Heroes & Villains
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Transcript: Source8

Men sharing their memories of Dr King
(H Huntley and D Montgomery, eds., ‘Black Workers' Struggle for Equality in Birmingham’, Champaign, University of Illinois Press, 2004, p.109, p.198, a product of the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute's Oral History Project)

Source 8a

It impressed me a whole lot because Dr. King was a man who ... I never heard a man speak so eloquently. He was a dynamic speaker. It was just something. I didn't know nothing about being a speaker. It was just something that was in this man that when he spoke, everybody listened. His speech sank deep into me. And I used to go to church down in my hometown, and all the preachers would preach about it, John 3:16, "God so loved the world..." They were showing me how to serve God but wasn't showing me how to pull myself up out of the miry clay and to make a better life for myself. [Jimmie Louis Warren speaking]

Source 8b

I demonstrated at city hall once and was present at L.R. Hall when a white guy said he wanted to shake Dr. King's hand, and instead he slapped him. The guy was grabbed, and Dr. King said, "Leave him alone." Dr. King told the guy that he loved him, and he did not press charges against him. I was at the Palm Sunday March but was not arrested. If you worked at these shops and factories, had a family, you probably were not going to get arrested. But you would do anything else that you could do. That was my position. [Harvey Lee Henley speaking]