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Oswald Mosley papers: Nicholas Mosley deposit


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Reference XOMN
Former reference OMN
Covering dates 1896-1983
Held by Birmingham University Information Services, Special Collections Department
Extent 19 boxes
Conditions of access Some material in this collection is subject to conditional access, and one item is closed. This is indicated at file level.
Archival history Cynthia Mosley's papers were kept by Oswald Mosley after her death. According to Nicholas Mosley's 1982 biography of his parents, Oswald Mosley acquired the papers of his mother, Maud Mosley, from his younger brother, John, after her death, but destroyed most of her diaries, with the exception of those covering the first four years of his life and pages from the day of her birthday from each of the diaries he destroyed. These, together with Cynthia Mosley's papers and some of his own personal and political papers, were transferred into the possession of his son, Nicholas Mosley, shortly before Oswald Mosley's death in 1980. It is apparent that Nicholas Mosley used these papers as material for the first volume of his biography of his parents, 'The Rules of the Game', published in 1982. Papers relating to Oswald Mosley then in the possession of his stepmother, Diana Mosley, were also placed at his disposal for the duration of his work. The remainder of Oswald Mosley's personal papers remained in the possession of Diana Mosley until 1994, when two separate deposit agreements were made with the University of Birmingham. Nicholas Mosley deposited the papers in his possession of Cynthia Mosley, Oswald Mosley and Maud Mosley. Diana Mosley deposited the personal papers of Oswald Mosley still in her possession, together with papers created by the Union Movement secretariat. In an interview with the Guardian in 1998, Nicholas Mosley stated that he had received a large quantity of his mother's letters, including substantial correspondence between her and his father. Extracts from many of these are reproduced in his biography to illustrate the nature of their relationship, but these remain in the possession of Nicholas Mosley. Papers of Cynthia Mosley appear to have been arranged to some extent by Cynthia, in particular some of the correspondence from school friends, and correspondence relating to her political career. Much of her correspondence appears to have been later partially sorted by Nicholas Mosley in the process of his research for his 1982 biography of his parents. Many letters were grouped into bundles labelled in Nicholas Mosley's handwriting, and he also made attempts to identify some of the correspondents with pencilled comments. In particular, letters in the series of correspondence sorted by subject may have been arranged by Nicholas, or he may have maintained the arrangement first made by Cynthia. No particular system of arrangement appears to have been used by Oswald Mosley with his own papers. This is in contrast to the definite system of arrangement that appears to have existed for files of material kept by Mosley's Union Movement secretariat. These secretariat papers are held in the Diana Mosley deposit. It has been difficult to get an idea of original order because of the complicated custodial history of Mosley's papers. He moved home frequently, and his papers had become scattered, while others have probably been lost or destroyed. Nicholas Mosley removed some of his father's papers from storage in Ireland in order to carry out research, while other papers remained in the possession of Diana Mosley in storage in Ireland and France. The papers taken by Nicholas Mosley, and deposited by him, were arranged into sections based either on the type of material or on the subject. With permission of the depositor, some items were catalogued as part of the Diana Mosley deposit where it was appropriate to restore original provenance. Information about this is retained on the deposit file.
Accruals No further accruals expected
Source of acquisition Deposited with the Special Collections Department, University of Birmingham Information Services, by Lord Ravensdale in 1994
Appraisal information Weeded for duplicates
Creators Mosley, Cynthia, 1898-1933; Mosley, Katherine Maud, 1874-1950; Mosley, Nicholas, 1923-; Mosley, Sir Oswald Ernald, 1896-1980, politician
Arrangement The collection has been arranged into three sub-fonds, reflecting the fact that it comprises the papers of three individuals. A: Papers of Cynthia Mosley; B: Papers of Oswald Mosley; C: Papers of Maud Mosley.
Supplementary information This catalogue is also available on the University of Birmingham's Online Archive Catalogue, and a collection level description is available on the Archives Hub. A paper copy is also available for consultation in the Special Collections Department reading room, together with supplementary finding aids.
Related information OMD: Oswald Mosley Papers: Diana Mosley deposit; MS124: Papers of Jeffrey Hamm; MS196: copies of Action and other Union Movement publications
Bibliography

Administrative history:
Full biographical histories of Oswald Mosley, Cynthia Mosley and Katherine Maud Mosley are included at sub-fonds level

Contents:
Personal and political papers of Oswald Mosley, and of his first wife, Cynthia Mosley (nee Curzon); personal papers of his mother, Katherine Maud Mosley. The papers consist of correspondence; press cuttings; draft and published writings; policy documents and reports relating to Oswald Mosley's political movements the New Party and the British Union of Fascists; photographs; diaries; notebooks; financial papers. There is also some material created by Nicholas Mosley when he was writing his biography of his parents. This consists of research notes and correspondence. The majority of the papers date from the 1920s and 1930s, although there is also material relating to Oswald Mosley, particularly correspondence and drafts of books he published, that dates from the post-war period. There is very little material dating from the 1939-1945 period. This is likely to be because Oswald Mosley was imprisoned under Defence of the Realm Regulations for most of this time. Katherine Maud Mosley's diaries date from the final years of the nineteenth century, and there is some correspondence in Cynthia Mosley's papers that dates from the 1914-1918 war. Nicholas Mosley's research papers date from the early 1980s. Full details of the scope and content of the papers in the collection is provided in the descriptions at sub-fonds level.



Papers of Cynthia Mosley  XOMN/A  1906-1939

Former reference: OMN/A

8 boxes

Administrative history:
Cynthia Blanche Curzon, second daughter of Lord George Nathaniel Curzon and Mary Leiter of Chicago, daughter of Levi Zeigler Leiter, was born on 23 Aug 1898. She spent her early childhood in India, where her father was Viceroy from 1898 to 1905. After her mother's death in 1906, Cynthia, usually known as 'Cimmie' and her sisters, Irene, sometimes known as 'Nina', and Alexandra, always known as 'Baba', lived at either Carlton House Terrace, London or Hackwood Park in Hampshire and were largely educated at home. Cynthia spent two terms at The Links boarding school for girls in Eastbourne in 1916, and worked as a clerk at the War Office during the winter of 1917-1918. In 1918 she worked on a farm as a landgirl, and also did a welfare course at the London School of Economics which included social work in the East End. She met Oswald Mosley in 1919 while campaigning for Nancy Astor, a friend of her father, in the Plymouth by-election. They became engaged in March 1920, and were married 11 May 1920. They had three children; Vivien, born in 1921, Nicholas, born in 1923 and Michael, born in 1932. Cynthia strongly supported her husband in his political career, and involved herself in public and charitable works in Harrow, where he was Conservative MP from 1919 to 1922 and Independent MP from 1922-1923. When he joined the Labour Party in 1924 she also became a member, and was selected as prospective parliamentary candidate for Stoke-on-Trent. She took a keen interest in labour conditions, unemployment and poverty and accompanied her husband on fact finding trips to India in 1925 and the United States of America in 1926. She also took an active role in Oswald Mosley's election campaigns during the 1920s and spoke at political meetings. In 1929 she was elected Labour MP for Stoke-on-Trent and served until 1931 when she stood down due to ill health. She resigned from the Labour Party in March 1931 in support of her husband who was then in the process of forming the New Party. Cynthia Mosley initially took an active role in New Party politics, but after the defeat of all their candidates in the General Election of 1931 she seems to have ceased all practical involvement in politics, and so was not involved in Oswald Mosley's formation of the British Union of Fascists from what remained of the New Party in 1932. She suffered increasingly from ill health during the early 1930s, and was often unwell with kidney problems. Cynthia Mosley was taken ill with appendicitis and died of peritonitis on 16 May 1933. Sources: Nicholas Mosley, The Rules of the Game, 1982; Anne de Courcy, The Viceroy's Daughters: The Lives of the Curzon Sisters, 2000

Contents:
The papers consist of a large volume of personal and formal correspondence written to Cynthia Mosley, together with press cuttings and publications containing information about her, and personal papers including material relating to her public and political life. Most of the material dates from after her marriage to Oswald Mosley in 1920, although there is a substantial amount of family correspondence and letters written to Cynthia by schoolfriends and officers serving in the First World War that predates this. The extensive correspondence, which makes up the majority of these papers, provides a valuable source for the study of Cynthia's family and personal life, illuminating her social life and her relationships with friends, and giving a view of her social network, drawn from individuals and families from the English aristocracy, but also including people active in the arts, and in politics. However, there is no correspondence in these papers between Cynthia and her husband, Oswald Mosley. The papers also include formal correspondence relating to Cynthia Mosley's public and political life, including letters relating to her participation in public and charitable work, particularly with hospitals and womens' groups, at Harrow, when Oswald Mosley was MP there in the early 1920s, later correspondence relating to her interest in labour conditions, poverty and social welfare after joining the Labour Party, and letters from 1929-1931 relating to her work as Labour MP for Stoke-on-Trent. Press cuttings and publications also document Cynthia Mosley's political activities, and the papers also include notes for and drafts of some of her speeches. Taken together with the correspondence, this material provides evidence of Cynthia's genuine commitment to the Labour movement in her own right, as well as her loyalty in supporting her husband's political career during the 1920s and early 1930s.

Family correspondence and associated papers  XOMN/A/1  c1906-1939

Former reference: OMN/A/1

14 files

Contents:
This series largely consists of personal correspondence sent to Cynthia from various members of her family, but also includes a small number of letters written to her sister Irene Curzon, later Baroness Ravensdale, both before and after Cynthia's death in 1933, most of which do not relate directly to Cynthia herself. The series also contains material relating to the education of Cynthia's daughter Vivien Mosley, consisting of a mixture of school work and reports dating from the early 1930s. The majority of letters from all family correspondents discuss social engagements and activities, but letters from Cynthia's uncle Francis Curzon are concerned with her financial affairs, and the sequence of letters from her aunt Margaret Paget (nee Leiter), include details about a 1926 court case relating to the possible appropriation of funds from the Leiter Estate trust, from which most of Cynthia's income was derived. The most prolific correspondents among Cynthia's family were her sisters, Irene Curzon and Alexandra (Baba) Metcalfe (nee Curzon). Letters from Baba in this sequence were written during her childhood and adolescence, and are therefore mainly concerned with her social plans, while many of those from Irene were written during her time working with the YMCA in France during the final months of the First World War in 1918, and contain information about her life and work there. There are also sequences of correspondence from Cynthia's aunts and cousins on her father's side, and some letters from her father, George Nathaniel Curzon, as well as letters from other correspondents who are clearly relations but who cannot be further identified.

Letters from George Nathaniel Curzon  XOMN/A/1/1  c1906-c1916

Former reference: OMN/A/1/1

1 file

Contents:
These consist of letters and a telegram written to Cynthia during her childhood, and include: /1 containing details about a memorial to be erected at Kedleston for Cynthia's mother Mary /4 incomplete, but refers to Cynthia's first impressions of school.

Letters from Irene Curzon, Baroness Ravensdale  XOMN/A/1/2  c1916-c1931

Former reference: OMN/A/1/2

1 file

Contents:
Most of these letters are signed Nina, the name by which Irene was known to her family. The majority were written while Irene Curzon was working with the YMCA in France during the last months of the First World War in 1918 and describe various aspects of her life there, including her living arrangements, health and daily life, her work in the YMCA hut, organising concerts and other entertainments for British forces, and other social activities which include visits to the casino and whist drives. Some letters also give news of mutual friends of Irene and Cynthia on active service in France, as well as referring to news of friends at home and Irene's plans for the Christmas holiday season. Of these letters: /10 mentions that she has asked her father for £50 so that she can buy comfy chairs and tables to make the hut nice, 'as the YMCA are impossible in that line' /12 gives an account of her stay in hospital and convalescence due to jaundice and internal inflammation /16 discusses her need for warm winter clothes /18 describes her recent illness with Spanish influenza /20 mentions receiving a gramophone for the hut, which 'is a godsend, I often play it to very ill men to take their minds off' Earlier letters were written while Cynthia was at school in 1916, and later letters in this sequence were written after Cythia's marriage to Oswald Mosley, and mainly concern Irene's social life, particularly her travels abroad: /22 is written from Jerusalem and gives an account of her journey from Alexandria, through Cairo and by train to Jerusalem, including a description of her visit to the pyramids, and to the bazaars and mosque in Cairo, her visit to Bethlehem and her future plans to travel to Italy /23is written from New York but refers to the establishment of the New Party by Oswald Mosley, and enquires about the support he has received from other MPs. It also mentions the political situation in England and the forthcoming election of 1931

Letters from Alexandra Metcalfe (nee Curzon), 1904-1995  XOMN/A/1/3  1910-c1926

Former reference: OMN/A/1/3

1 file

Contents:
These letters are signed Baba, the name by which Alexandra was commonly known to both family and friends. They largely concern Baba's social activities, and contain details of her social engagements, news of mutual friends, discussions about new clothes, and her plans for future social visits. Many are written while she was staying with friends and with Curzon relations. The sequence includes some childhood letters written to Cynthia, but most date between 1918 and 1921, and include correspondence written while Cynthia was ill with measles during her time working for the War Office in 1918, and other letters written from Paris while while Baba was at school there in 1921. This last group of letters include references to Cynthia's married life, particularly /15 which refers to Cynthia's wedding and to her new husband 'Tom', /16 and /17 which refer to her new house at Smith Square, and /18 which refers to the birth of Vivien Mosley in February 1921. /26 is written from Simla, where Baba and her husband, Fruity Metcalfe, lived during their time in India in 1926.

Letters from Francis Nathaniel Curzon  XOMN/A/1/4  1923-1924

Former reference: OMN/A/1/4

1 file

Contents:
These letters are signed Uncle Frank. They concern the financial affairs of Cynthia and of her sister Irene, specifically relating to the Leiter Trust fund they had inherited from their mother Mary Curzon (nee Leiter), and Frank Curzon's negotiations with lawyers and trustees of the fund in America. They include a letter to Cynthia from Gerald Laurence of G. B. Laurence & Co, solicitor ,enclosing a letter written by Frank Curzon to Irene concerning the trusteeship of Mary Leiter's marriage settlement.

Letters from Margaret Hyde Paget (nee Leiter), Countess of Suffolk  XOMN/A/1/5  1915-1926

Former reference: OMN/A/1/5

1 file

Contents:
These letters are signed Aunt Daisy. The majority date from between 1915 and 1918, and most of these were written to Cynthia from India, where her husband was stationed. They chiefly concern details of her activities, including shooting and riding, and include descriptions of the landscape in India, but also make reference to news from England relating to the domestic arrangements of Cynthia and her sisters. This sequence also includes two letters written to Cynthia's sister Irene during this period. The letters include: /2 which contains an account of Margaret's voyage to India to join her husband in Delhi. /3 and /4 written to Irene, containing details of social activities over the Christmas and the news that her husband, Henry Molyneux Paget, Earl of Suffolk, has been passed fit for active service and will probably be sent to fight in Mesopotamia /6 which refers to Cynthia's being sent to school at Eastbourne /7 which refers to war news, including the surrender of Kut and details about the Mesopotamia campaign /8 and /9 which include news about the progress of the campaign from her husband, who is now on active service /10 which refers to her husband's death in April 1917 and gives news about his actions in battle, received from General Wauchope /12 is written from Chicago in 1926 at the time when Cynthia and Oswald Mosley were travelling in the USA, and discusses the progress of a court case concerning funds from the Leiter estate.

Letters from Katharine Maud Mosley  XOMN/A/1/6  c1920

Former reference: OMN/A/1/6

1 file

Contents:
These are signed Mother or Ma. They comprise: /1 letter written to Cynthia shortly after her marriage to Oswald Mosley in 1920, expressing her pleasure at their match, and welcoming her to the family, and /2 undated letter discussing possible social engagements, and enclosing a letter to Irene Curzon, now lost.

Letters from Edward Metcalfe (Fruity)  XOMN/A/1/7  1925-1926

Former reference: OMN/A/1/7

1 file

Contents:
These letters are signed 'Fruity', the name by which Edward was known to his friends. They comprise: /1 letter written on his engagement to Cynthia's sister Baba, assuring her of his feelings for Baba, and promising to care for her /2 written from Simla, expressing his happiness at having been married to Baba for a year, and giving details about their life in Simla, their friendship with the Viceroy and Lady Birdwood and their future travel plans, dependent on Baba's health.

Letters from 'Cousin Jenny'  XOMN/A/1/8  1917-1922

Former reference: OMN/A/1/8

1 file

Contents:
These letters are written from different addresses in Aldershot, Farnham, Torquay and Bournmouth and most are signed Coz Jenny, though two letters, clearly in the same handwriting and with similar content, are signed Mavaine. In some correspondence the writer refers to 'Frank' and 'Maurice', possibly her sons, both of whom appear to be serving in the British forces during the First World War. See OMN/A/4/2/7 and OMN/A/4/28 for letters from Frank Pretyman and Maurice Pretyman. /1 contains the news that Maurice may be on a hospital ship, having been wounded in the Dardanelles /2 concerns Maurice, and news from a friend of his of the mismanagement of the Dardanelles campaign; the writer expresses her sorrow at the loss of so many lives /4-/6 explain that she haas returned to live in Bournemouth to be near 'Margaret' at Richmond Lodge, and to help to care for her sister-in-law /7 refers to her grief, and to that of Daisy and 'Ciss' in his suffering and 'maimed young life' Several letters refer to Aunt Daisy, Aunt Eleanor, and to Cynthia's father; the writer is clearly a relative of Cynthia, but it has not been possible to positively identify her

Letters from 'Bahdie'  XOMN/A/1/9  Undated [1928]

Former reference: OMN/A/1/9

1 file

Contents:
These letters primarily discuss the financial difficulties of the writer, who frequently asks Cynthia for assistance, in acting as guarantor for an overdraft with the Derby bank, and refers to financial assistance given by Cynthia's sister Irene. None of the letters are dated by year, but internal evidence suggests a date of 1928 for one letter; the content of others suggests that they were written before this time. The writer is clearly a Curzon relative, but it has not been possible to further identify her. /1 and /2 are written from Chesham Place, London, where the writer, and possibly her husband, are renting a room due to lack of funds. The writer approaches Cynthia for help /6 was probably written around 1928 and contains information about a bequest made to the writer by 'Aunt Blanche', who has recently died, which is to be invested for her by 'Uncle Frank'. The writer also refers to being a beneficiary of the will of 'Aunt Ellie'.

Letters from other family members  XOMN/A/1/10  c1918-c1931

Former reference: OMN/A/1/10

1 file

Contents:
This material consists of a small number of letters from Cynthia's Mosley relations, a larger number from her Curzon relatives, and also includes letters from the children of her father's second wife, Grace Duggan. /1-/3 comprise childhood letters from Hubert and Marcella Duggan, written from Hackwood and dated 1918 /4 is written by Tonman Mosley,brother of Oswald Mosley's grandfather. It concerns the election of Cynthia and Oswald Mosley as members of the Denham Golf Club in 1928 /5 is from Ernald Mosley, brother of Oswald Mosley's grandfather and concerns Cynthia's health after her illness in 1929 /6 is written by Cynthia's aunt Blanche Curzon and concerns social activities at Manderston, where she is staying. It is undated /7 is also sent from Manderston, and is from Cynthia's cousin Magdalene, daughter of Richard Nathaniel Curzon. It is written to Cynthia and her sister Irene, and gives news of her forthcoming marriage to Hugh Gillilan in 1919 /8 is also from Magdalene Gillilan (nee Curzon) and contains advice for a happy married life, written soon after Cynthia's engagement to Oswald Mosley in 1920 /9-/11 are written by another of Cynthia's aunts on the Curzon side of the family, one letter being sent from Manderston, the others from Monte Carlo, and from a hotel in Knightsbridge. These largely concern family and social news and are undated. A reference to Cynthia's baby in /9 suggests that it was probably written in 1921 after the birth of her first child /12 is from Cynthia's cousin Joan, the daughter of Assheton Nathaniel Curzon. It introduces a Captain von Salzmann who is interested in Oswald Mosley's New Party. The letter is dated 1931 /13 is signed 'Aunty' and is written from Devizes in 1918. There are no other clues as to the writer's identity. It contains news about mutual friends or relations, and refers to Cynthia's work at the War Office /14 is from Cynthia's cousin Humphrey Faulconer, who had been page at her wedding. It is written from his school in Wimbourne, Dorset in 1931, gives details of his life there, and thanks her for a present.

Letters from Odie Hyslop, nanny to Vivien and Nicholas Mosley  XOMN/A/1/11  1921-1926

Former reference: OMN/A/1/11

1 file

Contents:
These letters take the form of regular progress reports to Cynthia on the wellbeing, progress and activities of her children while she was away from them, beginning in May 1921, when Vivien Mosley was a few months old. Most of the letters are written from the Mosley family home at Smith Square, London, but several letters are written from other addresses, mostly seaside locations in England and the South of France, to which the children were taken on holiday. Several letters are written from the point of view of the children, as if they are giving a report of their own activities. Later letters include drawings and written contributions from Vivien and a smaller number from Nicholas, including some which are undated. Odie Hyslop also records details of visits by Cynthia's friends and relations, and her own social engagements.

Letters from Vivien and Nicholas Mosley  XOMN/A/1/12  c1926-c1932

Former reference: OMN/A/1/12

1 file

Contents:
These largely consist of brief letters and drawings, by Vivien Mosley and sent to her mother, although some are addressed to both her mother and father. There are also some drawings by Nicholas Mosley, and /23 is a telegram from Viven to Oswald Mosley in Rome, dated 1932, asking when he would return. The rest of the correspondence is undated, but a conjectured date for some letters can be suggested from references in the letters to the cities that Oswald and Cynthia Mosley were visiting.

Letters to Irene Curzon  XOMN/A/1/13  1911-c1939

Former reference: OMN/A/1/13

1 file

Contents:
These letters consist of a mixture of personal and formal correspondence written to Irene Curzon, and include: /1 letter from 'Oozibrozivo', H.M.S.Highflyer, East Indies Station, Calcutta, 1911, containing an account of the Delhi Durbar held in Dec 1911 to celebrate the coronation of George V /2 letter from Cynthia written while at school at The Links, Eastbourne, discussing plans for the holidays and giving details of school life /3 from Audrey, 1920, making arrangements to meet Irene in London, and passing on her congratulations to Cynthia on her engagement /4 letter from Gladys Waterbury, announcing her engagement to Billy Wynne-Finch in 1929 /5 signed 'Campbell Shaw' and mentions having lunch with Irene's sister and brother-in-law [Cynthia and Oswald Mosley], who the writer considers to have been unjustly criticised /6 signed 'Diana' and sent from Warwick Lodge, Melton Mowbray. It refers to a visit by Irene to Dresden. The reverse page contains a comment about Diana's letter in an unidentified hand. /7 from Israel Sieff, concerning the contact details of a group of people, of which he is a member, who aim to 'try to make the world happier'. These people are presumably connected with industry, and Sieff may have been contacted by Irene on behalf of her brother-in-law, Oswald Mosley, perhaps with the intention of getting them to work together on issues relating to labour and unemployment /8 from J. B. Walker of Slough, probably a veterinary surgeon, and gives details of the health of a horse that Irene seems to have been considering purchasing, dated 1936 /9 from Horace Smith, The Cadogan Riding School, Sloane Street, London, regarding the supply of a horse, and clarifying the situation regarding Oswald Mosley's arrangements regarding two horses, dated 1936

School work and school reports of Vivien Mosley  XOMN/A/1/14  1930-1932

Former reference: OMN/A/1/14

1 file

Contents:
This material consists of school work, school reports, drawings, and lists of examination marks for Vivien Mosley at Brechin Place School in 1930, and Francis Holland Church of England School in 1932. The school work includes photocopies of examination questions and Vivien's answers in the subjects of Arithmetic, History, Geography, Literature, French and Grammar for December 1930, while she was at Brechin Place School, together with drawings of historical events, presumably connected with her studies. There is one report from Brechin Place School, for the autumn term of 1930; the other reports are from Francis Holland school for each school term of 1932. There is also a bill for school fees addressed to Cynthia Mosley and dated September 1932 and a photocopy of a list of sporting fixtures and other regular activities such as dancing, cooking and diction to take place at the school during the Christmas term 1932

Personal correspondence  XOMN/A/2  1909-1933

Former reference: OMN/A/2

23 files

Contents:
This series consists of letters written to Cynthia by friends and other social and political contacts. Most of the correspondence dates from the 1920s and early 1930s, but there are also letters written to Cynthia during her adolescence, and before her marriage to Oswald Mosley in 1920. Correspondents are largely based in Britain, but Cynthia also had several American friends. Several correspondents appear to have been particular friends, each having written a number of letters that survive in this collection. It is possible that other correspondents wrote more letters than are now represented in this series, but that these were later lost. Although the date range of surviving letters is fairly wide, relatively few individuals seem to have maintained a friendship with Cynthia throughout the period of her adulthood. Many close friendships, such as those with Dick Wyndham, Georgia Sitwell and Zita James, appear to have been established only during the later 1920s, while others, with individuals including Barbara Lutyens and Amelie Troubetzkoy, seem to have been discontinued in the years immediately after Cynthia's marriage. Common themes discussed in personal correspondence to Cynthia Mosley include social activities and engagements, holidays and leisure activities, the personal relationships of correspondents and of mutual friends, and the professional and domestic lives of the correspondents. Letters from individuals active or interested in politics also frequently discuss or refer to various aspects of the current political situation in England during the 1920s and early 1930s, particularly as it affected the life and career of Cynthia Mosley and, more particularly, of her husband Oswald Mosley. However, these references are not usually very detailed. In addition to letters from close friends, there is substantial volume of correspondence from other friends and acquaintances, indicating that Cynthia was extremely socially active. The extent of this personal correspondence allows us to build up a picture of Cynthia's social and friendship network, both before and after her marriage, encompassing socialites, artists, writers, politicians and political activists, civil servants and members of the armed forces, provides a snapshot of the connections of members of a social elite during the inter war years.

Letters from Nancy Astor  XOMN/A/2/1  c1918-c1930

Former reference: OMN/A/2/1

1 file

Contents:
These letters largely discuss social engagements and personal matters. It is clear from the tone of much of the correspondence that Nancy Astor acted as a confidante for Cynthia and her sister Irene, but it is not possible to discover from the letters the precise nature of the topics they discussed with her. Some letters contain information about Astor's political activities, including: /2 inviting Cynthia to come to help with her 1919 by-election campaign in Plymouth /3 offering her help to Cynthia in 1930. A label reading 'New Party politics' in Cynthia's handwriting is on the envelope, but the content does not appear to directly relate to this.

Letters from Elinor Glyn  XOMN/A/2/2  c1916-c1921

Former reference: OMN/A/2/2

1 file

Contents:
The main theme of these letters is Cynthia's relationships with male friends and suitors, and her personal development. Several letters contain a discussion of Cynthia's character, her spirited nature and her ambitions for happiness in life and relationships. Earlier letters also hint at Elinor Glyn's own feelings following the end of her relationship with Cynthia's father, George Curzon and his re-marriage to Grace Duggan. /1 and /2 are sent from Tite Street, London, and contain references to Elinor's time at Montacute House, which she decorated for Curzon but left at the end of 1916 The other letters are all sent from addresses outside England, mainly from Paris. /3 and /4 contain opinions and advice about how Cynthia should deal with a relationship with an unidentified young man in 1919, including Elinor's analysis of his character, but /4 also mentions that she has been visiting the battlefields with the French Army /5 congratulates Cynthia on her engagement to Oswald Mosley in 1920, and comments on the match; 'how delightful that he is in parliament & so you will find interest for that part of your character which needs something beyond the world & its amusements' /6 contains New Year's wishes for 1921 and alludes to Cynthia's pregnancy /7 refers to a plan for Cynthia to spend some time in America and contains advice about what she should say to a suitor about her plans /8 contains a detailed account of the plot of one of Elinor's novels, and her reasons for writing /9 concerns Cynthia's relationship with an unidentified young man, and contains advice for her, but also mentions Elinor's work with French and American soldiers, presumably during the First World War.

Letters from Zita James  XOMN/A/2/3  c1927-c1933

Former reference: OMN/A/2/3

1 file

Contents:
Most of the letters in this sequence are addressed to Cynthia, but there are also two letters which Zita James wrote to Oswald Mosley shortly after Cynthia's death in 1933. They largely concern social affairs, particularly holidays in the Mediterranean, and contain information about other people in the social group in which the Mosleys moved, including Georgia Sitwell. /1 mentions Zita's forthcoming marriage to Arthur James /2 congratulates Cynthia on her success in the 1929 election in Stoke-on-Trent /3 refers to Zita James's holiday in Russia with Cynthia in the summer of 1930, expresses her gratitude for being chosen to accompany her, and asks Cynthia to ignore her comments about being in financial difficulties /4 also contains information about Zita and Cynthia's time in Russia and again thanks Cynthia for the opportunity to travel with her /6 is written from Cannes, and thanks Cynthia for the loan of a motor boat which she and her friends have made use of /7 is written from Florence, where Zita was staying with Georgia Sitwell and gives details of their arrival (see also OMN/A/2/11/3). Most of the letter is devoted to an account of advances made towards Zita by 'Mario' and 'Freddy' during the holiday /8 and /9 are written to Oswald Mosley, addressed as 'Tom'. A photograph, possibly of Cynthia's youngest child, Michael, is enclosed with /8, which also contains details of Zita's recent holiday on the French/Spanish border with 'Andre'. /9 expresses her feelings of grief over Cynthia's death, and the comfort she has received from staying at Cynthia's home and spending time with Michael.

Letters from Olga Lynn  XOMN/A/2/4  Undated [1920s-1930s]

Former reference: OMN/A/2/4

1 file

Contents:
These letters are brief, and largely discuss social arrangements. /2 thanks Cynthia for a party she has recently held, and makes further arrangements to meet /3 congratulates Oswald and Cynthia Mosley, possibly on their election successes in 1929

Letters from Oliver Lyttelton  XOMN/A/2/5  c1918-c1920

Former reference: OMN/A/2/5

1 file

Contents:
/1 is dated 1918 and seems to have been written to Cynthia while Oliver Lyttelton was recovering from an illness or injury. He enquires about social arrangements, and mentions that he intends to go 'surreptiously to the Derby tomorrow and hope I am not found out or I should get a nasty look from Lady Evelyn'. He also mentions 'Bobbie', a mutual friend who has gone to Salisbury to begin flying. 'Bobbie' is possibly Nancy Astor's son Robert Shaw. /2 thanks Cynthia for her good wishes, and mentions that he has 'started in the city,

Letters from Pamela Lytton  XOMN/A/2/6  1920-1926

Former reference: OMN/A/2/6

1 file

Contents:
These letters largely discuss social and family matters /1 congratulates Cynthia on her engagement /2 and /3 are written from India, where Pamela's husband was Governor of Bengal from 1922-1927. /2 is written from Government House, Bengal in 1922 and gives details of her life in Dacca, a description of her surroundings, and news about her children who are in Darjeeling. She complains about the lack of social activities in Dacca and asks about the wellbeing of Cynthia's sister 'Baba' /3 is written from the Governor's Camp, Bengal in 1926 and gives an account of a recent visit by Baba and Fruity Metcalfe, and news about her children and social activities

Letters from the Manners family  XOMN/A/2/7  1910-1920

Former reference: OMN/A/2/7

1 file

Contents:
This material consists of correspondence from several members of the Manners family of Clovelly Court, Devon and Avon Tyrell, Hants mainly to Cynthia, although some are addressed to her sister Irene. Correspondents include John Nevile Manners, Francis Henry Manners, Betty Constance Manners and Angela Margaret Manners, the children of John Thomas, 3rd Baron Manners. There are also several letters from their aunt, Christina Louisa Gostling (nee Hamlyn Fane), their mother's sister, who signs herself 'Aunt Chris'. John Manners was a lieutenant in the Grenadier Guards, and was killed in action in Flanders in September 1914. Letters from his brother, sisters and aunt to Cynthia and Irene during the last months of 1914 and the beginning of 1915 contain information about this. Letters from all correspondents also include details about social activities. Letters from Angela, Betty and 'Aunt Chris' also discuss Angela's war work with the English Ambulance in Belgium in 1914. /1-/7 are letters from John Manners. These are undated, but the content suggests that they were written in the years immediately prior to the outbreak of war in 1914. Several refer to visits by the Curzon sisters to Avon Tyrell or Clovelly, and contain news about John's sporting and leisure activities, particularly his interest in playing cricket. /1 is written to Irene, but the rest are addressed to Cynthia. /6 is written from Palfau in Austria, where he is staying with his father and sister, Angela. /7 is a printed Christmas card issued by the Grenadier Guards, featuring a photograph of the 'Review of the Brigade of Guards in Hyde Park, April 1913, by H.M. King George V' /8 is a letter to Cynthia from Francis Manners, written from Eton shortly after his brother's death. He mentions that the news was made worse for the family because 'we had more or less made up our minds that he had been taken prisoner /9-/12 are letters from Angela Manners. /9 gives details of a course in hospital nursing at the London Hospital which she has recently completed. It also contains details about the education of her brothers Francis, who is at Eton, and John, who is at university /10 is addressed to Irene and Cynthia and concerns the death of her brother John, but also gives details of her recent ambulance work in Belgium, and mentions that the Curzons are currently looking after 'the little Belgian princes' /11 expresses her disappointment that Cynthia cannot come to help with her hospital work, and alludes to the disapproval of Cynthia's father, Lord Curzon /12 thanks Cynthia for her letter of condolence on the death of her mother, Constance Edwina Adeline Manners (nee Hamlyn Fane) in March 1920 /13-/21 are letters from Betty Manners, dated roughly between 1912 and 1918. Several are addressed to both Irene and Cynthia, and most letters contain details about social and leisure activities /15 is a photograph of an unidentified adolescent boy and a child /16 gives news of the illness of her brother John and urges Irene and Cynthia to write to him /17 is written from Austria and contains news about the family's social engagements and sightseeing there /18 mentions that John is missing in action, and expresses her anxiety about him. She also gives detailed news about Angela's ambulance work in Mons, which she has heard from 'Mrs Bridges' who has just returned from Belgium. /19 gives news of the expected return of Angela and the English Ambulance, via Bergen by ship at the end of 1914 /22-/33 are letters from Christina Gostling; 'Aunt Chris', dating between 1910 and 1916. Most are written to Cynthia, but some are addressed to Irene, and others to Cynthia and both of her sisters. They include: /23 referring to an operation which John Manners has recently undergone /26 giving an account of the departure of John Manners, with his regiment, for Flanders in August 1914, and of the departure of Angela Manners with the Belgian Legation with 'Nellie Hozier' to do ambulance work. She expresses her sadness that the usual summer activities at Clovelly cannot take place, and mentions that the house seems very quiet /27 expressing her concerns about Angela and John /28 expressing her grief at the death of John Manners. This letter also contains details of tributes to John from his old masters at Eton /30 containing details of Angela's experiences with the English Ambulance in Belgium /31 mentioning Irene's engagement to 'Mr Guy' [Benson] in 1916

Letters from Violet Georgina, Viscountess Milner  XOMN/A/2/8  1930

Former reference: OMN/A/2/8

1 file

Contents:
These letters discuss the political situation in 1930 /1 refers to Violet's reading of the 'Mosley Memorandum', which had been published in the 'Manchester Guardian' and the 'National Review'. She offers her sympathy to Cynthia during this difficult time, but assures her that Mosley did the right thing in resigning /2 was sent to Cynthia with a copy of 'Questions of the Hour', published by Violet's husband, Viscount Milner, in 1923, and contains the comment 'I am glad Mr Macmillan has written what many of us feel'

