Cecil Day Lewis

Cecil Day Lewis was a Communist Party member during the 1930s and was under surveillance until 1952. He later became Poet Laureate of the United Kingdom from 1968 until his death in 1972 and is the father of actor Daniel Day Lewis.

This file contains remarks by MI5 on Lewis and his communist links, Lewis' application for a passport including his signature and Ministry of Information correspondence on Lewis.

Ralph Baden Davenport Powell

Ralph Baden Davenport Powell (KV 2/2075)

Powell worked as a broadcaster for Nazi German radio 1942-1945 after taking over from 'Lord Haw Haw'. Powell was a relative of Lord Baden-Powell, creator of the Boy Scouts.

This file includes copies of photographs of Powell and his application for a passport and an extensive MI5 report on his activities.


William Joyce, alias Lord Haw Haw

  • Catalogue ref: KV 2/245
  • Date: 1924 - 1944
William Joyce, alias Lord Haw Haw (KV 2/245)

A senior member of Oswald Mosley's British Union of Fascists, he left to found the National Socialist League in 1937. He moved to Berlin in 1939 and throughout the Second World War broadcast anti-British propaganda, including trying to drive a wedge between Britain and the US, and published a pamphlet called 'Fascism and Jewry'. He was executed in 1946.

This file includes press cuttings on Joyce with a Daily Herald newspaper report from 3 April 1941 where William Joyce admits he is Lord Haw-Haw.


Sir Oswald Mosley and Lady Mosley

  • Catalogue ref: KV 2/884
  • Date: 1933 - 1940
Oswald Mosley speech (KV 2/885)

From 1932 Mosley was the leading figure in the British Union of Fascists and the Union Movement when it was formed in 1947. He was detained under Defence Regulation 18b in 1940 with his wife, Lady Diana Mosley, and released in November 1943.

Before the war, Lady Mosley was thought to be Mosley's main communication link with Hitler and had frequent conversations with the Nazi leader.

This file includes cuttings from a Blackshirts pamphlet and a poster advertising a public speech by Mosley.


Rudolph Hess

  • Catalogue ref: KV 2/34
  • Date: 12 May 1941 - 20 May 1941

Rudolph Hess was a prominent politician in Nazi Germany. Appointed Deputy Führer to Adolf Hitler in 1933, he served in this position until 1941.

This file includes speculative letters sent to Hess from US and British citizens and intercepted by the authorities due to insufficient postal addresses. It also includes papers relating to Hess's arrival in Britain in 1941 and his subsequent detention here during the Second World War.

Emil Julius Klaus Fuchs

Emil Julius Klaus Fuchs (KV 2/1245)

German/British atom spy Fuchs was an anti-Nazi agitator and communist in Germany in the early 1930s. He fled to the UK in 1933. After studies in Bristol and Edinburgh and research work in Birmingham, he became a member of the British team engaged in developing the atom bomb with US counterparts. He worked on this project in the US from 1943 to 1945, but in 1942 he also volunteered his services to the Russians.

This file includes translated correspondence between the German consulate in Bristol and the German embassy regarding the issuing of a new passport to Fuchs, his registration card and photograph and details from his application for British naturalization.


Grand Duke Vladimir Kirilliovitch, aliases Romanov, Mikhaylov

Grand Duke Vladimir Kirilliovitch (KV 2/1667)

The heir to the Russian Romanov dynasty, Kirillovitch spent the Second World War principally in France. It was said by some that the Germans considered him a candidate for whatever monarchy they might have set up had their invasion of the Soviet Union succeeded.

This file contains Foreign Office papers outlining Hitler's supposed plan to use Kirilliovitch as a puppet leader of Russia, newspaper cuttings outlining his disappearance and various letters regarding his possible whereabouts.


Hans Karl Georg Wendt

An active Nazi party member, in mid-1939 Wendt arrived in the UK, nominally as a correspondent of a German newspaper but with an intelligence brief. He left in August 1939 before the start of the Second World War, his maid leaving behind an address book with Ribbentrop's and Hitler's private telephone numbers. In 1940 he was in Sweden in a propaganda role.

This file includes his British registration card with photographs, German marriage certificate and documentation relating to his departure from Britain and what he left behind.