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Reference MSS
Covering dates 9th century-20th century
Held by Lambeth Palace Library
Extent Over 4,000 volumes or files
Conditions of access Access conditions are displayed on the Library's website: http://www.lambethpalacelibrary.org
Creators Lambeth Palace Library
Supplementary information The Manuscripts are described in a series of catalogues and indexes (fully listed on the Library website http://www.lambethpalacelibrary.org).

Administrative history:
Lambeth Palace Library is the historic library of the Archbishops of Canterbury, founded in 1610. It is the principal library and record office for the history of the Church of England, holding, in addition to the Archbishops' archives, material acquired from other sources.

Contents:
The Manuscripts sequence at Lambeth Palace Library comprises a collection of material created by a diverse range of individuals and organisations, both within and outside the Church of England. The material has been accumulated by acquisitions made over several centuries, including some material which strictly forms part of the archive of the Archbishops of Canterbury. The contents, both single volumes and collections of material, cover not only ecclesiastical history but other subjects, ranging for instance through architectural, colonial, political and social history. Numbered from MS. 1, the series continues to accrue beyond MS. 4500. The manuscripts date from the 9th century to the present day, including some 600 medieval manuscripts.



MISCELLANEOUS COPIES of RECORDS FROM VARIOUS SOURCES.  MS 608  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608

The handwritting of the greater portion of this MS. is) very similar to, if it be not the same as, that of MS 597 (Pelham's Letter Book.)
Language:  Latin

