Learning Curve, The Great War
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Transcript: Source4
Extract from the Illustrated London News on the state of Germany, 5 April 1919
(Catalogue ref: ZPER 34/154, reproduced by permission of the Illustrated London News Picture Library)

NEMESIS OVERTAKES BERLIN: BOMBS; FLAME-PROJECTORS; MINENWERFER.

GERMANY EXPERIENCES THE HORRORS OF WAR SHE INFLICTED ON THE ALLIES: GOVERNMENT TROOPS WITH FLAME-THROWERS AND GRENADES PROTECTING AN UNDERGROUND STATION IN BERLIN.

"FIRING HEAVY ARTILLERY AT CROWDED TENEMENTS MEANS A BUTCHER'S BILL OF SEVERAL THOUSANDS": A MINE-THROWER IN THE ALEXANDERPLATZ, BERLIN.

By the irony of fate, Berlin has suffered at the hands of her own people the terrors of air-raids and bombardment which she escaped in the war. During the recent street fighting between Government troops and Spartacists, nearly every form of slaughter devised by the Germans against the Allies - flame-throwers and mine-throwers, shells and hand-grenades - was used with terrible effect. "For some hours," writes Mr. George Young, "a regular barrage was laid down on the Alexanderplatz and neighbouring streets, in which machine-guns, field-guns, and minenwerfer were freely used. The insurgents' positions were made untenable by aeroplane observation and bombing . . . . Firing heavy artillery at crowded tenement houses means a butcher's bill of several thousands, mostly women and children, and damage to property of several millions. . . . The Government . . . left the whole matter to Noske (Minister of National Defence), who, in turn, left it to his military advisers, Majors Gilsa and Hammerstein. . . . The result has been civil war."

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