Letters from Irene McLaughlin (previously Irene Castle)  XOMN/A/2/9  c1918-c1929

Former reference: OMN/A/2/9

1 file

Contents:
These letters largely discuss various aspects of Irene's personal and social life and include details about her husbands and children, but several also make reference to her professional life, as a dancer, and then as a movie actress. There is also a group of photographs of a child, presumably Irene's daughter. Most of her correspondence to Cynthia can be dated either from postmarks, or from the content of individual letters. These include: /1 written from the Ritz Hotel, making social arrangements which also include Gladys Waterbury, referred to as 'Quart' (see also OMN/A/2/16) /2 written from a passenger ship on the Adriatic in 1919 which contains details about Irene's fellow passengers and the entertainments on board. She also mentions that she is accompanied by Robert [Treman], who was about to become her second husband, and expresses her hope to start a family with him /3 written from New York in March 1919 and gives details about her new job in the movie business. Her first picture is to be 'The Firing Line' and will be filmed in Miami. She also gives an account of a recent holiday in Cuba, and mentions that she and Robert hope to be married in May. /4 is dated 1924 and discusses her new relationship with 'Fred' and her feelings of freedom. She also mentions her recent travels in China and Japan, and expresses her hope to visit Cynthia in Venice during the summer. She also reports the death of her niece Barbara from meningitis and describes her feelings about this /5 is written on headed notepaper labelled 'Mrs Frederic McLaughlin', suggesting that by this time Irene had married 'Fred'. Most of the letter is concerned with her domestic life with her daughter Barbara and includes a description of her new home in Lake Forest, Illinois /6 announces the birth of a premature son to Irene and Fred and gives details of his health and of the jealousy of her daughter Barbara. She also comments on the personal lives of friends of Cynthia in Antibes and alludes to Cynthia's election to parliament in 1929 /7 comprises six black and white photographs of a small girl, presumably Irene's daughter Barbara

Letters from Harold Nicolson  XOMN/A/2/10  1929-1933

Former reference: OMN/A/2/10

1 file

Contents:
/1 is written from the British Embassy in Berlin and dated 1929. Harold Nicolson discusses the possibility that he will be recalled to London by the Foreign Office, and of another offer 'to take a well-paid job in London which might give me scope for politics'. He asks Cynthia not to say anything to anyone about this. He also discusses feelings in the Foreign Office about [Philip] Snowden and others and regrets that he is unable to see Oswald and Cynthia in Antibes /2 is written from Long Barn, Weald, Sevenoaks and dated Sept 1929. Nicolson gives details about his proposed change of career, which entails a three year contract to work on a newspaper. He thanks Cynthia for speaking to the Prime Minister about him and hopes that he will be able to do some political work either for the Liberal or Labour Party in the future. /3 is a brief postcard sent from Ohio in 1933 which mentions that he is 'still alive - if only just so', and that he has seen 'Esther'

Letters from Georgia Sitwell  XOMN/A/2/11  c1927-c1933

Former reference: OMN/A/2/11

1 file

Contents:
The majority of these letters are undated, but most can be given an approximate date from the content. They primarily discuss aspects of Georgia Sitwell's personal and social life, and several contain details of social activities. They include: /1 written from a hospital or convalescent home in France, this letter is addressed to 'Lady Cynthia', indicating that Georgia does not yet know Cynthia particularly well. The letter contains a message of thanks for some flowers, and contains a description of Georgia's surroundings, and her suspicion that the nurses have a poor opinion of her because of 'pajamas & cigarettes & no sign of a husband in spite of photographs of the baby' /2 written from Rhodes, asking Cynthia to encourage people to attend an art exhibition organised by Rosenburg to be held at the Leicester Galleries, and featuring works by [the cubist painter Gino] Severini, a friend of Georgia and her husband. Georgia also gives brief details of her travel plans and of the history and landscape of Rhodes, and enquires about the current political situation, asking 'what about Tom's resignation?' /3 written from Florence, where Georgia was staying with Zita James (see also OMN/A/2/3/7), and addressed to Cynthia and Oswald Mosley, thanking them for their hospitality at Antibes, and containing a description of her journey from Cannes to Tuscany by car, meeting up with 'Christabel' and 'Sach' [Georgia's husband Sacheverell Sitwell] /4 is also written from Florence, dated two days after the previous letter, and addressed to Cynthia alone. It mentions that 'Mario' and the 'Hausmanns' have visited, and that Mario and Zita have had a 'misunderstanding' /5 is undated. Georgia mentions a financial crisis, and asks whether she and Sacheverell can come to lunch

Letters from Blanche Marie Louise Barrymore, called Michael Strange  XOMN/A/2/12  c1924-c1932

Former reference: OMN/A/2/12

1 file

Contents:
These letters are all signed Michael Strange. A large number of them are undated. It has been possible to provide a conjectured date for some of these from their content, but others cannot be dated. The majority of the correspondence is concerned with aspects of Michael Strange's personal, professional and social life, but several letters also contain references to events in Cynthia's life, particularly the political career of herself and her husband, her health, and her social life. The correspondence includes: /1 written from Paris in 1924, asking Cynthia to get 'Miss Massingham' to send her a copy of George Bernard Shaw's play about Joan of Arc /3 mentions that she has recently appeared in 'Electra' at the [New York] Metropolitan Opera House, alongside Margaret Anglin [in 1927] /4-/8 are written from a nursing home in Liverpool, where she is recovering after an operation. Most of these urge Cynthia to pay her a visit there. /9 is written from a hotel in the Swiss Alps, probably in 1929. Strange refers to her operation in Liverpool the previous year, and to Cynthia's visit to Berlin as well as giving details about her surroundings and activities in Switzerland /10 contains references to giving a lecture tour, possibly one of the tours that Strange undertook under the management of her agent, beginning in 1928 /11 congratulates Cynthia on her decision to stand for parliament [in 1929] /12 is typed, dated 1929 and contains brief details about Michael Strange's recent lecture tour, her impressions of living in New York, and her plans for producing plays during the coming year. She also informs Cynthia of her plans to stay in London during the spring, and mentions the view of an unidentified American Senator that Oswald Mosley will soon be in the Cabinet. /13 is a telegram wishing Cynthia victory in her election campaign [in 1929] /14 gives news about her children Robin and Diana and refers to Oswald Mosley's resignation from the Cabinet [in 1930] /15 is dated 1931 and gives details of Michael Strange's recent social activities in New York. She mentions that her friends Charlie Chaplin and Ralph Barton are sailing to England, and hopes that Cynthia will see Charlie. She comments that Oswald Mosley's political convictions are admired in America. /16 is written from Sicily and concerns Cynthia's poor health, containing references to her kidney infection and the possibility that she will have to undergo a caesarian operation. The remainder of the letter gives an account of Michael Strange's holiday in Italy and Sicily /17 is written from Sorrento and contains details about her plans to visit Paris /20-/22 contain references to Cynthia and Oswald Mosley's political careers and to undated elections /27 mentions that Michael recently dined near Stephen Tennant and Sassoon, and gives her impressions of Tennant

Letters from Christopher Tennant  XOMN/A/2/13  1920

Former reference: OMN/A/2/13

1 file

Contents:
These letters were written around the time of Cynthia's engagement and marriage to Oswald Mosley. Christopher Tennant discusses these events, but also writes about his own personal life and expresses his feelings of deep friendship towards Cynthia. /1 mentions the engagment of 'Barbie' [Barbara Luytens] to Euan [Wallace] and expresses Tennant's disappointment 'to have my Barbs whisked away'. He also asks about 'Tom' Mosley, and thinks he may know him /2 is largely concerned with buying a fan for Cynthia, and contains details about the specifications. Tennant also comments on a photograph of Cynthia in the [Daily] Sketch, and mentions his forthcoming journey to Cambridge /3 asks whether Cynthia will attend Tom Poynder's dance when she returns from Paris and assures her that he will be at her wedding /4 mentions that he has received an account of Cynthia's wedding, indicating that he was not, after all, able to attend. He also reports that he has been in touch with Cynthia's sister Baba. He gives brief details about his exams in Cambridge, and informs her that he will return to Wilsford for his twenty first birthday

Letters from Amelie Troubetzkoy (nee Rives)  XOMN/A/2/14  1914-1923

Former reference: OMN/A/2/14

1 file

Contents:
The majority of these letters were written to Cynthia before her marriage to Oswald Mosley in 1920. They are written in an affectionate style, and reflect Amelie Troubetzkoy's affection for Cynthia and her sisters, and her fondness for their father George Curzon. They largely concern Cynthia's progress and personal life, but also contain information about Amelie Troubetzkoy's novels and plays, and her health and social life. They include: /2 written from the Italian lakes, shortly after the outbreak of war in 1914, recording local excitement about the war with Austria and giving details about potential travel and financial difficulties caused by the war /3 refers to a recent play by Troubetzkoy entitled 'The Fear Market' which has been playing in New York, and offers to send Cynthia some money to enable her to buy tobacco for her friends among the soldiers serving at the front /4 sympathises with Cynthia's feelings of homesickness while at school in Eastbourne in 1916, and gives an account of the success of her play, 'The Fear Market'. She also mentions sending cigarettes to soldiers in Eastbourne, and her plans for a war benefit [concert] /5 refers to Cynthia's work at the War Office, and enquires about her reaction to George Curzon's second marriage to Grace Duggan. She also mentions the forthcoming publication of her new novel 'The Ghost Garden', which is to be entitled 'The Elusive Lady' in England, and expresses her sorrow at losing so many English friends in the war. She gives brief details about her domestic life and surroundings /6 includes a newspaper cutting of a poem by Amelie Troubetzkoy entitled 'The Soldier's Creed', copies of which are to be given to American soldiers departing for France. Troubetzkoy also enquires about Cynthia's family and hopes she will soon come to America /7 congratulates Cynthia on her engagement and expresses her disappointment that she will not be able to attend the wedding due to illness /8 is dated 1921 and gives news of her ill health. She explains that she and her husband Pierre are not able to travel to England because of problems with his passport due to the Bolshevik government in Russia /9 is dated 1923 and expresses Amelie Troubetzkoy's wish to see Cynthia, her husband and their daughter in England. She mentions that a volume of her poetry has been reviewed in English publications, and that a book entitled 'The Sea Woman's Cloak' is to be published in the autumn, and gives news about a play she is hoping to put on.

Letters from Euan Wallace and Barbara Wallace (nee Lutyens)  XOMN/A/2/15  c1918-1920

Former reference: OMN/A/2/15

1 file

Contents:
This correspondence consists of letters from Euan Wallace to Cynthia before his marriage to Barbara Lutyens and letters from Barbara Lutyens to Cynthia both before and after her marriage to Euan Wallace. Letters from Barbara Lutyens are signed 'Barbs' or 'Barbie'. One of these letters was written on the couple's honeymoon, and includes contributions from both of them. Both Euan Wallace and Barbara Lutyens appear to have been friends with Cynthia independently, and letters from Euan Wallace suggest that he may have been introduced to Barbara through Cynthia. Cynthia's friendships with both these correspondents seems to have been close; the letters are primarily concerned with their personal and emotional lives. Letters include: /1 from Euan Wallace, thanking Cynthia for her offer to see him off /2 from Euan Wallace, dated 1918, discussing the love affair and forthcoming marriage of two mutual friends, and giving news about his work and activities on active service in France, and the latest developments of the war. He also thanks Cynthia 'for your sympathy for me in my rather stormy married life'. Euan Wallace was divorced from his first wife in 1919 /3 from Euan Wallace, at the British Embassy in Washington in 1919, giving an account of his work and leisure activities in Washington, which include golf and motoring. He also refers to the possibility of his marrying again and enquires about Barbara /4 from Barbara Lutyens discussing future social arrangements and giving brief details of her leisure activities at Thorpeness, Suffolk /5 from Barbara Lutyens in 1919, giving details about the recent activities of mutual friends and making plans to meet. Enclosed in this letter is one from Emily Lutyens, affirming her friendship with Cynthia /6 from Barbara Wallace, shortly after her marriage in 1920. She expresses her happiness, but confides to Cynthia that there are some aspects of married life that she has found difficult and painful, and asks whether Cynthia has shared her experiences /7 is written during Euan and Barbara Wallace's honeymoon in Italy, and includes a description of their journey and surroundings written by Euan, and details about the couple's sightseeing activities written by Barbara. She also tells Cynthia of her desire to become pregnant, and her frustration that this has not yet happened /8 from Barbara Wallace giving details about her stay in Derbyshire with her husband, and discussing her desire to become pregnant /9 from Barbara Wallace in 1921, discussing social plans for the summer and giving brief details of her domestic life. She also reflects on the way their friendship has changed since they both married, and refers to her jealousy at others, including Cynthia, having children, particularly after her own miscarriage.

Letters from Gladys Waterbury  XOMN/A/2/16  c1918-c1929

Former reference: OMN/A/2/16

1 file

Contents:
These letters concern events in Gladys Waterbury's personal life, and include information about her social activities. They are signed 'Quart'. Gladys Waterbury also wrote to Cynthia's sister Irene Curzon, signing herself either Gladys or 'Quart, (see OMN/A/1/13/4). These letters include: /1-/2 written from Monte Carlo and containing details about Gladys's surroundings and social activities in Monaco /4 containing details of social arrangements, and refers to Cynthia's recent 'coming of age' [in 1919] /5 congratulates Cynthia on her marriage and informs her that she plans to return to America shortly /6 congratulates Cynthia on her pregnancy [with Vivien Mosley] and gives a brief account of her activities since returning home, which include playing golf. She also expresses her concern for Irene Curzon who is currently living alone /7 asks Cynthia to order a 'teddy bear' coat for her and urges her to write if she is not feeling ill /8 is dated 1929 and announces Gladys's engagement to 'Billy Wynne Finch' and her plans to come to live in England. She wishes Cynthia luck with the election 'even though I don't agree with you' /12 refers to Gladys's visit to the battlefields of France, presumably after the end of the First World War /13 written from Santa Barbara, California, in which Gladys mentions seeing photographs of Cynthia on a skiing holiday in the 'Sketch' and the 'Tatler' and gives an account of her own holiday in the mountains of California

Letters from Doris Welles  XOMN/A/2/17  c1926-c1928

Former reference: OMN/A/2/17

1 file

Contents:
Much of the content of these letters is concerned with Doris Welles' interest in English politics. /1 is written from the 1917 Club, Gerrard Street, London, a club for left wing intellectuals, while Doris was waiting for Malcolm MacDonald, son of Ramsay MacDonald. This letter also refers to conversations relating to politics that Doris has had with 'Bob'. /3 also makes reference to discussions with Malcolm MacDonald, while /4 mentions meetings with Cynthia's 'friends' [Beatrice] Webb and Bertrand Russell /2 is written from Milwaukee and dated 1928. It refers to John Strachey, but mainly discusses Doris's personal, and domestic life and includes a set of black and white photographs of her 'farm, a young child and a woman, possibly Doris and her child. The letter refers to time spent with Cynthia and Oswald Mosley at Manderston, with Cynthia's Curzon relatives, and at Kedleston.

Letters from Reggie and Alice Winn  XOMN/A/2/18  Undated [1920s-1930s]

Former reference: OMN/A/2/18

1 file

Contents:
These letters are brief, and were written primarily as letters of thanks to Cynthia for her good wishes on the couple's marriage. /2 is written by Alice Winn, and expresses her hope that 'we may be as happy as you and Tom, whom I look upon as a model couple'. She also writes 'Reggie tells me that you were his first love, so you probably realise how lucky I am!'

Letters from Frank and Muriel Wright  XOMN/A/2/19  c1918-c1922

Former reference: OMN/A/2/19

1 file

Contents:
The majority of these letters are written to Cynthia by Muriel Wright, but some are written by her husband Frank; Cynthia's friendship seems to have been with the Wrights as a couple. Many letters from Muriel discuss Frank's ill health, and his treatment by a Christian Science practitioner. References in these letters suggest that Cynthia had an interest in Christian Science, and may have provided Muriel with contact details for practitioners in her area. A letter from Muriel dated January 1922 states that Frank died on 6 January that year. A death notice was published in 'The Times' on 10 January 1922 reporting the death of Frank Lowndes Wright at the age of 27. He had been 'greviously wounded in action in Flanders in October 1914' and was a retired Captain of the 1st battalion of the West Yorkshire Regiment. Letters from Frank include: /2, dated 1920 and written from a 'pension' possibly in France or Italy, containing a detailed account of his surroundings and his attempts at conversation with others staying at the pension. He encourages Cynthia to write to him and express her ideas on paper, if they are not able to meet to have a conversation /3 dated March 1920 congratulating Cynthia on her engagement but also expressing his reservations about the match, urging her not to get married too quickly /4 also dated March 1920, admitting his fears that he will not see much of Cynthia once she is married, and expressing his unease at her choice of husband, repeating his concerns that she will get married too quickly and commenting 'there is another reason for knowing your Tom very thoroughly which is best discussed with a married woman - Muriel would be a good person...men are very differently constituted to women - they are much more passionate, and a much greater strain is put on their self-control', urging Cynthia to talk about this, and not to ignore it. This advice suggests that Frank knew something of Oswald Mosley's reputation as a womanizer before his marriage Letters from Muriel include: /5 discussing domestic matters, including recruiting a maid, finding a house to rent, but particularly concerning the continuing ill health of Frank. The letter contains details about his physical condition, and the effect that this has on his mental health /6 thanking Cynthia for a Christmas present she has sent for Muriel's baby son. She also gives details about Frank's health and refers to her growing interest in Christian Science /7 and /8 discuss Frank's treatment by a Christian Science practitioner, a Mr Tennant, and include detailed accounts of Frank's health and his prognosis. /7 includes a page torn from a directory of Christian Science Practitioners, with the name of Charles Tennant marked. /8 explains that she did not talk about Christian Science when she recently met Cynthia and her husband, because she was not sure whether Oswald Mosley was interested in the subject /9 is dated January 1922 and announces Frank's death from 'consumption' and pneumonia. Muriel gives a description of the period leading up to Frank's death and his courage during his illness, and discusses her feelings of grief, and her plans for the future, which depend to some extent on the decision of her parents-in-law /10 discusses her life with Frank and affirms her belief in the principles of Christian Science /11 is dated May 1922 and includes information about the doctrine of Christian Science /12 thanks Cynthia for all the support she has shown to both Muriel and Frank during the time she has known them.

Letters from Dick Wyndham  XOMN/A/2/20  c1928-c1929

Former reference: OMN/A/2/20

1 file

Contents:
These letters are chiefly concerned with Dick Wyndham's social life, and his work as an artist. They are written in an affectionate and lively style and several letters contain stories and anecdotes about his experiences at parties and on Mediterranean holidays. There are also occasional references to events in Cynthia's life, including her decision to stand for election to parliament in 1929. Letters include: /2, probably written in 1928, containing a description of a party that he recently attended, at which he met a Norwegian girl. He also refers to Cynthia's visit to Berlin, and the possibility of Picasso accepting a commission for a portrait /3, written on a series of picture postcards of the Norwegian landscape, containing a detailed account of his holiday there /5, written from a hotel in Provence in the autumn of 1929, containing detailed information about the life and career of Van Gogh, and an account of Dick Wyndham's work on his own paintings and his experiences in Provence /6, also written from Provence, and including details about his encounters with other hotel guests and with a Frenchwoman he met in Marseilles /8 suggests that Neville Lewis might paint Cynthia's portrait.

Letters from Allan Young  XOMN/A/2/21  1929-1932

Former reference: OMN/A/2/21

1 file

Contents:
These letters primarily discuss political matters, and are likely to have been written to Cynthia in Allan Young's capacity as Oswald Mosley's political secretary in London. They range in date from 1929, when Cynthia was first elected as Labour MP for Stoke-on-Trent, to 1932, after Allan Young had resigned from Oswald Mosley's New Party. They consist of: /1 written on headed notepaper of the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and containing Young's comments on Cynthia's maiden speech in the House of Commons /2 written on headed notepaper of the Mosley's London residence, 8 Smith Square, Westminster and containing an account of Young's attendance at an Independent Labour Party conference in Norwich, his views about the views of representatives there on the problem of unemployment and his suspicion that the 'Socialist Movement' will not be able to do anything about it. He refers to Cynthia being on holiday, and wishes he were there. He also gives some advice to Oswald Mosley: 'I hope Tom is well and happy. I hope he is not trying to make up his mind about htings. It is so much pleasanter, safer and more reliable, to let minds make themselves up....and act as events occur', suggesting that this letter may have been written immediately before Mosley's resignation from the Labour Party in 1930 /3 dated 1932, and sent with some books belonging to Cynthia that Young is returning. He is reluctant to contact Cynthia, writing 'I am not sure what kind of terms we are supposed to be on....I am very inexperienced in the technique of breaking old ties and I hesitated to subject myself to the risk of a snub from you of all people'. He also refers to the possibility that he has caused further bad feeling by visiting Birmingham. He ends the letter on a conciliatory note, saying 'I have never had any reason to do other than remember you with an affection which does not easily die'

Personal and informal letters from known correspondents  XOMN/A/2/22  1909-1933

Former reference: OMN/A/2/22

1 file

Contents:
These letters are from friends and acquaintances of Cynthia Mosley who can be positively identified by name. For the most part, these individuals seem to have been only occasional correspondents with Cynthia, and only one letter, or in a few cases, two letters, survive in the collection from each person. The content of the letters varies; many discuss purely personal matters, though there are also several letters from politicians from both the Liberal and Labour parties which are mainly concerned with accepting or declining social invitations. A small number of letters are possibly from personal friends who wrote to Cynthia about political matters, while others may be from political contacts who became personal friends with Cynthia. Letters comprise: /1 from Isabella Allen, dated 1915 /2 and /3 from 'Bill' Allen and his wife Paula (previously Paula Casa Maury). These letters date from 1933 when the Allens were staying in Lofer, Austria and include details about their surroundings, as well as enquiries about Cynthia's health around the time of her appendix operation and favourable comments about Oswald Mosley's 'Blackshirt' publication /4 from Herbert Asquith, Bedford Square, London, dated 1922 accepting an invitation to dinner /5 and /6 from Margot Asquith, wife of Herbert Asquith, 44 Bedford Square, London, concerning the publication and reception of her autobiography in 1921 and asking Cynthia's opinion of it. She also refers to the political situation in Ireland at the time /7 from the secretary of Dr Benes, foreign minister of Czechoslovakia and member of the Council of the League of Nations, dated 1924 and sent from Claridges Hotel, London /8-/9 from R. H. Benson. /8 is written from Buckhurst, Sussex, 1917, /9 is written from Park Lane, London, dated 1918 /10 from J. C. Bose, Artillary Mansions Hotel, London, declining an invitation in 1926 due to his lecture schedule but promising to meet Cynthia before he returns to India /11 from Roy Browning, Landguard Manor, Shanklin, Isle of Wight, undated /12 from Violet Brassey of Apethorpe Hall, Peterborough, mother of Cynthia's friend Gerard, who was killed in action in 1918, enclosing a photograph of Gerard and thanking Cynthia for her condolences /13 and /14 from Stanley Owen Buckmaster, Porchester Terrace, London, accepting social invitations in 1923 /15 and /16 from William C. Bullitt, an American diplomat and advisor to Franklin D. Roosevelt. /15 is sent from Paris in 1931, and discusses the chances of Roosevelt winning the Presidency of the United States of America in 1932, the impact of this victory on the Prohibition Amendment and the possibility of forming a youth movement possibly aligned to Mosley's New Party policies. /16 is sent from Bremen in 1932 and mentions that Count Paul Teleki, a Hungarian statesman is keen to meet Cynthia and her husband to discuss matters relating to the New Party /17-/18 from Henry 'Chips' Channon, signed 'Chips' or 'Chippy'. /17 is addressed to Cynthia and 'Tom' [Oswald Mosley]. /18 gives an account of recent travels in Italy with 'Buchie', after a holiday in Venice with the Mosleys, probably in 1925 (see OMN/A/2/22/69) /19 from Lee Church of Long Beach, California, dated 1923 /20-/21 from Sibyl Colefax, Argyll House, Kings Road, Chelsea, undated, apparently discussing Cynthia's political career, and referring to social plans /22 from Frederick Peabody Crane, consisting of a note with contact details written on his business card. There is no date on the card, but it is probable that the note dates from September 1930 when Cynthia and her friend Zita James met Crane while in Athens on holiday /23 from Maud Cunard at the Hotel Ritz, Paris, making social arrangements, undated. /24 from Cecil Gairdner, Harley House, London, thanking Cynthia for her hospitality during his stay on the Riviera and giving brief details of his journey home with Mrs Wallace, Mr Hansell and Prince George, undated. /25 from William Goode, Claridge's Hotel, London, making social arrangements to invite the Mosleys for lunch, together with the Bradburys and Lady Cunard, undated. /26 from Miles Graham at the time of his engagement to Cynthia's sister Irene Curzon in 1933, sent from Villa d'Este, Como. The letter enquires about Cynthia's health following her operation and hopes that she will be able to attend Irene's wedding. He expresses his happiness at his engagement /27 from Richard Burdon Haldane, Queen Anne's Gate, Westminster, accepting an invitation in 1924 /28 from Ian Hamilton, Hyde Park Gardens, London,1924 /29 and /30 from Katie Hammersley. /29 is dated December 1915 and sent from La Panne. It mentions that Cynthia's presents for 'the princess and princes' will be given to them on Christmas day, and gives brief details of the bombardment of Ostend by the English monitors. /30 is dated 1916 and sent from Essex. It congratulates Cynthia's father George Curzon on being appointed to the War Committee with Lloyd George, and on his engagement to Mrs Duggan. Katie Hammersley also passes the best wishes of 'the princess' to Cynthia /31 from Mary Herbert, Pixton Park, Dulverton, 1924, concerning the death of her husband, Aubrey Herbert, and what his loss means to Cynthia and Oswald Mosley /32 from Edith Hillingdon, Grosvenor Street, London,undated. /33 from James K. Howard, Eastbourne, 1916, inviting Cynthia to tea and giving brief details about his administrative army work /34 from Sir William Hutchinson, River House, Hammersmith, thanking Cynthia for inviting him to her Venetian party, undated. /35 from Elsie James, Carlton Hotel, London, 1924, making social arrangements /36 from Lesley Jowell, Upper Brook Street, London, offering support during the period following Oswald Mosley's resignation in 1930 /37 telegram from William Lyon Mackenzie King, Prime Minister of Canada, 1926 /38 from Stephen King Hall, Yateley, Hampshire, 1929, discussing disarmament, and mentioning that he has been approached with an offer to produce a play which he has written /39 from Margaret Storm Jameson on behalf of Alfred A. Knopf inc Borzoi Books, 1927 /40 greeting card from Arthur Lawson, Christmas 1909 /41 from Stephen Leacock, undated /42 from Rosamund Lehmann, Ipsden, Oxford, 1931, referring to the defeat of candidates in Oswald Mosley's New Party at the recent General Election, and praising the most recent issue of 'Action' /43 from Norah Lindsay, Grosvenor Street, London, undated /44 from Megan Lloyd George, Bron-y-de, Churt, Surrey, undated /45-/46 from Edith Sophy Lyttelton, mother of Oliver Lyttelton. /45 is dated 1923 and dicusses social arrangements, /46 is dated 1929 and congratulates Cynthia on her successful election campaign /47 from Hermione Lytton, daughter of Sir Victor Bulwer-Lytton and his wife Pamela, Government House, Darjeeling, 1922, containing a detailed account of her journey to India, arrival in Calcutta and daily life and activities in India /48 from Harold Macmichael, Acting Governor General at Khartoum, Sudan, 1929, making arrangements to meet Cynthia in London after he leaves Sudan, having handed over to General Huddleston and discussing his own political views. /49 from Miles Malleson, Portsdown Road, to Cynthia and Oswald Mosley congratulating them on their election success in 1929 /50 from Dudley Field Malone, American attorney and friend of Cynthia and Oswald Mosley, Paris 1930 /51 from Michael Mason, Eynsham Hall, Oxfordshire, 1931, making social arrangements /52 from W. K. McClure, British Embassy, Rome, making arrangements to meet in Rome, probably during Cynthia's visit with Oswald Mosley in April 1933 /53 from Christabel McLaren, Tal-y-Cafn, Wales, undated /54 from B. Mitchelham, Chateau St Christophe, Oise, undated /55-/56 from Gerald Murphy, 1930 /57 from Phyllis Nichols, Vicolo Tre Madonne, making social arrangements, undated. /58 from Geoffrey Nickson, Eton, Windsor, 1932, making arrangements to meet Cynthia. /59 from Ethel Pearson, Hotel de Castiglione, Paris, Mar 1929, sending good wishes for happiness and luck to Cynthia and mentioning that she looks forward to hearing her maiden speech in the House /60 from Ralph Peto, British Clinic, Tangier, giving an account of his recent flying accident, undated /61 from Wogan Philips, undated, thanking Cynthia effusively for her hospitality at a recent party /62 from Glyn Philpot, Tite Street, Chelsea, making arrangements to begin a portrait, undated /63 from Ruth Pratt, New York, giving details of recent social engagements with Lady Astor and Mrs Lyttelton, undated /64 postcard from Frank Pretyman, Wisconsin, 1914. For other letters from Frank Pretyman to Cynthia, see OMN/A/4/2/8 /65-/66 from Gertrude M. Richards. /65 is dated 1922 and sent from Queen Anne's Mansions, London, discussing the publication of 'High Tide' and other poetry anthologies in England. /66 is dated 1923 and sent from New York, making arrangements to meet when she visits London /67 from Nathalie Ridley, Portman Square, London, undated /68 from Hugo Rumbold, White's, attached to a letter of introduction for Hugo Rumbold, undated. /69 from 'Buck', Herbrand Edward Dundonald Brassey Sackville, Cernobbio, Italy, 1925, thanking Cynthia for a recent holiday in Venice /70 from John [Singer] Sargent, Tite Street, Chelsea, concerning a commission for a drawing of an unidentified lady, undated. /71 postcard from F. Campbell Shaw, written at sea, and postmarked Southampton, 1930 /72 from Edith Sitwell, poet, critic and biographer, Pembridge Mansions, London, inviting Cynthia and Oswald Mosley to a party for Pavel Thelitchev, given by Edith and Osbert Sitwell, undated /73 from Ethel Snowden, political campaigner and wife of Philip Snowden, Labour MP and Chancellor of the Exchequer in Ramsay MacDonald's 1929 government. This letter is written from Carlisle Mansions, Westminster, inviting Cynthia for lunch in 1924 /74 from Stephen Tennant, artist and writer, Wilsford Manor, Salisbury, making social arrangements, undated /75 from S. A. Tewell, Harrow-on-the-Hill, 1922 /76 from Abigail Brown Tompkins and Emma Louisa Tompkins, New Jersey, 1922 /77 from Robert Vansittart, Secretary to George Curzon at the Foreign Office 1920-1924, making social arrangements /78 from Harry Rowan Walker, West Eaton Place, London, 1932, asking Cynthia if she will visit Brenda Dean Paul in hospital in Chobham /79 from Sidney Webb, Grosvenor Road, Westminster, 1924, declining an invitation on behalf of himself and Mrs Webb /80 from Florence Wedgwood, wife of Josiah Wedgwood, Beaufort House, Chelsea, 1930, offering her support following Cynthia's resignation from the Labour party, but warning her that Josiah does not approve of her new policy /81 from Josiah C. Wedgwood, Liberal MP, House of Commons, cancelling a social engagement in 1920 /82 from Marguerite R. Wilber, New York, 1925, concerning Christian Science /83 from Ellen Wilkinson, Labour MP, House of Commons, declining a social invitation, undated /84 from Margaret Wintringham, Labour MP, Little Grimsby Hall, Louth, undated /85 from Catherine Xarosi, 1928, concerning social arrangements, but also asking for Cynthia's impressions about Germany and Eastern Europe

Personal and informal letters from unknown correspondents  XOMN/A/2/23  c1914-c1933