Contents:
Mostly in Latin.
EXTRACTS from ANCIENT RECORDS relating to IRELAND, made in the time of Sir George Carew.
List of persons referred to in the above extracts.
Adrian, pope. Argentine.
Alexander, pope. Arthur.
Alexander, [Wm.] Arundell.
Alger. Ashe.
Alford. Assick.
Alleton. Atholl.
Ambrose. Avell.
Aphowell. Audeley, Lo.
Archdeacon. Arnold.
Barnwell, Lord. Barry.
Barckley. Barry, Lo.
Barrett. Bathe, Lo.
Bateman. Barefoot.
Barnwell. Barenton.
Berkeroll. Bennett.
Belinge. Betaghe.
Beaumont. Bedlow sive Beaulieu.
Becker. Beckett.
Belwoode. Birmingham, Lo.
Birmingham, Com. Louthe. Birmingham.
Bigod, Com. Northfol. Bitterley.
Bisset. Blound.
Blunt, Lo. Montjoy. Blundell.
Boyle, Lo. Bohun, Com. Northap.
Bould, Lo. Boniface, Papa.
Bollerey. Boyxe.
Bohume, Com. Hereford. Bonham.
Box. Bronfedir.
Brasbrudge. Brin.
Britt. Bromyche. Just. Hib.
Brokton. Breerton.
Browne, Archb. Dub. Browne.
Brun. Brewer.
Brooke, Lo. Cob. Bromin.
Brabason. Brabason, Lo.
Burid. Burghell.
Burlayne. Burghershe.
Bullen, Com. Ormond. Butler.
Butler, Com. Carricke. Butler, Com. Ossory.
Butler, Com. Ormond. Butler, Vicero. Montgarret.
Butler, Viceroy Tully-Philim. Butler, Lo. Dunboyne.
Butler, Lo. Cahir. Burgh.
Burgh, Com. Clanrickard. Burgh, Com.Ulton.
Burgh, Lo. Letrim. Burgh, Lo. Castleconnell.
Burnell.
Canvill. Campton.
Cantwell. Castlemartin.
Candall. Cardin.
Cantocke. Cantelupe.
Carew. Calfe.
Castell. Cerdell.
Caddeggan. Christopher.
Calthrope. Chichester, Lo.
Cabbary. Chevre.
Clare. Clare, Com. Pembro.
Clare, Com. Glost. Clemens, Papa.
Clifford. Clinton.
Cogan. Colton, Just. Hib.
Courcy, Lo. Courteney, Loc. Hib.
Cony. Courteis.
Courteney, Marg. Exon. Cornwall.
Condon, sive Caunton. Colmore.
Costantine. Collin.
Comin. Cobham.
Cornwallis. Coppinger.
Cotenham. Cris.
Creaghe. Cusake.
Cuddle. Cywathe.
Dalton. D'Amorie.
Dacres, Lo. Den.
Darcy. Deventh.
Daniell, Lo. Delamare.
Dardis. De la Barre.
Dauson. De la Haye.
De la Motte. D'Excestre.
De la Montayne. De la Feild.
De la Rochell. Devreux, Com. Marshall.
De la Hander. Dinant.
De la Poole, Com. Lincolne. Dillon.
Dowdall. Druhull.
Drewe. Drugo.
Drayton. Dullard.
Dudley, Lo. Dudley Viceroy, Lisle.
Eborum. Englishe.
Ebritt. Enfield.
Elingham. Everard.
Everingham. Evermashe.
Eustace, vide Fitz Eustace. Excestre.
Exton.
Falliaghe. Fiant.
Fant. Finer, Lo. Clinton.
Faill. FitzAldelme, vide Burgh.
Faringdon. FitzAnthony.
Fenton. FitzAlured.
Ferrers, Com. Derby. FitzAndrew.
Ferreter. FitzAlexander.
FitzEustace. FitzDavid.
FitzEustace Viceroy Balt. FitzEustace, Lo.
FitzFreriche. FitzGibbon.
FitzGeoffrey. FitzGilbert.
FitzGiles. FitzGeralld.
FitzGerald Com. Kildare. FitzGerald, Com. Desmond.
FitzGerald, Viceroy Co. Deu. FitzHenry.
FitzJohn. FitzMilo.
FitzMaurice. FitzMaurice, Lo.
FitzMathew. FitzNicholas.
FitzOliver. FitzOwen.
FitzOilo. FitzPhillippe.
FitzRobert. FitzRainfrater.
FitzRoger. FitzRichard.
FitzRaymond. FitzSymon, Archiep. Dub.
FitzStephen. FitzThomas.
FitzTirreloghe. FitzWalter, vide Butler.
FitzWarren. Fleminge.
FitzWilliam. Fleminge, Lo.
Foylle. Fresney.
Galbolly. Gernon.
Gaynard. Geneville.
Galan. Genison.
Gardiner. Gifford.
Garthe. Gise.
Galway. Goldinge.
Gowler. Gray, Viceco. Grany.
Godinan. Gray, Lo.
Golafrey. Grady.
Gold. Gresden
Grandison. Greley.
Grace. Grege.
Graunt. Griffin.
Griffithe. Gurguntius Rex.
Guillomare.
Hakenshew. Hoethe.
Haverington. Hoge.
Haye. Hodnet.
Hackett. Howard, Com. Surr.
Harwood. Holland, Dux. Surr.
Hary. Husey.
Haunder. Hurlye.
Hastings, Com. Pem. Hamilton, Lo.
Herford. Harvey.
Hethin. Hoare.
Jeneville, vide Geneville. Isketsale.
Johannes, Archiep. Ardmaghe. Juner.
Ivetch.
Kanville. Kerney.
Kevanaghe. Keppoke.
Kevanaghe, Lo. Ketinge, sive Ketin.
Kinge. Knevett.
Lawlesse. Ledwitche.
Laundy. Le Brett.
Lacy. Le Grace.
La. Fresney. Lenington.
Laungton. Ley.
Langford. Liverpoole.
Lacy, Com. Ulton. Liston.
Lambert, Lo. Lighe.
Levett. Lond.
L'Enfant. Logan.
London. Loundres.
Longespee. Longe.
Lucy.
Mandeville. Manners, Com. Rutl.
Mautmorris. Malachias, Archiep. Ard.
Mareis. Manwayringe.
Marshall. Marward.
Marshall, Com. Pem. Maye, Archiep. Ardma.
Maddy. McDonnell, Viceroy.
Mansell. McCraghe.
Manes. McCartie, Com. Clancare.
McMahun. McCashad.
McCartie. McGillipatricke.
McDonewhad. McGillipatricke, Lo.
McGennis. McGoghagan.
McMoroghe. Mortimer, Com. Ult.
McPhilippe. Mortimer, Lo.
Misset. Montcheney, Lo.
Milton. Moubray, Com. Nottingham.
Monte. Mole.
Monthermer, Com. Glo. Morton.
Monteiute, Lo. Molis.
Morewatche. Montayne.
Moore. Muleton.
Mountmorency, vide Clare. Moore, Lo.
Molendinis. Myaghe.
Morley, Lo. Melton.
Massingberd.
Nangle. Napper.
Neville. Newton.
Neville, Lo. Nehoville.
Niaghe. Nuterville.
Norris. Nugent.
Nugent, Lo.
Obrien, Com. Thomond. Oeailla.
Obrien, Lo. Inseg. Ofarall bane.
Obrien, Lo. Ibrack. Ofarall boye.
Obirne. Ofelmythe.
Obinton. Ogundre.
Obrien. Ohanloyne.
Obrenan. O'Kinselaghe.
Ocarroll. O'Kennidie.
Occo. O'Kelly.
Oconnor. Oleyne.
Odonnenold. Olfernond.
Odonogan. Omore.
Odwyn. O'Moroghe.
Odempsy. O'Malaghlin.
Odonnell, Com. Tirconnell. O'Moloy.
O'Neale, Co. Tyr. O'Neale.
O'Neale, Barr. Danga. O'Nolan.
Oreylie. Oskolly.
Otohill, sive Otoole. Oulferd.
Oye.
Patishue. Payton.
Pagett. Pennington.
Percy, Lo. Perrers.
Petite. Perrot, Dep. Hib.
Penteney. Penrosse.
Penchoit. Pipard.
Pincerna, vide Butler. Plantagenet, Co. Ult.
Pirpont. Plantagenet D. Clar.
Pinkeney. Plantagenet, Dux. Ebor.
Pickworth. Plantagenet, D. Glos.
Plantagenet. Co. Morton. Plantagenet, Co. Rutl.
Plantagenet, Cornub. Plantagenet, Co. Corke.
Plantagenet, Princeps Angl. Pluckenet.
Pluckenet, Lo. Killin. Pluckenet, Lo. Dunsa.
Pluckenet, Lo. Louthe. Power.
Power, Lo. Porter.
Poynings, Dep. Hib. Preston.
Portis. Preston, Lo.
Preston, Vice Co. Prendergarst.
Preston. Co. Desm. Punchardon.
Purcell.
Raleighe. Repenteney, vide Penteny.
Rathe. Read.
Rupe, vide Roche. Ridlesford.
Rainger. Ridgeway, Lo.
Rawson, Vice Co. Roche.
Radulphus, Co. Eu. Dñi Louth. Roche, Lo.
Radcliff, Com. Sussex. Rokell.
Redd. Rous.
Robins. Rossell.
Rochford. Russell.
Sabina. Shortall.
Sargant. Skiddy.
Sanford. Skurlocke.
Savadge. Slane, vide Fleminge.
Seyre. Smither.
Segrave. Soriner.
Segrave, Ducissa Northfol. Spencer, Co. Glo.
Semer, Co. Hertford. Starkie.
Scroope, Lo. Stapleton.
Scone. Stake.
Shemais. Stafford.
Shighan. Standley, Co. Derby.
Standley, Loc. Hib. St. Ledger.
Stoker. St. Ledger, Dep. Hib.
St. Amand, Lo. St. Michell.
St. Albin, vide Tobin. St. Paule, Com. Pem.
St. Lawrance, Lo. Sweyne.
Swarney. Sweyne, Archiep. Ard.
Synbeghe. Symott.
Talbot. Thorborow, Cancel. Hib.
Talbot, Lo. Thony.
Talbot, Co. Sal. Thornton, Thesau. Hib.
Talbot, Archiep. Dub. Tirrell.
Tallon. Tiptoft, Co. Wig.
Tallour. Tipper.
Taffe. Tirmont.
Tanner. Topploa.
Tany. Tobin.
Travers. Trant.
Travill. Twether, D. Bedf.
Tuite. Turberville.
Turner, Epus. Mid. Tuchet, Co. Cast.
Valor. Verneill.
Valence. Verdon, Just. Hib.
Vaux. Verdon, Lord.
Vere, Co. Oxen, D. Hib. Ufford, Loc. Hib.
Vesey, Lo. Viveanus, Legatus.
Vigornia, sive Worcester.
Wale. Waterhouse.
Warren, Com. Surr. Werun.
Wallis. Wells, Lo.
Wakeman. Wellesley.
Warwicke. Weston.
Waspaill. White.
Walloppe, Tresaur, Hib. Windesor.
Walshe, sive Welshe. Wisham.
Walton, Archiep. Dub. Wig.
Wilbraham. Wiseman.
Wogan, Just. Hib. Wolfe.
Worcestre, vide Wigornia. Wolsey, Card.
Woodlocke. Wright.
Wygorne, vide Vigornia. Wriotesley.
Wingfield, Viceroy. Wyney.

