TUDOR HACKNEY
The Daniells
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Chapter 6: All Is Lost

Yorke House 1599

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Lady Essex seated at her writing desk with her secretary Lady Essex seated at her writing desk with her secretary
Scene 1: Lady Essex demands payment

Seated at a writing desk, Lady Essex holds out her hand. Smiling, The Secretary hands her a quill, which Frances uses to sign a prepared statement.

Her Ladyship insisted that she should be recompensed in full at once. An impossible demand for John and myself, as well she knew.

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Ralph Bell Ralph Bell
Scene 2: Baliffs arrive

Ralph Bell, bailiff, and his assistant hammer on the door of the Parsonage.

They use a lump hammer and an iron bar to force the lock.

 

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Ralph Bell values items Ralph Bell values items
Scene 3: Jane and Johns possessions valued

Jane looks on as Ralph Bell places a number of items on the table.

Ralph picks up an item to value it.

"Silver candlestick - ten shillings -"

Jane indignantly:"fifteen!"

"Twelve" - Bell writes in the inventory

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Bailiffs remove the family's possessions Bailiffs remove the family's possessions
Scene 4: The house is emptied

Jane and the children look on as the bailiffs carry out a cupboard and Turkish rug.

The bailiffs took everything - the hay from our fields and even the animals from the barn.

Our home was purchased for a but a quarter of its value.

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Jane, her children and Margaret Harp leave the house Jane, her children and Margaret Harp leave the house
Scene 5: Jane leaves the house

Jane, accompanied by her children and Margaret Harp, leaves the house with a few paltry belongings

And we were cast out on the street like dogs.

 

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Jane writes to the Queen asking for a pardon for her husband Jane writes to the Queen asking for a pardon for her husband

Westminster Lodgings 1606

Scene 6: Jane writes to the Queen

Jane's anger and emotion is palpable as she recalls her experience.

Your majesty, until we met with this disaster, I trusted English laws above all others, but for four years we have tried to pay our fines without success. Our estate remains in the hands of powerful adversaries and their corrupt stomachs ensure that we will never be free of our debts despite all my labors and hard earned income. No, not even if my husband lives another twenty years.

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Jane recounts how she is spurned and spat upon at court Jane recounts how she is spurned and spat upon at court
Scene 7: Jane pleads

Whenever I plead for justice I am threatened with banishment. Even now at court I am spurned and spat upon and turned out of doors.

I write to you now, your majesty, in the hope that this plain and true narration may at long last win a pardon for our cause. For despite all that has befallen me, I still place my trust in God and pray that someday, we may have justice.

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The letter, pleading for a pardon, is complete The letter, pleading for a pardon, is complete
Scene 8: The fate of the Daniells

Despite legal action, the Daniells were never able to recover any of their losses. John received a licence to publish the account of his troubles in January 1610 but died intestate at his lodgings in Tuthill St, Westminster on 30th April 1610.

Their house was converted into two cottages in 1764. These were later demolished in 1845.

It is thought that Jane returned to the Daniells' Cheshire house in Daresbury, although her fate still remains a mystery.

It has taken 400 years for the Daniells to achieve publicity for their manifold woes.

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This site, developed with funding from the New Opportunities Fund as one of the projects within Sense of Place, London, forms part of the National Archive's Education site. It was developed as a partnership between Hackney Archives Department, Immediate Theatre and the National Archive's Education Team