Former reference: OMN/A/2/23

1 file

Contents:
These letters are predominantly from friends of Cynthia Mosley, although there are also a small number of letters from individuals who seem to have corresponded with her on a less personal, though still informal, level. This correspondence has been filed together because the letters have, for the most part, been signed only by the sender's first or last name, or by initials only, making it impossible to confidently identify these individuals. The content of the correspondence varies, and some letters, particularly from the late 1920s and early 1930s, refer to contemporary political issues, but the majority are concerned with personal and social matters. Letters comprise: /1 from 'Alice', Windsor Castle, 1920. /2-/3 from 'Alan', Fitzroy Square, London, undated /4 from 'Angie', concerning her recent marriage to 'Stewart' and expressing her certainty that Cynthia will be happy in marriage /5-/7 from 'Armand', Rue de Varenne, Paris, undated /8 from 'Arthur', Belgrave Square, London, 1924 /9 from 'Audrey', Deanscroft, Oakham, undated, asking Cynthia to visit her /10 from 'B', Arlington Street, London, undated /11 from 'B', Royal Northern Club, Aberdeen, 1929 /12 from 'Beattie', South Kensington, undated /13 from 'Betty', Mansfield Street, London, 1916, concerning the birth of her baby /14 from 'Antoine Bernstein', St Moritz, undated /15 from 'Bill', Cap d'Antibes, France, congratulating Cynthia on her election victory 1929 and giving details about his recent operation for 'mastoid' /16 from 'Blos', Avenue St Honore d'Eylau, Paris, 1930, concerning Cynthia's wedding anniversary and mentioning 'Nigs' /17 from 'Bobbie', Lathbury Park, Newport Pagnell, undated, but written after Cynthia left school in 1916. Contains references to social activities at Cliveden, the home of the Astor family. This correspondent' is probably Robert 'Bobbie' Shaw, son of Nancy Astor and her first husband Robert Gould Shaw /18 from 'Bruce', Welbeck Abbey, Worksop, Notts, undated /19-/20 from 'Charles', British Embassy, Paris, undated, making social arrangements /21 from Colin, White Star Line, to Cynthia and 'Tom' [Oswald Mosley], undated /22 from 'Con', Park Lane, London, 1916 /23 from 'Curtis', Fitzroy Square, London, acknowledging receipt of payment for a Lurcat painting /24-/25 from G. Delayth, Godalming, Surrey, 1921-1922, concerning gardening work, particularly the supply of plants and flowers /26 from 'Diana', Warwick Lodge, Melton Mowbray, undated, concerning her forthcoming marriage to 'Percy' /27-/29 from 'Dicks'. /27 is sent from Dunkeld House, Perthshire, 1919, and gives details about social activities with 'Barbie' (see OMN/A/2/23/59-64 and OMN/A/2/15). /28 is sent from Witley Court, Worcestershire, dated 1920, and discusses her feelings after the recent death of a relative, probably her mother. /29 is sent from St Jean Cap Ferrat, dated 1921, giving details of her social and travel plans with 'Con' /30 from 'Docs', 1921, giving an account of recent travels, and mentioning 'Quart' - Gladys Waterbury (see OMN/A/2/16) /31 from 'Dot', Trent, New Barnet, 1916, discussing the marriage of Cynthia's father, George Curzon, to Grace Duggan /32 from 'Edwina', Hotel Lutitia, undated /33-/34 from 'Elsa'. /33 is written from Cambridge, Mass, 1927, discussing her plans to come to Europe, /34 is written from Rue de Bruxelles,undated. /35-/38 from 'Elsie', Munden, Watford, undated. Elsie is the wife of 'Rob' who wrote to Cynthia during his service in Palestine in the First World War (see OMN/A/4/2/9), and who is also mentioned in these letters. /36 refers to the marriage of Cynthia's father, George Curzon, to Grace Duggan, so presumably dates from 1916. /37 asks Cynthia to be godmother to her son Patrick. /39 from 'M de Felcourt', Hyde Park Hotel, London, 1924, making social arrangements /40 from 'Francis', Great James Street, London, undated /41 from 'Francis', Boulevard St Germain, 1930, written in French /42 from 'Hazel', Malvern Wells, undated /43 from 'Hermione', undated /44 from 'Hilda', Roxburgh, undated, mentions 'Buchie' and 'Chips' (see OMN/A/2/22/69 and OMN/A/2/22/17-18) /45 from 'Hutch', 1923, written to Cynthia in Paris, discussing social activities. This is possibly Leslie Hutchinson, jazz musician /46 from 'Jeanne', Bryanston Square, 1916, discussing Cynthia's success at school in cricket and tennis, and giving news of the success of 'George' in his exam for Eton /47 from 'Joan', Hurtwood House, Albury, Guildford, Surrey, 1928, containing map of directions to Hurtwood from Dorking /48 from 'Joanie', Portman Square, 1922 /49 from 'John', Fifth Avenue, New York, 1932, discussing his writing career, and enquiring about Cynthia's health following the birth of her son Michael /50 from Mr 'Jones', Crediton, Devon, 1928, referring to Cynthia's recent visit [to Berlin], discussing local politics in Smethwick, and the Labour Movement, and mentioning the kindness experienced following the loss of someone close to him, possibly his wife. /51 from 'Archie C Kerr', Hurstpierpoint, Sussex, 1929, making arrangements to meet, and mentioning recent social activities with 'Nigz' (see OMN/A/2/23/73-76) and 'Blos' (see OMN/A/2/23/16) /52 from 'Kiki', Hotel Bradford, Paris, [1929], containing congratulations on Cynthia's maiden speech /53-/54 from 'Krishna'. /53 is written from 'The Laurels', 1918 and the writer discusses studying with a tutor and working for an exam. /55 from E de Lannx, Rue Visconti, Paris, 1929, concerning Cynthia's requirements for a divan she has ordered /56 from 'Lilias' (nee Hawker), South Australia, 1920, after her marriage, giving details of her life there (see also OMN/A/4/1/3 for letters from Lilias) /57 from 'Lizzy', Portman Square, London, 1922 /58 from 'Lindsay', Buckingham Palace Road, London, undated /59-/64 probably from members of the Lutyens family, Thorpeness, Suffolk, and Dunkeld House, Perthshire, 1919-1920. Letters give details of leisure activities including swimming and sailing, and several mention 'Barbie' - Barbara Lutyens (see OMN/A/2/15). The correspondents are possibly her sisters. Only a small part of /64 survives; the rest has been torn away. /65 from 'Margaret', Marine Hotel, Lossiemouth, undated. The writer gives an account of activities at Lossiemouth and mentions that Ramsay [MacDonald] seems to be much happier in this environment. She expresses her disappointment that Cynthia and Oswald Mosley are unable to be there, suggesting that that the gathering at Lossiemouth may have been a Labour party event /66-/68 from 'Marjorie'. /66 is written from Switzerland and /67 from Cap d'Antibes. All are undated. /66 and /67 encourage Cynthia to shop at Wanda Watazzi, a Paris boutique /69 from 'Manz', 1917, discussing social activities, and enquiring about Cynthia's illness /70 from 'Merard', Rue Notre Dame des Champs, Paris, undated, giving details about a flat for rent in Paris /71 from 'Merk', Boston, Mass, 1920, giving an account of the voyage to New York and current activities in Boston /72 from 'E. Munthe', Societa Italiana Servizi Marittimi, undated /73-/76 from 'Nigs'. /73, written from the British Embassy, Paris, congratulates Cynthia on her engagement in 1920. /76, written from Belvedere, Calcutta, 1931, discussing Indian politics and the possibility of a new Indian Reform Act /77-/81 from 'Nora', dating between 1919 and 1930. Several are written from 'White Star' passenger ships /82 from 'Oozibrozivo', H.M.S.Highflyer, East Indies Station, Calcutta, 1911, containing an account of events organised for the Delhi Durbar to mark the coronation of George V /83 from 'Paul', Villa Abamelek, Rome, 1923 /84 from 'Philip', New University Club, London, 1932 /85 from 'Pierre', Avenue Henri Martin, Paris, 1930, discussing his social plans, and enclosing a cutting from a French newspaper which mentions the presence of Cynthia Mosley at a social gathering /86 from 'Phoebe', Landdowne Terrace, Eastbourne, undated /87 from 'Simon', Upper Brook Street, London, 1922, announcing the birth of a baby to himself and 'Barbie, with undated letter, presumably from 'Barbie', thanking Cynthia for her present for the baby /88-/89 from 'Sylvia'. /88 is a telegram, sent from Paris, possibly referring to a school reunion. /90 telegram from 'Treves', sent to Cynthia care of Lady Miller, Manderston /91 from 'Tyrell', British Embassy, Paris, 1930, discussing matters relating to the arrival of a French parliamentary delegation in London and suggesting arranging a meeting with 'Wedgwood Benn' /92 from 'Viola', Woburn Square, London, undated, concerning the cost of renting a villa /93 from 'Violet', Portofino, Italy, concerning arrangements for Cynthia's honeymoon in 1920 and the possibility of leasing a villa. She suggests contacting the Grenfells /94-/95 from 'Willie', Royal Palace, Brussels, 1930-1931./98 makes arrangements for Cynthia to meet the Queen and the Duke of Brabant in Brussels /96 from 'Willie', probably written in 1929, expressing concern about Cynthia's illness and congratulating Oswald Mosley on his post, but commenting, 'I cannot allow myself to admire Mr Jowitt very much' /97 from 'Willie', concerning news about wounded officers during the First World War /98 from 'Will', Mayfair Hotel, London, undated, thanking Cynthia and Oswald Mosley for their hospitality and asking them to visit New York /99 from 'Willingdon', P&O liner, 1931 /100 from 'Witz', Rue Duguay-Trouin, Paris, 1927, written in French, making social arrangements /101-/144 are written in English and French, from individuals who cannot be confidently identified even by a first or last name. Some are incomplete. The majority discuss social engagements, and many are letters of thanks to Cynthia for her hospitality at parties and other social events. /128 includes a cutting from a French newspaper on the subject of disarmament, 1930 /145 and /146 are letters not apparently written to Cynthia but found in her papers. /145 is a letter from unidentified sender addressed to 'Mrs Parsons' in 1923 concerning the hire of a villa in Italy. /146 is an undated letter sent from Eaton Grange, Wellington, Shropshire to 'Darling Mother', written by an unidentified child and containing a description of life at school.

Formal correspondence  XOMN/A/3  c1908-1936

Former reference: OMN/A/3

1 file

Contents:
Letters in this series are characterised by their focus on Cynthia's public life, particularly her involvement in politics and charitable and fund raising work. Cynthia's political development can be charted through this correspondence, from her participation in constituency affairs in Harrow, as the wife of the serving Conservative and Independent MP, Oswald Mosley, through her membership of the Labour party and her election as Labour MP for Stoke-on-Trent in 1929, and her subsequent resignation and involvement in Mosley's New Party. The series also contains letters relating to Cynthia's charitable work before her marriage, and to her work at the War Office during the last years of the First World War. The letters chart the course of Cynthia's political career, reflecting the fact that it was affected by her husband's political decisions to a great extent, but also illustrate her interest in social welfare in her own right, and her activities undertaken independently of Oswald Mosley, such as her visit to Russia in 1930. The file also contains a letter addressed to Cynthia in 1936, three years after her death.

Formal letters from individuals and organisations  XOMN/A/3/1  c1908-1936

Former reference: OMN/A/3/1

1 file

Contents:
These letters comprise: /1-3 from Bella Sidney Wood at Cassell & Co, publishers of 'Little Folks Home Pages', a newsletter sold for the benefit of the 'Little Folks Convalescent Home', Cooden, near Bexhill-on-Sea, connected with the Queen's Hospital for Children in Bethnal Green, London. One letter is dated 1908, the others are dated 1915-16. All thank Cynthia for her work as a 'Little Folks' collector, and for the financial gifts she has been able to collect for the convalescent home /4 from Harold Samuels, Ealing, 1918, arranging music lessons for Cynthia's sister at the Wigmore Hall Studios /5 -/7 from the War Office, Whitehall, dated between 1917 and 1919, concerning Cynthia's voluntary employment there. These include /5, dated 1917, giving details of the kind of work that women appointed to positions in the War Office might be expected to undertake and suggesting that Cynthia Curzon might be employed in a voluntary capacity. /6 and /7 are letters of thanks for Cynthia's work at the Directorate, dated 1918 and 1919 /8 from an unidentified correspondent, likely to have been an immigrant to Britain, dated 1920. The writer gives details about his or her employment in a cinema in Crouch End, and asks for financial assistance. It is clear from the letter that Cynthia has given this assistance in the past /9 from R. Thrower, dated 1921. The correspondent was possibly a recipient of charitable works by Cynthia, but the content of the letter is unclear /10 from Ermine Murray, probably dated 1921, since the correspondent refers to Oswald Mosley's recent speech on the political situation in Ireland, after leaving the Conservative benches over government policy on Ireland, and asks Cynthia to congratulate him on this speech /11 from Elizabeth Marion Bryce, Buckingham Gate, London, 1921, accepting Cynthia's invitation to join her committee for the English Speaking Union Ball /12 from members of the Broad Street Club, London, thanking Cynthia for inviting them to her home at Upper Ifold for the weekend. This letter is undated, but it is likely to have been written between 1920 and 1923, when the Mosleys rented a cottage at Upper Ifold. It is possible that this invitation was related to Cynthia's responsibilities towards her husband's constituents when he was MP for Harrow /13 from a group of boys who were also recipients of the Mosleys' hospitality at Upper Ifold, dating from the same period as /12 /14 from the honorary secretary of the National Unionist Association Women's Parliamentary Committee, Southern Area, January 1922, calling for Cynthia's resignation following the withdrawal of Oswald Mosley from the Conservative party, since membership is limited to the wives of official Unionist Members of Parliament /15 from Carl Alexander Frederiksen, Copenhagen, 1922, asking for financial support /16 from E. V. Francis, a member of the Hanwell Unionist Association, 1922, offering assistance with Cynthia's plans to visit Oswald Mosley's constituents in the area following his resignation from the Conservative Party and his victory as an Independent /17 from Agnes Forsyth Rome, officer of the Harrow branch of an unidentified organisation, likely to have been connected with Oswald Mosley during his time as MP for Harrow. The letter is undated, but it was probably written after Mosley left the Conservative Party in 1922, as it refers to the opposition the writer has faced for supporting Mosley's policy /18 from A. J. Hayes, of St Ann's Girls' School, Hanwell, dated 1922, thanking Cynthia for her donation to the school /19 from K. E. Williams, making social arrangements, and wishing Oswald Mosley success in his election campaign in November 1922 /20 from Dr Douglas Kirkwood, Sloane Street, London, Nov 1922 concerning the vaccination of Cynthia's baby [Vivien] /21 from an unidentified correspondent associated with the Winter Distress League, enquiring whether Cynthia is willing to become Chairman of the Special Committee appointed to organise a benefit Ball, 1923 /22 newspaper cutting sent by Samuel E. Erickson, clerk of the Superior Court of Cook County, Chicago, 1923, concerning a Chancery case brought by Marguerite Hyde Suffolk against the trustees and individuals of the Leiter Trust, who include Cynthia's daughter Vivien Mosley, to whom the envelope is addressed. /23 from Louie Smith, member of the Hanwell 'Mothers Meeting', sending Cynthia the congratulations of this group on the birth of her son in 1923 /24 from C. S. Helfield, Harrow-on-the-Hill, concerning the possibility that Oswald Mosley will not stand again for election in Harrow, and pledging his or her support for Mosley's policies. This is undated, but must have been written before Mosley joined the Labour party in 1924 /25 from Katharine Atholl, Eaton Place, London, 1924, giving her name as a patron of a dance organised by Cynthia in aid of the 'Children Adoption Association' /26 from M. E. Clynes, St John's Road, Putney, 1924 declining Cynthia's invitation to meet the League of Nations committee /27 from Arnold Keppel, Portmas Square, London, concerning Oswald Mosley's decision to join the Labour Party, April 1924. He mentions that he has recently joined the party himself /28 from Mary Drew, 2 The Boltons, London, congratulating Oswald Mosley on his decision to join the Labour Party, April 1924 /29 from John Wheatley, Minister for Health in Ramsay MacDonald's 1924 Labour government, declining a lunch invitation, 1924 /30 from William Platt, Hallwell Road, London, Nov 1924, congratulating Oswald Mosley on his 'moral victory' in his unsuccessful election campaign in [Ladywood], Birmingham, giving his opinion about the danger of running an 'empire on Beaverbrook 'principles'' /31 from P. Convoy Shakespiar of the Perry Barr and Birchfield Independent Labour Party, 1925, enquiring about the possibility of Cynthia Mosley standing as prospective candidate for the Handsworth Division /32 from F. D. Bone, secretary of the Press Club, 1925, confirming arrangements for Cynthia and her husband Oswald Mosley to attend for a social engagment /33 from Robert J. Prew, London correspondent of Hearst Newspapers, 1925, thanking Cynthia for an article she has written for the company's American newspapers /34-/35 from a representative of 'The Westminster Press', 1926. These concern the supply of a book of 'Old English Songs' and discuss class conflict and commercialism /36 from S. Salverinim, Warwick Square, London, 1927, declining an invitation to lunch with the Mosleys, and expressing the desire to meet Oswald Mosley, having been impressed by a recent speech /37 from unidentified correspondent, Rue de l'Universite, Paris, 1929, making arrangements to meet /38 from H. Miles, [as secretary of the Stoke, Fenton and Longton Labour Party], June 1929, enquiring about Cynthia's health, and discussing arrangements for a victory rally to be held in Trentham Gardens. This letter is typed on headed paper featuring a photograph of Cynthia Mosley /39 from W. G. Cove, Labour MP for Aberavon, Hamilton Place, London, July 1929, informing Cynthia that Sir Charles Trevelyan has agreed to meet a deputation in his room in the House /40 from Galerien Thannhauser, Berlin, Jan 1930, concerning the possible purchase of a 'Stillife' by Matisse /41 from T. C. Harding, Erdington, Birmingham, Feb 1930 congratulating Cynthia on her radio broadcast on 'personal liberty' /42 from Dorothy Melenevsky of the Society for Cultural Relations with Foreign Countries, Kharkiv, Soviet Union, Nov 1930, referring to her meeting with Cynthia in Kharkiv, sending thanks to Cynthia and Zita James for a parcel of food and soapflakes and accepting their offer to send journals, giving hints about living conditions in the Soviet Union at the time, and expressing the desire that Cynthia should return with her husband Oswald Mosley /43 from Eugenio di Pirani, New York, Dec 1930, asking for a signed photograph of Cynthia /44 from the London Library, Nov 1932, acknowledging receipt of Cynthia's application for membership, and giving details of the entrance fees and annual subscription /45 from unidentified correspondent, Dec 1932, congratulating Oswald Mosley on his speech at a recent meeting, and discussing his own political ambitions and his desire to help Mosley's cause. /46 undated letter from Michael McKenna, inviting Cynthia to a children's concert /47 undated letter from Mabel Prust, thanking Cynthia for her concern about her improving health /48 letter addressed to Cynthia Mosley and dated 1936, three years after her death. The sender of the letter is a reader of 'Action', and an admirer of the political views promoted in that publication, and the letter contains a request for financial assistance.

Correspondence sorted by subject  XOMN/A/4  1914-1931

Former reference: OMN/A/4

24 files

Contents:
This series consists of personal and formal correspondence organised according to either the identity of the sender or the subject matter discussed. It comprises letters from pupils at 'The Links' boarding school in Eastbourne dating between about 1916 and 1918; letters from officers and other ranks serving in the 1914-1918 war; letters from members of the Belgian royal family dating between 1915 and 1931; letters and other papers relating to visits to France that Oswald and Cynthia Mosley made during the 1920s; largely formal correspondence relating to Oswald and Cynthia Mosley's tour of India in 1925; largely formal correspondence relating to Oswald and Cynthia Mosley's tour of the United States of America in 1926; correspondence from friends, politicians, constituents and members of the public relating to Cynthia Mosley's political speeches and broadcasts between 1927 and 1930. Letters from Cynthia's school friends, from the majority of her correspondents serving in the First World War, and from the Belgian royal family primarily concern personal and social affairs, but the First World War letters obviously also contain information about the progress and impact of the war, and some letters from Cynthia's school friends also contain references to the impact of the war on people on the Home Front. Letters and papers relating to visits to France by the Mosleys reveal details about the couple's social life, involving foreign travel, shopping and extensive leisure time; by contrast, letters relating to Oswald and Cynthia Mosley's tours of India and the United States of America, to view labour conditions in both countries, provide evidence of their interest in the Labour movement and in socialist politics, even before Cynthia became a Labour MP in 1929. Correspondence relating to Cynthia's speeches and broadcasts gives a further indication of her developing political views and interests after her election as MP.

Letters from schoolfriends  XOMN/A/4/1  1916-c1920

Former reference: OMN/A/4/1

8 files

Contents:
This correspondence consists of letters from pupils at 'The Links' school in Eastbourne, which Cynthia Curzon attended in 1916. Some were written during the time that Cynthia attended the school, but the majority appear to have been written after her time there. A list, created by Cynthia, containing the names of pupils at 'The Links' during the spring and summer terms of 1916 (see OMN/A/7/1), has made it possible to identify the writers of these letters. Common themes in letters written from school are lessons and sporting activities, particularly lacrosse, the behaviour of teachers and the frequently changing alliances and friendships among the pupils. Letters written to Cynthia during school holidays commonly discuss travel and associated social activities, and contain details about the family and domestic lives of Cynthia and her correspondents.

Letters from Kitty Clements  XOMN/A/4/1/1  c1916

Former reference: OMN/A/4/1/1

1 file

Contents:
These letters include: /2 mentioning that Edwina Ashley (later wife of Louis Mountbatten), and her sister Mary are new pupils at 'The Links' /3 containing an account of a family funeral and gives details about her plans to attend a 'domestic economy place' in Kent.

Letters from Hester Hardy  XOMN/A/4/1/2  c1917

Former reference: OMN/A/4/1/2

1 file

Contents:
These include: /2, written to Esmee Whitall, another pupil at 'The Links', which mentions Cynthia /7 refers to a visit that Cynthia has made to the school, to see friends there /11 asks for information about a Miss Broadhurst, and the National Political League, of which she is President

Letters from Lilias Hawker  XOMN/A/4/1/3  1916-1917

Former reference: OMN/A/4/1/3

1 file

Contents:
Most of these letters are written from 'The Links' and record the latest events at school for Cynthia's benefit, including details about friendship groups and music lessons, and especially the fortunes of the lacrosse team.. By 1917 Lilias is attending another school, and /10 gives details about her daily life there, in comparison with the routine at 'The Links'. She also mentions that her brother is being sent back to the Front. Other letters also mentioned her brother's service in the army, including /3 which records that that 'Charlie' has taken a draft of troops over to France but has been able to return and spend some leave with his family.

Letters from Audrey James  XOMN/A/4/1/4  1916

Former reference: OMN/A/4/1/4

1 file

Contents:
These include: /1 and /2 expressing Audrey's feelings of sadness that Cynthia will not be returning to 'The Links', /3 written while on holiday, giving an account of leisure activities /4 written during the autumn term at 'The Links', giving details about new pupils and description of where everyone sleeps

Letters from Silvia James  XOMN/A/4/1/5  c1916

Former reference: OMN/A/4/1/5

1 file

Contents:
The majority of these letters are written from 'The Links' and contain detailed descriptions about various aspects of daily life at the school, including sleeping arrangements, the characteristics of new pupils, examination results and the organisation of school games team. They also contain details about Silvia's personal feelings about the school and her life there. /4 thanks Cynthia for her gift of a torch, to enable Silvia to read during the dark evenings /5 refers to the marriage of Cynthia's father, Lord Curzon, and to Cynthia's feelings about this relationship

Letters from Violet Quick  XOMN/A/4/1/6  1916

Former reference: OMN/A/4/1/6

1 file

Contents:
These include: /1 written from Bridgwater during the summer holidays and discusses possibilities for her continuing education after leaving 'The Links' /2 and /3 are written from 'The Links' during the autumn term of 1916, and largely contain news about the teachers, lessons and details about which pupils have been appointed prefects and games captain

Letters from Myrth Whittall  XOMN/A/4/1/7  1916-1920

Former reference: OMN/A/4/1/7

1 file

Contents:
The majority of these letters are written from 'The Links', probably during the later part of 1916 and perhaps the beginning of 1917. They provide descriptions of daily life at the school after Cynthia has left, and include information about activities including lacrosse, music and elocution, as well as details about friendship groups, and the illnesses suffered by pupils and staff. /1-/3 and /5 are written from Myrth's home and contain details about her social activities and those of her sisters /9 is written from Constantinople, 1920, and gives details about a gift of clothing that she has bought for Cynthia, as well as a description of her activities in Constantinople which include riding and attending events at the High Commission. She refers to Cynthia's wedding, and expresses her own feelings about marriage and children

Additional letters from schoolfriends  XOMN/A/4/1/8  1916-1919

Former reference: OMN/A/4/1/8

1 file

Contents:
This correspondence includes: /1-/5 from Otta Tarn, most of which are written from 'The Links' in the autumn term of 1916, with the exception of /1 which is written during the summer of that year and gives details about her difficult journey north of Inverness involving passport checks. /2 mentions her plans to help with the war effort by making bandages or doing some hospital work, and the remainder of the letters contain details about daily life at school /6 from Audrey James and Esmee Whittall, written in a notebook labelled 'Audrey & Esmee Private Notes dedicated to Cynthy' which also includes a letter from Cynthia to Audrey and Esmee. Statements in this notebook suggest that it was sent to Cynthia and returned to 'The Links' so that Audrey and Esmee could write the next instalment of their account of life at school during the autumn term of 1916. The content is largely concerned with disagreements between the correspondents and other pupils at 'The Links' /7 from Esmee Whittall containing her opinions about fellow pupils /8-/9 from Beryl Peice, 1916 /10 from Lilias Hawker, written from the British Embassy, Rome, undated, encouraging Cynthia to travel widely, if her father will agree to her doing so, and giving details about her own travels in Italy /11-/12 from Myrth Whittall. /11 is written from 'The Links' in 1917 and includes news about the fortunes of the cricket team, while /12 is written from Palace Gardens Terrace, Kensington, and probably dates from 1919. Myrth mentions attending various plays in London, including 'Abraham Lincoln' which was on at the Hammersmith Lyric in 1919, and her family's plans to travel to Constantinople /13 from Hester Hardy, written from 'The Links', probably during the summer term of 1917. It contains details about the success of the school cricket team and mentions that pupils are going to the sea to bathe rather than the baths. It also mentions Cynthia's work at the War Office /14 from an unidentified correspondent at 'The Links', undated.

Letters from soldiers serving in the First World War  XOMN/A/4/2  1914-1918

Former reference: OMN/A/4/2

11 files

Contents:
This majority of this correspondence consists of letters to Cynthia from officers stationed on the Western Front during the First World War, but also includes correspondence from Maurice Pretyman, an officer serving in the Dardanelles in 1915, and 'Rob', serving in Palestine in 1918. However, the correspondence also includes brief letters and field postcards to Cynthia and to her father, Lord George Curzon, from soldiers and sailors serving in the war, who were likely to have been employees of the family. It is probable that this occasional correspondence was received as a result of the Curzon family's benevolence in sending gift parcels to aid the war effort and to give assistance to former servants, and is therefore distinct from the letters from officers, who appear, for the most part, to have been family friends. A possible exception is the correspondence from Victor H. T. Weekes, serving with the Navy during the war, who was a regular correspondent with Cynthia, but who, from the content of his letters, appears not to have been from the same social background. Sequences of letters from most correspondents cover only a few months, although letters from Rex Benson, and from Frank Pretyman were written over a longer period and give some indication of the development of their careers and views about their experiences, and the progress of the war. Letters from most correspondents contain information about life at the front, which includes descriptions of routines and any military action they were involved in, but these accounts are not often very detailed. The other main theme of these letters is Cynthia's war work and social life in England, and that of her sister Irene Curzon, often discussed in the context of a longing to return to England and take part in social activities. Several correspondents also discuss the affairs of mutual friends, and give news about other members of their social network who are serving in the war. The nature of much of this correspondence from officers is affectionate and protective of Cynthia in the manner of an older brother, but in some letters the tone is mildly flirtatious.

Letters from Rex Benson  XOMN/A/4/2/1  1916-1918

Former reference: OMN/A/4/2/1

1 file

Contents:
Letters dated 1916 indicate that Rex Benson was then serving with the 59th Cavalry Division in Ireland in 1916. These letters are largely concerned with the engagement of Cynthia's sister Irene Curzon to Rex's brother Guy Benson, and the ending of this relationship by Irene in August 1916. /1 expresses his pleasure and surprise at the match, while /2 and /3 discuss the repercussions of the end of the engagement and give his opinions about Irene's actions. He also refers to events in Cynthia's own life, commenting in /2 that he is pleased she has managed to persuade her father not to send her back to school [at 'The Links', Eastbourne]. /4 is dated 1917 and is typewritten. It is postmarked London, and Rex mentions that he is suffering from mumps. By 1918 Rex Benson was a Major working at the General Headquarters of the British Armies in France. /5 is dated April 1918 and gives an account of work of the British forces during the German offensive that March, writing of his certainty that the Germans will launch another attack. He also gives his opinion about conscription in Ireland /6 is dated September 1918 and contains details about his visit to Deauville where he met Cynthia's sister Irene [who was working there with the YMCA] at the casino.

Letters from Gerard Charles Brassey, lieutenant Coldstream Guards  XOMN/A/4/2/2  1918

Former reference: OMN/A/4/2/2

1 file

Contents:
These letters indicate that Gerard Brassey was serving in the 2nd battalion of the Guards Division in the summer of 1918. His brief correspondence with Cynthia gives details about mutual friends who are also serving in the war, but also records Gerard's feelings about his situation. /2 mentions Cynthia's social activities during the summer, and he writes 'you don't know how I envy you though I haven't minded being here a bit yet'. /3 is dated 6 Aug and gives an account of Gerard's own leisure activities in France, which include riding, dining at an officers' club, and watching films. He also mentions that he is to go into the line shortly, but reassures Cynthia that 'it is not very dangerous in this part of the line'. Gerard Brassey was killed in action 27 Aug 1918. See OMN/A/2/22/12 for a letter from his mother, Violet Brassey, to Cynthia shortly after his death.

Letters from Herbrand Edward Dundonald Brassey Sackville  XOMN/A/4/2/3  c1918

Former reference: OMN/A/4/2/3

1 file

Contents:
These letters are signed 'Buck' or 'Buch'. Most are undated, but are written from H.M.S. Lady Evelyn, at the Royal Navy base at Larne, near Belfast. The only letter which is dated is postmarked London, May 1918. The letters give few details about 'Buch's' daily life, but /2 mentions that he has applied for foreign service and /3 contains the comment 'I'm having a damned easy time compared with most people in France; & probably will continue to do so till the rough weather sets in'. /1 also contains information about Cynthia's life, enquiring whether she has begun working on the land yet [as a land girl], and implies that she will find ploughing hard work For a further letter from 'Buck', see OMN/A/2/22/69

Letters from James K. Howard  XOMN/A/4/2/4  1916

Former reference: OMN/A/4/2/4

1 file

Contents:
These letters are signed 'Jimmie', and are written from an unidentified location in Flanders. Internal evidence indicates that James Howard was an officer in the Hampshire Carabiniers Yeomanry, working in France with the Cavalry Corps Cavalry. He was a frequent correspondent with Cynthia between July and December 1916; no letters survive after this period, but see OMN/A/2/22/33 for a letter written to Cynthia while he was stationed in Eastbourne earlier in 1916. The letters are written in an affectionate and informal style, but often criticise Cynthia for failing to write as often as he would like, although others apologise for this criticism, and are usually written after he has received a bundle of delayed mail. James Howard was in the trenches from August to October, but did not appear to see very much action. For the last few months of the year, he, his men, and the horses, seem to have been out of the front line for the winter. Howard gives infomation about various aspects of his surroundings and daily routine, including details about meal times and facilities for washing and shaving. He also describes daily activities related to the care of the horses and administrative tasks that he is reponsible for, and social activities such as visits to local towns and villages, and leisure pastimes. Several letters also contain details about Cynthia's life, and it is clear that Howard holds her in some affection. He mentions her life at school in Eastbourne, and refers to the social life of Cynthia and her sister Irene. /2 contains details about mutual friends who are also serving on the Western Front and gives an account of seeing several Allied aircraft flying overhead and one being shot down /3 gives details about conditions in the trenches and also describes having the opportunity to go riding around the local area /4 refers to Cynthia's interest in baseball, and his opinion that most English people do not understand it. He also refers to being Canadian, and sympathises with Cynthia's sister Irene after breaking off her engagement to Guy Benson /7 discusses the progress of the latest 'push' and describes his negative feelings towards some officers who have recently arrived /9 gives details about his work with a fatigue party, the possibility of playing golf in the park of a nearby Chateau and his recent visit to the coast with a fellow officer and their interpreter and his wife /10 mentions that he is being trained in the use of the machine gun and that he is learning the Tango in his free time /11 describes recent Christmas festivities, which included hymn singing outside the sergeants' mess, and a football match between officers and sergeants. He also mentions his hope that he might soon be given leave

Letters from Humphrey Macmichael  XOMN/A/4/2/5  1915

Former reference: OMN/A/4/2/5

1 file

Contents:
These letters indicate that Humphrey Macmichael served in the 7th Border Regiment and was probably involved in the Battle of Loos which took place at the end of September 1915. Letters written during the summer of 1915 give details about his daily routine and conditions in the trenches. /1 mentions the noise of the German guns, the kindness of the French people, and his amusement at listening to his men trying to make themselves understood, and then having to censor their letters. /2 describes having to work in building parapets in the trenches in deep mud, and the devastation caused to the local villages by shelling. Letters written during the autumn contain information about the recent military action. /3 mentions that 'our regiment took party in the last push at the end of September, and a rough time it was too' and gives brief details about the battle around the Ypres area. He records that he is now in billets some miles away from the firing line /4 gives an account of the recent explosion of a German mine and gives details about the almost complete destruction of the town of Ypres by bombing. Humphrey Macmichael was the son of Cynthia's aunt Sophia Curzon and Rev. Charles Macmichael, and therefore Cynthia's cousin

Letters from M. de Neve  XOMN/A/4/2/6  1915

Former reference: OMN/A/4/2/6

1 file

Contents:
These letters indicate that M. de Neve was serving in the '2e Guides' in Belgium in 1915. They do not give detailed information about his experiences there, but several make reference to being in the trenches, and to Zeppelin raids. It is apparent from de Neve's correspondence with Cynthia that he was known to her in connection with her friendship with members of the Belgian royal family; several letters enquire about the princes Leopold and Charles, and their time at the Curzon's home at Hackwood. Letters include: /1 thanking her for sending him photographs and giving brief details about surroundings in the trenches and the damage done by shells /4 referring to witnessing recent Zeppelin raids /5 mentioning a 'Miss Hammersley' in her connection with Belgian royal family. For letters from Katie Hammersley to Cynthia concerning the Belgian royal family, see OMN/A/2/22/29-30 /6 wishing Cynthia a happy Christmas and asks whether Princes Leopold and Charles will spend Christmas at Hackwood /7 thanks her for a Christmas present, and mentioning the pleasure Cynthia must have in driving her car

Letters from Frank R. Pretyman  XOMN/A/4/2/7  1915-c1917

Former reference: OMN/A/4/2/7

1 file

Contents:
These letters are signed 'Parkie', and the majority address Cynthia as 'dearest little sister'. Frank Pretyman appears to have served with the Inland Water Transport of the Royal Engineers during 1915 and with the Scots Guards during 1916. Several letters contain information about various aspects of his life at the Front, but many also discuss Cynthia's life in England, including her time at school in Eastbourne, her work for the War Office in London, and family and social activities. It appears that Frank Pretyman was a family friend; his letters are affectionate and illustrate his protective feelings towards Cynthia. See OMN/A/1/8 for letters from a relative of Frank Pretyman, and OMN/A/4/2/8 for letters from his brother, Maurice. Some letters also contain comments which illustrate some of his feelings about the war. These letters include: /1 containing a description of Frank's dug out, including details about the noise of shell fire and mortars, and mentioning the risk of being hit by stray bullets /2 describing listening to a waltz on the trench gramophone, discussing popular songs and his desire to get a 'Blighty' wound and be able to return to England /4 referring to his current work away from the trenches which enables him to live without worrying about 'when am I next going up to the trenches' and 'is the Bosh going to blow us there or not'. This letter also mentions Cynthia's recent social activities and contains some advice not to get engaged 'until your brother has had a good look at the engagee' /5 including brief details about the navvy battalion and working with his men, and urging Cynthia to enjoy herself 'just as much as you can, war or no war' /7 written from hospital due to illness. Frank refers to 'Jimmy' being in England and being able to see Cynthia at school in Eastbourne, and enquires whether her headmistress would let him take her out. For letters from 'Jimmy' - James K. Howard - see OMN/A/2/2/33 and OMN/A/4/2/4 /9 written from Guards Camp in Surrey, referring to recent social activities with Cynthia and her family /10 describes his happiness at having a weekend at Hackwood while on leave and includes details about his fellow officers. He expresses his feelings about the waste of young lives in the war, commenting: 'its the young fellows who have only just started their lives that one feels so sorry for - what a waste of time and energy it seems for some young fellow to have lived say 19 years & just when he is going out to try his luck with the world - a fool little piece of lead stops everything' /11 gives details about a recent battalion sports competition, at which events included a tug of war and an officers jumping competition. Music was provided by band of the Irish and Frank reflects on the way music affects people, and expresses his view that this explains why so many people get engaged at dances, because they are sent temporarily insane by the music. /12 discusses mutual friends, and refers to her father's forthcoming marriage and his recent appointment [as Leader of the House of Lords in Lloyd George's War Cabinet] /13 refers to Cynthia's work at the War Office /14 refers to the loss of a mutual friend in the war and gives brief details of his recent trip in an aeroplane

Letters from Maurice Pretyman  XOMN/A/4/2/8  1915

Former reference: OMN/A/4/2/8

1 file

Contents:
These letters indicate that Maurice Pretyman was serving in the Dardanelles on the Gallipoli campaign during the summer of 1915. For letters from his brother, Frank, see OMN/A/4/2/7, and OMN/A/1/8 for letters from a relative of the Pretyman brothers. /1 is written from an Atlantic liner full of soldiers in the Mediterranean. /2 gives an account of his work unloading horses on the beach and describes the difficult conditions under which the horses have had to work, both on the voyage, and at their destination. He also discusses the courage of the Australian troops and the nature of the Turkish enemy.

Letters from 'Rob'  XOMN/A/4/2/9  1918

Former reference: OMN/A/4/2/9

1 file

Contents:
These letters are signed 'Rob'. It has not been possible to identify the correspondent as his surname is illegible. He was serving in 'A' Squadron of the Hertfordshire Yeomanry in Palestine in 1918. Internal evidence also indicates that he was married to 'Elsie', another of Cynthia's correspondents (see OMN/A/2/23/35-38), and that the couple lived at Munden, Watford. Many of the letters discuss the recent death of his small son, and the effect that this is having on Elsie, particularly with him being away on active service. He frequently expresses his concern about his wife, and also explains his own feelings of grief and sadness. Some letters contain information about his experiences in Palestine, but his main concern seems to be the health and wellbeing of his family. /1 asks Cynthia to go and see Elsie, and let him know how she is. He also thanks her for her interest in their other son, Patrick, to whom Cynthia is godmother. /2 thanks Cynthia and her sister Irene Curzon for their support and sympathy, and discusses the effect his son's death has had on his religious faith, and the impact that being stationed in Palestine has had on him. /3 discusses the news that mutual friends 'Biffy' and Audrey Fenwick have become engaged, and refers to Cynthia's work with the Land Army. He also gives a detailed account of his recent visit to Jerusalem /4 gives an account of the conclusion of the Armistice with Turkey and the effect this has had on morale in camp. He also describes his journey through Nablus and his journey up the coast to Lebanon, with details about the landscape he has travelled through. /5 thanks Cynthia for helping Elsie at the recent wedding of 'Biffy' and Audrey, and mentions that he has been reassured about his wife's feelings for their baby, and that he might take 'Nigey's' place. He also gives his opinion about the character of 'Reggie Halsey', a mutual friend.

