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Beginners' Latin
Petitioning Mary I and Phillip of Spain, historiated initial. 1558. Cat ref: KB 27/1185/2

Lesson 6: Hic, hec, hoc; third and fourth conjugation verbs

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Fourth conjugation verbs; obire

Verbs from the fourth conjugation end ‘-ire’.

audire to hear
scire to know
venire to come

To conjugate these verbs, remove the ‘-ire’ and add these endings.

Latin English
-io I
-is you (singular)
-it he/she/it
-imus we
-itis you (plural)
-iunt they

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Look at our example of venire      to come

Latin English
venio I come
venis you come (singular)
venit he/she/it comes
venimus we come
venitis you come (plural)
veniunt they come

 

agricole ad curiam veniunt the farmers come to the court ad curiam, -e (f.) to the courtGlossary - opens in a new window
     
non scio I do not know  
Handy hints Handy hints - third and fourth conjugation verbs
Did you notice the similarities between the endings of regular third and fourth declension verbs? Look back at the lesson and check.
The difference is that in the fourth declension, the ‘I’ and ‘they’ forms have an ‘i’.
Noticing patterns like this makes learning Latin much easier.

Obire to die

This is an irregular verb, which although similar to a fourth conjugation verb, is a compound of 'eo, ire, ivi, itum - to go'. It conjugates in the following way:

obeo
I die
obis
you die
obit
he/she dies
obimus
we die
obitis
you (pl) die
obeunt
they die

 

Checklist Checklist:
Are you confident with:
How to decline a fourth conjugation verb like venire?
The difference between the endings of regular third and fourth conjugation verbs?

Practice sentences

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