Statutes of Kilkenny, passed in the year 1367.  MS 608, f. 1  1367

Former reference: MS 608, f. 1

Contents:
Printed by Hardimans.

Grant by Henry II., at pleasure, to Robert FitzStephen and Miles De Cogan, of the custody of the City of Cork, with cantred of the same, formerly belonging to the hostmen of the same city; also grant of the whole kingdom of the said city, from Cape St. Brede on the sea, and Limoch, to the water of Lismore, to be held of the King and his son John (the said city and cantred excepted) at 60 knights' fees.  MS 608, f. 9  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 9
Language:  Latin

Contents:
Witnesses, John bishop of Norwich, Adam bishop of St. Asaph, and Augustin bishop of Waterford, Richard De Lucye, William FitzAldem, sewer, Hugh De Lacy, Hugh De Burid, Roger Fitz Ranifrater, Maurice De Prendergast, Robert Dene, Robert FitzEliodorus, Geffrey Seyre, Henry De Mautmoris. Oxford.--an. 2. (afterwards erased) Henry II.
Certain evidences transcripted out of the book of the extent of the Earl of Ormond's landes called the Red Book. In anno reg. Edw. I. 31°.
Grant by Robert De Mandevile to Robert FitzFrerich of Clonomagag with its appurtenances, as held by Dunlese O'Donenold, at the annual rent of 15 shillings, paid half at Easter, half at Michaelmas, for all service. For holding this land, the said Robert gave two horses of the price of four marks.
* Grant by John, archbishop of Dublin, to Theobald Walter (Butler of the E. of Mortaigne) of the sergeantry of Geoffrey De Morisco (servicium Galfridum De Morisco,) for the land and castle of St. Nemus (Holywood), at the annual rent to be paid at Michaelmas of two pounds of wax, due by the said Geffry; likewise the sergeantry of Jordan De Marisco for the land of Douliand and Rathmongog and Tulath in Meth, with their appurtenances, rendering annually to us and our successors such service as is testified to us by the charter which he holds. Also the whole land of Rathsalagh held by Resus FitzPhilip when the said Theobald the second entered Ireland, at an annual rent to be paid at Michaelmas of half an ounce of gold.
Ibidem," 31 Edw. I.

Assent of the prior and canons of St. John the Baptist, Nannath, to the grant made by Theobald FitzWalter, Butler of Ireland, whereby the said Theobald granted to the said house six carucates and 40 acres of land in Karemath near to Louthunlauth and one carucate and a half in Louthnulauth? near Karemath, and 4 carucates and 40 acres of land in Cloncury and Lesrony, and Balnath Beel derg with appurtenances in free and perpetual almoign, so long as there should be in the said house 13 infirm people supported by the said house each of them having every day a loaf, drink from the cellar, and one mess from the kitchen; the number of canons of the said house to be increased when their means shall permit. The said canons are also to have free election and consecration of their priors; also the fisheries, ponds, mills; reserving to him and his successors the right of distraining whenever any of the said conditions are infringed.  MS 608, f. 9b  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 9b
Language:  Latin

Contents:
Ibidem." 31 Edw. I.

Inspeximus by Prince John, Lord of Ireland, etc., of a grant made by John Archbishop of Dublin to Geoffry De Mariscis, of the Castle of Holywood, with one knight's fee, bequeathed to him by Walter his brother, in Killenkeynin, Keolkno, Killesco, Pliochan, Kilherke, Balliomolan, Kynnanath, Tylathcarthes; also of five carucates near Accnerth; to wit, Balliobrennan, Balliodays, Loutheradene, Ballicarman, Dunmoliath, Clohamehun, Crenath, Jealtach, by the service of half a knight's fee. Also grant to the said Geoffry of the moiety of the barony given to the archbishop by the said Earl for a moiety of one knight's service; on condition that he take on himself the said service.  MS 608, f. 10  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 10
Language:  Latin

Contents:
Witnesses H. Cornwall, A. bishop of Fernes, Robert De Milton, Walter De Verdon, Earls;--John De Courcy, Adam De Canvile, Peter Pipard, Theobald FitzWalter, Christopher De Worcester, Roger Tirelle. St. John the Evangelist's day, in the Nativity. 4 Ric. I. at Notingham.
Ibidem." 13 (sic.) Edw. I.