Letters from Victor H. T. Weekes  XOMN/A/4/2/10  1914-1916

Former reference: OMN/A/4/2/10

1 file

Contents:
These letters indicate that Victor Weekes was in the Navy, and served on HMS Iron Duke, flagship of the Grand Fleet, from December 1914. Before this date he appears to have been stationed in Marseilles. He addresses Cynthia in a formal way, and from the content of the correspondence it is likely that Weekes was a servant of the Curzon family at some point. He often enquires about Cynthia's sisters, and makes reference to their childhood ambitions. It is possible that Victor Weeks also corresponded with Cynthia and her sister Irene before the war; there are letters dated 1911 to both sisters in very similar handwriting from a sailor on the HMS Highflyer stationed in India, but these are signed 'Oozibrozivo'. See OMN/A/1/13/1 and OMN/A/2/23/82 The majority of these letters contain stories about events on board ship, and the way these stories are told suggests that Weekes saw the war as an opportunity for heroic action in a noble cause. Letters include: /2 discussing the excitement of being a soldier rather than a sailor, but expressing gratitude that he is to leave Marseilles to join Sir John Jellicoe's staff since he is sure that he will be involved in whatever naval action takes place. He also gives an account of the intentional sinking of a box of secret documents by a British officer after the ship which was carrying them was hit by a German torpedo /4 is a printed Christmas card issued by the 'Iron Duke' /5 giving an account of the Christmas celebrations on board ship and discussing the threat of German submarine attacks on the fleet and Zeppelin raids on the east coast of England /6 containing a description of Sir John Jellicoe, news about the battle of the Falkland Islands from one of the ships that took part, and reflections on the character of the enemy /7 containing an account of the exploits of a sub-lieutenant airman in an encounter with a Zeppelin /8 describing the disaster that almost befell Sir John Jellicoe when he was washed out of his cabin by a large wave, and mentioning Weekes' feelings of restlessness that the fleet have not seen very much action. /9 referring to Cynthia attending school, and giving an account of a midshipman breaking a 'tradition of the sea'

Letters and field postcards from others serving in the First World War  XOMN/A/4/2/11  1915-1918

Former reference: OMN/A/4/2/11

1 file

Contents:
This material consists of field postcards and letters sent to Cynthia and to her father, Lord George Curzon, from soldiers serving in the Sherwood Foresters and Grenadier Guards in 1915, thanking them for gifts of tobacco and cigarettes, and of letters to Cynthia from officers serving in the army and RAF between 1915 and 1918. It is possible that some of the soldiers writing to Cynthia and her father were previously employees of the Curzon family. /1-/5 are field postcards from W. Yeoman, F. C. Parker, W. Waller, J. Sutton and J. Varley. All express gratitude for the gifts, and some urge Curzon and Cynthia to write again. J. Varley's field postcard contains a request for a mouth organ to be sent to him. /6 is a letter of thanks from Varley to Cynthia, in which he writes that he has 'been in the firing line since November and had a rough time with the rain and frosty weather'. He explains that he has no family to write to him, having lost his father in the Boer War, and having no siblings. He asks whether Cynthia might be able to send him some cigarettes and cake in the future. /7 is an undated field postcard to Cynthia from J. A. Campbell /8 is from 'J.Painting', serving with the 17th Lancers, Curragh, Ireland, dated May 1915. He thanks Cynthia for her gifts, and gives his impressions of 'soldiering'. /9 is from Guy Benson, dated July 1916. He describes his surroundings, being billeted at a chateau, and his disappointment at so far having seen no action. He also expresses his feelings about Cynthia's sister Irene, [to whom he has recently become engaged]. See OMN/A/4/2/1 for letters from Guy Benson's brother Rex which contain details about Guy's engagement to Irene Curzon /10 is from 'Archie', 13th Wing, RAF, dated Nov 1918, giving brief details of his work in France, but primarily discussing his social plans, and the personal lives of mutual friends, some of whom have received military honours. /11 is from 'Hern', Guys Hospital, dated Mar 1916, containing a list of mens clothes he is sending, apparently for Cynthia to wear. /12 is from 'Oliver', dated Oct 1918. It contains details of his part in the Allied advance, including details of being billeted in undamaged villages, catching partridges to eat, and his contacts with French civilians

Letters from the Belgian royal family  XOMN/A/4/3  1915-1931

Former reference: OMN/A/4/3

1 file

Contents:
This material consists of correspondence from Queen Elisabeth, wife of Albert I of Belgium, and from their children, Leopold and Marie Jose. Letters are mainly addressed to Cynthia, but one letter from Queen Elisabeth is also addressed to Irene Curzon. The Belgian king and queen were friends of Lord George Curzon, and Elisabeth and her children stayed at his home at Hackwood for the majority of the First World War. The correspondence is brief, and largely consists of letters of thanks or correspondence of congratulations or condolence on events in the lives of Cynthia and the Belgian royal family. /1-/5 are letters from Prince Leopold, dating between 1915 and 1927. /1 gives details of his activities while on holiday /2 is written from Eton where he was at school in 1918. /3 is a letter of condolence on the death of Cynthia's father, and mentions the kindness that Lord Curzon showed to the family during the war. /4 is dated 1926 and announces Leopold's engagement to Princess Astrid of Sweden and /5, dated 1927 thanks Cynthia for her good wishes on the birth of his daughter. /6-/12 are letters from Queen Elisabeth, dating between 1915 and 1931. /7 and /8 are cards sent with Christmas presents for Cynthia and her sisters Irene and Baba. /9 is a letter of congratulations on Cynthia's marriage to Oswald Mosley in 1920, expressing Elisabeth's pleasure that she is to attend Cynthia's wedding. /10 is dated 1921 and was sent with photographs recently taken at Cynthia's house when Elisabeth visited her godchild, Cynthia's daughter Vivien. /11 thanks Cynthia and Vivien for a gift of flowers, and mentions meeting them in Paris in 1927. /12 is a picture postcard of the Swiss Alps, containing New Years wishes for 1931 /13-/15 are letters from Princess Marie-Jose, dating between 1915 and 1919. /13 is a picture postcard of La Panne in Belgium, dated July 1915. /14 and /15 are brief letters of thanks

France  XOMN/A/4/4  1919-c1929

Former reference: OMN/A/4/4

1 file

Contents:
This material comprises correspondence and other papers relating to visits made by Cynthia to France, particularly Paris, during the 1920s. Correspondence includes letters from friends such as Gladys Waterbury, and Sibyl Colefax, which were sent to Cynthia from England while she was in France, and more formal letters from Le Comte Clauzel, the Princess of Piedmont, Lucile Paray and 'Ch. Benoist d'Azy', written from France and concerning social arrangements or administrative matters. Other papers consist of printed promotional leaflets for fashion boutiques in Paris; business and personal calling cards for individuals based in London, Paris and other locations in France, including cards for fashion designers and dressmakers; typescript details about furnished apartments available for rent in Paris; bills and receipts, some made out to Oswald Mosley for the use of utilities and services relating to the hire of villas and apartments; notes made by Cynthia on scraps of paper, largely consisting of addresses in Paris, some of which are for art galleries, restaurants, bars, furniture stores and boutiques which Cynthia presumably patronised while staying there. Letters comprise: /1 from Gladys Waterbury, signed 'Quart', Curzon Street, Mayfair, 1919, discussing social events and enquiring about Cynthia's stay in Paris. /2 from Gladys Waterbury, Curzon Street, Mayfair, undated, containing addresses of dressmakers and milliners in Paris. For further letters from Gladys Waterbury, see OMN/A/2/16 /3 from Sibyl Colefax, Argyll House, Kings Road, Chelsea, undated, containing addresses for personal contacts in Paris /4 from Le Comte Clauzel, Ambassade de France, a Londres, 1924, arranging a meeting with Cynthia /5 from the Princess of Piedmont, undated, making social arrangements /6 from Lucile Paray, dressmaker based at 8, Place de la Madeleine, Paris, undated, inviting Cynthia to view her new collection on her next visit to Paris /7 from Ch. Benoist d'Azy, proprietor of 'Service Flats', 5, Rue Copernic, Paris, 1929, discussing a booking to rent two apartments in Paris in December 1929, with details of the price, and an attached bill which includes a description of the apartments and the services and facilities

India  XOMN/A/4/5  1925-1930

Former reference: OMN/A/4/5

1 file

Contents:
The majority of this material consists of correspondence written to Oswald and Cynthia Mosley relating to their tour of India in early 1925. It also includes a decorated envelope containing calling cards of individuals or businesses based in India, some of which the Mosleys presumably used while they were there, and notes in Cynthia Mosley's handwriting containing the addresses of contacts whom they presumably visited during their stay. This file also includes some later correspondence addressed to Cynthia, consisting of letters of condolence on the death of her father, Lord Curzon, a former viceroy of India, and letters from Indian friends whom Cynthia presumably met in 1925. The correspondence comprises: /1 from 'Ralph', Viceroy's Camp, India to Cynthia, 8 Jan, discussing arrangements for her arrival in Delhi and offering his assistance with anything the Mosleys might need during their stay /2 from the Rajah of Panagal, Hyde Park, Kilpauk, Madras to Cynthia, Government House, Madras, 8 Jan, sent with a copy of 'The Story of Ramayana' which he hopes she will enjoy /3 from R. A. Narayana Aiyar, 'Vasanthashrama', Sandaipet Street, Madura, to Oswald Mosley, 9 Jan, apologising for not being in Madras to welcome him, commenting that he would have liked to show Cynthia Mosley an educational institution for girls. The letter gives details of the sightseeing that the couple were able to do in Madras, accompanied by Mr M. S. Sundara Sarma /4 from the editor of 'The New Empire' Calcutta Evening News, to Oswald Mosley, 10 Jan, arranging an interview for his views on 'certain political topics of the day' /5-7 from K. C. Roy Chowdhry, member, Bengal Legislative Council, Councillor, Calcutta Corporation, to Oswald Mosley. /5 is dated 12 Jan and concerns possibilities for Mosley to meet representatives from Labour and Trade Unions and to gain information about Indian Labour conditions. He encloses a letter from Latafat Hossein, Secretary of the Kankinarah Labor Union, and gives details about his own credentials, having acted as Private Secretary to Keir Hardie during his Indian visit /6 dated 13 Jan and confirms Mosley's engagements at Kankinarah Jute Mill, at the India Club to meet Socialists and an evening engagement to preside over a meeting at Y.M.C.A. College branch on 'Peasant Proprietorship' /7 dated 15 Jan, enclosing a copy of the address that Chowdhry is to make at the India Club and mentions that the local papers have reported Mosley's activities /8-9 from Theodore Thomas, 21 Burdwan Road, Alipore, Calcutta, to Oswald Mosley. /8 is dated 13 Jan, enclosing a copy of a letter dated 7 Jan and sent to Mosley in Madras. Both discuss arrangements to Mosley to speak at the Calcutta Parliament and invite him and Cynthia to dine with him and his wife /9 is undated, making arrangements for Mosley to be collected by car /10 from the editor of 'The Forward Publishing Limited', 19 British India Street, Calcutta, to Oswald Mosley, 13 Jan, enquiring whether he will grant an interview on his views 'on the present political situation here and in Britain' /11 from unidentified correspondent, Queen's House, Columbo, to Oswald Mosley, 13 Jan, informing him that he has sent a parcel of clothes for him and Cynthia, and expressing his pleasure that the couple have not been disappointed with India /12 from the Secretary of the Young Men's Christian Association, College Branch, 86, College Street, Calcutta, to Oswald Mosley, 13 Jan, thanking Mosley for agreeing to preside at K. C. Ray Chowdhury's lecture on 'Peasant Proprietorship' /13 from Ann M. E. Jackson, 6 Temple Chambers, 6 Old Post Office St, Calcutta, to Oswald Mosley, 14 Jan, inviting him and Cynthia to tea, when it would be possible for Mr Van Manen to show the couple his Tibetan treasures, or alternatively, to meet him at the Asiatic Society of Bengal /14 from unidentified correspondent, 137 Canning Street, Calcutta, to Oswald Mosley, Government House, Calcutta, 14 Jan, inviting Mosley and Cynthia to tea at Birla Park /15 from P. Banerjea, Senate House, Calcutta, to Oswald Mosley, 15 Jan, enclosing presentation copies of his books on 'Public Administration in Ancient India', 'A Study of Indian Economics' and 'Fiscal Policy in India' /16 from Professor G. N. Joshi, Wilson College to Oswald Mosley, 12 Feb, asking him to telephone him /17 from Archie Kerr, Cairo, 24 Feb, to Oswald Mosley, confirming arrangements for him to meet Sidney Pashe at the Ministry of the Interior and Dr Hasiz Asisi at the Mohamed Ali Club /18 from undentified correspondent, Bijay Manzil, Calcutta, to Cynthia Mosley, 26 Mar, offering condolences on the death of her father, Lord George Curzon /19 from K. C. Roy Chowdhry, member, Bengal Legislative Council, Councillor, Calcutta Corporation, to Cynthia Mosley, 2 Apr, offering condolences on the death of her father, Lord George Curzon, who, he mentions, had been Chancellor of the local university /20 from G. Sethi, c/o The Labour Association, Jamshedpur, to Cynthia Mosley, 2 Apr, offering condolences on the death of her father LOrd George Curzon /21 from S. N. John Butler, 34, Old Post Office St, Nungansbakan, Madras, to Oswald and Cynthia Mosley, 2 Apr, enclosing newspaper cuttings from the Madras News about the life of Lord Curzon, and mentioning that Colonel Balfour is trying to find employment for him /22 from B. Chakhavahti, 237, Lower Circular Road, Calcutta, to Cynthia Mosley, 9 Apr, offering condolences on the death of her father, Lord George Curzon, and mentioning his administration in India as viceroy. He writes that 'although I did not see eye to eye with regard to his administration' he is grateful for Curzon's interest in Indian Art and concern for the protection of Ancient monuments /23 undated telegram from 'Sapru' to Oswald and Cynthia Mosley, c/o Lady Lutyens, Government House, Calcutta, making social arrangements The remaining letters in this file do not directly relate to the Mosleys visit to India. They consist of: /24 from Kanji Dwarkadas, 'Crow's Nest', Tardev, Bombay, to Cynthia Mosley, 14 Aug, enclosing articles on the 'Women of India, dealing with child-marriages, women factory workers, and commercialised vice'. The letter also refers to Oswald Mosley's apparent current political ambitions, and mentions that Ratansi has started canvassing votes for the Council of State elections /25 from T. Rangachariar, Ritherdon House, Vepery, Madras, to Cynthia Mosley, 3 Sep 1930, asking that she extend her hospitality to his son, R. Parthasarathy on his forthcoming visit to England /26 from R. Parthasarathy, 51 Lancaster Gate, to Cynthia Mosley, 19 Nov 1930, accepting her invitation to have tea with her at the House of Commons

USA  XOMN/A/4/6  1925-1926

Former reference: OMN/A/4/6

1 file

Contents:
The majority of this material consists of correspondence written to Cynthia and Oswald Mosley relating to their tour of the USA in early 1926 to study labour conditions. Much of the correspondence is addressed to Cynthia Mosley and is from representatives and officers of Labour and social and community organisations, print media and commercial enterprises, but there are also a small number of personal letters from friends. Other formal or official correspondence is addressed to Oswald Mosley, or to the Mosleys as a couple. The file also includes copy letters of introduction for the Mosleys, addressed to individuals in New York, Boston, Philadelphia and Chicago, asking for help in planning their tour; calling cards of individuals or businesses based in the USA, many of which the Mosleys visited during their tour; printed booklet issued by the Canadian Club of Ottawa for the season 1925-1926 containing names of the officers of the club and lists of the guests the club had recived since 1903; printed 'Program of Action' produced by the Chicago Federation of Men Teachers and Chicago Federatin of Women Teachers; notes, some in Cynthia Mosley's handwriting, containing the addresses of other personal and professional contacts whom the couple presumably met while travelling. There are also some earlier letters addressed to Cynthia which relate to the Mosleys American tour, consisting of correspondence from American undergraduates, members of the English Speaking Union, who visited England in 1925. Correspondence comprises: /1-/3 letters of thanks from American undergraduates visiting England on a trip organised by the English Speaking Union in the summer of 1925 to Cynthia Mosley. These are from Graham Mattison, Walter M. Rankin and Edward Duffy. The correspondents mention the Mosleys proposed visit to the USA in the winter of 1925 and offer their hospitality in return /4 from James Atkins, Assistant Secretary of the English Speaking Union, London, to Cynthia Mosley, Upper Ifold, Dunsfold, Surrey, 4 Aug 1925, containing the address of Harold I. Pratt in New York, presumably a member of the English Speaking Union in America /5-/12 copy letters of introduction dated 22 Dec 1925 from unidentified member of the Labour movement to: Ivy L. Lee, 111, Broadway, New York; Paul D. Cravath, 52 William Street, New York; William J. Tully, 1 Madison Avenue, New York; Henry Goddard Leach, 'The Forum', 247 Park Avenue, New York; Hon John W. Davis, Messrs Stetson, Jennings & Russell, Mills Building, 15 Broad Street, New York City; Allan Forbes, State Street Trust Co, 33, State Street, Boston; Edward W. Bok, Philadelphia; Colonel Robert McCormick, 'The Tribune', Chicago /13 from Edyth Copeland, Los Angeles, to Cynthia Mosley, 23 Dec 1925, discussing Cynthia's visit to the USA and offering her hospitality. The content of the remainder of the letter indicates that Edyth was a childhood friend of Cynthia's mother Mary Curzon (nee Leiter) /14 from S. Clowes, 5a Hill Street, Hanley, to Oswald Mosley, 31 Dec 1925, giving contact details of the Secretary of the American Pottery Workers Federation in East Liverpool, Ohio, and the President in Trenton, New Jersey /15 from Aaron Sapiro, Law Office, Straus Building, Chicago, to Oswald Mosley, 5 Jan 1926, offering times for a meeting in New York or Chicago to discuss the cooperative handling of wheat crops in North America /16 from Helena Mills John, Secretary of the Common Interests Committee of the English Speaking Union, to Cynthia Mosley, 6 Jan 1926, containing the addresses of the American undergraduates whom the Mosleys met in England during the summer of 1925. See OMN/A/4/6/1-4 for letters relating to this visit /17 from William B. Feakins, Inc, Times Building, New York, to Cynthia Mosley, 9 Jan 1926, discussing the possibility that Cynthia might engage his services as an agent to arrange for her to deliver some lectures during her stay in America /18 from John L. Jones, Executive Secretary, Kansas City Open Forum, 1122 Troost Avenue, Kansas City, to Oswald and Cynthia Mosley, 9 Jan, inviting them to address a meeting of the 'Open Forum' and giving details of his previous work for the Independent Labour Party in Britain /19 from S. K. Ratcliffe, The City Club of New York, to Oswald Mosley, 10 Jan 1926, encouraging him to attend a dinner at the Town Hall Club, a derivative of the League for Political Education /20 from Sara D. Roosevelt, mother of Franklin D. Roosevelt, 47 East Sixty-Fifth Street, [New York], to Cynthia Mosley, 13 Jan 1926, inviting her to lunch /21 from James D. Landauer, Douglas L. Elliman & Co, Inc, Real Estate & Insurance, 15 East 49th Street, New York, to Oswald Mosley MP, Hotel St Regis, New York, 14 Jan 1926, inviting him and Cynthia for lunch, to repay the hospitality shown to him and other American students by the Mosleys in London /22 from Laura Hughes Lunde, Director, Progressive Party, 6708 Olympia Avenue, Chicago, Illinois, to Cynthia Mosley, 14 Jan 1926, inviting her to speak for the Progressive Party on a subject of her choice while she is in Chicago /23 from Florence Kelley, General Secretary, National Consumers League, 156 Fifth Avenue, New York City, to Cynthia Mosley, 14 Jan 1926, inviting her to address a luncheon arranged by the organisation at the Town Hall /24 from Herbert Pell, Democratic State Committee, State of New York, 15 East 40th Street, New York City, to Cynthia Mosley, 14 Jan 1926, complimenting her on her recent statements on the concentration of capital and offering his assistance in the methods of American politics and political organisation and inviting her to political meetings convened by his organisation /25 from William Floyd, editor, 'The Arbitrator', 114 East 31st Street, New York City, to Oswald Mosley, 14 Jan 1926 inviting him and Cynthia to meet 'a group of sympathetic friends, among them Bishop William Montgomery Brown who was recently deposed from the Protestant Episcopal Church on account of his authorship of 'Communism and Christianism''. This letter includes a draft reply written in pencil in an unidentified hand /26 from Robert Wilberforce, 12 West Fifty-Third Street [New York] to Oswald Mosley, 15 Jan 1926, arranging meetings between the Mosleys and Governor Strong of the Federal Reserve Bank, and 'two editors' /27 from George H. Cartlidge, Vice President, National Brotherhood of Operative Potters, Trenton, N[ew] J[ersey], to Cynthia Mosley, 15 Jan 1926, arranging a visit to potteries in Trenton /28 from Morris Hillquit, 214 Riverside Drive, New York City, to Oswald Mosley, 15 Jan 1926, making arrangements to meet him and Cynthia in New York /29 from F. Wire, S.S. Majestic, to Oswald Mosley, 16 Jan 1926, containing contact details for Aaron Sapiro /30 from William M. Feigenbaum, 1532 East 10th St, Brooklyn, New York, to Oswald Mosley, 18 Jan 1926, discussing arrangements for the Mosleys to be the guests of Congressman Victor L. Berger in Washington, and a proposed tour of a public school /31 from Bebe Panetta, Springfield, Mass[achusetts], to Cynthia Mosley, 19 Jan 1926 expressing her admiration for her after reading about her in a newspaper. She emphasises the differences in their fortunes, working for $10 per week she writes 'it's just a life of drudgery for me', and asks for a photograph of Cynthia /32 from H. B. Brougham, The Century Association, 7 West Forty-Third Street, New York, to Oswald Mosley, 17th Jan 1926, enclosing a letter of introduction to 'Catchings' /33 from Wallace Clark, Industrial Engineer, 50 West 12th Street, New York, to Oswald Mosley, Hotel St Regis, New York, 19 jan, enclosing letters of introduction to Mr Weld of Swift & Company and Mr Wood of Sears, Roebuck & Company, and offering to show Mosley some of the chain stores in New York to give him an idea about recent tendencies in methods of distribution /34 from Algernon Lee, Acting Executive Director, The Rand School of Social Science, Seven East Fifteenth Street, New York City, to Cynthia Mosley, 19 Jan 1926, making arrangements for her and Oswald Mosley to address a public meeting of the Socialist Party, and a dinner organised by the Rand School /35 from John Daniels, National Secretary, English Speaking Union of the United States, to Cynthia Mosley, 19 Jan 1926, containing contact details for members of the Union in Chicago and California /36 from Mr and Mrs Frank O'Healy, Saybrook Comm to Cynthia Mosley, 20 Jan 1926, congratulating her on her recent radio speech /37 from Robert Halpern, Chairman, Committee on Speakers, Social Problems Club, Earl Hall, Columbia University, New York, to Cynthia Mosley, 20 Jan 1926, inviting her and Oswald Mosley to address the student body /38-/39 from Harry W. Laidler, Executive Director, League for Industrial Democracy, 70 Fifth Avenue, New York City, to Oswald and Cynthia Mosley, St Regis Hotel, 5 Avenue and 55 Street, New York. /38 is dated 20 Jan 1926, containing detailed information about members of various Labour organisations in Washington, Chicago, Los Angeles, Santa Barbara, Cleveland and Pittsburgh, together with their contact details. /39 is dated 21 Jan 1926 and recommends that the Mosleys speak at the Columbia University Social Problems Club. It also suggests that they might speak at the University of Chicago Liberal Club /40 from Edward Levinson, Assistant editor, 'The New Leader', New York, to Cynthia Mosley, 23 Jan 1926, enclosing a newspaper cutting from 'The New York Times' and encouraging her to publish a reply through the columns of 'The New Leader' /41 from Louis Levine, Institute of Economics, 26 Jackson Place, Washington D.C, to Oswald Mosley, New Willard Hotel, Washington D.C, 23 Jan 1926, inviting him and Cynthia to lunch at the Brookings School of Economics and Government, in order for them to meet the members of this school and of the Institute of Economics. The back of this letter contains pencilled notes in Cynthia Mosley's handwriting on the Labour Movement, possibly intended as memory aids for a speech she was to give /42 typescript draft of a letter from Thomas Barker, New York Ave & Pacific Street, Jamaica, L.I, to the editor of 'The New York Times', 25 Jan 1926, in reply to an article critical of the Mosleys written by Gerard Maxwell-Willshire. The content of Barker's reply suggests that the criticism was based apparent inconsistencies between their social status and political ideologies /43 from William J. Tully, Metropolitan Life Insurance Co, New York City, to Oswald Mosley, The New Willard, Washington D.C, 25 Jan 1926, informing him about the welfare work done by his company among its employees and inviting him and Cynthia to view the sanatorium and rest house for employees and meet the company president in New York /44 from R. F. De George, 400 West 19th Street, New York City, to Cynthia Mosley, The New Willard, Washington D.C, 27 Jan 1926, thanking her for her concern and stating commitment to the [Labour] Movement /45 from Peggy Mosley Williams, Hotel Adams, Phoenix, Arizona, to Cynthia Mosley, 27 Jan 1926, offering her support and giving an account of her work during the war, her involvement in politics in Albania and her work with American Indians for the American Red Cross. She invites Cynthia and Oswald Mosley to come to New Mexico and view some of the government projects in progress there /46 from Eugene Debs, office of Theodore Debs, Terre Haute, Ind, to Florence [Hall], 2 Feb 1926, concerning arrangements for a banquet to be held in Chicago for Oswald and Cynthia Mosley /47 from Jeanette Marks, Head of the Department of English Literature, Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, Massachusetts, to Cynthia Mosley, c/o Mr James Oneal, 7 East 15th Street, New York City, 4 Feb 1926, inviting Cynthia to speak on socialism at the college as the guest of the Progressive Reading Club /48 from Hugh A. Studdert Kennedy, 234-6 Holbrook Building, 58 Sutter Street, San Francisco, California, to Cynthia Mosley c/o American Express Company, New York City, 5 Feb 1926, enlcosing a copy of 'The Argonaut' which contains an article about Cynthia and Oswald Mosley /49 from L. P. Sherwood, The Canadian Club, Ottawa, to Oswald Mosley, c/o American Express Company, 65 Broadway, New York, 9 Feb 1926, asking him to confirm his engagement with the club for 6 Mar /50 from Ethel W. Thomas, The Womens Canadian Club, Ottawa, to Cynthia Mosley, c/o American Express Company, 65 Broadway, New York City, 12 Feb 1926, inviting her to a luncheon arranged in her honour on the same day that Oswald Mosley is to address the Men's Canadian Club /51 from Harry W. Laidler, Executive Director, League for Industrial Democracy, 70 Fifth Avenue, New York City, 15 Feb 1926, to Oswald and Cynthia Mosley, American Express Company, 65 Broadway, New York, 15 Feb 1926, asking them to contact him to set a date for a dinner engagement in New York /52 from Florence S. Hall, 30 E.Ontario Street, Chicago, Ill, to Oswald Mosley, 23 Feb 1926, discussing a proposed banquet to be held in Chicago in his honour, to which Eugene Debs has been invited. The letter also discusses arrangements for Mosley to meet Robert Mons Lovett and Jane Adams, and possibly other members of the Socialist Party /53 from George R. Kirkpatrick, Acting Executive Secretary, The Socialist Party, 2653 Washington Blvd, Chicago, Ill, to Cynthia Mosley, 2350 Lincoln Park West, Chicago, Ill, 24 Feb 1926, concerning Cynthia's desire to meet Eugene Debs, Jane Adams and Dr Robert Lovett, and Oswald Mosley's wish to see industrial Chicago, and discussing arrangements for meetings and trips through the city. The reverse of this letter contains pencilled notes in Cynthia Mosley's handwriting giving details of the times of meetings arranged with Aaron Sapiro, Jane Adams, Sears Roebuck and others /54 from Harry W. Laidler, Executive Director, League for Industrial Democracy, 70 Fifth Avenue, New York City, to Oswald Mosley, 2350 Lincoln Park West, Chicago Ill, 1 Mar, 1926, inviting him to dinner in order to meet a group of officers and friends of the League in his house in Brooklyn or elsewhere in New York /55 telegram from Eugene Debs, Terrehaute, Ind, to Florence S. Hall, 30 East Ontario St, Chicago Ill, with regards and greetings to Oswald and Cynthia Mosley and regrets that he will not be able to attend the banquet given in their honour at the Morrison Hotel /56 from Genevieve Forbes Herrick, Chicago Tribune, to Cynthia Mosley, 2 Mar 1926, expressing her pleasure at being able to meet her, and commenting on Cynthia's popularity with Chicago journalists /57 from William M. Feigenbaum, Jewish Daily Forward, 175 East Broadway, New York, to Oswald Mosley, 3 Mar 1926, making arrangements to have lunch with him before he sails from New York. The reverse of this letter contains pencilled notes in Cynthia Mosley's handwriting recording the names of people she met at a lunch appointment arranged for her at the Madison Hotel. Attendees included Morris Hillquit and his wife, Harry Laidler, and William Feigenbaum /58 from H. B. Barth, Secretary, East Liverpool Chamber of Commerce, East Liverpool, Ohio, to Cynthia Mosley, New York, 8 Mar, informing her that he is sending her some photographs taken during her visit to East Liverpool, together with copies of East Liverpool, Pittsburgh and Cleveland newspapers containing articles of interest to her. He also asks for an autographed photograph of Cynthia for the Chamber of Commerce headquarters /59 from Haley Fiske, President, Metropolitan Life Insurance Co, New York City, to Cynthia Mosley, Madison Hotel, 15 East 58th Street, New York City, 9 Mar 1926, making arrangements for her and Oswald Mosley to view the company offices and operations /60 from Harry W. Laidler, Executive Director, League for Industrial Democracy, 70 Fifth Avenue, New York City, to Oswald Mosley, Madison Hotel, 15 East 58 Street, New York City, 10 Mar 1926, thanking him for the opportunity to dine with him and Cynthia and enclosing an article on the Labour banking movement /61 from Eugene Debs, office of Theodore Debs, Terre Haute, Ind, to Cynthia Mosley, New York City, 10 Mar 1926, congratulating her on the success of her visit to Chicago, and commenting that she has won the hearts of all the comrades. He expresses his hope that the Mosleys visit will benefit the revival of socialist spirit and the reorganisation of the Socialist party which was persecuted during the war /62 from M. Campbell, Chicago, Ill, to Cynthia Mosley, 14 May, discussing the court case concerning payments from the Leiter Estate Trust /63 from Julia Ellsworth Ford, 43 West 74th Street, to Oswald Mosley, 19 Aug 1926, enclosing a letter of introduction to Senator Borah and a card for Cynthia Mosley for the privileges of the Cosmopolitan Club for use on their return to America /64 from Meta Berger, 980 First Street, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, to Cynthia and Oswald Mosley, 8 Smith Square, London, 8 Sept, thanking them for their hospitality towards her children and making reference to an unidentified election campaign that she and her husband are involved with. /65 undated letter from Alice Griswold, to Cynthia Mosley, thanking her and Oswald Mosley for their hospitality in London, and giving her contact details in Pennsylvania in the hope that they will visit her there

Correspondence relating to Cynthia's speeches and broadcasts  XOMN/A/4/7  1927-1930

Former reference: OMN/A/4/7

1 file

Contents:
The majority of these letters were written to Cynthia to congratulate her on her maiden speech in the House of Commons after her election as MP for Stoke-on-Trent in 1929, or concerning a radio broadcast she made in February 1930 on the subject of social convention. The file also includes a letter, dated 1927, relating to a speech made by Cynthia in Hyde Park. Most of this correspondence is written by friends or political figures, but some is clearly written by members of the public, including constituents of both Oswald and Cynthia Mosley. Letters comprise: /1 from William Riley, Norwood near Fewston, Harrogate, Yorkshire, 28 June 1927, expressing his admiration for a speech made by Cynthia in Hyde Park, likening Cynthia to a prophetess and explaining that he sees Cynthia and Oswald Mosley as doing God's work. The letter contains substantial biblical imagery and Riley includes several bible references to encourage Cynthia in her political career /2 from Ernest ?Brown, House of Commons Library, 31 Oct 1929, with congratulations on her speech, 'a delightful first effort, we are so glad that we are all your 'friends''. This correspondent was probably Ernest Brown, Liberal MP for Leith /3 from 'Christopher', Staff College, Camberley, 1 Nov 1929, with congratulations on her speech, 'a most important and significant utterance full of the very best spirit that there is about now in England' /4 from 'MAC', House of Commons Library, 1 Nov 1929, congratulating her on her speech which he has read in Hansard, having been absent from the Chamber when she made it. Internal evidence suggests that 'MAC' was a Labour party colleague of Cynthia, but it has not been possible to further identify him /5 from Florence Wedgwood, 12 Beaufort House, Chelsea, 1 Nov 1929, with congratulations on her speech; 'you may have had 'something for nothing', but you are re-paying now'. For other letters from Florence Wedgwood to Cynthia, see OMN/A/2/22/80 /6 from Irene Curzon, 3, Deanery Street, London, signed 'Nina', with her congratulations, expressing her feelings of pride in Cynthia, writing 'the occasion was so alarming for you with Daddy's record behind you - & tho' his views would have differed he could but not be proud of his daughter's debut' /7 from Victor Cazalet, Conservative MP, House of Commons, 14 Nov 1929, with congratulations on Cynthia's maiden speech, 'to how few it is given to 'speak' as well as they 'look'' /8 from 'E. F. C', London E.12, 3 Dec 1929, expressing her admiration for Cynthia which dates from her attendance at a meeting addressed by her in support of 'Our Susan' and informing her that he has named her baby daughter after her /9 from The Central Council for Broadcast Adult Education, Savoy Hill, London, 19 Feb 1930, thanking Cynthia for her broadcast and referring to a favourable report in the 'Evening Standard' /10 from J. J. Stonier, 57 Vicarage Road, Smethwick, 19 Feb 1930, expressing his feelings on hearing Cynthia's radio broadcast: 'the message you sent over the wireless was one of real hope to many, who, like myself., are just sick and tired of convention...last night..revealed you as one quite distinct and apart from the crowd of those who battened and fattened on our sufferings as kids in the mines of this country...never again I hope will I feel embarrassed in your presence but realise that we are Comrades in Arms for the betterment of the race'. /11 from William Rob[er]t Bant, 49 Ather Road, Redditch, Worcestershire, 19 Feb, with congratulations on Cynthia's radio broadcast. He hopes to meet her, having been unable to do so when she visited Redditch to assist Frank Lloyd at the Temperance Hall /12 from Agatha Beasley, 2 Belvedere Drive, Newbury, Berkshire, 20 Feb, with congratulations on Cynthia's radio broadcast, commenting that she would like to have heard more about Cynthia's views on education and housing. The letter contains a detailed account of Agatha Beasley's experiences running a working girls club, her views about slum clearance, and her belief that girls should be educated to the age of fifteen /13 from Laura West, 'Riverside', The Rhydd, Hanley Castle, Worcestershire, 21 Feb, giving an account of her desire to become a speedway rider, and the impact that Cynthia's radio broadcast has had on her. She writes that she has been inspired by Cythia's encouragement to break social conventions and asking whether she might lend her the money to enable her to buy a bike and other equipment /14 from Susan K. Maclagan, 7 Coverdale Road, Brondesbury, London, 9 Mar 1930, asking for advice about whether to educate her children at home rather than send them to public schools. She writes that she has been inspired to ask after listening to Cynthia express her ideas about education in her recent radio broadcast /15 undated letter from Maud Mosley, 105 Cadogan Gardens, London, signed 'Ma', congratulating Cynthia on her performance that night, and thanking her for 'making it possible for me to witness your triumph' /16 undated letter from 'Elsie', Nottlers House, Bricket Wood, St Albans, congratulating Cynthia on an unidentified speech

Correspondence of congratulations and condolence  XOMN/A/5  1920-1929

Former reference: OMN/A/5

6 files

Contents:
This series consists of letters and telegrams marking major events in Cynthia's adult life during the 1920s, including her engagement and marriage, the births of her first two children, the death of her father, and successes in her political career and that of her husband Oswald Mosley. The correspondence is mainly from friends and family members, although there are also some letters and telegrams from politicians, constituency activists, particularly in Harrow, where Oswald Mosley was MP in the early 1920s, and from representatives of organisations in which Cynthia had an interest as a benefactor or an official. Several of the friends and family members who wrote to Cynthia on these occasions also wrote to her for other reasons, and letters from many correspondents in this group of letters can be found elsewhere in Cynthia Mosley's papers.

