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Lesson 6: Passive verbs - part 2 | 1 2 3 4 5 6

Imperfect passive tense

Handy hint

The presentView the definition of this term - this link opens in a new window, imperfectView the definition of this term - this link opens in a new window and futureView the definition of this term - this link opens in a new window tenses all share the endings below.

Latin English
-r I
-ris you (singular)
-tur he/she/it
-mur we
-mini you (plural)
-ntur they

The endings for the imperfect passive tense are the same as the other tenses in this group, but they need to be preceded with ‘ba-’.

Endings
Latin English
-bar I
-baris you (singular)
-batur he/she/it
-bamur we
-bamini you (plural)
-bantur they

To form an imperfect passive you need to add these endings to the stem of the verb.

First, second and third conjugations

To get the stem, remove ‘-re’ from the infinitive form of the verb and add the relevant endings.

Imperfect passive of voco, vocare, vocavi, vocatum (1) to call

Latin English
vocabar I was being called
vocabaris you were being called
vocabatur he/she/it was being called
vocabamur we were being called
vocabamini you were being called
vocabantur they were being called

Fourth conjugation

To get the stem, remove ‘-re’ from the infinitive form of the verb, add ‘-e’ and then add the relevant endings.

For example:

audio, audire, audivi, auditum the stem ‘audi-’ becomes ‘audie-’.

Latin English
audiebar I was being heard
audiebaris you were being heard
audiebatur he/she/it was being heard
audiebamur we were being heard
audiebamini you were being heard
audiebantur they were being heard

Checklist

Are you confident with:

  • The meaning of an imperfect passive tense?
  • The form of an imperfect passive tense?
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