Grant by Eustace Le Poer, to Edmond Le Botiller of the manor of Donathmoz in O'Mail, with appurtenances, as held by David FitzDavid De Offynton, "sine aliquo retenemento faciendo inde capitl: dominis feodi servit inde debita." Witnesses, Lord John FitzThomas, John FitzRobert, John de Drudull, Thomas de Cantwell, knights; John de Leuit, Meyler de Candall, Henry Leffant and others. "Ibidem." 31 Edw. I.  MS 608, f. 10b  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 10b
Language:  Latin

Contents:
Deed of covenants by Sir John FitzJohn de Barry, Hugh de Barry, and William de Barry, reciting that they had supplicated the Lord Theobald Pincerna (Butler) of Ireland, to obtain for them the King's peace for certain wrongs said to be done by them. They bind themselves not to commit any infringement of the peace in the lands of the King or of the said Theobald, from the time of executing these presents until he shall return from the Court with the said concession, at which time they are willing to pay any forfeiture he shall impose and give security for themselves and their followers. Failing this he shall have right of entry on all their lands without opposition. They agree also to find as mainprisers, the Lord John de Barry their father, Tancred de Barry and Mathew de Barry their brothers, who will bind themselves by the same covenants.
Duncarnin, Friday, on the morrow of the Purification of the Blessed Virgin Mary, and in the 24 year of the reign of King Edward.
Ibidem," 31 Edw. I.

Final composition between Otto de Grandison and John de Druge, clerk, concerning all his receipts, issues, and liveries for all the time he remained in the service of Otto and Gerard his nephew in Ireland. To the end that all action against the same John may be cut off, the said John, by statute merchant, for 200l. covenanted with the said Otto that his lands and tenements should be restored to him. Dated at London, the Kalends of July, 18 Edw. I. "Ibidem," 31 Ed. I.  MS 608, f. 11  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 11
Language:  Latin

Contents:
Grant and release from Gervase de Raley to Henry Laffayn, his heirs and assigns for ever, of one carucate of land in Slefardath, which is called Greyston. Witnesses: The Lord Walter Lenfant, Walter Le Brit, Knights: William de Cantwell, Miles de Cantwell, John de Cantwell, William de Monte, Richard de Cantwell, Alexander Cerdel, and others. Dated at Cassell, the 23rd---- (sic.)
Ibidem," 31 Edw. I.
Grant by Theobald Butler of Ireland to the Lady Joan La Bottiller his mother of two mills of Tirlagh in Ofelmith, to wit, the old mill and the new, in exchange for 25 marks of annual rent, which the said Lady his mother held as dower in the manor of Arthmail, to hold during her life, rendering annually 76s. 8d, a year; saving to him and his assigns free milling (moltura) in the same mills of the corn and malt of his house at his own expense, and that of his family, without any toll or rent. Tirlath, Tuesday next before Sts. Philip and James, 26th year of King Edward.
Ibidem," 31 Ed. I.

Agreement between John de Nehovile and Lord Theobald Butler of Ireland, 24 April.--Edw. [I], that the former shall pass over the seas with Theobald to Scotland, and there during the war between Edward King of England and the King of Scotland shall serve him with three horses caparisoned and whatsoever goods and men he may be able to procure in the King's Court or elsewhere; for which Lord Theobold on his return to Ireland shall mainprize him, and pay him 40 marks. "Ibidem," 31 Edw. I.  MS 608, f. 11b  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 11b
Language:  Latin

Contents:
Release from Roger FitzMiles McNaspuk to Richard Le Power, knight, of his claim to 7s. annual rent arising out of the lands which Richard holds of him in Rathnorbi, and the suit of court which the said Richard might do for the same Roger's court of Ouerke, with the summones, attachments, &c., which Richard or his tenants of Rathnerby answer twice a year to Roger's Court of Polrethane, except that Richard and his tenants of Rathnorby shall answer twice a year at Roger's Court at Polrain; and, in case Richard or his tenants be amerced for any trespass in that court, their amercement shall not exceed 6d. of silver. Waterford, Monday next after the translation of St. Thomas, 1320. 14 Ed. II.
Ibidem," 31 Edw. I.

Writ by Ralph of Mount Hermer, Earl of Gloucester and Hereford, lord of the liberties of Kilkenny, to the sheriff of Kilkenny, reciting that William son of Simon Le Poer in the Earl's Court of Kilkenny recovered against John, son of William, son of Simon Le Poer, one hundred pounds, and afterwards granted the same to Master Thomas de Cantoke; and as the said John could not show cause why the same ought not to be levied to the use of Master Thomas, it was considered that the latter should recover. Master Thomas thereupon prayed the benefit of the statute in that case provided, namely, that it is at the choice of the plaintiff, whether the sheriff shall levy on the lands, or deliver to him all the goods and chattels of the debtor, except his oxen and beasts of his plough, and half of all his land, at a reasonable price and extent, until the debt be lived. Therefore we command you to cause this to be done for the said Master Thomas. Witness, Walter Ivech, our seneschal of Kilkenny, at Kilkenny, 8th January. 28 Edw. [I]. "Ibidem," 31 Edw. I.  MS 608, f. 12  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 12
Language:  Latin

Contents:
Grant by Theobald [Fitz]Walter, the Butler of Ireland, for safety of his soul and for that of his ancestors, to the Prior and brethren of the Hospital of St. John outside the new gate of Dublin, of one carucate of land in Logesneth and Dresman, for the support of thirteen infirm persons in the said hospital; to hold of him and his heirs in pure and perpetual almoigne.
Ibidem, 31 Edw. I.
Grant by Edmond [son] of Walter, the Butler of Ireland, to his brother Thomas Botiller, of his manor of Tillauthnerg, which is called Castle Gras in Fothrid, as fully as he had the same by the feoffment of Walter, son of Edward Le Gras; to hold to him and the heirs of his body, doing 40s. of royal service, when royal service shall be proclaimed. Witnesses, the Lord Nicholas de Karreu, John de Valle, John de Bottiller, knights; Theobald Talbot and others.
Ibidem," 31 Edw. I.

