of cagework, some slated and some finished, but standing so far asunder, that they can have but little succor one of the other. Here is an infinite number of Irish, who give such great rents that the English cannot get any land.
(188.) Mercers' Hall, 3,210 ac.--Not let to any man, but held by one Varnon, agent for the company. Castle formerly begun is now thoroughly finished, and is not inferior to any. A very large town, 120 ft. sq., 4 flankers, of good stone and lime. Near the bawn are 6 houses of cagework, some covered with shingle, others thatched, and inhabited by such poor men as they could find in the country, and these pay such dear rates for the land that they are forced to take Irish tenants to pay their rent. Divers other houses of slight building, but far off, and dispersed in woods, where the inhabitants are forced to relieve such wood kerne as go up and down the country. There are 46 town lands, let to Irish of the sect of Clandonells, the wickedest men in all the country.
(189.) Merchant Taylors' Hall, otherwise Macoskin, 3,210 ac.--Valentine Hartopp has newly come to dwell, having taken this for 61 years. Castle finished, battlemented and very strong, 50 foot long and 34 wide. No bawn begun as yet, but the gentleman is causing stone and lime to be laid in readiness, that they may go roundly away with it. Near the castle are 7 good houses of stone and lime, well slated and inhabited with English, in a well chosen place. A fair large church is nigh finished, 86 foot long and 32 broad, roof set up and ready to be slated. Planted with British:
Freeholders, 6.
6 having 60 acres apiece.
Lessees for years, 18.
1 of 120, 1 of 180, 3 of 120 apiece, 5 of 60 apiece, 2 of 60 jointly, 6 of 36 apiece.
Cottages, 5.
Each has a house and garden plot with 3 ac. of land. In toto, 30 families, making 40 men with good arms.
(190.) Haberdashers' Hall, otherwise Ballycastle. [No quantity stated.]
Sir Rob. McLennan has taken this of the company for 61 years. Here is a castle, thoroughly finished, very strong and well wrought, he with his lady and family dwell in it. No sign of any other kind of building, more than slight houses after the Irish manner, which are dispersed. Church still as at the first, and nothing done to it. There were nominated to me 6 freeholders, who were in Scotland, and these set down but for small quantities, and 21 leaseholders, but not one could show anything in writing for estates, nor landlords any counterpanes. I saw the land planted with British to the number of 80 men, and in the castle arms for them.
(191.) Clothworkers' Hall, 3,210 ac.--The said Sir Robert has taken this for 61 years. A castle of lime and stone 54 foot long, 34 wide, and 28 high, not yet covered, and no plantation with any British tenants. One freeholder, the parson of the parish. All inhabited with Irish.
(192.) Skinners' Hall, otherwise Dungevon, 3,210 ac.--The Lady Dodington, late wife to Sir Edw. Dodington, dec., is in possession, having a grant from the company for 61 years. Here is a strong castle, 2½ stories high, a large bawn of lime and stone, well fortified. In this she now dwells, with 24 in her family. There is also in another place called Crossalt, a strong castle of lime and stone, built by Sir Edward, 80 foot long and 34 broad, with two turrets to flank it. A bawn of lime and stone 100 ft. sq., 14 high, and 4 flankers. So that on this proportion are two bawns and two castles, with two villages of 12 houses apiece near each castle. A good church adjoining the castle, and a good teacher to instruct the people. Plenty of arms in these castles. Planted with British:
Freeholders, 7.
1 having 200 acres, 6 of 120 apiece.
Lessees for years, 8.
1 of 300, 4 of 160 apiece, 3 of 100 apiece. Cottagers, 11. Each has a house, a garden plot, with 2 or 3 acres of land. In toto, 26 families, all resident, making, with undertenants, 80 men.
(193.) Vintners' Hall, 3,210 ac.--In the hands of Baptist Jones. A bawn of brick and lime, 100 foot sq., with 2 round flankers and a good rampart, which is more than any of the rest have done; within the bawn 2 good houses, opposite each other; one 70 ft. long and 25 wide, the other nothing inferior. Near the bawn are 10 good houses of English cagework, very strong and covered with tiles, the street very large and to be commanded by the bawn. All inhabited with English, and himself, with wife and family, resident. Divers other good houses further off with English, full number of freeholders and leaseholders, but he being gone into England, and his tenants being at the assizes, I saw them not. Good store of arms in the house, and upon the land are 76 men.
(194.) Drapers' Hall, otherwise Moneymore, 3,210 ac.--Not let to any man, but held by the agent, Wm. Russell. A strong bawn of stone and lime 100 ft. sq., 15 high, with 2 flankers; a castle within the bawn, same width, battlemented, 2 flankers, and nearly finished, before the castle are 12 houses, 6 of lime and stone and 6 of timber, inhabited with English. This is the best work I have seen for building. A good watermill and malthouse; a quarter of a mile from the town there is a conduit, which brings water to all places in the bawn and town in pipes. The tenants have no estates, for the agent can make none; neither will they till such time as their land be improved to the uttermost. Within this castle good store of arms.
