Crime and PunishmentHeresy  and Treason Return to the main page
Source 1   Transcript Print page
   
  SP 15/27/b; letter. Edmund Campion trained as a Roman Catholic priest in Dublin, Douai (in the Low Countries) and Prague, where he joined the Society of Jesus (Jesuits). The Jesuits sent him to England in 1580. This letter was sent to a friend abroad later that year and shows what it was like for a Roman Catholic priest travelling in secret around England, helped by many, yet in permanent danger of being caught.
In Part (i) he describes how he was nearly arrested on arrival at Dover. (Dr. Allen was head of a seminary at Douai, which trained English Roman Catholic priests. He may have been the person to whom this letter was written.)
Part (ii) describes how he travelled about the country in secret, staying in safe Roman Catholic houses.
In part (iii) he describes how he avoids those out to catch him.
In part (iv) he explains that he only came as a priest and asked to preach to the Queen and court.
However, the fact that the private letter from which these extracts were taken is in the government papers suggests that they were on to him. He was caught at Wantage in July 1581, tortured, tried as a traitor and hanged. The Roman Catholic Church made him a saint in 1970.
 
Hints
  As you read these three Sources,
-compare the attitudes and personalities of Campion and Hamertun.
-Look for evidence of the government's attitude and their network of anti-Catholic informers.
In Source 1 look for:
-evidence of Campion's personality;
-evidence that there was still lots of support for Roman Catholicism (-but note that he might exaggerate this);
-evidence that lots of people were very hostile to Roman Catholics and that the government were working hard to catch him;
-evidence that there was no real distinction between heresy and treason.

 
Worksheet Instructions
  Put some of the examples you have found from these Sources into your Gallery Worksheet.
 
  SP 15/27/b; letter
SP 15/27/b; letter
SP 15/27/b; letter
SP 15/27/b; letter
 
 
Source 3 Source 2