Memorandum that Philip, son of William le Erchedeken, who held land in Onoynad of FitzMiles, Baron of Ouerk, in the manor called Dounbrin, by the service of 20s. of royal service and suit of court, (which Arnold Le Poer held of the same Philip by the service of one penny and 20s. royal service,) enfeoffed Edmond Botiller of the rent and service aforesaid, to him and his heirs for ever. The same Arnold did fealty in full assize of Kylkenny before Thomas Le Botiller (keeper of the liberties of Kilkenny for our Lord the King by the death of the Lord Gilbert de Clare) in 8 Edw. [I.]. "Ibidem," 31 Edw. [I.]  MS 608, f. 12b  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 12b
Language:  Latin

Contents:
Grant by Philip Marshal to his kinsman Gerald Marshal, and his heirs, of all his land, viz., Sheneykascum, Tegamuscum, and Meyriscum, from the present feast of Saint Mathew. 31 Edw. [I.]
Ibidem," 31 Edw. I.
Edmond Butler of Ireland to his beloved and faithful constables and bailiffs, reeves and burgesses, and all other his faithful people greeting. (Unfinished.)
Ibidem," 31 Edw. I.
Indenture, witnessing that John, son of Alan Whit, of Kilkenny, bound himself and his heirs to James le Bottiller, Earl of Ormond, and his heirs, in royal service and suit of the Earl's court of Overke, from fifteen days to fifteen days, and in wards, marriages, &c., as his ancestors and tenants of Ballyleyn have been accustomed to render to the Lords of Overke and the ancestors of the said Earl. Kilkenny, 26 July, 40 Edw. III.
Thus far transcripted out of the Earl of Ormond's Book of Extent, de anno. 31 R. R. Ed. I.

Exemplification of letters patent, 14 April, 6 Edw. III., granting to James le Botiller of Ireland then lately created Earl of Ormond, a yearly rent of 10l. from the farm of the city of Waterford. Witness, Lionel Earl of Ulster, the King's son, Lieutenant in Ireland. At Dublin, 12 April, 38 Edw. III.  MS 608, f. 13  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 13
Language:  Latin

Contents:
From the collection of James Lee.
The King to William of Windsor, Governor of Ireland, stating that he had lately by the assent of his great council ordained that everybody having possessions in Ireland should in his proper person come into the said land or send men (gentes) thither according to the value of his possessions before the feast of Easter in the King's 49th year, to remain there thenceforth for the safety and defence of the land, under penalty of forfeiture.
Anno 49 regni Edw. III.
Appointment of Maurice FitzThomas, Earl of Kildare, as Justiciary of all Ireland, from the day of the departure of William of Windsor until his return; he is to oversee the country of Lenistre, and Stephen, bishop of Meath, the country of Mounster. Westminster, 10 February, 50 Edw. 3.
Read in the presence of William Tani, prior of the hospital of St. John of Jerusalem in Ireland, chancellor of Ireland, Thomas Scurlock, abbot of St. Thomas the Martyr near Dublin, treasurer of Ireland, Robert de Preston, knight, chief justice of the common bench of Ireland, John Keppock, chief justice of pleas, and others of the King's council there.
Appointment of James le Botiller, Earl of Ormond, as Justiciary of Ireland, to keep the land of Ireland with the castle and other appurtenances, during pleasure; and to re-receive at the Exchequer of Ireland 500l. a year; with 20 men at arms and so many horses caparisoned. Westminster, 24 July, 50 Edw. III.
Grant by the King to the Earl of Ormond of power to admit to his fealty and peace as well English as Irish rebels and to pardon them. Also to oversee the actions of all the King's ministers, and to remove those who are useless, except the chancellor, treasurer, and other officers appointed by letters patent under the great seal of England, by the advice of the council there; and in place of them to substitute other useful and fit men. Also to administer justice to all men according to the laws and customs of that land, and to do all other things for the good government and safety of that laud and for the recovery of the King's rights. Westminster, 6 Aug., 50 Edw. III.
Grant to James le Botiller of Ireland, lately created Earl of Ormond, of an annual rent of 10l. from the farm of the city of Waterford. Salisbury, 2 Nov. 2, Edw. III.
Mandate to the bailiffs of the city accordingly.
Records of gaol delivery in Ireland, temp. Edw. I., Edw. II., and Ric. II.
1 Ric. II. Monday next after the feast of [St.] Valentine, pleas of the crown and gaol delivery at the Naas before James le Botiller, Earl of Ormond, justiciary of Ireland.
3 Ric. II. Monday next after the feast of Sts. Peter and Paul, ditto at Dublin, before James son of James le Botiller, Earl of Ormond, justiciary, locum tenens of the justiciary.
2. Ric. II., in the quindene of Michaelmas, ditto [place not named] before James le Botiller Earl of Ormond, justiciary.
3 Ric. II. Monday next after the feast of St. Luke, ditto at Dublin before Alexander bishop of Ossory, justiciary of Ireland.
3 Ric. II. Tuesday next after the feast of St. Andrew the Apostle, ditto at Dublin, before John Bromwich, justiciary of Ireland.
3 Ric. II. Monday next after the feast of All Saints, ditto at Dublin before Alexander Bishop of Ossory, justiciary.
3 Ric. II. Monday next after the feast of St. George the Martyr, ditto at the Naas, before John Bromwich, justiciary.
3 Ric. II. Friday next before the feast of St. Petronilla, ditto at Dublin, before Edmond de Mortimer, Earl of March and Ulster, lieutenant in Ireland.
5 Ric. II. Thursday next after the feast of All Saints at Clonmell, and the Thursday next before the feast of St. Clement.
5 Ric. II. Monday next before the Conversion of St. Paul, also pleas of the crown and gaol delivery at Corke before Master John Colton, Dean of Dublin, justiciary of Ireland.
8 Ric. II. Friday next after St. Andrew, pleas of the crown at the Naas, before James Le Bottiller, Earl of Ormond, justiciary.
8 Ric. II. Monday next after the Ascension, pleas of the crown and gaol delivery at Wexford, before Philip de Courtney, lieutenant in Ireland.
9 Ric. II. Monday next before the feast of St. Luke, ditto at Dublin, before Philip de Courtney, Lieutenant in Ireland, and John Penrose, Chief Justice to hold the pleas of Ireland with him.
9 Ric. II. The same on Monday next after the feast of St. Patrick, at Trim.
32 Edw. I., in the quindene of St. Martin, common pleas at Dublin, before John Wogan, justiciary of Ireland.
3 Edw. II. Three weeks from Easter, pleas of the crown and gaol delivery at Dublin before the same.
6 Edw. II. The like on Monday before the feast of St. James at Clonmell.
6 Edw. II. Saturday next after the feast of St. Nicholas, ditto at Cassell before Edmond le Bottiller, keeper of the land of Ireland.
6 Edw. II. Monday in the morrow of the Annunciation, pleas of the crown at Cassell before Walter de Thornebury, chancellor of Ireland, and William Alexander, appointed in place of Edmond le Bottiller, engaged in remote parts.
6 Edw. II. Friday next after the quindene of Easter, pleas of the crown at Dublin, "sive potius Drogheda, ex parte Uriel," before Edmond Bottiller, keeper of Ireland.
7 Edw. II. Monday before St. Laurence the Martyr, pleas of the crown and gaol delivery at Corcke before Walter de Thornebury, chancellor of Ireland and William Alexander (as before).
7 Edw. II. Monday next after St. Luke, ditto at Waterford before Edmond le Bottiller, keeper of Ireland.
11 Edw. II. Thursday in the morrow of [All] Souls, pleas of the crown at Thomastown before Roger de Mortimer, lieutenant in Ireland.
8 Edw. I. Tuesday next before the feast of the Assumption of St. Mary, gaol delivery at Drogheda, "ex parte Uriel," before Theobald de Verdun, justiciary.
8 Edw. II. Friday next after the close of Easter, pleas of the crown at the Naas, before Edmond le Bottiller, justiciary.
11 Edw. II. In the quindene of Easter, pleas of the crown at Dublin before William archbishop of Cassell, keeper of Ireland.
12 Edw. II. Monday next after the Nativity of the Blessed Mary, pleas of the crown and gaol delivery at Corke before the same.