Congratulations on the engagement and marriage of Oswald Mosley and Cynthia Curzon  XOMN/A/5/1  1920

Former reference: OMN/A/5/1

1 file

Contents:
The majority of this correspondence consists of telegrams and brief messages of congratulations written to Cynthia mainly by friends and family on the occasion of her engagement to Oswald Mosley in March 1920, and on her marriage to him in May 1920. Some letters of congratulation are more detailed, and include other personal and social news. Letters include: /2 from Humphrey Macmichael, Walpole Grange, Sittingbourne. For further letters, see OMN/A/4/2/5 /3 from Lydia K. Commander, editor, Women's Department, Cross-Atlantic Newspaper Service, Fleet Street, London, asking Cynthia if she would provide a message for American women on the occasion of her marriage, as her mother's 'beauty and charm are still held in affectionate remembrance' /6 telegram from Odie [Hyslop], Cynthia's former nanny /13 from Angela Manners, mentioning that she has heard from Nancy [Astor] and others that Cynthia is 'a wonder at canvassing...so with your new life as a politician's wife you will have a tremendous time of it' /19 from 'Aunt Chris' Manners /21 from 'Auntie', Manderston, Duns, N.B /30 from 'Uncle Frank', Francis Nathaniel Curzon, Mount Street, London, sending a gift of a tiara with amethysts and white topaz, presumably for Cythia to wear at her wedding /31 from Emily Lutyens /45 from James Rennell Rodd, Ardath, Shamley Green, Surrey /46 from Blanche Curzon, Cynthia's aunt, William Street, Lowndes Square, London, mentioning that she knows Oswald Mosley's family and has stayed at Rolleston when young /49 from Colin Campbell, Port Regis, Broadstairs, Kent, advising Cynthia on the wisdom of keeping control of her own money and appointing her own lawyer and broker /51 from B.A. Campbell, 294, Burdett Road, London, General Secretary of the 'Paddy's Goose Boys' Club' in Shadwell, East London. /52 from Alfred Duggan, A. M. McNeile's, Eton College, Windsor, son of Grace Duggan, Cynthia's step-mother; 'I was delighted to get Marcella's letter telling me all about your engagement; she could not have written a more glowing account if Captain Mosley had been an apostle! He's the youngest MP in the House now, isn't he? Is he a Tory or a Bolsh? Anyway, when he is Premier you will invite me to lunch at Downing Street, so that I can write a garbled account of the conversation to the Daily Herald!' /54 from Barbara Lutyens, Mansfield Street, London /55 telegram from Grace Curzon /57 from 'Uncle Alfy', Alfred Nathaniel Curzon, Selwood Hall Hotel, Brighton, with details of his wedding present of a silver coffee pot and the advice to marry in June, 'a much better month - May is considered unlucky' /61 from Wilfrid Lawson, Isel Hall, Cockermouth /63 from Gladys Waterbury, signed 'Quart', Santa Barbara, California /65 from Myrth Whitall, Palace Mansions, West Kensington /66 from 'Aunt Sophy', Sophia Macmichael, nee Curzon, Walpole Grange, Sittingbourne /73 from Muriel Wright, Montpelier Square, London. For further letters, see OMN/A/2/19 /76 from unidentified sender, Headquarters, British Military Mission, Constantinople, containing an account of his journey to Constantinople and his activities there. He is clearly a friend of Cynthia and of Barbara Lutyens /83 from Mary Lyttelton, Great College Street, Westminster, London /84 from Mary O'Donaghue, Westerton, Lynwood Avenue, Epsom, one of Cynthia's colleagues at the War Office /89 from Christopher Tennant, Queen Anne's Gate, London /90 from Harold Macmichael, Khartoum, Sudan. For further letters, see OMN/A/2/22/48 /93 from Katie Hammersley, Chateau de Laeken. For further letters, see OMN/A/2/22/29-30 /96 from 'Aunty Mike', Eden-Grand Hotel, Cap D'Ail, France, expressing approval of the match; 'what I always wanted for you was someone with big interests in politics and ..a real career that you might share in' /98 from Irene Castle, later Irene McLaughlin, asking for Cynthia to assist Evelyn Hubbell in establishing a Castle [dance] school in London, and enclosing Hubbell's business card /100 from 'Aunt Juliette', Dupont Circle, Washington D.C, discussing Cynthia's former plans to visit the United States, and mentioning 'Uncle Joe', possible Joe Leiter, Cynthia's uncle /102 from 'Aunt Selina', Lawrenny, Begelly, Pembrokeshire /104 from Guy Benson, South Street, Park Lane, London /105 from 'Aunt Daisy', Hamilton House, Newmarket /113 from 'Aunt Daisy', Margaret Hyde Paget, (nee Leiter), Countess of Suffolk /116 from Assheton Nathaniel Curzon, Queen's Gate Gardens /127 from Herbrand Edward Dundonald Brassey Sackville, signed 'Buch' Rue Ferrere, Bordeaux /131 from 'Bahdie', Basil Street, London. For further letters, see OMN/A/1/9 /145 from 'Dot', Villa Edelweiss, Cannes, France, expressing pleasure at the match; 'he is such a perfect dear - & you will love his political aspirations & be an enormous help to him I am sure' /169 from Myrth Whitall, Palace Mansions, West Kensington, explaining that she is in quarantine for mumps and is unable to attend Cynthia's wedding. The letter includes two black and white photographs of members of the Whitall family, taken on board a yacht off Constantinople /172 from E. Winton, Farnham Castle, Surrey, with his thoughts on Christian marriage /178 from King Manoel II of Portugal, Fulwell Park, Twickenham, with congratulations to Lord George Curzon on Cynthia's marriage on behalf of himself and the Queen /183 from Muriel Wright with good wishes for Cynthia's wedding day

Congratulations on the birth of Vivien Mosley  XOMN/A/5/2  1921

Former reference: OMN/A/5/2

1 file

Contents:
This correspondence consists of telegrams and letters of congratulations written to Cynthia Mosley shortly after the birth of her first child, Vivien, in February 1921. The majority of these letters are from friends and family members, and consist of brief messages of support, but there are also several longer letters which discuss other personal and social news. Letters include: /1 from 'Aunty', Margaret Hyde Paget, (nee Leiter), Countess of Suffolk /4 telegram from 'Aunt Daisy and Uncle Hardress'; Margaret Waller (nee Curzon) and Hardress John Waller /5 telegram from Alfred, Hubert and Marcella Duggan /18 from 'Aunt Sophy', Sophia Macmichael, Walpole Grange, Sittingbourne /22 from 'Elsie', Nottlers, Bricket Wood, St Albans, with congratulations from her and 'Rob'. For further letters from 'Rob', see OMN/A/4/2/9, and from Elsie, see OMN/A/2/23/35-38 /23 from 'Rob', Nottlers, Bricket Wood, St Albans /24 from 'Nigs', Ashby St Ledgers, Rugby. For further letters from 'Nigz', see OMN/A/2/23/73-76 /37 from Cecil Gairdner, Cavendish Club, 119 Piccadilly, London /38 from 'Aunt Blanche' Curzon, Cadogan Place, London /40 from 'Aunt Daisy', Margaret Waller, nee Curzon /41 from Barbara Wallace (nee Lutyens), Pattishall House, nr Towcester, containing news about house hunting and her health /42 from Euan Wallace, Pattishall House, nr Towcester /46 from Gladys Waterbury, signed 'Quart', Fairfield House, Convent Station, New Jersey, with details of her travel plans. For further letters from Gladys Waterbury, see OMN/A/2/16 /49 from M. Campbell, Campbell Ranch, Goleta, California, enclosing a brooch which had belonged to Cynthia's mother, intended to be given to her first granddaughter /52 from 'Auntie', Margaret Hyde Paget, nee Leiter, Countess of Suffolk, enquiring about Cynthia's poor health since the birth of her daughter /55 from Ernald Mosley, brother of Oswald Mosley's grandfather, Monksgate House, nr Horsham /60 from Nancy Astor, St James's Square, London

Congratulations on the birth of Nicholas Mosley  XOMN/A/5/3  1923

Former reference: OMN/A/5/3

1 file

Contents:
This correspondence consists of telegrams and letters of congratulations written to Cynthia Mosley shortly after the birth of her son Nicholas in June 1923. There are also a small number of letters addressed to Oswald Mosley. The majority of these letters are from friends and family members, but there are also several letters from organisations with which Cynthia had a connection, either independently, or through her husband Oswald Mosley and his parliamentary constituency. Most letters consist of brief messages of support and good wishes, but there are also some longer letters from friends which include other personal and social news. Letters include: /2 telegram from Elizabeth Mosley /3 telegram from Tonman Mosley, brother of Oswald Mosley's grandfather /5 telegram from Ethel Hutchins, honorary secretary of the Women's Section, Hanwell Branch /7 telegram from Agnes Miles and Dorothy Boyson Jones, Women's Section, Wealdstone Branch /10 telegram from Hanwell Constitutional and Progressive Association /11 telegram from Florence Bourne Wheeler and the Derbyshire Branch National Council of Women /12 telegram from Charles Twinn and George Hill, Wealdstone Mens Branch /13 from Irene Noel-Baker, South Eaton Place, London, wife of Philip Noel-Baker /14 from Violet Whish, Madrid Road, Barnes, London, asking for christening details in order to inform the newspapers. She also comments on Cynthia's professional life; 'I hope for yourself a wider and more useful field opens out to you than politics, which is only half a life...it is a woman's age. But politics is only playing at life.' /16 from 'Elsie', Nottlers, Bricket Wood, St Albans. For further letters from Elsie, see OMN/A/2/23/35-38 /18 from Irene Castle, later Irene McLaughlin, with two black and white photographs of a small boy, labelled 'Our Bill', and a cutting from the Chicago Herald of a picture of Cynthia Mosley and the headline 'It's a Boy!'. For further letters from Irene Castle, later McLaughlin, see OMN/A/2/9 /19 from Dorothy Rayall, honorary secretary, Greenford Girls Guild /21 from Agnes Rowe, Hindes Road, Harrow-on-the-Hill, on behalf of the Chairman and Committee of the Women's Section, Harrow Constitutional and Progressive Association /22 from Henrietta Leslie, honorary secretary, The Mosley Committee, Save the Children Fund, Langham Street, London /24 from 'Hilda', Walpole Grange, Sittingbourne /25 from Emma Walton, Harrow, Wealdston and District War Memorial Maternity Hospital on behalf of the House Committee /29 from Sydney Walton, Chairman, Harrow Historical Pageant, to Oswald Mosley /30 from Victoria Sackville, White Lodge on the Cliff, Roedean, Brighton,mother of Vita Sackville-West, to Oswald Mosley /32 from Hilda Moore-Brabazon, Fairway, Sandwich Bay, Kent, to Oswald Mosley /33 from Tonman Mosley, brother of Oswald Mosley's grandfather, Lion House, West Park, Harrogate, to Oswald Mosley /34 from Eveline Miller (nee Curzon), The Berkeley Hotel, Piccadilly, London, to Oswald Mosley /35 from Geraline Townshend (nee Curzon), Bodiam Manor, Sussex, to Oswald Mosley /36 from Olga Lynn, signed 'Oggie', Catherine Street, London, to Oswald Mosley. For letters from Olga Lynn to Cynthia Mosley, see OMN/A/2/4 /37 from Sibyl Colefax, Argyll House, 211 Kings Road, Chelsea, to Oswald Mosley /38 from Blanche Curzon, Cadogan Place, London, to Oswald Mosley /39 from G. Heathcote, Oswald Mosley's maternal grandmother, Ebury Street, London, to Oswald Mosley /40 from Assistant Trust Officer, Public Trustee Office, Kingsway, London, to Oswald Mosley /41 from Ernald Mosley, brother of Oswald Mosley's grandfather, Monks Gate House, nr Horsham /42 from E. Heaton, The Hut, Greenford, Middlesex, to Oswald Mosley /43 from 'The Harrow Observer & Gazette', to Oswald Mosley /46 from Muriel Wright, Courtfield Gardens, London /48 from 'Aunt Daisy', Margaret Waller (nee Curzon), Cornwall Gardens, London /49 from an unidentifed member of the Cazalet family, Fairlawne, Tonbridge /51 from Gladys Waterbury, signed 'Quart', American Embassy, Avenue De Messine, [Paris], with details of her social activities in Paris and news of mutual friends /55 from Barbara Wallace (nee Lutyens), Canon Hill, Maidenhead /59 from Dorothea Borton, secretary, Joint Parliamentary Advisory Council, Hobart Place, London /61 from 'Dicks', Villa le Roudini, Sli-Ligure, Genova, with details of her extended travels in Italy and references to the recent election of Stanley Baldwin as prime minister, and the election of Mabel Russell as MP /64 from 'Uncle Frank', Francis Nathaniel Curzon, Newmarket /67 from Mary E. Manning, honorary secretary, Labour Co-partnership Association, Bloomsbury Square, London /69 from Eleanor Heathcote, ?maternal grandmother of Oswald Mosley, Betton Hall, Market Drayton, Shropshire /70 from B.A.Campbell, signed 'La La', general secretary, 'Paddy's Goose' Clubs, High Street, Shadwell, London /71 from Emily Lutyens, Mansfield Street, London /72 from Lydia Roberts, on behalf of the ladies of the Executive Committee, Hanwell Association of Girl Guides /76 from Frances Charteris, Hatton Hall, Hatton HIll, Windlesham, Berks /77 from Cyril Neaves, honorary secretary, Hanwell Cottage Hospital to Oswald and Cynthia Mosley /78-/79 from two unidentified correspondents, presumably members of the Sackville family, earls De La Warr, living at Buckhurst, Withyam, Sussex

Condolences on the death of Lord George Curzon  XOMN/A/5/4  1925

Former reference: OMN/A/5/4

1 file

Contents:
This material consists largely of telegrams sent to Cynthia on the death of her father in March 1925. Most of these are from contacts of Lord Curzon outside the UK, and provide evidence of his political and personal interest in foreign affairs. There are also a small number of letters of condolence. The file also includes two printed copies of the order of service for the Memorial held for Curzon at the Pro-Cathedral Church of All Saints, Derby, 27 Mar 1925. The correspondence comprises: /1 telegram from 'Zagloul', Cairo, to Cynthia and Oswald Mosley. 'Zagloul' is possibly the Egyptian nationalist leader Saad Zaghloul, with whom Curzon had contacts during his time as Foreign Secretary /2 telegram from Hamed Mahmud, Cairo, to Cynthia and Oswald Mosley /3 telgram from Imre Schwaiger, Delhi. /4 telegram from King Albert and Queen Elisabeth of Belgium, Lackenpalais. /5 telegram from Francis de Croisset, Paris /6 telegram from Marthe Seyde, Paris /7 telegram from 'Bossier', Westminster /8 telegram from 'Senff', New York /9 telegram from 'Nancy', Santa Barbara, California /10 telegram from 'Marconi', yacht 'Elettra Cotrone' /11 telegram from 'Christopher', Camberley /12 from 'Ted', The Homestead, Upper Hale, Farnham, Surrey, 'Lord Curzon was one of those delightful people who always put his guest at ease - however humble they might be' /13 from Nicolae Titulescu, Romanian Minister in London, Legatiunea Regala a Romaniei, Londra /14 from ?J. Kitson, House of Commons Library

Congratulations on Oswald Mosley's election victories  XOMN/A/5/5  1922-1926

Former reference: OMN/A/5/5

1 file

Contents:
This correspondence consists of letters and telegrams of congratulations, addressed to Cynthia, but relating to the election success of Oswald Mosley. Some letters are from friends and family, but others are from individuals who appear to have been political activists, constituents, or constituents or supporters of Oswald Mosley. Most of these relate to his victory in the 1922 General Election, when he stood as an Independent candidate for Harrow, but there are also letters of support relating to his campaign for election as Labour MP for Smethwick in 1926. The content of the correspondence makes it clear that Cynthia played a significant role in her husband's campaigning, and that her presence may have been partly responsible for the extent of his success. Letters comprise: /1 from M. Colbeck, 60 Middle Road, Nov [1922] /2-/4 from Ellen Pollard, Uxbridge Road, Hanwell, Nov 1922. /2 was sent with some flowers to place on Oswald Mosley's breakfast table, and Pollard suggests that he adopt the red rose as his emblem, while /3 urges Cynthia to 'counsel Mr Mosley to be very very circumspect and discreet in his words, when he takes his seat in the new Parliament...I do not want our old friends to be able to say 'I told you how it would be' &c &c' /5 from 'Violet', St Petersburgh Place, London, Nov 1922 /6 from D. Bennyfield, Wellington Square, Chelsea, [1922]; 'you both deserve every vote polled. I'm so glad the majority was such a good one, & that it will 'learn 'em' on the hill! It has been such a pleasure lending a hand' /7 from 'Aunty', Margaret Hyde Paget (nee Leiter), Countess of Suffolk, Nov [1922]; 'I am sure you must have helped a lot in gaining Tom's success' /8 from Isabel Margesson, 147 Victoria Street, Westminster, Nov 1922; 'I know how much you have helped him & so the triumph is shared by you' /9 from Nora Hastings, The Nora Hastings Dramatic Academy and School of Elocution, 139 Bond Street, London, Nov 1922, with congratulations, and a request to include Oswald Mosley's name in her list of patrons /10 from Kathleen Simon, 59 Cadogan Gardens, London, Nov 1922; 'to me it is a particular pleasure for apart from the great value he will be to the party in the House I am more than delighted he beat a man such as Ward-Jackson who did not mind stooping to abusing me in the most ungentlemanlike way because he disagreed with me!' /11 from Ethel Hutchins, 11 Chepstow Road, Hanwell, Nov 1922; 'I was delighted and honoured to be able to help you & Mr Mosley in your great fight'. For other congratulatory correspondence from Ethel Hutchins in her capacity as honorary secretary of the Women's Section, Hanwell Branch, see OMN/A/5/3/5 /12 from Mary E. Hill, 1 Gerard Road, Harrow, Nov 1922, referring to the use the Mosleys appear to have made of her home during the election campaign /13 from Florence Bourne Wheeler, Netherlea, Holbrook, Derby, Nov 1922. This letter discusses Cynthia's involvement in an unidentified Education Committee, but also congratulates Oswald Mosley /14 from Bernard Myers, 93 Harley Street, London, Nov 1922 /15 telegram from Margaret Maclean, ChorleyWood, Dec 1923, with congratulations on the re-election of Oswald Mosley [at Harrow] /16 Incomplete letter from Kenneth Lindsay referring to Cynthia's involvement in political work in Harrow, and offering his support for Oswald Mosley's forthcoming election campaign in Ladywood, Birmingham [in 1924] /17 from P. Bolloms, 58 Scarle Road, Wembley, Middlesex, offering his support to Oswald Mosley in his election campaign in Ladywood, Birmingham, and congratulating Cynthia for her recent speech in St Andrews Hall on behalf of the Labour Party /18 from William Barrett, 1822 Pershore Road, Kings Norton, Birmingham, Oct 1924, offering his support to Oswald Mosley in his election campaign, and expressing his admiration that the couple 'forego high social life and...come into the slums of this city to try and raise the workers from the unjust position into which capitalism has forced them' /19 telegram from Cynthia's sister Baba, Plymouth, to Cynthia, Grand Hotel, Birmingham, Oct 1924 expressing condolences on Oswald Mosley's narrow defeat at Ladywood /20 from unidentified correspondent, 'Sezincote', Moreton in Marsh, Gloucestershire, 1926, offering support to Oswald Mosley in his campaign for election as Labour MP for Smethwick /21 from 'Elsie', Nottlers, Bricket Wood, St Albans, undated; 'I'm sure no one could vote against your wish. For further letters from 'Elsie', see OMN/A/2/23/35-38 /22 from Nathalie Campbell, 24 Ovington Gardens, London, undated /23 from S. H. Callbult, 3 Park Mansions, Battersea, undated

Congratulations on Cynthia Mosley's election victory  XOMN/A/5/6  1929

Former reference: OMN/A/5/6

1 file

Contents:
This material consists of letters and a large number of telegrams relating to Cynthia's election as Labour MP for Stoke-on-Trent in May 1929. Some letters also make reference to Cynthia's illness shortly after her election victory, when she suffered a miscarriage in early June 1929. Most of the correspondence is from friends and family, but there are also a small number of letters and telegrams from political contacts. Telegrams include: /2 from Cynthia's sister Baba [Metcalfe], Plymouth /3 from Cynthia's mother-in-law and children, singed 'Granny, Viv and Nicho'; 'congratulations to Mummy M.P' /10 from Ramsay MacDonald, Eastington, wishing Cynthia luck; 'all signs favour great Labour victory at Stoke' /11 from Smethwick Labour Party /13 from Sibyl Colefax, Chelsea /14 from Blanche Marie Louise Barrymore, signed Michael Strange, Cowes /21 from Eva and Robert Lutyens Letters include: /22 from Harold Macmichael, Khartoum, Sudan, offering his congratulations, 'though I cannot go the length of saying I share your political views (!)' /24 from 'Irene', enquiring about Cynthia's health, having heard from Allan Young that she was ill, and apologising for sending a cheerful telegram immediately following her victory, not being aware that she was unwell. /27 from 'Aunt Daisy', Margaret Waller (nee Curzon), Cornwall Gardens, London, with commiserations to Cynthia and Oswald Mosley on Cynthia's miscarriage /29 from O. Skinner, member of the English Speaking Union American Undergraduates Group, Blyth & Co, 120 Broadway, New York, with congratulations on Cynthia's election success and concern about her health /31 from Margaret Lloyd, wife of Edward Mayow Hastings Lloyd, 48 Clarendon Road, London, with comments about her recent work in East Leicester for Frank Wise, civil servant and financial adviser. She records the favourable impression that women in this area had of Cynthia; 'many women..spoke with the greatest enthusiasm of you & your speeches & marvelled especially at the way in which you quoted 'all them figure - who ever she could remember them all I don't know - it was wonderful'!!' /34 from H, Miles, 'Westholme', 40 Barnfield, Garden Village, Stoke on Trent, with thanks for a present that Cynthia has sent him, presumably in recognition of his work on her election campaign. H. Miles was secretary and organiser of the Stoke, Fenton and Longton Labour Party. He expresses his pleasure that she was pleased with his efforts, and that he was involved in 'a fight which commenced three years ago in a Districy which was known politically as the 'Black Spot' of the Potteries & which you now hold with the largest majority over the two opposing Parties' /37 from Grantley Martin, 'Woodside', Hathaway Road, Southbourne, Bournemouth, who confirmed Cynthia at Guildford when he was Rector of Stoke-next-Guildford /38 from 'Uncle Frank', Francis Nathaniel Curzon, Hamilton House, Newmarket, offering his congratulations to Cynthia, and also to Oswald Mosley on his appointment to the new Government; 'a fitting reward for his unremitting efforts in Parliament and in the country'

Press cuttings and publications  XOMN/A/6  1925-1931

Former reference: OMN/A/6

2 files

Contents:
This series consists of press cuttings from national and local newspapers, including one article in a newspaper published for readers in America, and copies of the journals of business and political organisations which contain articles and reports about Cynthia Mosley that relate to her political beliefs, her interest in labour conditions and her career as Labour MP for Stoke-on-Trent. This material includes information about Cynthia's speeches, her role in debates in the House of Commons, and also contains some references to her constituency work.

Press cuttings  XOMN/A/6/1  1925-1931

Former reference: OMN/A/6/1

1 file

Contents:
These comprise: /1 article published in American Weekly, 1925, entitled 'Lady Cynthia Startles British Society' which focuses on Cynthia's decision to join the Labour Party and to stand for Parliament at Stoke-on-Trent. The article gives details about her family background and that of her husband, and records the critical reaction of some of her friends and other members of the aristocracy to her new political allegiances /2-/3 articles published in unidentified newspapers reporting on Cynthia's selection as a parliamentary candidate. One of these articles contains a report on Cynthia's appearance at a concert in aid of miners, possibly organised by the Miners Federation /4 article published in 'Forward', Sept 1927 focusing on the Widows' Pensions Act, on which Cynthia made her maiden speech in 1929 /5 article published in the 'Syracuse Herald', Aug 1929, entitled 'The Half American Lady in England's Parliament', which focuses on the election campaigns of Oswald and Cynthia Mosley and includes details about the critical reaction to them in the English press snd their visit to the United States of America in 1926 to study industrial conditions. It also highlights the fact that the couple were the first husband and wife to sit in Parliament together. /6-7 reports published in the 'Staffordshire Sentinel' Sept 1929 focusing on Cynthia's constituency work, including her attendance at the opening of an exhibition at the Public Museum and Art Gallery in Hanley, and at a meeting at Fenton Town Hall at which she spoke on proposals to establish nursery schools and her wish to see one in her own constituency /8-/10 articles published in 'The Spectator', the 'Evening World', and an unidentified newspaper Nov 1929, containing details about Cynthia's maiden speech in parliament. The article in the 'Evening World' is by Ellen Wilkinson MP, and contains a brief profile of some of the younger Labour MPs in parliament, including Cynthia. /11 article published in unidentified newspaper reporting on Cynthia's role in the House of Commons debate on the ratification of the Optional Clause /12-/14 reports published in the 'Evening Standard', 'The Times' and the 'Southport Guardian', Feb and Mar 1930 on Cynthia's contribution to debates on Sir E. Hilton Young's Rural Amenities Bill and the Labour Amendment to it /15-/17 reports published in the 'Evening Standard', 'The Listener', and 'Popular Wireless', Feb and Mar 1930 consisting of reviews of Cynthia's radio broadcast debate with Mr [Charles Arthur] Siepmann on 'Convention' which took place on 18 Feb 1930 /18 report published in the 'Muswell Hill Record', May 1930 on Cynthia's attendance at a May Day demonstration at Alexandra Palace, organised by the East and West Labour Women's Advisory Councils, at which she was the chief speaker /19-/21 reports from 'Evening World', 'Birmingham Daily Mail', and an unidentified newspaper 1929-1930, on Cynthia's high attendance in the House of Commons, and on her admirable fashion sense compared to other women MPs /22 letter published in 'The Times' concerning Cynthia's contention that the Navy, Army, Police, G.P.O and the tramways are 'Socialistic institutions', undated. /23 undated report published in unidentified newspaper containing details about a speech given by Cynthia at a New Party meeting at 'City Hall' /24 article published in the 'North Cheshire Herald' July 1931, entitled 'The Government's Failure' in which Cynthia outlines the policies of the New Party /25 report published in the 'Evening Star' Jul 1931 about Cynthia's attendance at an all night sitting of the House of Commons, at which she spoke on unemployment benefit, and her relations with other women MPs /26 report published in the 'Irish Telegraph', Apr 1932 on the birth of Cynthia's third child. It also praises her skill in public speaking.

Publications  XOMN/A/6/2  1926-1929

Former reference: OMN/A/6/2

1 file

Contents:
This material comprises a copy of the 'Chamber of Commerce Bulletin', East Liverpool, Ohio, April 1926, and a copy of 'The Vote; The organ of the Women's Freedom League', 15 Nov 1929. The 'Chamber of Commerce Bulletin' contains a report on the visit of Cynthia and Oswald Mosley to East Liverpool. The report includes a biographical profile of Cynthia, with details about her family background and political interests and that of her husband, and contains an account of the couple's stay in East Liverpool, visiting various china, automobile and steel production plants, and being entertained by representatives of the Chamber of Commerce 'The Vote' contains a report of Cynthia Mosley's maiden speech in the House of Commons on the Widows', Orphans', and Old Age Pensions Bill, of which she was in favour, and includes a brief biographical profile which focuses on her political views and experience

Personal papers  XOMN/A/7  1906-1933

Former reference: OMN/A/7

4 files

Contents:
This series consists of manuscript and typescript writings and associated material, press cuttings, medical reports, examination results and associated correspondence, drawings, printed material and ephemera relating to various aspects of Cynthia Mosley's personal and professional life. It includes childhood notes and essays and assignments composed during her time at boarding school in 1916; notes for and drafts of some of her political speeches made between 1929 and 1931 when she was Labour MP for Stoke-on-Trent, together with associated material such as press cuttings; medical records giving details of her recurring health problems, during the 1920s and early 1930s. Papers in this series that relate to Cynthia Mosley's public and professional life complement other types of material that survive in this collection, specifically files of formal correspondence, correspondence relating to Cynthia's speeches, and the series of press cuttings and publications concerning Cynthia's career in politics during the 1920s and early 1930s.

School work and school reports of Cynthia Curzon  XOMN/A/7/1  1914-1916

Former reference: OMN/A/7/1

1 file

Contents:
This material consists of marked essays, assignments and other schoolwork written by Cynthia Curzon while she was a pupil at The Links boarding school in Eastbourne in 1916. Most of the work is written on loose leaf lined paper, but there is also an exercise book kept by Cynthia during the spring term of 1916 which contains notes on Anglo Saxon and medieval English literature. The majority of the essays and assignments are written on the subject of the poems of Robert Browning; other assignments include essays on English and European history, French literature, written in French, and a page of Geography questions. Associated material included in this file consists of a handwritten ode to a teacher, presumably composed by Cynthia, and a handwritten list compiled by Cynthia which contains the names of pupils at The Links during the spring and summer terms of 1916, divided by the class they were in at the time. This list also contains the names of the mistresses at the school, and of teachers from outside who taught classes there. The file also contains notes on headed writing paper from Cynthia's home at Hackwood, Basingstoke, relating to Christian doctrine, probably written as part of the preparation for her confirmation in 1914

Papers relating to Cynthia Mosley's public and professional life  XOMN/A/7/2  1922-c1931

Former reference: OMN/A/7/2

1 file

Contents:
This material consists of a variety of manuscript, typescript and printed material relating principally to Cynthia Mosley's political career. The majority of these papers date from the period when Cynthia was Labour MP for Stoke-on-Trent between 1929 and 1931; there are just two items which date from before this time, relating to Cynthia's involvement in public life. The material relating to Cynthia Mosley's political career comprises mounted and unmounted press cuttings from national and local newspapers and journals, dating between 1927 and 1931, on subjects relating to mass production, free trade, exports and the Trade Union Act, including annotations in Cynthia's hand; handwritten notes and typescript drafts of speeches and letters written by Cynthia, including a draft of a speech on the position of women in society, and draft notes on the subject of the Widows' Pensions Act, on which Cynthia made her maiden speech as an MP; transcript of a radio broadcast made by Cynthia and Charles Arthur Siepmann on Social Convention, 18 Feb 1930; election material relating to Cynthia Mosley's 1929 campaign, and papers relating to her attendance in the House of Commons as a new MP in 1929; printed pamphlet entitled 'Six Months of Labour Government', containing an account of the early achievements of Ramsay MacDonald's 1929 government and including annotations in Cynthia's hand. Other material consists of a printed report of the Harrow, Wealdstone and District War Memorial Maternity Hostel, 1921-1922 which includes an introduction by Cynthia Mosley; a coloured illuminated souvenir of thanks to Cynthia Mosley from the 2nd Harrow Troop of Baden Powell Scouts Wolf Cub Pack, dated Feb 1922, for her attendance at an exhibition of handicrafts and sale of works; and a menu for a 'Ladies Night' given by the Press Club in Oct 1925 at which Cynthia Mosley was a guest, including a pencil sketch of Cynthia and of the other guest, Miss Clemence Dane. These appear to be signed 'D.F.James', but it has not been possible to identify this artist. There is also a typescript draft of a letter from Cynthia and other unidentified women in politics to Lord Grey, urging him to return to political life, possibly as part of Oswald Mosley's attempts to form a Centre Party in 1921 (see also OMN/B/2/1)

Medical records  XOMN/A/7/3  1922-1932

Former reference: OMN/A/7/3

1 file

Contents:
These comprise reports on blood tests and other medical examinations and doctors reports and recommendations based on these tests. The file also includes business cards for doctors at the Contrexeville spa in eastern France where Cynthia spent some time in the autumn of 1932 and a letter to Cynthia from C.F.Shaw, wife of George Bernard Shaw, 4, Whitehall Court, London, Sept 1928 containing contact details for a Dr William Cooper of 40 Park Lane. The letter suggests that this doctor offers less conventional treatment. Cynthia's doctor in 1922 appears to have been a Dr Douglas Kirkwood. Detailed reports dating from 1930 and 1931 are issued by a Dr Obermer, based at 14A Manchester Square, London, and these include dietary recommendations, and a printed slip confirming Cynthia's pregnancy with her third child Michael in 1931. There are also medical reports relating to Cynthia's stay at the Wilbraham Nursing Home, 3 Wilbraham Place, Sloane Street, London in Feb 1932, and recommendations for medication issued by Dr Etterlen at Contrexeville spa in Aug 1932.

Miscellaneous personal papers  XOMN/A/7/4  c1906-c1933

Former reference: OMN/A/7/4

1 file

Contents:
These papers consist of handwritten notes compiled by Cynthia; typescript and manuscript poetry; drawings, printed material and ephemera. These include notes written by Cynthia as a child consisting of lists of clothing for fictional characters, presumably as part of a game, and notes written in adulthood consisting of lists of furniture and fabrics required for rooms in which Cynthia lived with her husband, Oswald Mosley. The poetry appears to have been written while Cynthia was working at the War Office in 1917, possibly by a colleague; the subject matter concerns Cynthia's work there as a clerk, and much of the poetry expresses praise for her. The file also includes a set of three cartoons of unidentified individuals by Ladislav Kondor, dated 1925, and a pre-printed Christmas gift tag addressed to Cynthia from Oswald Mosley, the only item written to her by her husband that survives in these papers.

