Nuremberg Sentences

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Nuremberg Sentences

On 10 October 1946 ((C.M. 85(46)(4)) the Cabinet were informed that the Control Council in Berlin were considering the appeals which had been lodged following the sentences which had been imposed by the Nuremberg trial.  An appeal had been heard about the sentence of death on General Jodl being changed from being executed by shooting rather than hanging; this had been supported by representatives of the US and France but neither the British nor the Soviet member of the council endorsed this view.  The Cabinet endorsed the view that the sentences should not be modified.  Count von Papen, who had been acquitted at Nuremberg, had applied to take up residence in the British Zone. Thishad been refused and the Cabinet were asked to endorse the decision.  The Cabinet agreed that he should not be admitted because he would then have to be interned and brought before a tribunal as a potentially dangerous person and it was undesirable that the British authorities should appear to be putting the same man on trial again and it was undesirable that they should appear to be giving asylum to a person of such notoriety.