These lordships, manors, and lands were appertaining to the Butlers, ancesters to the Earl of Ormond in the reigns of King Edward the I. and King Edward the II., as by a book of extent written in those days appeareth; which book belonged to the Earl of Ormond.  MS 608, f. 15  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 15
Language:  Latin

Contents:
Talanth in Offelmith in county Catherloghe. Lands in the barony of Kilkenny in county Kildare. Arclo in county Kilkenny. O'Mayle. Tristeldermott. Brun. Bree manor, Corduff manor. Balligarran in county Kildare. Cloncorre manor. Ballihouke. Knocklufor manor in county Kilkenny. Orerke barony in county Kilkenny. Rowir in county Kilkenny. Ardmayle manor. Eliognathie. ["Eliogarthie," according to Carew.] Thorles in county Tipperary. Ninchianalef manor, in Eliognathie. ["Eliogarthie," according to Carew.] Moycarkesley in Eliognathie. Carrick McGriffine manor, in county Tipperary. Ballisithan manor. Moyathny manor. Killine manor. Villa Fabry. Yvor Villa. Ballyhothy manor. Greraghte manor. Polroan manor. Donkerin manor. Roskren in Elicarwill. Colnbreran in Elicarwill, Seyrkeran. Ynes Manor. Carkenlis manor, in county Limerick. Hollywood manor in County Dublin. Cloncorry manor. Turvie manor in county Dublin.

Restoration of Thomas Butler Earl of Ormond.  MS 608, f. 15b  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 15b

Contents:
Inspeximus and exemplification by King Henry VII. of a petition presented to him in Parliament at Westminster, 7th November last, by Thomas Ormond alias Butler, knight, setting forth that James Ormond late Earl of Wiltshire, John Ormond alias Butler, knight, and the suppliant, for their true allegiance and service to King Henry VI., were by Act of Parliament 1 Edw. IV. attainted of high treason, and that the said Earl and John being deceased without issue of their bodies, the suppliant is brother and heir in blood as well to the said late Earl as to the said John; praying also that the said act, and all other acts of attainder and forfeiture made in the time of Edward IV. against the said James and John, might be void and annulled, and that the suppliant be restored to all his dignities, estate, and preeminence, the name only of Earl of Wiltshire excepted, and also inherit all possessions so forfeited.
Also of the assent to the same petition by the Commons of England in the said Parliament. Also of the King's answer to the same petition. "Soit fait come il est desiré.
Westminster, 10 December, 1 Hen. VII.
(The petition is in English.)

Records of Ireland concerning the Lord of Dunboyn, anno 7 Ed. IV. Castr. Dublin.  MS 608, f. 16b  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 16b

Contents:
Grant by Edw. IV. to Edmond Botiller, baron of Dunboyn, for his services in the wars in Ireland, (with the consent of John Earl of Worcester, Deputy of George Duke of Clarence, Lieutenant of Ireland,) of ten pounds a year out of the fee-farm of Waterford, which James Earl of Wiltshire lately forfeited.
Also of the prises of wines belonging to the King in the ports and franchises of Limerick and Cork, and towns of Rosse, Yoghall, Gallway, Kinsall, Dungarvan, and Dengill; to hold for life.
Witness the said Deputy, at Trym, 26 February, 7 Edw. IV.
Granted by the Deputy, on petition, by authority of parliament.
Enrolled in the Memoranda Roll of the Exchequer of Ireland, in the 9th Edward 4.
(From Records in Dublin Castle.)

