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Transcript: Source4

Memo from the Acting Governor General of Sudan on the effects of sanctions on trade with Italy, October 1936
(Catalogue ref: T 160/678)

Source 4a

  1. The League of Nations (Sanctions) Ordinance 1935, based on the Order in Council of October 25th, was published in the Sudan Government Gazette on 15h November 1935. A copy of the Ordinance is attached to this memorandum.
  2. The general effect of the Ordinance on importers and exporters dealing in Italian trade may be seen in the following tables:-

Imports.

From 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936
6 months
  £E £E £E £E £E £E
Italy 73,494 34,980 36,275 33,888 36,177 3,565
Eritrea 6,755 2,419 3,994 1,707 1,761 913
It.Somaliland 271 11 - 2 18 -
Libya (and Tripoli) - - - - - 75
Total 80,520 37,410 40,269 35,597 37,956 4,553

Source 4b

Exports

To 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936
6 months
  £E £E £E £E £E £E
Italy 63,377 34,980 36,275 33,888 36,177 3,565
Eritrea 4,286 2,419 3,994 1,707 1,761 913
It.Somaliland - - - - - 75
Libya (and Tripoli) 721 804 959 1,209 2,246 -
Total 68,384 92,887 59,704 112,209 440,240 114,818

Re-exports

  1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936
6 months
  £E £E £E £E £E £E
Italy 325 9,758 58 1,914 1,654 1,097
Eritrea 6,851 7,469 4,519 1,981 147,484 72,292
It.Somaliland - 80 162 102 - -
Libya (and Tripoli) - 193 - - - 16
Total 7,176 17,500 4,739 3,997 149,138 73,405

Source 4c

(c) The prohibition of credit to Italy was responsible for the marked reduction in exports, of which the main items in the past have been ginned cotton, gum, dom nuts and sesame. Exporters however have had no difficulty in finding substitute markets elsewhere and the loss of the Italian market has not caused any undue hardship. It is of interest to note that, presumably in anticipation of sanctions, there was in the first eleven months of 1935 a marked increase in the Italian demand for gum and cotton.

(d) The prospect of hostilities early in 1935 gave rise to a vigorous export trade with Eritrea which grew with mushroom-like rapidity as the Italian authorities realized the value of easily accessible supplies of foodstuffs and transport animals in the Sudan and the advantages of the Sudan route for the import of wheat flour, cotton piece goods, motor cars and coffee. With the exception of transport animals whose export was prohibited under the Ordinance this trade has been well maintained.