Papers of Oswald Mosley  XOMN/B  1909-1983

Former reference: OMN/B

10 boxes

Administrative history:
Oswald Ernald Mosley, eldest son of Oswald Mosley and Katherine Maud Heathcote, was born on 16 November 1896. He attended Winchester school and Sandhurst, and was commissioned into the 16th Lancers cavalry regiment at the outbreak of the First World War in 1914, but later transferred to the Royal Flying Corps. He injured his leg in a flying accident while in England, shortly after gaining his pilot's certificate and was recalled to his former regiment, spending the winter of 1915-1916 in the trenches. He was invalided out of the war due to his damaged leg in 1916, and spent the last two years of the war working in London in the Ministry of Munitions and in the Foreign Office. He was elected Unionist MP for Harrow in 1918 and was a member of the National party coalition led by Lloyd George. He rapidly became disillusioned with the government and in November 1920 he left the government over the Black and Tan atrocities in Ireland, which he condemned in the House of Commons. His political outlook at the time, informed by his experiences during the war, his sympathy for ordinary working people, and his concern to improve social conditions, was thought to be more suited to the Liberal party, and he was involved in discussions with Robert Cecil during the early 1920s to form a Centre Party, but he was re-elected as an Independent MP for Harrow in the General Elections of 1922 and 1923. He joined the Labour party in 1924, and stood for election in Ladywood, Birmingham that year, being narrowly defeated by Neville Chamberlain. He was supported in his political career by his first wife, Cynthia Curzon, whom he married in 1920. Cynthia also joined the Labour party, and accompanied Mosley on visits to India in 1925 and the USA in 1926 to study labour conditions. The couple had three children, Vivien (b. 1921), Nicholas (b. 1923), and Michael (b. 1932). Cynthia Mosley died of peritonitis in 1933. Mosley was elected Labour MP for Smethwick in 1926, and was elected to the party's National Executive Committee the following year. He was re-elected in the general election of 1929, and was appointed Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster by Ramsay MacDonald, with special responsibility for unemployment. In response to the economic crisis and large scale unemployment of the period, Mosley proposed a programme, known as the 'Mosley Memorandum', which aimed to stimulate the economy and provide employment by using public funds to promote industrial expansion. When the Cabinet rejected these proposals, Mosley resigned from the government. He formed the New Party in 1931, supported by Cynthia, and by other former Labour MPs including John Strachey, John Beckett and Robert Forgan, as well as others including Harold Nicolson and Cyril Joad. The New Party contested several seats at the 1931 General Election but failed to win any. Mosley was drawn to the success of Italian fascism in solving some of the economic and social problems of the early 1930s, and made several visits to Rome, meeting Mussolini in January 1932. He disbanded the New Party and formed the British Union of Fascists (B.U.F) in 1932. Some of those who had supported the New Party became officials in the B.U.F, but others were uneasy about Mosley's adoption of fascism, and by the anti-semitic views increasingly expressed by the movement. The B.U.F was initially successful, and attracted large numbers of new members and some mainstream support. However, a meeting at Olympia in June 1934 was disrupted by political opponents, and the ensuing violence had an adverse effect on B.U.F support. The militaristic elements of the B.U.F, such as the uniforms, fascist salute and organised marches, together with the movement's willingness to exploit existing tensions by employing anti-semitic rhetoric and campaigning in Jewish areas in the East End of London, highlighted sinister parallels with the Nazi regime in Germany, and B.U.F activities were undermined by the passing of the Public Order Act in 1936 which outlawed the wearing of political uniforms, and the use of threatening and abusive language, and restricted rights to organise marches. The B.U.F campaigned against war with Germany, and held a Peace rally at Earls Court in the summer of 1939. After the outbreak of war, the movement continued with its peace campaign. Mosley, along with many other B.U.F members and supporters, was imprisoned under Defence Regulations 18B in May 1940 amidst fears of a German invasion of Britain. He was initially held in Brixton prison, but in 1941 he was moved to Holloway to join his second wife, Diana. Mosley had married Diana, one of the Mitford sisters, and the divorced wife of Bryan Guinness, in 1936 in Berlin, although they had been in a relationship for some years before this. Mosley had two sons with Diana, Alexander (b. 1938) and Max (b.1940). Oswald and Diana Mosley were released from prison in 1943 on the grounds of Mosley's ill health, and the couple were placed under house arrest. They settled first at Crux Easton in Hampshire, and moved to Crowood in Wiltshire in 1945 where Mosley ran a farm. In 1948, following the publication of his book 'The Alternative', he established the Union Movement, which advocated British integration in Europe, with the exploitation of British colonies in Africa to provide foods and other raw materials that European countries lacked. The Union Movement also campaigned against immigration to Britain from Commonwealth countries. Mosley established the Euphorion Press in an attempt to publish the works of right-wing authors, and Diana Mosley edited a monthly right-wing journal, 'The European' between 1953 and 1959. The Mosleys left England in 1949 and settled first in Ireland, and afterwards in France. They continued to make regular visits to England, and Mosley stood for election for the Union Movement in North Kensington in 1959 and Shoreditch and Finsbury in 1966. He resigned his leadership of the movement in 1966, at the age of 70, and began to focus on the rehabilitation of his character, through the publication of his autobiography, 'My Life' in 1968, and his appearances on television and radio. A biography of Oswald Mosley was published by Robert Skidelsky in 1975. Oswald Mosley died on 3 December 1980. Sources: Administrative history for the British Union Collection held at the University of Sheffield Library, http://www.shef.ac.uk/library/special/bunion.html Accessed March 2005; Robert Skidelsky, Oswald Mosley, 1975; Nicholas Mosley, The Rules of the Game: Sir Oswald and Lady Cynthia Mosley, 1896-1933, 1982; Nicholas Mosley, Beyond the Pale: Sir Oswald Mosley and Family, 1933-1980, 1983.

Contents:
These papers consist of personal and political correspondence; policy and administration material relating to Oswald Mosley's political movements the New Party and the British Union of Fascists; post-war political and literary writings; press cuttings; photographs and financial papers. They also include research papers generated by Nicholas Mosley in the course of his research into his father's life and political career for his biographies, 'The Rules of the Game', and 'Beyond the Pale'. These research papers document certain aspects of Mosley's career, specifically the financial assistance given to the British Union of Fascists during the early 1930s by Mussolini's government, and the reasons for Oswald Mosley's imprisonment in 1940 under Defence Regulations 18B. The sequences of correspondence and press cuttings span the entire period of Mosley's active political career, from the 1920s to the 1960s, and also include material dating from the 1970s, when he had retired from leadership of the Union Movement. The correspondence largely comprises letters from politicians and political activists, writers and commentators, from both the inter-war and post-war period, but also includes some family and personal letters. The sequence of financial papers provides evidence of Mosley's personal wealth, particularly after the Second World War, but also includes material relating to his attempts to fund his political ventures through the establishment of offshore radio stations during the 1930s. Taken together, these papers shed light on the development of Oswald Mosley's political views and ideologies, particularly during the postwar period when he became more interested in the idea of European Union, and constitute a useful source for the study of his political career, both as an MP in the 1920s, and as leader of the British Union of Fascists and its successor organisation, the Union Movement.

Family correspondence  XOMN/B/1  1923-1952

Former reference: OMN/B/1

3 files

Contents:
This series largely consists of letters to Oswald Mosley from his mother, Maud, but also contains a small amount of correspondence from other members of his family, including his sister-in-law, Irene Curzon, his son, Michael Mosley, his daughter, Vivien Forbes-Adam (nee Mosley), his second wife Diana Mosley, and an unidentified aunt living in Market Drayton, Shropshire. The content of the majority of the correspondence relates to the personal and social life of Oswald Mosley, but letters from his mother also contain information about his political career, particularly during the period that he was leader of the B.U.F in the 1930s.

Letters from Maud Mosley  XOMN/B/1/1  c1923-c1948

Former reference: OMN/B/1/1

1 file

Contents:
Letters are addressed to 'my darling Tom', and signed 'ever loving mother'. Many focus on Mosley's political career, and contain information about his mother's opinions about his changing party allegiances, and about her active role within the Women's Section of the B.U.F during the 1930s. The letters also discuss family and domestic affairs, and include details about Mosley's children, and Maud Mosley's concern for them, and for her son, following the death of his first wife, Cynthia. Letters include: /1 written to mark Mosley's birthday in Nov 1923, discussing his politics as an Independent MP and his views on Free Trade. She urges that he 'be as wise in your eventual choice of a party dear old Independent as you were in your choice of a wife!' /2 telegram commiserating Mosley on his election defeat as Labour party candidate at Ladywood, Birmingham, in 1924 /3 praises Mosley's efforts to ensure that his children spent a happy Christmas in 1933, the year that Cynthia had died. /8and /9 dated 1935 and express Maud Mosley's feelings of hurt at her son's apparent lack of support and confidence in her as leader of the Women's Section, and the threat to her position that she perceives from other female members of the B.U.F. They contain details about the structure and organisation of the movement. /9 is typed and obviously intended to be a formal letter, rather than a personal one. Maud Mosley describes some of the recent intrigue and tensions between members of the B.U.F at Headquarters, and offers to step down from her work for the movement in order to preserve her relationship with her son. /11 written at the end of 1936 and refers to attempts by Maud Mosley's sister Dorothy to contact the spirit of Cynthia Mosley on behalf of Oswald that year /14 written in 1937 mentions that Oswald Mosley's daughter Vivien has made a good impression in Munich, largely thanks to the influence of Cynthia's sister Irene Curzon, who was responsible for her care. This letter also refers to a recent march that Mosley took part in, presumably connected to his B.U.F activities. /15 is dated Nov 1945 and discusses Maud's plans for moving house /16 is written from Aylsham, Norfolk in 1948 and discusses social arrangements to see Mosley and his son Alexander. /17-/22 are undated, but were probably written during the 1930s. /20 refers to Maud Mosley's work at B.U.F regional branches, and a forthcoming rally.

Letters from Irene Curzon, Baroness Ravensdale  XOMN/B/1/2  Undated [1930s]

Former reference: OMN/B/1/2

1 file

Contents:
These letters are addressed to 'Tom', and signed 'Nina'. They are all undated, but some have been given a conjectured date by Nicholas Mosley, which has been written in pencil on individual letters. /1 and /2 discuss negotiations that Irene was engaged in to provide horses for Mosley's daughter Vivien, and possibly for himself. /3 is dated 8 Oct, and mentions the repercussions of 'Sunday's events'. This is possibly a reference to the disturbances between fascists, anti-fascists and the police in the East End of London on 4 Oct 1936, known as the Battle of Cable Street.

Letters from other family members  XOMN/B/1/3  c1930-c1952

Former reference: OMN/B/1/3

1 file

Contents:
These consist of single letters from one of Mosley's aunts, his son Michael, his daughter Vivien, and a letter likely to have been written by Diana Mosley, his second wife. Letters from Diana Mosley and Vivien Forbes-Adam (nee Mosley) are dated; the letter from Michael Mosley can be given a conjectured date from internal evidence. /1 love letter to Oswald Mosley, probably written by his second wife, Diana, and dated 1937. This identification has been based on content, handwriting and the seal on the envelope, which features a female hunter, presumably because Diana was named for the Roman goddess of hunting. /2 letter from Michael Mosley, Oswald Mosley's younger son from his first marriage to Cynthia Curzon. This letter is written from St Ronan's school in Devon, which Michael attended during the 1940s. Michael sends birthday greetings to his father and gives news of his recent activities at school. The letter is signed 'Micky' /3 letter from Vivien Forbes-Adam, Mulberry Walk, Chelsea, London, 1952, giving family news about her husband and daughter Cynthia, and the new baby she is expecting /4 undated letter from an unidentified aunt of Oswald Mosley, written from Betton House, Market Drayton, Shropshire. The letter thanks Mosley for his condolences on the death of a family member likely to have been her husband.

Personal and political correspondence  XOMN/B/2  1920-1980

Former reference: OMN/B/2

4 files

Contents:
This series largely consists of correspondence written to Oswald Mosley during the course of his active political career, but also includes correspondence written to his second wife, Diana (nee Mitford) during the 1930s and 1950s, as well as some draft and copy correspondence written by Mosley, and a small number of letters concerning him or his affairs. Most of this correspondence is of a political or formal nature, and contains letters written by politicians and other public figures, particularly during the 1920s, when Mosley was an MP, firstly for Harrow as a Unionist and later Independent candidate, and afterwards for Smethwick where he represented the Labour party. Correspondence dating from the 1930s and 1940s also includes letters from members and supporters of the British Union of Fascists, which Mosley founded in 1932, after the demise of his short-lived New Party, and post-war correspondence from individuals, both in Britain, and in other countries, who were sympathetic to Mosley's political philosophy and policies as leader of the Union Movement,, A small proportion of the letters in this series relates to Mosley's personal and domestic life, and to his social and leisure interests. Although the correspondence spans the entire period of Mosley's adult life, there is more material from the 1920s and 1930s than from the post-war period. Letters from friends and some political contacts address Mosley as 'Tom'; letters from people who knew him on a personal level in later years sometimes address him as 'Kit'.

Letters 1920-1930  XOMN/B/2/1  1920-1930

Former reference: OMN/B/2/1

1 file

Contents:
The content of this correspondence largely relates to Oswald Mosley's parliamentary career during the 1920s, first as MP for Harrow, and later as a member of the Labour Party and MP for Smethwick, and consists of letters from political contacts and constituents. It also includes letters from friends of Mosley and his first wife, Cynthia, and a small amount of correspondence relating to Oswald Mosley's social and leisure interests. Letters include: /1 from Josiah C. Wedgwood, dated 1920, declining a social invitation /2-/6 from Robert Cecil, dating between 1920 and 1921, together with a draft text, written in Cecil's hand, criticising government economic and foreign policy, and proposing policies to alleviate the economic situation of the early 1920s, and a foreign policy based on the principles of the Covenant of the League of Nations. The letters relate to attempts by Oswald Mosley and Robert Cecil to form a Centre Party that drew its support from members of the Conservative, Liberal and Labour parties, and efforts made to involve Lord Edward Grey and Herbert Gladstone in this campaign. /7-/12 relate to Mosley's role in Robert Cecil's plans to form a Centre Party during 1921, and his attempts to gain the support of newspaper editors. They include letters to Robert Cecil from R. Lee Campbell and Herbert Gladstone, dated 1921, and letters to Mosley from Herbert Gladstone, J. A. Spender, editor of the 'Westminster Gazette', dated 1922, and Henry Massingham, editor of 'The Nation'. There is also a letter to Massingham from Alfred Harmsworth, dated Apr 1922 which contains his analysis of the character of Robert Cecil, and a promise that his newspapers will make a point of reporting his activities. /13 from J. Finch, Secretary of the Cottesmore Hunt, Oakham, with a receipt for Mosley's subscription for the 1920-1921 hunt season, dated 1921 /14 typed report issued by the Brighton Phrenological & Mental Science Institution, on the 'brain capacity and general characteristics' of Oswald Mosley, compiled by J. Millott Severn, 1921 /15 from Ellen Pollard, Uxbridge Road, Hanwell, congratulating Mosley on his election success, and asking for his advice on behalf of another constituent, 1922 /16 from Margot Asquith, 44 Bedford Square, London, 1923, discussing the current political situation, and the chances of a Liberal victory in the forthcoming election /17 from 'Charles M', Paris, congratulating Mosley on his election success in Harrow [in 1922], and mentioning his substantial majority /18-/20 letters of congratulations on Mosley's election victory in Harrow in 1923 from activists and supporters: Bernard Myers, Harley Street, London; D. Beningfield, Wellington Square, Chelsea, London; Margaret Greville, Charles Street, Berkeley Square, London /21-/22 telegrams of congratulations on Mosley's Harrow victory in 1923 from Herbert Gladstone, and Margot Asquith /23-/24 from Henry Massingham. /22 is sent from the Royal York Hotel, Brighton, and offers Mosley his support and companionship. /23 is sent from 'The Nation and The Athenaeum', Mar 1924, inviting Mosley to lunch to discuss the next step in his political career, likely to be joining the Labour party /25-/26 from John Lavery, Cromwell Place, London. The letters discuss arrangements that Mosley has made for him to sketch in the House of Commons in preparation for a painting. A photograph of his 1921 painting of the House of Lords in session is enclosed with /24. /27 from Hazel Lavery, wife of John Lavery, Cromwell Place, London, making social arrangements, 1924. /28 telegram from George Sutton, Mosley's political secretary, to Mosley in Paris Nov 1924. The telegram asks whether Mosley is prepared to be nominated as Labour candidate in a by-election at Dundee. /29 telegram of Christmas and New Year greetings from William Lyon Mackenzie King, dated 1926 /30 from John Strachey, editor of 'The Miner', Russell Square, London, 1927, enclosing a handwritten extract from a newspaper or journal, possibly 'The Miner', which contains a report of the favourable impression that Mosley made in Durham. /31 from Denham Golf Club, 1927 to George Sutton, concerning Mosley's application for membership, and returning Mosley's cheque in payment of fees. /32 from James L. Garvin, Gregories, Beaconsfield, 1928, discussing the need for more younger people to be in government, particularly in the Foreign Office, and offering Mosley his moral support. /33 from Victoria Sackville, mother of Vita Sackville-West, White Lodge on the Cliff, Roedean, Brighton, 1928, asking for a small financial contribution towards the payment for a 'roof of friendship' /34-/35 from political contacts, written on House of Commons paper. Both are dated May 1930 and both correspondents offer their support following Mosley's resignation from the Labour government. /32 is from an unidentified correspondent. /33 is from Philip Noel Baker who congratulates Mosley on his recent speech at a Labour party meeting, and expresses the belief that he will be able to get the government to adopt his policy to alleviate unemployment if he follows the same line of argument in his forthcoming speech in the House. /36 telegram of congratulations from Syrie Maugham, Oct 1930, possibly for Mosley's speech at the Labour party conference at Llandudno that year /37-/47 are undated. Many are from friends of Oswald Mosley and his wife, Cynthia. They include: /37 from Ralph Peto, The Flower House, Beckenham Lane, Catford, discussing Lloyd George and the foreign policy of the government, particularly in relation to the role of Lord Curzon, Mosley's father-in-law, as Foreign Secretary. For letters from Ralph Peto to Cynthia Mosley, see OMN/A/2/22 /38 from 'Curtis', Paris, making social arrangements and giving advice about how to serve claret wine /39 from Blanche Marie Louise Barrymore, signed Michael Strange, Rue Leroux, with congratulations, and discussing recent social activities. For letters from Michael Strange to Cynthia Mosley, see OMN/A/2/12 /40 from Glyn Philpot, Florence, making social arrangements. For letters from Glyn Philpot to Cynthia Mosley, see OMN/A/2/22 /41 note from unidentified correspondent, written on the reverse of a printed appeal for sick and disabled ex-servicemen, Mar 1929. The note referes to 'socialists', and arranging a meeting with 'Oliver' /42 from unidentified French correspondent, congratulating Mosley on a recent victory, and making social arrangements /43 note addressed to 'Comrade Mosley', from an unidentified writer with the surname Baldwin. It is possible that this was Oliver Baldwin, who represented Dudley in parliament and later joined Mosley's New Party /44 from George Bridges, The Red House, Great Kimble, Princes Risborough, discussing the 'Persian Railway contract' /45 from unidentified correspondent discussing Mosley's speeches /46 from unidentified correspondent written on House of Commons Library paper, discussing the 'Mesopotamian question' /47 from unidentified correspondent offering support.

Letters 1931-1940  XOMN/B/2/2  1931-1940

Former reference: OMN/B/2/2

1 file

Contents:
The majority of these letters are concerned with Mosley's leadership of the British Union of Fascists, and consist of correspondence from members and supporters of this movement. There are also a small number of letters relating to Mosley's personal and domestic life, and his social interests during this period. The file also contains letters to Diana Mosley, including correspondence in German from Magda Goebbels. Letters include: /1 from 'Colin', House of Lords, May 1933, sending condolences to Mosley on the death of his first wife, Cynthia /2 from B. A. Campbell, The Peel Institute, St John Street, London, Jun 1933, thanking Mosley for allowing him to take boys on a camping holiday to Mosley's home at Denham, and offering his sympathy on Cynthia's death. For letters from B. A. Campbell to Cynthia Mosley, see OMN/A/5/1 and OMN/A/5/3 /3 telegram from Count Grandi, Italian Ambassador, May 1934 on the anniversary of Cynthia's death. Oswald Mosley has written a brief reply to this message on the same telegram. /4 from Robert Forgan, Wildwood Terrace, London, 1935, discussing the financial situation of the B.U.F and warning Mosley that 'one source of income is known to a number of people who are not in your confidence'. This possibly refers to the payments made to the movement by Mussolini's government. /5-/7 are letters from Italian supporters of fascism and are dated 1935. /5 is from the Princess of Piemonte, making arrangements to meet Mosley. /6 is from Andreina Carati Celli, Bordighera, asking Mosley for financial assistance after her separation from her husband, a fascist official. /7 is from Angela Lilletta Guerrieri, Rome, member of an Italian fascist youth organisation, expressing her excitement at Mosley's forthcoming visit to Rome. /8 from an unidentified supporter, dated 1935, expressing concern about Mosley's recent illness /9 from Wilfrid Hill-Wood, Eaton Place, London, 1936, discussing action to be taken about an unidentified matter. /10 from Mosley's doctor at Harley Street, containing a prescription, 1936 /11 from Stanley J. Passmore, Merrow Farm, Dunsfold, nr Godalming, Surrey, with best wishes for Mosley's recovery from appendicitis, 1936 /12 from G. Soudet, Paris, to Monsieur Gauthier regarding an order for three fencing swords, 1937. Gauthier has written a reply at the bottom of the letter. This letter was presumably in Mosley's possession because of his involvement in fencing /13 from Judy Whittam, Arkwright Road, Hampstead, London, enquiring whether Mosley would grant her an interview /14 from 'Jim', Sheffield Terrace, London, discussing an article, possibly intended for publication in 'Action' or 'Fascist Quarterly', 1938 /15 from W.E.D (Bill) Allen, Mullagh Cottage, Killyleagh, Co. Down, discussing repayment of a loan that Allen took out in order to fund the B.U.F during Mosley's illness, and expressing his disappointment that Mosley had not contacted him directly or offered to regularise the situation. /16 letter from Reginald Wheatley, Albert St Stables, Melton Mowbray, Leicestershire, discussing Mosley's stable account and mentioning a horse that had been sent to Mosley's home at Wootton Lodge /17 from a B.U.F supporter to Mosley in Brixton prison, containing an account of the writer's financial difficulties, and his view of the current political situation /18 and /19 are undated. /18 is from a B.U.F supporter who offers items of jewellery to Mosley in order to fund the movement. /19 is a note sent from London Airport by an unidentified writer Letters to Diana Mosley include: /20-/23 from Magda Goebbels between 1936 and 1938. /20 and /21 discuss plans for Diana's visit to Germany in the autumn of 1936, and Magda's attempts to get a visa for her. /22 is dated 1937 and expresses her sympathy for Diana and her parents over the recent elopement of Jessica Mitford. /23 is a card of thanks for Diana's good wishes on the birth of Magda's daughter in May 1938 /24 in German from Hans Waschetta, dated Apr 1936. The letter describes the situation in the Rhineland after its re-militarisation by German troops and discusses the apparently favourable reaction to developments in the British press. He praises Hitler and expects him to convince the whole of Europe, including eventually France, to come to a common understanding. He asks Diana about the mood of the British public to events in Germany /25 from an unidentified English friend discussing social affairs.

Letters 1941-1950  XOMN/B/2/3  1941-1950

Former reference: OMN/B/2/3

1 file

Conditions of access: /40 is closed until 2033. Items /9-/39 are subject to conditional access until 2026.

Contents:
The majority of this correspondence does not directly relate to Mosley's political career. It largely focuses on his efforts to establish himself in the political arena following his release from prison at the end of 1943, and contains some fragmentary information about his post-war interests in publishing, and the development of his political thinking and its expression in political writing in the late 1940s. It includes letters from German contacts which discuss 'business' arrangements, likely to refer to attempts by Mosley to foster political alliances amongst those who might be interested in his ideas for European union. Other correspondence contains information about Mosley's financial position during his imprisonment, and about his domestic life during the period immediately after the end of the Second World War. Letters include: /1 copy letter from Mosley to Oswald Hickson, Collier & Co, solicitors, 1942, discussing his financial contributions, and those of others, to 'Action' /2 copy correspondence between Oswald Hickson, Collier & Co, 1942 and Field Roscoe & Co, solicitors, concerning defamatory remarks made by Lieutenant Colonel Thomas Cook MP about Mosley's imprisonment /3 draft letter from Mosley, written in Diana Mosley's hand, to Mr Chivers, concerning repairs to be made to the Mosley's house at Crux Easton, Mar 1944 /4 from Major P. C. Battine, Donne Place, Chelsea, London, 1944, making social arrangements /5 from Marsh & Ferriman, solicitors, concerning a libel action brought by A. K. Chesterton against the 'Daily Worker' and the 'Jewish Chronicle', 1945 /6 from Ann Good, Stoke Newington, London, concerning building work and the supply of Calor Gas to Mosley's home, 1945 /7 from George Sutton, Ladbroke Grove, London, discussing the possibility of he and his wife returning to work for Mosley at his farm, 1945 /8 from Bernard Scapaticca, Henry Street, Ancoats, Manchester, discussing the possible purchase of vacant property owned by Mosley in Manchester, 1945 /9-/39 are letters from B.U.F members and supporters, several of whom were imprisoned, like Mosley, under 18B Regulations during the Second World War, expressing their continued loyalty and support. The great majority of these were written at Christmas 1945, and a number of the correspondents offer assistance to Mosley in his newly-established publishing company. Amongst these letters is a telegram from Robert Gordon-Canning, and a letter from Dr Margaret Vivian offering a manuscript for publication. There is also one letter dated 1942, which thanks Mosley for his gift of cigarettes to the writer's brother, who is in prison. /40 this item of correspondence is closed /41-/42 letters from Desmond Stewart giving his comments and opinions on Mosley's writing and speeches. /41 is dated 1947 and refers to a speech that Mosley gave at Oxford University, mentioning that Ken Tynan was disappointed not to have attended. He also encloses a letter that Mosley wrote to Henry Williamson. This letter discusses Middleton Murray's review of Mosley's book 'The Alternative' which was published in 1947, and his writing style. /43 two draft letters from Mosley to 'Porter', filed together in an envelope dated Nov 1948. The letters appear to discuss a libel suit /44 in German from Dr Walter Schilling, Buenos Aires, Jul 1948, confirming the arrival of Mosley's leaflet and expressing his pleasure at its content. He asks for another 300 copies and hopes that his cheque for over 100 Argentinian pesos has arrived in Mosley's account. He refers to Churchill's speech in Cardiff, and thinks that Mosley should make it clear that Churchill is Europe's gravedigger. /45 in German from unidentified correspondent signed 'G', Dec 1949, discussing German and foreign 'business', and the need for financial support for any meetings that might take place. The letter also refers to a 'business' trip to be made by Mosley The word business is possibly code for right wing political activities. /46 in German from unidentified correspondent, Dec 1949, sharing feelings of hope in the future, and the feeling that the German people are beginning to realise that they are at the heart of Europe. He sends Mosley a gift of an angel figure made in the Soviet Zone of occupation in Germany /47 translation of a letter from 'Otto' to 'Alf', Dec 1949, discussing a forthcoming business trip and arrangements for visas. Expresses hope for the future /48 in German from 'Otto' to 'Alf', with English translation, Jan 1950, discussing arrangements for Mr Maier or the 'nephew' to visit 'Uncle Max', depending on whether the papers are ready /49 from unidentified correspondent, Jan 1950, discussing 'business' arrangements and potential difficulties /50 in German from unidentified correspondent signed 'G', discussing 'business contacts' and 'business brochures' to be printed, and the need to meet immediately after the British General Election. Also mentions the need for more funds for the German 'business' /51 from Oswald Pirow, Pretoria, Jan 1950, discussing the reaction to 'The Alternative' in Germany, and commenting on the progress of his New Order political movement in South Africa. /52 from Dr Hans Grimm, Losterhaus, Lippoldsberg. Germany, 1950, discussing proposals for the publication of the German version of 'The Alternative', Jan 1950 /53 in German from 'Otto' to 'Alf', with English translation, Feb 1950, discussing the arrival of the 'nephew and giving the address of Johannes Bernardt in Madrid. He asks whether it might be possible to arrange an invitation to England for 'Prince', through 'Raven', presuambly Raven Thomson /54 in German from unidentified correspondent signed 'G', with English translation, Feb 1950, enclosing the address of D. Hanke in Buenos Aires and arrangements for a mutual 'business' meeting, and giving a 'new business address', of Heinz Weber in Westfalen /55 from unidentified correspondent, Feb 1950, giving the address of Mirilo Giobbi in Italy, and discussing arrangements to meet

Letters 1951-1980  XOMN/B/2/4  1951-1980

Former reference: OMN/B/2/4

1 file

Conditions of access: Many of the items in this file are subject to conditional access until 2061.

Contents:
This correspondence largely relates to Mosley's political and literary activities during this period. Several letters focus on the development of his policy on Europe and his discussions on this subject with friends based both in the UK and in mainland Europe. Other letters concern the publication of his writing, particularly on Europe and other aspects of Union Movement policy. Most of the correspondence dates from the 1950s, but there are also some later letters, one of which encloses a printed programme dating from 1930. Letters include: /1 from Cahir Healy, House of Commons, 1953, making social arrangements, giving news of mutual acquaintances including Gordon Hamilton, Robert Gordon-Canning and Jack Ramsay. He also comments on Jeffrey Hamm's recent article in 'The European' on the subject of Partition /2 from 'Nikolaus' to Diana Mosley, written in German and French, Dec 1953, thanking her for her support and friendship during his previous hard times /3 in German from S. Ruche, Jul 1954, comprising a typed accreditation authorising the carrier to accept money for H.U.R and a handwritten note of thanks for the hospitality received, and expressing confidence, having met Mosley, that the common 'great struggle' will eventually be successful /4 in German from unidentified correspondent, Aug 1954, referring to receiving help through Dr Rau which enabled him to stay longer in Dublin, and sending apologies from Rau who is unable to attend the meeting /5-/6 from Francois Genoud, Lausanne, Aug 1954, giving details of travel plans, and making arrangements to meet Mosley. /6 contains handwritten notes by Mosley at the end of the letter /7 from Desmond Stewart, Elie, Fife, Scotland, 1955. The letter is addressed to 'Kit' and contains a detailed discussion of Mosley's writing for 'The European', and proposals to increase sales /8 copy letter from Mosley to A. Raven Thomson, 1955, containing his definition of European Socialism, to be presented at the Annual Conference /9 in German with partial English translation, from unidentified correspondent, Dec 1955, making arrangements to meet in Paris. Asks if the Italians have paid their dues, and that the Japanese should be reminded to get in contact. /10 from Michael Farnon, Trinity College, Cambridge, 1956, thanking Mosley for speaking in a recent debate [at the students union] and commenting on reviews in the 'Varsity' and 'Cambridge Evening News' /11 in German from Arthur Ehrhardt, publisher of Nation Europa, Dec 1956, discussing Mosley's views about [Konrad] Adenauer, and about Suez. He congratulates him on the January edition of 'Analysis' and hopes to print some of it in his own publication 'Suchlicht' /12 from Marsh & Ferriman, solicitors, 1957, in connection with correspondence with Vom Berg, and Mosley's communication with the Irish authorities. /13 from Colin Wilson, Old Walls, Mevagissey, Cornwall, 1958. Contains a detailed discussion of Mosley's policies and ideals, and the the ways in which these views are misrepresented in public /14 from a correspondent in Nova Scotia, Canada, 1958, asking for an autographed picture of Mosley. The writer encloses a set of black and white photographs of a Union Movement rally in Trafalgar Square in 1957, one of which is inscribed on the back. /15 from John Montgomery of A. D. Peters, Literary Agent, Buckingham Street, Adelphi, London, 1958. The letter asks for Mosley to provide information about a photograph of Franklin D. Roosevelt and Oswald and Cynthia Mosley on Florida Beach in 1926, to assist James Roosevelt in his research for a biography of his father /16 from a correspondent in New York State, 1959, in support of Mosley's policy on immigration, enclosing a number of press cuttings on this subject. /17 in German from Arthur Ehrhardt, publisher of Nation Europa, Jan 1960, with thanks for a copy of 'Action', and mentioning an article about anti-semitism. He goes on to discuss the worsening situation for the movement in Germany and complains about the attitude of the British press and their attempt to prevent the Anglo-German common destiny. He praises Mosley's slogan 'Europe a Nation', and hopes that he will contribute an article to the July edition of his publication /18 sequence of copy correspondence between Mosley and Bertrand Russell, Dec 1961-Jan 1962. This was inspired by the publication of a series of articles by Russell in the 'Sunday Times', and discusses European integration, the perceived military threat from Soviet Russia and the possibility of nuclear war /19 copy letter written by Mosley 1962, apparently intended as a report on his recent visit to the United States of America, dealing with the reaction from print and broadcast media, and from his appearance at Buffalo University /20 copy letter from Mosley to Lord Thomson of Fleet, 1969, objecting to aspects of his treatment by 'The Times' and 'The Sunday Times' /21 photocopy of a letter from Colin Wilson, Tetherdown, Gorran Haven, Cornwall, 1971, congratulating Mosley on his appearance in a recent television programme /22 from unidentified correspondent, written from The East India & Sports Club, London, Sept 1971. The letter contains a detailed discussion of the political situation in Northern Ireland at the time, informed by the writer's recent meeting with Cecil King. /23 from Caroleen Conquest, research assistant for the Current Affairs Group at the BBC, 1974, asking for clarification of Mosley's views about William Joyce as part of her research for a forthcoming documentary about Joyce's life. A draft handwritten reply by Mosley is attached /24 from Alastair Burnet, 'The Daily Express', 1975, confirming a social engagement and including a list of individuals who will also be attending. These consist of journalists from 'The Daily Express', 'The Economist' and 'The Investors' Chronicle', and from ITV and the BBC /25 from a correspondent in connection with research for his thesis on the B.U.F, dated 1976. The letter encloses a printed souvenir programme produced by the Birmingham Trades Council & Labour Party for May Day Demonstration of 1930. Oswald Mosley and his wife Cynthia Mosley are listed among the speakers that day /26 from Colin Wilson, Tetherdown, Gorran Haven, Cornwall, 1980, thanking Mosley for agreeing to write an article for him, and giving details of other individuals who have also agreed. The letter also mentions that Mosley and Wilson are both to write a review of a book on Henry Williamson for Books & Bookmen /27 undated telegram sent from Mosley in Paris to Lucht Buderich in Dusseldorf asking him to contact Marsh & Ferriman, Mosley's solicitors.

Press cuttings  XOMN/B/3  1926-1980

Former reference: OMN/B/3

2 vols and 2 files

Contents:
This series consists of press cuttings largely relating to Oswald Mosley's personal life and political career, covering many of the major events in this, including his leadership of the British Union of Fascists, later the Union Movement, and his imprisonment during the Second World War under Regulation 18B. There is also a sequence of cuttings relating to a variety of political topics in which Mosley was interested; many of these concern British economic policy after the Second World War. The majority of the cuttings are loose, but there are also two albums containing press cuttings covering particular events in Mosley's political career; his election campaign and victory as Labour Party candidate at Smethwick in 1926, and his visit to Rome in 1933 as a guest at the International Fascist Exhibition, organised by Mussolini's government.

Album  XOMN/B/3/1  1926-1930

Former reference: OMN/B/3/1

1 vol

Contents:
This album contains press cuttings and photographs relating to Oswald Mosley's by-election campaign in Smethwick in Dec 1926. The majority of the cuttings consist of cartoons and printed photographs of Mosley, and of his wife, Cynthia Mosley, who assisted him in his campaigning and made several speeches in the constituency, and several of the photographs printed in the newspaper articles show them speaking to local audiences. There are also photographs of the crowds present at the election count. Many of the cartoons focus on the apparent conflict between the wealth and social background of the Mosleys and their membership of the Labour Party. There is one article, published in an unidentified American newspaper, dated 1927, which focuses on Oswald Mosley's election success despite his social status and the opposition of his father. The album also contains some loose black and white photographs taken during the campaign, consisting of a photograph of Oswald Mosley campaigning from his car, and two photographs of Cynthia Mosley. One of these shows her making a speech; the other shows her with an unidentified man, possibly a local Labour Party activist.

Album  XOMN/B/3/2  1933

Former reference: OMN/B/3/2

1 vol

Contents:
This album contains press cuttings from national and local newspapers consisting of articles and letters, largely relating to Oswald Mosley's visit to Rome in April 1933 to take part in the celebrations held for an International Fascist Exhibition. Many of these articles contain descriptions of events attended by Mosley and his followers, including the 'Birth of Rome' review of the Fascist militia, at which German Nazis were also present, and some include details about Cynthia Mosley, who accompanied her husband to Rome. Other articles focus on the growing popularity of fascist movements in Britain, particularly Mosley's political movement, its policies, and its likely influence on mainstream British politics. The album includes one unrelated cutting. This is a report published in the 'Daily Mail', 1 May 1933 announcing the engagement of Irene Curzon to Miles Graham. The album also contains loose research notes made by Nicholas Mosley which cite extracts from some of the press cuttings relating to the presence of Oswald Mosley and some of his supporters at the events in Rome.