Grant by Edw. IV. to Edmond, son of James le Bottiller, baron of Dunboyn, for his services in the wars in Ireland, and especially in the taking of Conn O'Conher, captain of his nation, (with the consent, as before, in full parliament at Drogheda before the Deputy) of the manor of Castlericard, county Meath, for life. Drogheda, 22 February, 7 Edw. IV. Granted on the bill of the Deputy, by authority of parliament.  MS 608, f. 17  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 17
Language:  Latin

Contents:
Pardon by Henry V. to William, son of Peter Le Bottiller, steward of the liberty of Tipperary (in consideration of his services in resisting O'Brien of Thomond, William Burke, knight of Connaught, O'Carvyll, and their army, who confederated for the conquest of Munster and Leinster, and for the great losses sustained by him through the spoiling of houses and lands, and also the burning of his castle and town of Cabbragh by the said enemies), of all debts and accounts due by him to the King, and of all amercements, for 100 shillings paid into the Exchequer of Ireland.
Witness John Stanley, knight, lieutenant in Ireland, at Kilkenny, 21 October, 2 Hen. ["7 Hen. V." in the heading.] V.
Pledges for the fine: Chris. Petit and Philip Flemyng, of co. Meath.
Enrolled and allowed in the Memoranda Roll of the Exchequer of Ireland, 15 Henry V. Easter records.
(From the records in Dublin Castle.)

Exemplification by Henry VIII. (at the request of Thomas Brokton) of an inquisition taken at Dunboyn, before James Boyxe of Ballevollan, escheator of Meath, 25 Hen. VIII., finding that James Bottiller, late Baron of Dunboyn, died seized of the manors of Dunboyn and Moymett, co., Meath, and that he had demised to Walter Brokton of Grange the town of Begistowne, for 20 years. Witness, Patrick Whyte, secondary Baron of the Exchequer of Ireland, at Dublin, 3 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII. Examined by Wm. Golding and Patrick Mole, clerks. (From the records in Dublin Castle.)  MS 608, f. 17b  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 17b
Language:  French and Latin

Contents:
Inspeximus by Henry VI. of the record of a plea in the chancery of Ireland (at the prosecution of Sir Christopher Plunkett and Joan his wife, deceased,) at Swerdes, 3 Hen. VI., respecting the manor of Kyllskyer. The King sent a writ close (dated at Trym, 10 Feb. 3 Hen. VI.) to Philip White, clerk, keeper of the treasury of books and records late of Edward Earl of March and Ulster and Lord of Trym, in the castle of Trym, to certify the causes of the seizure of the said manor into the hand of Roger De Mortimer, late Earl of March and Ulster, by John De Gresden, escheator of Meath. The inquisition taken by that escheator at Athboy, 17 Ric. II., found that Bertreda Laundey was seized of the said manor, which she held of Roger De Mortimer, lord of the liberty of Meath, as of his castle and manor [of Trym]; that she afterwards married Alex. Pentenei, jun; that the said Alexander and Bertreda in 26 Edw. III. alienated the manor to John Pentenei, their son, and his heirs; that the same John in 50 Edw. III. alienated it to William Falliagh, who alienated it to Bertoke Penteney, an outlaw for felony. By force of this inquisition the manor was seized into said Earl Roger's hands. Subsequently in a petition [The first portion of this petition, and also the end of the inquisition, have been omitted by error of the transcriber.] by said Christopher and Joan it was stated that the escheator had no power in law to take the said inquisition, considering the outlawry; and they prayed leave to prove their title, which was granted by privy seal dated at Swerdes, 19 March 3 Hen. [VI]. Their attorney, being admitted to plead, said that the manor was not held of said Earl Roger; that Peter Falyagh gave it to Alex. Penteney and Bertreda his wife for their lives, [Something is omitted here in MS.]............ to Joan, wife of said John, and the heirs male of said John, and if John died without heirs male, the manor to remain to Ric. Tuyt and his heirs; that after the death of said Alexander and Bertreda, it was enjoyed by said John and Joan, John dying without heirs male, and Luke Cusake, knight, as kinsman of said Ric. Tuyt, entered into the manor; that on said Luke's death it descended to Joan, wife of said Christopher, as his daughter and heir; and that Christopher and Joan were seized of it until they were ejected by colour of said inquisition. [Here another passage seems to have been omitted.] The sheriff was ordered to distrain said Christopher to appear in Court, to account to the king for the rents received from said Earl's death, but he did not till this had been done numerous times. At length he appeared, and said he had sundry exonerations, which he required time to produce; and at the next hearing he caluminated the said inquisition. The Barons of the Exchequer decided that he ought not to be called to account, but Maurice FitzEustace and Rowland FitzEustace, who had received the issues. [Another passage omitted?] Afterwards said Joan, daughter of John, entered into the manor, and enfeoffed Nicholas Castelmartin, who enfeoffed Thomas Dalton, chaplain, and his heirs, long before Earl Roger had anything to do with the manor. Further, the said Christopher pleads that he and Joan his wife issued out a writ of scire facias against said Thomas Dalton, who appeared before the justices of the King's Bench at Dublin, and said that John De Penteney was seized of the manor until he was disseized by said Alexander, Bertreda, and Peter, but afterwards entered again into possession. (Unfinished.)
Latin and french, headed.
Anno 3 H. 6, r[ecorda] in Castel[lo], Dublin.