(195.) Salters' Hall, 3,210 ac.--Hugh Sayer is upon this, and has built in 2 several places. At Marifelt there is a bawn of 80 ft. sq. of lime and stone, with 2 flankers, and a castle now in building, 60 ft. long, and 20 wide, now 8 stories high and roof ready to be set up; walls of bawn not as yet above 10 ft. high. Near the bawn are 7 houses of slight cagework, 5 inhabited by poor men, the other 2 stand waste. At Salters Town there is a bawn of stone and lime, 70 ft. sq., 12 ft. high, with 2 flankers and a poor house within it of cagework, in which the former, with his wife and family, dwells. Here are also 9 houses of cagework by the bawn, inhabited by British, a sawing mill for timber, but the glass houses are gone to decay and utterly undone. None have estates.
A Brief of the general estate of the plantation for persons planted in the several counties, contained in the book. Co. Cavan.--Freeholders, 68; lessees for lives, 20; lessees for years, 168; cottagers, 130; families, 386; bodies of men, 711. Co. Fermanagh.--Freeholders, 59; lessees for lives, 10; lessees for years, 177; cottagers, 75; families, 321; men, 645. Co. Donagall.--Freeholders, 59; lessees for lives, 25; lessees for years, 217; cottagers, 46; families that have no estate, 70; families in all, 417; men, 1,106. Co. Tyrone.--Freeholders. 84; lessees for lives, 26; lessees for years, 183; cottagers, 154; families, 447; bodies of men, 2,469. Co. Armagh.--Freeholders, 39; lessees for lives, 18; lessees for years, 190; cottagers, 43; families, 290; men, 642. Co. Londonderry.--Freeholders, 24; lessees for years, 78; cottagers, 16; families, 118; men, 642. The whole content of the 6 counties.--Freeholders, 333; lessees for lives, 99; lessees for years, 1,013; cottagers, 464; families, 1,974; bodies, 6,215, with arms.
Copy.


No further details   Appointment by John le Botteler, Earl of Ormond, lord of the liberty of Tipperary, of Edmund FitzJames FitzWilliam FitzPeter le Botteler, as seneschal of the said liberty, and grant of the moiety of the office of marshal [of the same]. Clonmell 7 June, 41 Hen. VI.  MS 613, f. 26  [n.d.]
No further details   Grant by Henry VII. to James Ormond, knight for the King's body, of the manor of Ardmulghum, the patronage of the church of Ardmulghum, and the lordships of Belgard, Fovre, Demor, and Derver, in co. Meath; of lands in Callan, Loghmeran, Ratheston, and other places in co. Kilkenny; and of the lands and tenements called the Earl's Grove, Kilmorarussyn, and the Old Mill, near Clomell, with all the King's lands in co. Tipperary; the premises being parcel of the possessions of the Earl of March, of which the King is seized in right of his consort, Queen Elizabeth, to hold in tail male. Canterbury, 10 Sept., 10 Hen. VII. By authority of Parliament.  MS 613, f. 28b  [n.d.]
No further details   "A note of such lands as Peers Butler, Earl of Osserie, and James Lord Butler his son, took by lease for term of years from Dame Anne St. Ledger, widow, and Dame Margaret Bullen, widow, (daughters and co-heirs unto Thomas Butler, late Earl of Ormond,) Thomas Lord Rochford, son and heir to Dame Margaret Bulleyne, and Sir George St. Ledger, knight, son and heir to Dame Anne St. Ledger; which said lands were then in the possession of the said ladies and their sons aforesaid in anno 20, regni Regis Henrici Octavi, viz.;"--the castle and manor of Kilkenny (rent, 200 marks Irish); the royalties of cos. Kilkenny, Tipperary, and Ormond; the manor and castle of Knoctopher (rent, 200 marks Irish); the manor and castle of Ballygarren (ditto); manor of Thorles (rent, 200 kine); the manor and castle of Dunmore; the manors of Puberafe, Portlerafe, and Killinalle, in co. Kilkenny; the country of Woney Mubrian; the manor and castle of Carrigne-Griffin, and "the two Ormonds" in co. Tipperary; and the manor and castle of Grenagh in co. Waterford.  MS 613, f. 29b  [n.d.]
No further details   "A brief collection of the life of Hubert Walter, Archbishop of Canterbury, and brother to Theobald Walter, the ancestor to Butler Earl of Ormond, collected out of a book entitled, "De antiquitate Britannioe Ecclesioe." [By Archbishop Parker.]  MS 613, f. 30  [n.d.]

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