Transcript

It is clear that the restoration and further development of the national economy of European countries would be facilitated if the United states of America, whose productive capacities have only not diminished during the war but have considerably increased, could give that economic help which these countries require. At the same time it is known that the USA herself is also interested in utilising her credit possibilities for the expansion of her external markets …

Hitherto it has been regarded as axiomatic that every nation should decide the question of how best to secure the restoration and improvement of its economy. No European government intends to interfere in deciding whether the Monnet plan is good for France or not. This is the affair of the French people itself. But this also applies to Great Britain, to the Soviet union, to Poland and to Czechoslovakia, and to every other European country …

… working out an all embracing economic programme for European countries - which will inevitably lead to interference by certain countries in the affairs of other countries - cannot be accepted as a basis for cooperation for the countries of Europe. Such attempts are now being made by certain powers, but they are doomed to failure and will only undermine the international authority of those powers.