Transcript

Disorderly Assembly in London
WO 34/103, f. 100


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By the KING.
A PROCLAMATION.
George R.
WHEREAS a great Number of Disorderly Persons have assembled themselves together in a Riotous and Tumultuous Manner, and have been guilty of many Acts of Treason and Rebellion, having made an Assault on the Gaol of Newgate, set loose the Prisoners confined therein, and set fire to and destroyed the said Prison: And whereas Houses are now pulling down in several Parts of Our Cities of London and Westminster, and Liberties thereof, and Fires kindled for consuming the Materials and Furniture of the same, whereby it is become absolutely necessary to use the most effectual Means to quiet such Disturbances, to preserve the Lives and Properties of Individuals, and to restore the Peace of the Country: We therefore, taking the same into Our most serious Consideration, have thought fit, by and with the Advice of Our Privy Council, to issue this Our Royal Proclamation, hereby strictly charging and exhorting all Our loving Subjects to preserve the Peace, and to keep themselves, their Servants and Apprentices, quietly within their respective Dwellings, to the End that all well-disposed Persons may avoid those Mischiefs which the Continuance of such riotous Proceedings may bring upon the Guilty: And as it is necessary, from the circumstances before-mentioned, to employ the Military Force, with which We are by Law entrusted for the immediate Suppression of such Rebellious and Traiterous Attempts, now making against the Peace and Dignity of Our Crown, and the Safety of the Lives and Properties of Our Subjects, We have therefore issued the most direct and effectual Orders to all Our Officers, by an immediate Exertion of their utmost Force, to repress the same, of which all Persons are to take Notice.
Given at Our Court at St. James's, the Seventh Day of June, One thousand
seven hundred and eighty, in the Twentieth Year of Our Reign.
God save the King.
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LONDON:
PRINTED BY CHARLES EYRE and WILLIAM STRAHAN, Printers to the King's most Excellent Majesty. 1780.

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