Learning Curve, The Great War
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Transcript: Source2
Newspaper extracts describing reaction in the USA to the Treaty, 29 June 1919
(The New York Times)

PEACE SIGNED, ENDS THE GREAT WAR;
GERMANS DEPART STILL PROTESTING;
PROHIBITION TILL TROOPS DISBAND …

LEAGUE OPPONENTS UNITING

Republican Senators Now
Seem Agreed on Policy
of Reservations.

MCCUMBER IS WON OVER

But North Dakota Senator Opposes
Any Action Nullifying
the Covenant.

SHANTUNG ACTION ASSAILED

Borah Calls It Indefensible –
Norris Demands a Reservation
Regarding It.

Special to The New York Times.

WASHINGTON, June 29. – With unexpected swiftness the Republican opposition in the Senate to the League of Nations covenant, as embraced in the Treaty of Peace, began to crystallize today, after the cables had brought word that Germany had signed the treaty, and that the President, in his message to the American people, had expressed the hope that the treaty would be "ratified and acted upon in full and sincere execution of its terms."

The President's message, coupled with his statement in interviews at Paris that he hoped the Senate would ratify the treaty with the League of Nations covenant in it, without amendment, had the effect, it appeared, of bringing closer the elements of opposition among the opponents of the League. Instead of influencing wavering Senators toward an attitude favoring the ratification of the League of Nations covenant, the President's appeal appeared to have exactly the opposite effect.

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