Personal and political press cuttings  XOMN/B/3/3  1926-1980

Former reference: OMN/B/3/3

1 file

Contents:
These papers consist of cuttings from newspapers, journals and magazines of articles and reports about different aspects of Oswald Mosley's personal life and political career over a substantial period of time, covering his position as Labour MP for Smethwick; his leadership of the British Union of Fascists in the 1930s; his marriage to Diana Guinness (nee Mitford), and his imprisonment during the Second World War under 18B Regulations; the revival of his political organisation, the Union Movement, in the 1950s, and his involvement in post-war meetings and election campaigns. The earliest cuttings comprise reports on Mosley's speeches at meetings, and in Parliament as an MP, and include /9 published in the 'Liverpool Echo' in 1926 about Mosley's dispute with his father about his socialist politics; /14 published in an unidentified French newspaper about Mosley's resignation from the cabinet in 1930. The file also contains articles relating to Mosley's New Party and his growing interest in fascism. Cuttings from the 1930s consist of articles about members of Mosley's British Union of Fascists, including /22 and /23 about John Beckett; /24 published in 'Forward' in 1934 about Mosley's proposals on unemployment; several articles about various aspects of fascist policy, including charges of anti-semitism and reports on meetings at which Oswald Mosley spoke, including /38 article published in 'Action' in 1936; articles about disturbances at a B.U.F meeting in Leith in 1937; and an article with several black and white photographs published in the 'Picture Post' in July 1939 about a large fascist meeting at Earls Court which was attended by the writer Henry Williamson and by Randolph Churchill, amongst others. Cuttings relating to Oswald Mosley's personal life include /36: article in an unidentified newspaper reporting on the opening of the Cynthia Mosley Day Nursery in Kennington in 1935 and several articles about Mosley's secret marriage to Diana Guinness (nee Mitford) and the birth of their son [Alexander] in 1938. Cuttings dating from the Second World War primarily concern the imprisonment of Oswald Mosley in 1940, and the political debate and different public opinions surrounding the issue of his release from Holloway prison in 1943 on the grounds of ill health. These include /69: article by George Orwell published in 'Tribune' in 1944. Post-war cuttings comprise articles about the reaction in Britain to the evidence from Nazi concentration and extermination camps; the trial of William Joyce; the 1945 election; and the revivial of fascism and Oswald Mosley's Union Movement. These include /102: article by Rebecca West, published in the 'Evening Standard' in 1947 about anti-semitism in London, and /99: report in the 'Eastern Evening News' in 1947 about Jeffrey Hamm being charged under the Public Order Act because of his anti-semitic agitation at meetings of the British League of Ex-Servicemen, of which he was a leader. Cuttings relating to Mosley's personal life consist of an article about Mosley's purchase of the Crowood estate in Wiltshire in 1945, and another on the publication of his book 'The Alternative' in 1947. Cuttings from the 1950s and early 1960s focus on public appearances by Oswald Mosley and the Union Movement's election campaigns, particularly at North Kensington in 1959. They include /110: article published in 'Varsity' in 1954 about Mosley's speech at the Cambridge students union; /114: article published in 'The Times' in 1958 about violence at a fascist meeting that Mosley addressed at Birmingham Town Hall; several articles about the Union Movement's election campaign in North Kensington and its role in provoking racial violence in Notting Hill in 1959; articles about disturbances at meetings in the East End of London and in Manchster in 1962 at which Mosley was attacked and injured. Other cuttings include Mosley's letters to the press, largely relating to his apparent boycott by the BBC, and to omissions or mistakes in articles and broadcasts about his life including his particularly on his supposed anti-semitism. There are also reports about Mosley's autobiography, 'My Life', and several interviews with Mosley dating from the 1970s and profiles of his life. The file includes two brief articles about the Mitford sisters, particularly Jessica and Nancy, and /160: review by Christopher Hitchens in the 'New Statesman' 1980 of Diana Mosley's biography of Magda Goebbels.

Press cuttings on political topics  XOMN/B/3/4  1930-1980

Former reference: OMN/B/3/4

1 file

Contents:
These papers consist of cuttings from newspapers, magazines and journals, collected by Oswald Mosley or by members of his secretariat. Many of these cuttings have been annotated in Mosley's handwriting. Most of the cuttings date from the late 1950s and early 1960s, but there are also some earlier cuttings which relate principally to the activities of Mosley's British Union of Fascists and include /1: article by W.E.D. (Bill) Allen published in an unidentified newspaper in 1930 which argues for political change managed by the young rather than old politicians like Stanley Baldwin. There are also a small number of cuttings dating from the years of the Second World War which focus on the progress of the Italian campaign and the war with Japan. The cuttings dating from the 1950s and early 1960s include articles on subjects related to Mosley's post war economic policy, comprising an article written by Robert Row in 'Union' in 1952 about proposals brought forward by Sidney Silverman for increased trade with the Soviet Union and countries in Eastern Europe; articles and letters published in 'The Times' in 1953 concerning the threat to British trade with Commonwealth countries from the United States and proposals to improve this situation, including letters from Robert Boothby; an article in 'The Financial Times' 1958 about the resignation of Peter Thorneycroft, Chancellor of the Exchequer, and rising inflation in Britain. Other cuttings focus on international security, particularly the perceived threat from the Soviet Union, and include an article by Bertrand Russell in 'The Observer' in 1958 about nuclear disarmament. There is also a set of mounted newspaper cuttings concerning the modernisation of procedures in the House of Commons, dated 1957, and an article published in 'The Observer' in 1960 about Harold Macmillan's visit to Africa which focuses on the establishment of independent African states and includes information about their leaders. The file also contains a small number of later cuttings dating from the 1970s. These include reviews published in 'The Listener' in 1971 of books about fascism in which Mosley is mentioned, including 'Fascist Minds and Fascist Beasts' by Clive James, and 'British Fascism' by Hugh Cecil, and an article about the fascist sympathies of Justice Frederick Lawton, published in 1978. There is also an article published in 'The Times' 1971 about British government policy in Ulster, which was another long-term political interest of Oswald Mosley

Political and literary writings  XOMN/B/4  1927-c1960

Former reference: OMN/B/4

8 files

Contents:
This series consists of manuscript, typescript and printed writings by Oswald Mosley, including drafts of some of his published monographs, as well as articles and policy documents. Most of the manuscript writings date from the 1940s and 1950s, and comprise drafts of articles; research notes; and full drafts of 'My Answer'; 'The Alternative'; and 'Europe: Faith and Plan'. There are also a small number of earlier articles dating from the 1920s and 1930s, some of which were published in political journals.

Drafts of 'The Alternative' and 'My Answer'  XOMN/B/4/1  1929-1947

Former reference: OMN/B/4/1

2 vols

Contents:
Written as continuous text in two volumes of 'Collins Scribbling Diary' for 1929 and 1930. The 1930 diary contains a draft of Part I of 'The Alternative' written from the front of the volume. The right hand pages contain text, with the date of composition of each day's work; the left hand pages contain notes and references, including information about proposed chapter divisions. It appears that Mosley wrote this draft between Jan 1947 and Jun 1947. Written from the rear of the volume are what appear to be drafts of short articles, some with headings including 'The Labour Party' and 'Africa'. The 1929 diary contains a draft of Part II of 'The Alternative', written from the rear of the volume. The layout of the text follows the conventions described for the draft of Part I, and the dates of composition suggest that Part II was drafted concurrently with Part I. This volume also contains a draft of 'My Answer' which Mosley published in 1946. This draft is written in continuous text from the front of the volume, and is followed by a series of what appear to be drafts of short articles, some with headings including 'Freedom of Speech' and 'The Economic Debate'. Some of these pieces of writing include an indication of the number of words they consisted of, suggesting that Mosley may have been writing them for inclusion in particular publications. Both these volumes were obviously re-used for Mosley's draft writings, but they also contain diary entries for the years 1929 and 1930. The 1929 volume contains entries for several days in Jun and July 1929, just after Mosley had been appointed to Ramsay MacDonald's cabinet as Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster with special responsibility for unemployment, under J. H. Thomas, the Lord Privy Seal. The entries contain information about Mosley's meetings with Thomas, Ramsay MacDonald and others, and some include comments about his work on the committee and his theories about how to alleviate unemployment. There are also entries for 21 Oct and 13 Dec, and written on one of the Memoranda pages at the rear of the volume are diary entries for 21 Feb, 25 Feb and 27 Feb 1930 which discuss events surrounding the attempted resignation of J. H. Thomas from the cabinet over Mosley's discussion of his proposals to deal with unemployment with Ramsay MacDonald, without first discussing them with Thomas. Another Memoranda page contains a pencilled list of dates for which there are diary entries in the 1929 volume The 1930 Diary contains one brief diary entry for 6 Mar 1930 which contains details of Mosley's appointments that day.

Drafts of 'Europe: Faith and Plan'  XOMN/B/4/2  1957

Former reference: OMN/B/4/2

2 vols

Contents:
Written in two volumes of large hardback notebooks in chapter sections. One volume contains drafts of chapters 1 to 4 and additions to chapter 6; the other contains drafts of chapters 5 to 7, with additions to chapters 3 and 4 and a draft of the introduction to the book. In both volumes, the draft text is written on the right hand pages, while the left hand pages contain notes, information about chapter divisions and references. There are also calculations of the number of words some chapters consisted of. The title is written at the beginning of each volume. It appears that its original title was 'Europe: Policy and Faith', but was later amended by Mosley to 'Europe: Faith and Plan'.

Unidentified draft writings  XOMN/B/4/3  Undated [1950s-1960s]

Former reference: OMN/B/4/3

1 vol

Contents:
These consist of drafts of what appear to be articles, written in a large paperback notebook. Many of the pieces of text include an indication of the number of words they consist of, suggesting that Mosley may have written them for inclusion in particular publications, likely to have been those produced by the Union Movement. Several of the pieces of writing appear to be on the subject of immigration, and refer to the involvement of Mosley and the Union Movement in the violence in North Kensington between 'Teddy Boys' and West Indian immigrants. The volume also contains a draft text entitled 'Mosley Policy on Coloured Problem' which outlines the Union Movement's immigration policy at the time.

Unidentified draft writings  XOMN/B/4/4  Undated [1950s-1960s]

Former reference: OMN/B/4/4

1 vol

Contents:
These consist of drafts of what appear to be articles or contributions to chapters of an unidentified book, written in a large hardback notebook. Some pages contain what appear to be chapter plans and divisions, but these do not seem to correspond to the chapter divisions of any of Mosley's major publications. Many of the pieces of text appear focus on the subject of immigration, and on the policy of the Union Movement on Africa, but other draft texts appear to concern different aspects of government economic policy.

Unidentified draft writings  XOMN/B/4/5  Undated [1950s-1960s]

Former reference: OMN/B/4/5

1 vol

Contents:
These consist of a mixture of what appear to be drafts of articles, chapter plans for an unidentified book, and extracts copied from published articles, not necessarily by Mosley, written in a small hardback notebook. Some of the pieces of text include an indication of the number of words they consisted of, suggesting that Mosley may have written them for inclusion in a particular publication. Most of the pieces of writing appear to focus on different aspects of the political history of the first half of the twentieth century, and there are several references to Churchill.

Unidentified draft writings  XOMN/B/4/6  Undated [c1945]

Former reference: OMN/B/4/6

1 vol

Contents:
These consist of research notes and chapter plans for an unidentifed book, possibly 'The Alternative', written in a small spiral-bound notebook. Many of these notes focus on contemporary politics, and include extracts from newspapers and speeches made in 1945.

Manuscript notes  XOMN/B/4/7  Undated [1940s-1950s]

Former reference: OMN/B/4/7

1 file

Contents:
These largely consist of loose research notes for 'The Alternative' which Mosley published in 1947, focusing on Mosley's theory that the will of most politicians is directed towards comfort, power or achievement. Other notes contain details about democracy and public duty, and include extracts from speeches by Oliver Lyttelton in 1945. This file also contains a draft of an article apparently written for the 'Gazette & Post' on the necessity of Britain joining the European Market and some loose fragmentary writings.

Published and typescript articles  XOMN/B/4/8  1920s-1960s

Former reference: OMN/B/4/8

1 file

Contents:
These consist of photocopies of printed articles by Mosley entitled /1 'The Labour Party's Financial Policy', published in 'The Socialist Review' in 1927 and /2 The Philosophy of Fascism', published in 'Fascist Quarterly' in 1933, and typescripts of various articles, speeches and policy documents written by Mosley for publication or dissemination on various subjects. These include /3: typescript dated Dec 1930 of a speech to the House of Commons which contains details of Mosley's proposals for economic reform, and /4: reply written by Mosley to an article published in the 'Evening Standard in the autumn of 1932 which discussed his political career and changing party allegiances in the context of his founding of the British Union of Fascists. There are also pieces of writing on fascist theory, propounded in /5: article entitled 'The World Alternative', published in Fascist Quarterly 1936; /6: the failure of the National Government; /7: two copies of a document describing B.U.F foreign and defence policy; /8: Union Movement propaganda in the USA; /9: Union Movement economic policy; /10: the need for parliamentary reform; and /11: copy of a typescript article entitled 'Europa und Annerkennung' about the benefits to Britain of European Union.

Personalia  XOMN/B/5  1909-1960

Former reference: OMN/B/5

8 files

Contents:
This series consists of written material, including appointment diaries and personal notebooks; registers recording details of game shot, and wine kept in Oswald Mosley's cellars; and several miscellaneous photographs. This material spans a wide date range, but the majority dates from the 1940s and 1950s. It is characterised by its focus on Mosley's personal rather than political interests, although the subject matter of the notebooks reveals Mosley's interest in Goethe and Greek history and philosophy which he explored further in published works like 'The Alternative'.

Diaries and notebooks  XOMN/B/5/1  1940s-1950s

Former reference: OMN/B/5/1

6 vols

Contents:
These consist of three pocket appointment diaries for the years 1946, 1947 and 1949, and two paperback notebooks containing Mosley's notes on literature, philosophy and politics, based on his reading.

Diary, 1946  XOMN/B/5/1/1  1946

Former reference: OMN/B/5/1/1

1 vol

Contents:
Pages between Apr and Dec are blank; the remaining pages contain a few details of appointments, but are largely filled with notes, lists and references including telephone numbers and addresses, presumably for friends and political contacts

Diary, 1947  XOMN/B/5/1/2  1947

Former reference: OMN/B/5/1/2

1 vol

Contents:
Appointments diary with entries giving brief details about meetings and social engagements. The first few pages of this volume contain addresses and telephone numbers for some of Mosley's contacts.

Diary, 1949  XOMN/B/5/1/3  1949

Former reference: OMN/B/5/1/3

1 vol

Contents:
Appointments diary with an inscription inside the front cover to Mosley from 'Alf', signed 'yours ever in Union'. Entries give brief details of meetings and social engagements, and a section at the back of the volume contains addresses and telephone numbers for Mosley's friends and contacts.

Notebook  XOMN/B/5/1/4  Undated [1940s-1950s]

Former reference: OMN/B/5/1/4

1 vol

Contents:
Contains notes made by Oswald Mosley on Goethe's Faust, and a separate piece of writing, apparently on the constitution.

Notebook  XOMN/B/5/1/5  Undated [1940s-1950s]

Former reference: OMN/B/5/1/5

1 vol

Contents:
Contains notes made as a result of Mosley's reading of various works, including Gilbert Murray on The Stoic Philosopher, and other works on Greek history and philosophy. There are also references for other books that he obviously intended to read on similar subjects.

Game Register  XOMN/B/5/2  1909-1913

Former reference: OMN/B/5/2

1 vol

Contents:
Pre-printed volume with columns to record date, place, number of game shot, individuals present on each shoot, and any remarks. Details have been entered for the 1909-1910 season, and the seasons following that, up to 1912-1913. Entries suggest that Oswald Mosley went shooting with members of his mother's family, the Heathcotes, at various locations in Staffordshire and Shropshire, including Rolleston and Apedale Hall.

Wine Cellar book  XOMN/B/5/3  1935-1944

Former reference: OMN/B/5/3

1 vol

Contents:
Pre-printed volume containing entries recording stock levels of various wines in Mosley's cellar, including details about wines kept at his flat in London. Stock-taking seems to have been done at regular intervals between 1935 and 1937, but more sporadically after this date. There is a gap between May 1940 and Nov 1942 when no details were recorded, presumably due to the arrest and imprisonment of Oswald and Diana Mosley. Sporadic stock checks seem to have resumed during 1943 and 1944. Inserted in this volume is a letter addressed to Oswald Mosley at Crux Easton House from A. Eberley, 24 Lowndes Street, London, 30 Mar 1944, who seems to have been an employee. The letter encloses the wine book and a list of books, and discusses wine stocks and arrangements to send clothes belonging to Diana Mosley to [her sister] Mrs Jackson.

Photographs  XOMN/B/5/4  1920s-1930s

Former reference: OMN/B/5/4

1 file

Contents:
These consist of black and white photographs of a miscellaneous nature, including a portrait photograph of an unidentified Nazi official inscribed in German; a photograph of a young girl, possibly Diana Mitford; portrait photograph of two young unidentified children; and a set of photographs of the interior of an unidentified house taken by a photographer in Lewes, Sussex. These photographs are stored in an envelope on which are written details of the rental price of the house.

Miscellaneous  XOMN/B/5/5  1922-1961

Former reference: OMN/B/5/5

1 file

Contents:
These papers consist of manuscript notes in Mosley's handwriting and printed reports and ephemera related to Mosley. This includes /1: undated typescript analysis of Mosley's character /2: printed information advertising the sale of Mosley's stud horses in 1922 /4: programme for an International Fencing Display held in London in 1931 in which Mosley took part /6: menu for a dinner held to commemorate Mosley's birthday in Nov 1944, signed by those who attended; /9: publicity leaflet produced by the Oxford [University] Union Society to advertise a debate at which Mosley spoke in 1961.

Financial papers  XOMN/B/6  1925-1959

Former reference: OMN/B/6

4 files

Contents:
This series consists of papers relating to the commercial and business interests and personal financial situation of Oswald Mosley and his family, including papers relating to his first wife Cynthia Mosley. It comprises extensive papers relating to Mosley's investments in stocks and shares, before, during and after the 1939-1945 war, and to his settlement trusts administered by the Public Trustee. It also contains a certain amount of material recording details of his income and expenditure, although not for the entire period covered by these papers. The series contains papers relating to Mosley's commercial interests. These include an extensive sequence of material documenting the efforts made by others, including his second wife Diana Mosley, on his behalf, to secure franchises for commercial radio stations outside the United Kingdom during the late 1930s, including Sark in the Channel Islands, and in Germany, and a small amount of material relating to the publishing companies he established after the Second World War. The series also contains papers relating to the purchase and administration of property acquired by Mosley immediately after the war, which were intended to provide him with a source of income through farming. Most of this material relates to the Crowood estate at Ramsbury, Wiltshire, where Mosley lived between about 1945 and 1951, but there are also references to other properties, including Crux Easton, where Oswald and Diana Mosley lived between 1944 and 1945.

Papers pre 1933  XOMN/B/6/1  1927-1932

Former reference: OMN/B/6/1

1 file

Contents:
This material consists largely of correspondence and associated papers from Mosley's solicitor G. B. Laurence, and from his stock and share brokers Spurling, Skinner, Tudor & Co, consisting of statements of accounts, share certificates, and valuation lists relating to the share holdings and investments of Oswald Mosley and his first wife Cynthia. There is also some correspondence from the Public Trustee relating to the Mosley Settlement Trust and the administration of property in Manchester, and to Cynthia Mosley's marriage settlement. Papers relating specifically to Cynthia Mosley include a letter from G. B. Laurence dated 1927 concerning the tax to be paid on Cynthia Mosley's income from the Leiter Trust inherited from her mother, together with a copy letter to Laurence from the Inland Revenue containing details of the tax paid in previous years. Other papers relating to Cynthia's financial status include valuations of her share investments compiled by Spurling, Skinner, Tudor & Co and apparently administered through 'C. M. Investments', established in 1925; correspondence from G. B. Laurence dated 1932 containing details of an investment scheme for Cynthia to invest money in Canadian companies; copy correspondence to the Public Trustee dated 1932 relating to the Mosleys' need to reduce their overdraft by offering securities to Barclays Bank on assets from Cynthia Mosley's marriage settlement. There is also a letter to Cynthia from Frank E. Stanley, dated 1933 which contains a statement of charges due from her sister, Lady Alexandra Metcalfe, as payment for her share of the rent of accommodation [at Yarlington House, Somerset] at Christmas 1932, together with handwritten bills for food and drink purchased during this stay. The file contains an undated personal letter written to Cynthia from 'Doris', at Le Chapon Fin Hotel, Bordeaux which discusses arrangements made with Doris's solicitor for her to rent an unidentified house that Cynthia seems to have owned. Other papers include a statement of accounts for 1929 giving details of the income and expenditure of Oswald and Cynthia Mosley during the time they spent in France. This consists of a list showing personal expenditure on hotels, cars and other outgoings, but also includes a list showing political expenditure for part of 1929, including contributions to the Smethwick, Stoke-on-Trent and Ladywood branches of the Labour party and office expenses including salaries, and the petty cash account of [Oswald Mosley's political secretary] Allan Young. The file also contains a typed statement produced by G. B. Laurence listing the savings to be made by closing Savehay Farm at Denham during the winter of 1931, and a set undated notes written in Mosley's hand which give instructions about selling shares.

Papers post 1933  XOMN/B/6/2  1933-1959

Former reference: OMN/B/6/2

1 file

Contents:
This extensive sequence comprises a wide variety of material largely relating to Oswald Mosley's financial assets, and to his investments, both in real estate and in stocks and shares. Although there are several documents dating from the 1930s, the majority of the papers date from the period between 1943 and 1945, and from the early 1950s. There are no papers dating between 1939 and 1943. The material consists of correspondence from Mosley's solicitors G. B. Laurence & Co, and later Marsh & Ferriman, his stock brokers Snell, Swaffield, Sidney J. Lovell & Co, and his accountants Spofforth & Price; lists of the value of various stocks and shares of both UK companies and those based abroad, particularly North American companies in the 1930s, and South African companies in the early 1950s; share certificates and details of the dividends on Mosley's share holdings and investments; bank statements for Mosley's accounts issued by Barclays Bank in the 1930s, and the Bank of Ireland in the 1950s; deeds and associated papers, and correspondence from the Public Trustee relating to Mosley's real estate holdings. Papers include an Opinion by G. B. Laurence on the settlement of Cynthia Mosley's will, her income from the Leiter estate, and her shares in U.S and Canadian companies, dated 1933, and a typed document recording Mosley's financial position after Cynthia's death, containing details of his debts and the income he could raise in order to pay for his children's maintenance and for the upkeep of Savehay Farm, Denham, dated 1935. Other papers dating from this period include a letter written to Diana Guinness concerning the sale of 32 Grosvenor Gardens Mews by Mosley in 1937, Mosley's tax returns for the year 1937-1938 including details of his sources of income and sums paid from his account to the B.U.F and B.U.F Districts Trusts in 1938, and statements issued by the Public Trustee of the income from the Sir Oswald Mosley Settlement Trust, and the Sir Oswald and Lady Mosley Settlement Trust in 1939, together with correspondence relating to rents from properties administered by the Public Trustee in Manchester. Papers dating between 1943 and 1945 largely relate to Mosley's various commercial and industrial investments, and include details of the value of his shares, some of which were connected with the Mosley Settlement Trust. These papers include correspondence from his stock brokers and draft handwritten correspondence from Mosley to his solicitors and to the Public Trustee. Other material dating from this period concerns the purchase of property at Crux Easton in 1944, and the payment of War Damage Insurance on jewellery and furniture belonging to Oswald and Diana Mosley. Papers dating from the 1950s consists of material relating to Mosley's investments in South African mines and in other industry in that country and in Southern Rhodesia, and correspondence relating to Mosley family property in Manchester administered through the Anslow Trust. This correspondence includes a letter from his brother Edward Mosley, signed 'Ted'. There is also correspondence from Captain O. M. Watts Ltd, dated 1950, concerning repairs to Mosley's yacht 'Alianora'. Other papers relate to Mosley's financial situation regarding his taxation and income from French estates and securities should he decide to emigrate to France, and correspondence from Anderson, Stanford (Removals) Ltd in Dublin, relating to the importation of Mosley's furniture and household effects through Irish Customs, 1953. There is a small amount of material relating to Mosley's income from his publishing ventures linked to the Union Movement in the 1950s, including the Sanctuary Press, Euphorion Distribution, and the New Union Press. This includes income and expenditure accounts and associated correspondence to Mosley from H. McKechnie; a typed report on the feasibility of establishing a branch of Euphorion Books in Paris and associated correspondence from Snell, Lovell & Co, dated 1950; and correspondence relating to the publication of Hans-Ulrich Rudel's 'Stuka Pilot' by Euphorion Books in 1953, and the royalties resulting from this publication in 1958. The file also includes some unrelated material which consists of a set of legal papers dated 1938-1939 comprising solicitors' correspondence, and copies of anonymous communications and correspondence received by Mary Russell Tavener, plaintiff in a slander suit brought against Mosley.

Commercial ventures  XOMN/B/6/3  1936-1946

Former reference: OMN/B/6/3

1 file

Contents:
These papers relate to efforts made by Mosley, his second wife Diana, and other supporters, to establish radio stations in countries outside the UK in order to sell advertising to raise money. Although the funds raised from this venture were intended to support the B.U.F, it does not appear that the radio network was ever intended to have a political focus. However, it was necessary to disguise Mosley's involvement in the project so as not to deter potential advertisers, and this entailed the establishment of holding companies and the recruitment of Diana Mosley and other supporters to enter into negotiations with representatives from the identified host countries. The material comprises drafts and copies of legal agreements; correspondence; and progress reports providing summaries of existing agreements and ongoing negotiations with host countries. Mosley's friend and B.U.F supporter Bill Allen was central to the plan, both for his financial assistance, and his connections to advertising through his family business, David Allen & Sons Ltd, based in Northern Ireland. The file contains correspondence from Bill Allen to Mosley, including /2: letter dated Mar 1936 which refers to a loan, and /30: letter dated Aug 1938 which discusses travel arrangements, forthcoming meetings with Frederick Lawton, the barrister appointed by Mosley's solicitors as a legal adviser, and payments to Peter Eckersley, another B.U.F sympathiser who was involved in one of the holding companies set up as part of the radio advertising project. The file contains several drafts and copies of legal agreements, largely relating to the establishment of the companies Museum Investment Trust, and Air Time Ltd. These include /4-/11: annotated drafts of Articles of Agreement dated 1937 drawn up by Frederick Lawton relating to the agreement reached in 1937 with the ruler of Sark to establish a radio station on the island, involving David Allen & Sons Ltd and Museums Investment Trust, and associated correspondence. There is also a draft Deed of Covenant, dated 1939, with annotations and additions by Frederick Lawton, relating to the allocation of shares in Air Time Ltd to David Allen & Sons Ltd, and a revised version of this document, together with associated papers. Papers relating to the 1937 agreement to establish a radio station on Sark include /26: typed memorandum on the jurisdiction applying to the establishment of radio stations on the Channel Islands, and to the rights of the Seigneur of Sark, and /27: an Opinion, compiled by Frederick Lawton to assess the legal situation. Other material includes of typescript reports and memoranda concerning agreements and negotiations, including /3: undated report on proposals to set up a radio station in Spain; /28: a document dated April 1938 which contains plans for representatives to attend conferences in Luxembourg, Spain and Liechtenstein, and details of the current efforts to secure franchises in Belgium, Irelend, Denmark, Germany, Liechtenstien, Sark, Iceland and Austria; /29: photocopy of a typescript progress report that appears to date from 1938 outlining the terms of existing agreements with Sark, Liechtenstein and Toulouse and Bordeaux in France, and the state of negotiations in Ireland, Denmark, Germany, Belgium and Austria. Further information about attempts to establish a radio station in Germany is contained in /12-/24: set of correspondence from Captain Wiedemann, Hitler's adjutant, to Diana Mosley, who travelled to Germany on several occasions to try to negotiate an agreement with the German government. These letters have been photocopied, and some have attached typed English translations. The correspondence is dated 1937-1938. It appears that Diana was occasionally accompanied by Frederick Lawton, and the file also contains /25: note written by him from the Hotel Kaiserhof in Berlin, dated June 1938. Financial papers relating to the venture include /38: set of audited accounts for Radio Variety Ltd, a company set up to sell advertising and develop programmes for the radio stations. These provide financial statements for 1943, 1944 and 1945, signed by James Herd, and Peter Eckersley, the directors of the company. There is also correspondence dated 1945-1946 from James Herd, accountant, to Mosley, concerning the value of Air Time Ltd shares, the assets and cash position of the company and its affairs. Undated material consists of a typescript written by Mosley giving an explanation of the financial situation of the B.U.F which led to the establishment of companies for radio advertising, and an undated letter to Mosley from B. Rayner concerning an unidentified business association. It is unclear whether this relates to Air Time Ltd or Radio Variety Ltd. The file includes /30: letter from Maud Mosley to an unidentified recipient relating to negotiations with Robert Gordon-Canning concerning the purchase of shares in New Era Securities, dated 1939. It is unclear whether this company was connected to the radio advertising venture.

Real estate papers  XOMN/B/6/4  1944-1947

Former reference: OMN/B/6/4

1 file

Contents:
This material relates largely to Oswald Mosley's purchase of property at Crowood, Wiltshire in 1944, and to the formation and administration of Pond Wood Estates, a company set up by Mosley to enable him to acquire the Crowood estate, as well as property at Crux Easton, Hampshire, and his requisitioned property at Denham, Buckinghamshire. The company was directed by Harold Hadden, property adviser to the Public Trustee, and he was responsible for all matters of estate management on the farms, as well as the company's investments. The vast majority of the papers concern Crowood, but there is a small amount of material relating to Crux Easton and Savehay Farm, Denham. Papers consist of legal correspondence from Mosley's solicitors, Marsh & Ferriman, including papers relating to the formation and administration of Pond Wood Estates and to Mosley's financial position; correspondence relating to the company's investments from Mosley's accountants, Spofforth & Prince; accounts and associated papers relating to taxation; papers relating to the purchase of property at Crowood, including two copies of the sales catalogue containing descriptions and photographs of the land and property comprising the Crowood estate, together with coloured plans, and a typed document giving the names of Crowood tenants; documents produced by Pond Wood Estates relating to the estate management of the farm at Crowood; miscellaneous bills dated 1944 from builders, electricians and water and heating engineers for repairs and improvements to Mosley's house at Crux Easton. Much of this correspondence and associated material was stored by Oswald Mosley in envelopes which appear to have formed a kind of filing system. The envelopes contain notes written in his hand which record details about the content of the enclosed correspondence, the organisation of which appears to be loosely thematic, rather than chronological. This arrangement has been preserved.

Political papers: pre 1940  XOMN/B/7  1930-1939

Former reference: OMN/B/7

5 files

Contents:
This series consists of correspondence, reports, policy documents and photographs largely relating to the organisation and activities of the British Union of Fascists. However, there is also a small amount of material relating to the New Party. The B.U.F papers are not extensive, but include material on the structure and policies of the Movement, and photographs of some of the large meetings and events which the B.U.F organised or attended. Most of the correspondence is written to Mosley by members or supporters of the Movement, including General J. F. C. Fuller, Bill Allen, B. S. James and Leigh Vaughan Henry and concerns the activities of the Movement, including references to the writings of William Joyce and to the reorganisation of the B.U.F. Reports written by General Fuller also deal with reorganisation.

New Party material  XOMN/B/7/1  1930-1932

Former reference: OMN/B/7/1

1 file

Contents:
These papers consist of a typed set of 'Speakers Notes' issued by the New Party Information Section, dated July 1931, and two printed pamphlets in the series of 'New Party Broadcasts'. The 'Speakers Notes' are labelled No. 1 'The Crisis', and contain statistics and research notes on trade, commerce, industry, current politics and social conditions from published sources including newspapers, Hansard, and the 'Ministry of Labour Gazette'. It is likely that this material was intended to be used as evidence to support New Party policy in speeches made by members. The 'New Party Broadcast' pamphlets are No. 1, entitled 'The Case for the New Party' by C. E. M. Joad, and No.7, entitled 'The New Party and the Old Toryism' by W. E. D. Allen.

B.U.F correspondence and associated papers  XOMN/B/7/2  1933-1939

Former reference: OMN/B/7/2

1 file

Contents:
The majority of these letters are written by members or supporters of the British Union of Fascists to Oswald Mosley. There is also /1: letter from Rex Tremlett, editor of 'Fascist Week', to Bill Allen; /9, /17-/18: a small amount of correspondence written to Robert (Bobby) Gordon-Canning in his capacity as a B.U.F supporter and friend of Mosley, and /6: letter to Lady Macgill about the organisation of the B.U.F in 1933. The file also includes /16: a statement of expenses incurred by A. K. Chesterton while working for the organisation in 1936, and 20-/21: receipts for substantial sums of money donated by Oswald Mosley to the B.U.F Trust Ltd and the British Union of Fascists (Districts) Ltd in 1938. There are a number of letters from Bill Allen. Some discuss articles that he wrote for the 'Fascist Week', including one entitled 'Lord Beaverbrook Entertains', of which /3 is a copy, and /2, dated Aug 1933, also mentions a book on fascism that he is in the process of writing. There is also /19: telegram congratulating Mosley on the success of the B.U.F in the 1937 elections in East London, and /22: letter dated Jul 1938 which contains details about unidentfied business proposals and agreements, possibly related to Mosley's commercial radio venture (see also OMN/B/6/3) Other letters consist of critical comments on B.U.F policy. These include a sequence of letters written by B. S. James, Leigh Vaughan-Henry and Robert Forgan, /10-13, on the style of a pamphlet written by William Joyce on B.U.F policy relating to British rule in India, and /8: typescript report on Joyce's pamphlets written for Mosley by G. S. Gerault in 1934. These individuals all advise Mosley that Joyce's writing is likely to damage the movement by alienating moderate supporters. An annotated copy of the pamphlet, entitled 'Fascism and India' is enclosed with B. S. James's letter. There is also /14: letter from A. Cleghorn to Mosley, dated 1935, reporting the actions of a Dr Pfister, possibly a member of the B.U.F connected with the 'Research Department', in relation to unfavourable impressions of the Movement expressed by members of the Nazi regime in Germany. Other significant correspondence includes /5: copy letter from C. R. De Miege, written from Rome in May 1933, together with Mosley's copy reply, and /7: letter from Lord Rothermere to Mosley, dated May 1934. The De Miege letter asks for the payment of a substantial sum to cover expenses incurred apparently to gain the financial support of Mussolini's government, and implies that sums of money were being transmitted to the B.U.F. Mosley's reply refutes this, and he suspends De Miege from his duties as an officer of the B.U.F for such conduct. The Rothermere letter gives notice of his intention to donate yearly dividends from the manufacture of 'Blackshirt' brand [cigarettes] to the B.U.F to show his sympathies with the movement.

Policy documents and publications  XOMN/B/7/3  c1933-1939

Former reference: OMN/B/7/3

1 file

Contents:
These papers comprise: /1: photocopied typescript 'Weekly Bulletin' of the British Union of Fascists and National Socialists for the week ending 6 May 1937 /2: draft election address explaining British Union policy for use in municipal elections, probably dating from 1936 or 1937, with marginal annotations by Mosley and details of appointments written in another hand on the reverse /3: handwritten document dated May 1938 and signed by Mosley giving instructions for the organisation of the B.U.F in the event of his death /4: typescript minutes of 'Huddersfield Meeting' held 10 Oct 1938 /5: photocopied typescript of Mosley's message to all British Union members issued 1 Sept 1939, signed by Mosley and his senior officials, Neil Francis-Hawkins, A. Raven Thomson, Ernest G. (Mick) Clarke, Hector McKechnie and B. D. E. Donovan. The file also includes /6: an undated set of notes in Mosley's handwriting about the organisation of the British Union of Fascists, and /7: n undated cartoon featuring 'The Green Shirt Movement for Social Credit' issued from the 'Headquarters, The Green Shirt Movement'

Correspondence and reports written by Major John Frederick Charles Fuller  XOMN/B/7/4  1934-c1936

Former reference: OMN/B/7/4

1 file

Contents:
These papers comprise several letters from Fuller to Mosley largely relating to aspects of B.U.F policy, and two typescript reports on the organisation of the B.U.F. Internal evidence suggests that the reports were compiled in 1934. They cover similar ground; /2 is entitled 'Report on B.U.F' and deals with the structure and philosophy of the Movement and includes Fuller's recommendations for the reform of the Defence Force Organisation, and of British Union Headquarters, together with his thoughts on British Union policy. /3 is entitled 'Report on the Organisation of the B.U.F' and contains Fuller's recommendations for British Union propaganda and detailed advice about the structure of the leadership within the organisation.The former report includes marginal annotations in Mosley's handwriting. Correspondence dating from 1934 also appears to have been written by Fuller in an advisory capacity, and includes /1: a letter advising Mosley on his relationship with the Rothermere press, and another containing his thoughts on policy and propaganda. The file also contains some later correspondence, including /5: a letter to Mosley from Stanley J. Passmore, presumably Fuller's solicitor, dated 1935, which explains the advice given to Fuller to drop his proposed libel action against Captain Leese and Messrs Lucas & Co for an article published in 'The Fascist' which made allegations about Fuller's links with Aleister Crowley. Undated letters include one in which Fuller refers to a forthcoming visit to Italy and asks Mosley to help him to arrange a meeting with Mussolini.

