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Robert I of Scotland (the Bruce) and his wife Isobel, daughter of John, Earl of Mar

Bruce remains the most revered of Scottish kings because of his victory at Bannockburn, and the struggle for independence from English dominance (achieved with the Treaty of Edinburgh-Northampton in March 1328). His body was found in Dunfermline Abbey in 1819. His skeleton showed that he was six feet tall, there was no evidence of leprosy (as suggested by some chroniclers), and that his heart had been removed. It was taken by Sir James Douglas on crusade in Spain, an ambition Bruce could not achieve in his own lifetime. Following Douglas's death in Granada in 1330, Bruce's heart was returned to his favourite abbey, Melrose, and buried there.

Reference: National Library of Scotland
MS, Seaton Armorial, Acc 9309, f. 7 (date: early 17th century).
By kind permission of Sir Francis Ogilvy

Robert I of Scotland (the Bruce) and his wife Isobel, daughter of John, Earl of Mar
 
 
 
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