Photographs  XOMN/B/7/5  1930s

Former reference: OMN/B/7/5

1 file

Contents:
This file consists of six photographs dating from the 1930s, depicting the activities of the B.U.F. /1 features Oswald Mosley and some of his Blackshirts in Rome in Apr 1933 at the International Fascist Exhibition and has been inscribed on the back by Nicholas Mosley. Cynthia Mosley is in the crowd in the top right corner of the photograph. /2 is a photograph of Cynthia Mosley surrounded by members of the B.U.F, possibly at a music concert. /3 and /4 are two damaged copies of a large black and white photograph depicting a large B.U.F meeting in the 1930s, possibly that held at Earls Court in 1939. The file also contains two outsize photographs. /5 is slightly damaged, and is a portrait photograph of Oswald Mosley which has been signed by the original members of the B.U.F on the second anniversary of the establishment of the Movement, in 1934. /6 is a group photograph depicting Mosley with several senior B.U.F officials. Nicholas Mosley has written a date - 1935 - at the bottom of the photograph, and has identified many of the individuals

Miscellaneous papers  XOMN/B/8  1923-1979

Former reference: OMN/B/8

3 files

Contents:
This series contains material of a fairly disparate nature. It consists largely of various pieces of manuscript and typescript writing by various authors on different subjects, but also includes a small amount of miscellaneous correspondence. Some of the writings are directly connected to Mosley's political career, while others have a more tenuous link.

Writings about Oswald Mosley  XOMN/B/8/1  1974-1979

Former reference: OMN/B/8/1

1 file

Contents:
These comprise photocopies of typescript academic writing about Mosley which were sent to him by the authors for his comment. /1 article written by William C. Bader, entitled 'Success and Failure in the Life of Oswald Mosley', together with a covering letter from Bader, Department of History, Clark University, Worcester, Massachusetts, dated Dec 1974 /2 paper written by Richard Graham, entitled 'Pressures for Peace in Britain, 1932-1939'. A pencilled remark at the top of the first page notes that the paper won the Gladstone Memorial Prize. The paper itself is undated, but was sent to Mosley in an envelope postmarked Sept 1979.

Other writings  XOMN/B/8/2  Undated [c1930-c1960]

Former reference: OMN/B/8/2

1 file

Contents:
These papers consist of a variety of manuscript and typescript items, comprising articles, narrative accounts, song lyrics and poetry, and notes on English medieval history, and copied literary quotations. Material includes typescript articles, /1is entitled 'Wasted Womanhood' by Ken J. Taylor, and/2 is entitled 'Russia's Rebirth' by an unidentified author. There is also /3: a typescript paper composed on House of Commons paper which is possibly a draft of a speech on unemployment and economic crisis. The text contains substantial handwritten amendments, and includes several sets of initials - presumably of individuals who were to read the paper - at the end, including the initials O.M. The provenance of these pieces of writing remains unknown, but it is possible that the text on unemployment was related to Oswald Mosley's work in the Labour government of 1929 in this area, which he later developed with the New Party after his resignation from the government in 1930. Song lyrics include/6: 'The Greyshirt Anthem', written by Patrick Moir, and /7: 'The Blue Flag. The file also includes /8: a printed pamphlet containing the poem 'A dream in the Luxembourg' by Richard Aldington, translated into French by Gustave Cohen and entitled 'Un Songe dans le jardin du Luxembourg', 1957. This is inscribed to Diana Mosley from Richard Aldington on the front cover.

Other miscellaneous material  XOMN/B/8/3  1923-c1937

Former reference: OMN/B/8/3

1 file

Contents:
Miscellaneous correspondence consisting of: /1 typed note on a blank telegram form issued Dec 1923 at Harrow, consisting of an anonymous warning, presumably addressed to Mosley, concerning discussion about him at a 'secret communist club'. /2 undated letter from Brinsley Le Poer Trench to Unity Mitford, attempting to persuade her to join an unidentified national socialist organisation, headed at the time by Lieutenant-Colonel Graham Seton-Hutchinson. This was possibly the Nordic League, of which Hutchinson was a member, but which was led by Archibald Ramsay from 1937. The letter also contains personal attacks on Mosley's character, and on B.U.F policy, alleging that the organisation was actually in league with 'Jewish finance'.

Research papers generated by Nicholas Mosley  XOMN/B/9  1981-1983

Former reference: OMN/B/9

5 files

Contents:
These papers consist of correspondence and associated material, research papers and working notes generated during the process of Nicholas Mosley's research for his two volume memoir of his parents, 'The Rules of the Game', published in 1982, and 'Beyond the Pale', published in 1983.

Correspondence  XOMN/B/9/1  1981-1983

Former reference: OMN/B/9/1

1 file

Contents:
Letters from various correspondents relating to Nicholas Mosley's research and to articles he wrote for newspapers to promote his memoirs of his parents. These include letters from Oswald Mosley's friends, and from former members of his political movements. /1-/3 from a former member of the B.U.F, dated 1981. They contain some information about the political events of the 1930s, and /1 includes photocopies of a typed letter to 'The Times' from Charles Martell about the imprisonment of Mosley under 18B Regulations; a letter from Henry Williamson to the correspondent, dated 1967; pages from published books which mention Mosley's imprisonment /4 from a supporter of Mosley, including verses composed in his memory, 1981 /5 from a correspondent who had observed the activities of the B.U.F in London during the 1930s, discussing the extent of Mosley's anti-semitism, and the reasons for it, dated 1981. /6 letter to Nicholas Mosley from Sir Frederick Lawton, a barrister appointed by Oswald Mosley's solicitors Marsh & Ferriman to act as a legal advisor at the time he founded this radio advertising company Air Time Ltd in 1937. The letter is dated Feb 1983 and offers Nicholas Mosley what help he can with his research on this topic. For papers relating to Oswald Mosley's commercial radio ventures, see OMN/B/6/3 /7 correspondence between Nicholas Mosley and John Silverlight of 'The Observer', dated 1983, discussing extracts from 'Beyond the Pale' to be printed in the newspaper as promotion for the forthcoming publication of the book. /8 copy of a letter written by A. King to the editor of 'The Observer' dated Sept 1983, presumably in response to the publication of extracts from 'Beyond the Pale', discussing his memories of attending Mosley meetings in the 1950s. /9 letter to Nicholas Mosley from an observer of Mosley's Union Movement, dated 1983, enclosing a newspaper cutting consisting of a photograph of Oswald Mosley with Union Movement supporters in 1954.

Italian papers  XOMN/B/9/2  1983

Former reference: OMN/B/9/2

1 file

Contents:
This file consists of photocopies of typed and handwritten correspondence between Count Grandi, the Italian Ambassador in London, and the Italian Foreign Office in Rome relating to payments made by Mussolini's government to Mosley's organisation, the British Union of Fascists from 1933 to 1934. These letters give details about the amounts of money transferred by the government into a Swiss bank account and other sums sent through intermediaries who acted as couriers, and emphasise the need for these transactions to remain a secret. /5 is a letter written at the end of Dec 1933 which mentions Mosley's forthcoming visit to Rome and a planned audience he expected to have with Mussolini in Jan 1934. /7 is the most detailed letter. It is dated 30 Jan 1934 and written by Count Grandi to Mussolini. It contains an account of Grandi's conversations with Mosley in which he spoke about the support of Lord Rothermere for his organisation, and the impact this is likely to have on the success of his political movement. It also contains Grandi's impressions of English political opinion and the likelihood of Mosley's ideas gaining support in the country. /12 is a letter dated 1939, giving details about the organisation and membership of the B.U.F. The file also contains /13: photocopy of pages from an unidentified book written in Italian about Mussolini which includes a footnote citing the Grandi letters to Mussolini, and /14: copy of David Irving's broadsheet 'Focal Point', Oct 1981, which includes an article based on these letters, which he discovered in Italian archives while doing other research. Nicholas Mosley states in 'Beyond the Pale' that Irving made the Italian letters available to him, and he makes use of them in this work, reproducing a facsimile of the letter dated 29 Dec 1933, of which several photocopies exist in this file. Nicholas Mosley also seems to have had some of the letters translated. The file includes typescript translations and a letter dated Mar 1983 from the translator. Other documents seem to have been translated before being photocopied; there are manuscript English translations at the bottom of several of the letters.

18B Regulations  XOMN/B/9/3  1981

Former reference: OMN/B/9/3

1 file

Contents:
Correspondence and associated papers including press cuttings relating to Nicholas Mosley's research on the detention of his father during the Second World War under 18B Regulations, and attempts by him and other members of the Mosley family to overturn the 100 year closure period on the Home Office material relating to his imprisonment. This material comprises: /1: two copies of a newspaper article published in 'The Times' Diary 22 Oct about the continued closure of the transcript of the judicial hearing into Oswald Mosley's case, despite Nicholas Mosley's attempts to gain access to it /2: letter to Nicholas Mosley from Robert Row, Sanctuary Press Ltd, 23 Oct, referring to the 'Times' article and discussing the the possible influence of the Defence Security Executive on Mosley's detention /3: letter to Nicholas Mosley from Margaret J. Ross Williamson, widow of Hugh Ross Williamson, 34 Bradbourne St, Parson's Green, London, 27 Oct, enclosing photocopies of letters that Hugh Ross Williamson wrote to 'The Catholic Herald' in 1942 on the subject of Mosley's imprisonment, a typed letter with handwritten additions written by Oswald Mosley to Hugh Ross Williamson from Holloway gaol in Jul 1942 discussing the legal reasons given for his imprisonment and a photocopy of part of a letter written by Hugh Ross Williamson, probably to 'The Times', probably in 1942, about Herbert Morrison, the Home Secretary at the time of Mosley's arrest. /4: newspaper article published in 'The Times' 27 Oct about the possible reasons for the continued closure of the Home Office file on Oswald Mosley's examination by Norman Birkett and press cutting of a letter from Ian Curteis published in 'The Times' commenting on this article /5: photocopy of a letter to the editor of 'The Times' from Diana Mosley, 4 Nov which sets out her reasons for wanting the release of the Home Office transcript of her husband's hearing before the 18B Advisory Committee in 1940 /6: press cutting of a letter from Alan D. Hadfield written 8 Nov and published in 'The Times' which discusses the reasons given for Mosley's arrest under 18B Regulations /7: letter to Nicholas Mosley from Brocard Sewell, Whitefriars School, Carlton Kings, Cheltenham, 20 Nov expressing his support for Nicholas Mosley's attempts to gain access to his father's 18B files, and informing him of two articles about Oswald Mosley published in the Aylesford Review in 1962 /8: letter to Nicholas Mosley from Alexander Mosley, 31 Rue De L'Universite, Paris, 2 Dec, about his attempts to gain access to his father's 18B file. He also refers to the possibility that Mussolini's government gave financial support to the B.U.F during the 1930s /9: letter to Nicholas Mosley from Jonathan Guinness, 31-45 Gresham Street, London, 7 Dec, enclosing copies of his correspondence with Lord Hailsham, the Lord Chancellor, in Nov 1981, and copies of replies received from the Home Office on the disclosure of material from Oswald Mosley's 18B file. The enclosures also include a photocopy of a page from Hansard, containing a transcript of the debate in the House of Lords 11 Nov 1981 during which Lord Boothby asked a question about the release of the papers relating to Oswald Mosley's detention under 18B Regulations /10: letter to Nicholas Mosley from J. Wake, Departmental Record Officer at the Home Office, 7 Dec, confirming that the papers relating to Oswald Mosley's detention under 18B Regulations are closed on security grounds, and enclosing a copy of the transcript of Lord Boothby's question in the House of Lords 11 Nov 1981 and the reply of Lord Belstead of the Home Office. Also filed with this letter is a copy of Nicholas Mosley's letter to J. Wake 27 Nov, asking for further information about the reasons for the continued closure of Oswald Mosley's 18B file. /11: copy of a letter from Nicholas Mosley to Robert Row, 11 Dec, asking for further information about the Defence Security Executive and informing him of his intention to begin research on the B.U.F in the 1930s. He also mentions that he will return Row's copies of 'Action' and will require the use of his copies of 'Blackshirt' for his research /12: letter to Nicholas Mosley from Jonathan Guinness, Nuneaton, Warwickshire, 17 Dec, making arrangements for Nicholas to meet Sir John Briggs-Davison at the House of Commons, in order to him to raise in the House of Commons the issue of Home Office's continued closure of Oswald Mosley's 18B files This file includes a set of photocopies of Nicholas Mosley's correspondence with J. Wake of the Home Office, and of the newspaper articles and other cuttings described above. It also contains a photocopy of Oswald Mosley's typescript Statement with his manuscript annotations in reply to the reasons given for his detention, probably dated 1940.

Notes from B.U.F publications  XOMN/B/9/4  c1982

Former reference: OMN/B/9/4

1 file

Contents:
Handwritten notes made by Nicholas Mosley on his reading of issues of 'Blackshirt', 'Action' and 'Fascist Week' dating from the 1930s. The notes include headings written at the top indicating the publication consulted and the year of issue, and notes from publications for each calendar year are clipped together. The dates of articles in these publications that Nicholas Mosley found useful for his research are given in the margin. The majority of the notes relate to articles written by William Joyce that illustrate his anti-semitism, but there are also citations for pieces written by Alexander Raven Thompson in 'Fascist Week' and pages headed 'John Beckett', containing details about articles published in 'Action' written by Beckett while editor of this publication. Nicholas Mosley also made notes from the B.U.F publications for his research into the organisation and development of the movement and its policy during the mid 1930s, and these include citations for Oswald Mosley's engagements during this period, for the large public meetings held at Olympia and Hyde Park, and for reports about the British Union holiday camp at Selsey in 1937. There are a smaller number of citations from pieces published in 'Action' in 1939 and 1940 about the guardianship of Mosley's children, and about his detention in 1940 under 18B Regulations. Many of these citations are used in 'Beyond the Pale', and it is clear that Nicholas Mosley used the B.U.F publications from the 1930s as a major resource for the study of his father's activities during the period.

Drafts 'Rules of the Game'  XOMN/B/9/5  c1982

Former reference: OMN/B/9/5

1 file

Contents:
Typescript draft of the Foreward to 'Rules of the Game', together with drafts of the beginning of the first two chapters of the book, consisting of details about the family backgrounds and early lives of his father, Oswald Mosley, and his mother, Cynthia Curzon. The drafts have been heavily annotated and amendments made in pencil; some text has also been crossed out by typewriter. A luggage label stored with these drafts includes comments in Nicholas Mosley's handwriting, dated Feb 1982, although it is not clear whether this label relates to the drafts, or to other material created or kept by Nicholas Mosley in the process of his research.

Papers of Maud Mosley  XOMN/C  1896-1945

Former reference: OMN/C

1 box

Administrative history:
Katharine Maud Edwards-Heathcote, daughter of Capt. Justinian Edwards-Heathcote of Apedale Hall, Staffordshire and his wife Eleanor, was born 2 Jan 1873. She married Oswald Mosley, 5th baronet 12 Dec 1895, and had three children, Oswald Ernald, 6th baronet, born 1896, Edward Heathcote, born 1899, and John Arthur Noel, born 1901. She and her husband spent some of their married life at the Mosley family home, Rolleston Hall, but seem to have moved around a lot, even living in Ireland for a time during 1898. They separated when her eldest son, Oswald, was about five years old, but did not divorce. After this separation Maud lived at Market Drayton, Shropshire, close to Rolleston, and her children were in regular contact with their Mosley grandfather; they saw their own father less frequently. In later life, Maud had a flat in London at 9 Wilbraham Place. She supported her son, Oswald, in his political career from the time of his first election as MP for Harrow in 1918, and occasionally appears to have made speeches at his meetings. On his marriage to Cynthia Curzon she appears to have ceased her practical involvement, but after Cynthia's death in 1933, Maud took a more active role in her son's political life. She was involved in the organisation of the British Union of Fascists, and for a time was leader of its Women's Section. She led marches and attended public meetings, and according to Nicholas Mosley's biography of his father, 'Beyond the Pale', she travelled round provincial branches of the B.U.F to raise morale. She continued to provide moral support for her son during the time he was imprisoned under 18B Regulations during the Second World War. She died in 1950. Sources: Burke's Peeragage, Baronetage & Knightage, 1938; Nicholas Mosley, The Rules of the Game: Sir Oswald and Lady Cynthia Mosley, 1896-1933, 1982; Nicholas Mosley, Beyond the Pale: Sir Oswald Mosley and Family, 1933-1980, 1983.

Contents:
These papers consist of diaries, correspondence and associated material - some of which relates to seances - and a scrapbook kept by Maud Mosley. The diaries are a valuable source of information for the early years of her married life, and diary entries for later years also provide occasional details about her involvement in the life of her son, Oswald Mosley. Further evidence for this can be seen in the composition of the scrapbook contained in these papers, which consists of press cuttings and associated material relating to Oswald Mosley's election as MP for Harrow in 1918 and his parliamentary and constituency activities during the first few months of 1919. Papers relating to Maud Mosley's attempts to contact the spirit of her deceased daughter-in-law, Cynthia Mosley during the mid 1930s also illustrate her concern for her son's emotional wellbeing as well as his political career.

Diaries  XOMN/C/1  1896-1945

Former reference: OMN/C/1

5 files

Contents:
These consist of four volumes of personal diaries for the years 1896 to 1899 kept by Maud Mosley in 'Houghton & Gunn's Diary', and pages from subsequent diaries containing entries for 1st and 2nd Jan for each year from 1900 to 1945, 2nd Jan being Maud Mosley's birthday, and 11 May 1920, the wedding day of her son, Oswald Mosley. The volumes of diaries contain daily entries which give details about Maud's daily activities and domestic routines and her comments about the weather and the health of family members, as well as recording information about her social and leisure engagements. There are also occasional comments about her feelings and opinions about her situation. The extracts taken from diaries from 1900 to 1945 contain similar information, but obviously focus on the events which took place on those dates.

Diary, 1896  XOMN/C/1/1  1896

Former reference: OMN/C/1/1

1 vol

Contents:
Regular activities include church attendance, shopping trips to Derby and Burton, social engagements with other landed families in the Staffordshire area, and attendance at hunt meetings and horse race meetings. Maud's husband, known as 'Waldie', appears to be a keen horseman, and often purchases horses, exhibits them in shows and rides his own horses in races. He also goes shooting regularly during the winter months. Particular entries discuss renovation and redecoration work at East Lodge, presumably the home of the couple during this time, occasional visits to London, mainly for shopping, but which also included theatre visits. Race meetings attended include the Derby races 17 Mar, the Grand National in Liverpool 27 Mar, Ludlow races 23 Apr, and Ascot in Jun. Maud is involved in a carriage accident 26 Apr, while returning from lunch, 'W driving a fearful pace..ran the cart up a mud heap & turned us over. W got off scot free. I pitched on to my head in the road cut it & my nose badly & bled like a pig'. Summer activities largely consist of attendance at events arranged by the Mosley family for the local community in their capacity as landowners. These include the 'school treat tea, 5 Aug, and the Rolleston Garden Party 8 Aug, 'merry go rounds, donkey races, swing boats etc..much appreciated'. Maud also attends a Ladies Cricket match at Dove Cliffs 7 May, and the Burton show 30 Jul, at which Mosley horses win prizes. She takes a holiday in Folkestone with her parents in late Aug, and travels to London 24 Oct to stay with them and 'await the event'. She records the birth of her first child, Oswald Mosley, described as 'infant Tommy' 16 Nov, and gives a brief account of labour and details of her illness afterwards. Subsequent entries give news of the baby's health and progress. Details of monthly household accounts are written on pre-printed account pages at the back of the volume

Diary, 1897  XOMN/C/1/2  1897

Former reference: OMN/C/1/2

1 vol

Contents:
Regular activities include attendance at hunt meetings and shooting parties during the winter months. The diary records details about the purchase of horses and other livestock at sales, and the welfare of these animals. There is also frequent news of Maud's son Oswald Mosley, known as 'Tommy', particularly his weight and general health, including details about his vaccinations and teething. Other regular activities include attending church, socialising with friends and attending race meetings at Ludlow, Chepstow and Keele. Maud also attends the Grand National at Liverpool 26 Mar, and wins £2 15s at the Derby races 8 Apr. She goes on shopping trips to Burton and visits London on several occasions during the year, sometimes with 'Tommy'. Particular entries record Maud's attendance at the hunt ball at the Midland Derby 3 Feb. Her husband also attends the 'Mince Pie Ball' at Derby 6 Jan, but Maud cannot attend because of the baby. Maud is examined by a doctor 26 Feb, possibly about a falsely suspected pregnancy. Several entries refer to the Jubilee celebrations which took place that summer. Maud is in London for the procession 22 Jun and describes watching the procession from St James's Street, then hiring a bus and travelling on the top to Earls Court. Maud gives details of the celebrations for Oswald Mosley's first birthday 16 Nov, and attends Evelyn Hartley's wedding 23 Nov Summer activities include the Rolleston Garden party which she attends 31 Jul with her baby, who 'was very much amused & enjoyed himself vastly' and the Burton Regatta 21 Jul. She also attends Tutbury horse show with her husband 28 Aug and 'heard many dull speeches, it poured with rain twice during lunch & after'. She holidays in Folkestone with her parents and 'Tommy' in early Sept. Maud's husband appears to be away from home at hunts and race meetings frequently. He also sees a boxing match in Birmingham 28 Jan. At a meeting of S[outh] Stafford[shire] hunt, 'W behaved shamefully & had to be driven home by Watkins' 11 Nov.

Diary, 1898  XOMN/C/1/3  1898

Former reference: OMN/C/1/3

1 vol

Contents:
Particular entries record visits to Ireland by Maud and her husband, the first of which takes place in Apr when 'Waldie' sails 13 Apr and Maud follows him 18 Apr. They attend race meetings at the Curragh where Waldie is riding, and Maud also spends time alone in Dublin. Her father visits 26 Apr, and they go to a polo match and visit Phoenix Park 28 Apr, and also watch the races at Leopardstown. Waldie returns to Ireland in Jun, and Maud has to make several trips there during the summer. It is apparent that they have bought a house outside Dublin, called 'Oatlands', and Maud spends time during the summer packing up furniture in preparation for the move to this house, which takes place in Aug. Maud records a 'general holiday in Dublin for a nationalist demonstration laying Wolf Tone's foundation stone' 15 Aug. She spends most of her time in Ireland shopping in Dublin or attending horse races and seems to be left alone for much of the time. She attends a horse show 24 Aug but records that 'Waldie disappeared almost directly we arrived so I had to tack on to wretched Bill all day'. Maud makes regular visits back to England and travels to Scotland 21 Oct 'to stay with my people' in Stirling, where the party participate in the usual countryside pursuits of shooting and fishing. She also visits London to go shopping and attend the theatre 10 Oct. Activities which take place before the move to Ireland include a New Year ball at Abbots Hill 5 Jan and Miss Worthington's wedding at Lichfield cathedral 12 Jan. Maud is patroness of the Meynell Hunt ball 27 Jan and gives details of arrangements for the event. She also gives details of a pit explosion at Padmore 7 Feb. She attends several race meetings during the spring, including the Liverpool races and the Grand National 24 Mar, the Epsom Derby 25 May, and Ascot 16 Jun. The diary also records news about her baby's welfare, including details about his illness in late Feb, the arrival of a new nurse for him 21 Mar, and his holiday in Folkestone which took place while Maud was in the process of moving to Ireland. The first lodgings they arrive at 18 Jul are 'horrid place full of fleas, black beetles & we had grubby sheets'. After changing lodgings the baby and nurse spend some weeks there, and return 10 Aug. Maud writes that baby Oswald is 'so funny & shy with us at first but gradually made friends'. The bottom of pages 6-9 Sept have been cut out

Diary, 1899  XOMN/C/1/4  1899

Former reference: OMN/C/1/4

1 vol

Contents:
Particular entries record details about house hunting. Maud leaves Ireland 3 Jan and spends the first half of the year in London with her family, visiting house agents and viewing houses in London and various locations in the south of England. Maud travels to Salisbury 8 Jun to look at Broxmore house, and visits house in Swindon 28 Jun. She views houses in Brighton 18 Jul and in Folkestone 19 Jul. She and her children spend some time in Brighton during Aug, but both she and 'Tom' suffer from a prolonged illness while they are there, 'Tom' suffering from swollen glands and a sore throat, and Maud from pain in her joints. She describes some of their symptoms and treatments. Her husband is rarely at home, and when he does appear his presence often seems a cause of tension. Maud records an altercation between him and their two year old son Oswald: 'had a miserable time W teasing Tom etc & I trying to defend him, finally W caught my bad wrist - hurting it badly' 11 Aug. Maud spends the autumn convalescing at Apedale Hall with her parents from 21 Aug, but her illness is prolonged, and it is not until Oct that she regains her health. Her husband views more houses during this period, and Maud travels with her parents to Fosbury in late autumn to stay there for a time. By Christmas they are living in Kent and making frequent visits to London for shopping and to hear a law petition referred to as 'W's case about settlement money' 12 Dec. His petition is granted 20 Dec. One reason for Maud leaving Ireland and staying in London during the spring of 1899 is the birth of her second son, Edward Heathcote 25 Apr. Maud describes the labour and comments that the baby is 'a huge chap', weighing over 9lb. She is not allowed downstairs until 20 May, and is churched 24 May at the baby's christening. The diary contains information about the health and general progress of the new baby, known as 'Ted', including details about his weight, vaccinations and teething, but far more attention is paid to her older son, Oswald, known as 'Tom'. She spends time shopping for clothes for him, and he is photographed 24 Jan. She writes that he 'saw his first Punch & Judy which delighted him' 3 Feb, amd that he is taken by her parents to 'see the Queen going to lay the stone of Victoria & Albert museum - Tom beside himself with excitement' 17 May. On his third birthday 16 Nov she writes 'bless him! he is sweet & thank heaven healthy & strong a most lovable chap'. Maud's activities in London include socialising with friends and parents, visits to the theatre and trips out in the carriage. She also attends church regularly, goes to a cookery exhibition 8 Mar, and attends 'rescue meeting of mothers for 'naughty girls' crowds of ladies & a large tea fight after' 22 Mar. Maud's husband spends most of his time at races, sometimes travelling to Ireland for this reason. When in London he appears to spend his time socialising with friends. Maud makes occasional comments on his wild behaviour: 'W went to Covent Garden & came back at 5am!!' 27 Jan, 'W dined out came home with his head cut open at 2am' 2 Apr, 'W went on to the club & came home about 4am with his foot a jelly having had a marble table upset on it' 8 Jul The end page of the diary contains pencilled notes in hand of Nicholas Mosley giving dates for particular events and activities in diary which he refers to his biography of his parents, 'The Rules of the Game'

Diary extracts  XOMN/C/1/5  1900-1945

Former reference: OMN/C/1/5

1 file

Contents:
This material consists of loose pages torn from Maud Mosley's personal diaries for the first two days of January for each year from 1900 to 1945; entries for 1907, 1909, 1914, 1915 and 1918 are missing. There is also a page containing entries for 10 and 11 May 1920. The entry for 11 May contains an account of Oswald Mosley's wedding to Cynthia Curzon. The year of the diaries from which these entries have been torn has been written at the top of each page in Oswald Mosley's handwriting. Since they only cover two days of each year, the entries are of limited use for the study of events in Maud Mosley's life, and the lives of her family. However, because the entries are for the same two days each year, including her birthday, 2 Jan, it is possible to chart some of the changes in her life over time. Entries for the years of her childrens' childhood include details about the presents they gave her on her birthday, and about the celebrations. The entry for 1902 records details about the illness of her baby, presumably her youngest child, John, who was born 12 Dec 1901. Other entries during these early years record details of social activities in and around Market Drayton, Shropshire, where Maud was living, including hunting, and the leisure activities of Maud's sons. Her entry for 1 Jan 1916 records that she had a 'letter of good wishes from Tom, but telling me (alas!) he & the Regt had gone into the firing line the day before' After the marriages of her sons in the 1920s, her birthday is generally spent with one or other of them, and their children. In 1923 she visits Shadwell 'for one of Mr Campbell's Childrens parties in the memorial club, but he showed us all over Paddy's Goose too', presumably with Oswald and Cynthia Mosley, who were friends with Mr Campbell (see OMN/A/5/1 and OMN/A/5/3). She mentions meeting her son John's wife Carol in 1925 'with great approval & much success' and in 1929 'Tom & Cim came to dinner & took me to the Empire after to see Buster Keaton in 'The Camera Man'...they dropped me at the flat & went on to Denham'. Maud's mother appears to be seriously ill from 1924, and on her birthday in 1928 she remarks 'my 55th birthday & for the first time in my life no greeting from mother'. Entries from the 1930s contain several references to her grandchildren and their visits with her sons. In 1935 'Irene, Viv & Nicko to lunch...Irene & children came back to tea & then went down to Denham' and in 1939 'Ted, Veronica, Irene, Viv & Nicky came to dinner...we all went to see an Edgar Wallace 'thriller''. Irene was Cynthia's sister Irene Curzon, who appears to have become the effective carer for Oswald Mosley's children during this time. Political developments are also mentioned. In 1934, Maud writes that fog has entailed the cancellation of a B.U.F meeting, and on her birthday in 1935 is grateful for 'so many kind gifts of flowers from Blackshirts' Wartime shortages are referred to in entries from the 1940s, and in 1942 Maud also mentions receiving 'letter from Tom written from Holloway where he has been sent to join Diana & much to my joy & relief said he was 'much happier'. His phlebitis 'no worse' which is not too good' The file also includes a black and white photograph of two unidentified children outside a country house. These are possibly Maud Mosley's grandchildren, possibly Vivien and Nicholas Mosley.

Other personal papers  XOMN/C/2  1918-1937

Former reference: OMN/C/2

3 files

Contents:
These are disparate in nature and consist of a scrapbook kept by Maud Mosley documenting her son Oswald Mosley's successful election campaign in Harrow in 1918 and his subsequent activities in the House of Commons and in his constituency; correspondence written to Maud Mosley, largely relating to her involvement in the B.U.F during the 1930s; and transcripts and associated papers relating to attempts by a spirit medium to contact the spirit of Cynthia Mosley for advice about Oswald Mosley's best course of action in politics in 1935 and 1936. Taken together, this material illustrates Maud Mosley's keen interest in and support for her son's political career, from its beginnings to his leadership of the British Union of Fascists in the 1930s.

Scrapbook  XOMN/C/2/1  1918-1919

Former reference: OMN/C/2/1

1 vol

Contents:
This volume contains press cuttings from national and local newspapers consisting of articles, notices, publicity leaflets, photographs, drawings and cartoons relating to Oswald Mosley's 1918 election campaign when he stood as Unionist Coalition candidate for the Harrow Division of Middlesex. These date from July 1918 to May 1919. The cuttings include an interview with Oswald Mosley in 'The Observer' 26 Jul 1918, an article by Oswald Mosley stating his policies, also in 'The Observer' 9 Aug 1918, various articles reporting on speeches given by Mosley to various organisations in the Harrow area, letters to 'The Observer' from Harrow constituents about the election; articles by and about Mosley's opponent A. R. Chamberlayne in 'The Gazette' 26 Oct and 2 Nov 1918; Mosley's reply in 'The Observer' 8 Nov 1918 to criticism by Chamberlayne; articles setting out the main points of the programmes of both candidates in 'The Observer' and 'The Gazette'; full page advertisement for Chamberlayne which appeared in 'The Gazette' 13 Dec 1918; short articles reporting on the outcome of the election in various national and local newspapers; articles about celebrations in Mosley's new constituency in 'The Middlesex County Times' 8 Feb 1919 and 'The Gazette' 8 Feb 1919; articles in 'The Times', The Observer', 'The Gazette' and the 'Daily Chronicle' Feb 1919 relating to Mosley's part in the debate on the Aerial Navigation Bill, at which he made his maiden speech; articles relating to Mosley's constituency work in Harrow including his attendance at the opening of the Harrow, Wealdstone and District Memorial Maternity Hostel, reported in the 'Morning Post' 3 Mar 1919, the Wealdstone Red Triangle, reported in 'The Observer' 14 Mar 1919, and a meeting held to discuss proposals for a cottage hospital to be built at Hanwell, reported in 'The Gazette' 3 May 1919. Both Oswald Mosley and Maud Mosley spoke at this meeting. The volume also contains letters to Maud Mosley relating to her son's campaign. These comprise letters of support following Oswald Mosley's selection as Unionist Coalition candidate, 20 Jul 1918 from E.G. Swain, The Rectory, Greenford, Middlesex, Sarita L. Macandrew, Dudley Lodge, Harrow-on-the-Hill, A.K.Tarlyon, Harrow on the Hill, and Jessie Buss, Honorary Secretary, Wembley Women's Unionist Assoc[iation]. There is also a letter congratulating Maud Mosley on her son's recent speech at Harrow from J. Basley-White, 50 Lexham Gardens, London dated 8 Dec.

Correspondence  XOMN/C/2/2  1931-1938

Former reference: OMN/C/2/2

1 file

Contents:
The majority of these letters discuss matters relating to the B.U.F during the 1930s, and were written to Maud Mosley in her capacity as leader of the Womens Section of this organisation. There is also one earlier letter, which refers to Oswald Mosley's New Party. /1 from Ed Macnaghten, 11A Weymouth Street, London, 11 Nov 1931 containing copied lines of poetry apparently for use in a speech about housing, and commiserating with Maud about the failure of the New Party in the General Election of 1931 /2 signed 'Tommy Lyons', Apr 1935. However, the content of the letter suggests that the writer is female. It contains detailed views about internal tensions in the B.U.F, and feelings of alienation by branch members. It focuses on a recent meeting at Swindon, at which William Joyce spoke, and where members of the audience were concerned at the heavy handed methods of crowd control employed by some B.U.F members. The letter also mentions Marjorie Aitken. Maud Mosley has written notes in pencil at the bottom of the first page of this letter /3 undated letter from unidentified Italian supporter of fascism, Rome. Refers to the hospitality shown by the writer to Maud and Oswald Mosley during their stay in Rome, and to the ongoing hospitality shown to 'Mr Dundas', Mosley's Chief of Staff /4 from Anne Brock Griggs, Worthing, 1938, discussing administrative matters of the B.U.F, and informing Maud Mosley of her current illness. Maud Mosley has written a note at the top of this letter.

Mediums  XOMN/C/2/3  1935-1937

Former reference: OMN/C/2/3

1 file

Contents:
These papers consist of typed correspondence written to Maud Mosley from a sender identified only as 'D', possibly her younger sister Dorothy, from different addresses in Argyll, Scotland and typed transcripts of communications with the spirit of Cynthia Mosley at seances held by this correspondent. The seance transcripts are dated Mar, Apr and May 1935 and the transcript dated 23 Mar is accompanied by a letter explaining some of the responses gained from the spirit. These attempts to contact the spirit of Cynthia Mosley appear to have been made at the request of Maud Mosley, and attempts were made to ask her advice about the decisions Oswald Mosley should make concerning the administration and policy of his political movement. The transcripts also reveal that the questioner also attempted to get the spirit to send messages to Maud Mosley. The file also includes a document written in pencil on notepaper headed 9 Wilbraham Place, London, representing Maud Mosley's attempts to contact the spirit of Cynthia Mosley in Dec 1936, and further correspondence from 'D' dated 26 Dec 1936 and 7 Oct 1937. The 1936 letter discusses further seances, including an attempt to contact Cynthia Mosley and an individual called 'Milne', in the hope of gaining their advice for Oswald Mosley. The 1937 letter refers to Maud's description of a recent B.U.F march and comments 'those Reds are proper swine, & am so glad they got better trounced than usual' and gives an account of a recent luncheon party at which there were several fascist supporters, one of whom had followed Oswald Mosley since his 'early Conservative days'.

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