Will of Sir Christopher Plunket, of Donsany.  MS 608, f. 20  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 20
Language:  Latin

Contents:
Made the day of St. Peter ad Vincula, 2 Edw. IV. His body to be buried in the chancel of Killeene before our Lady. "Item, I will that my wife Elizabeth Prestoune have all her kine, the sheep, the stud, that I gave her, that all be clear her own. Item, I will that she have all her own plough capills and her corn of Bedlowystoune and the swine of Donsany.
Item, I will that all mine own kine, swine, capills, and corn that is at the Clone, and half my corn, capills, that bethe at Dunsany, and all my rent that can be found in my tenants' hands, that all this, by the oversight of my wife and the vikery (vicar) of Killeene, bury me and inter me, and pay 19 marks and 10s. to the college of Killeene, the which I oweth them; and to pay at my burying to priests at Dyvelinge and Drowdath, for masses, 20 marks.
Item, I will, the old hanging of green and white bide in the hall at Donsany. Item, I will that the red bed, [and] a hanging of red, abide in the much ["moch," MS. i.e. great.] chamber. Item, I will, that two long costerys of red be y-given to the chancel of Donsanye. Item, I will that my wife have the new bed of red and two red curtains, and the much [Another passage omitted?] red bed, and the little red bed, and the bed of green and red and white. Item, I will that the bed of arras and the helinge (sic) of the bed, be y-given to the chu[rch?] of Donsany. Item, I will that the furnace and the lead abide to mine heir in the place of Donsany, with morell (sic) the black pot. Item, I will that all other harness of household help to bury me.
Item, as touching my silver vessels, I will that my wife have a basin and laver of silver, a pot of silver, a standing piece of silver over-gilt. Item, the high pensill [Or "ponsitt."] piece of silver over-gilt, with a lure, the borders gilt, with a standing foot, a harness morrane, [i.e. morrian.] and a plain piece of silver. Item, I leave the t'other part of my silver vessel[s], massery, mornanys [Sic, query morrianys?] to make two censers and a cross of silver over-gilt; and what cometh over that, to pay my debts, and to bury me.
Item, I will that my niece Joan have my scarlett gown and the fur. Item, I will that all mine other gowns be del[ivered] to priests.
Item, [of] all my silver vessel[s], I will that my wife make two censers, a cross, a chalice over-gilt, to the church of Dunsany, and to have that for my silver vessel (sic).
Item, I owe to the college of Killeene 19 marks and 10s. Item, I will that the Midsummer rent of Cloney, of anno Ed. 2, (sic), pay Foyle of Dwilinge, merchant, 5l. 14s. Item, I owe Robert Whitt, of Dwilinge, 32s. Item, I owe Browne of Drowdath, 7s. 4d. Item, I will that Awly O'Doffermoth have two marks, for hides that I had of him.
Item, I leave to the church of Donsany the 4 antiphoners, 3 gradalys, 3 mass books, a legend, 2 sawters and hymners y-noted; with these, the sawter's epistolary, a versiculary, and a martyrology; a cope of gold, a chasuble of cloth of gold, a chasuble of red satin, the cross, and the two censers and a chalice, the which yet was with the goldsmith of Trym, the day that this was writ.
Item, I have yeve my wife, in jointure, the lordship of Clonye. Item, I will that mine heir have my land, as the 'tail maketh mention. Item, I will that my wife [have for] term of life, in jointure, 10 marks, in the lordship of the Old-castle. Item, I will that Richard, Nicholas, Gerrett, Henry, and Oliver, have the lands as her (sic) 'tail maketh mention.
Item, I will that Garrett Plunkett make an end with John Avelle, and with Betaghe's daughter, the which [is] his wife, about the two serchalls that is betwixt Luthencrue and the Old-castle, for I suppose her right is best; and I discharge me, and charge Garrett, to end with him.
Item, I leave St. Nicholas' church of Dunsany 100s. in the Miltoune, besides Prestoune; in the day of the writing it borne (sic) 4 marks; John Tanner and John Ludwiche, tenants of it. Item, I leave to the said church the mill of Alomny, bearing a year to Sir Nicholas Barnwall his wife, while she liveth; and 8 acres of land clear to the church. Item, I leave to the said church the paas (sic) in Fyngall. Item, I leave to the said church 5 marks, the which I received yearly in Thomaztoune, for the certain that I sawe (sic) to the Earl of Ormond, for the 5 marks in Thomaztoune. And I will that my wife have all the rule of the said livelihood that shall go to the church of Donsany, to find priests to pray for me, until that time that my wife and my friends mortifies by a great parlement the aforesaid livelihood to priests, to sing at Donsany for Anne FitzGarret, that was my wife, and for Elizabeth that is my wife, and for myself. And which of my children that breaketh my will, I leave him Christ's curse, and mine; and all that helpeth to fulfil my will, I leave him my blessing.
Item, I will that the stud that is wone (sic) of Coffy be dealt in six parts, that is to say, to my five sons, and to John mine heir. Also my son Robart Plunkett saith that Anne FitzGerrat, that was my wife, should have yew (given) him an ouch, a pot of silver, and a much cope of silver of mine; and I deny, for I grant nought thereunto, for he never pleased me. And, as I am thus advised, I will that Oliver Plunkett have Thomas-Brydistoune, besides Moylaghts, and know that is my will. I will that Elizabeth, my wife, have--and she to do for my soul--the bawdrick of coral, the ouches, and rings that I gave her.
Item, Anne FitzGerrett and I left to our Lady of Donsany the great red chaplet of pearls.
Also I will Sir Robert of Prestoun and my brother Thomas Plunkett help and see that my will thus y-writ may be fulfilled; and so for beds, girdles, and all other small harness, the which I gave my wife Elizabeth, I will that she have them; and to the which will I putteth to my seal of arms.

Writ to ------ [sheriff] to summon a jury at Trym to try the complaint of Christopher Plunkett, knight, and Joan his wife, against Roisia Bellew of Kentestone, gentlewoman, Rob. Tuyt of same, and John Crys, for dis-seizing them of their free holding in Kenteston since the expedition of Henry III. into Gascony. Witness, Sir Thomas Stanley, Lieutenant in Ireland. Trym, 9 March. 10 Hen. VI.  MS 608, f. 21  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 21
Language:  Latin

Contents:
Confirmation by Chris. Plunkett, kinsman and heir of Sir Chris. Plunkett and Joan his wife (viz., son of John, their son and heir), of a grant made by Richard Avell and John Ashe, chaplains, to said Sir Chris. and Joan, of the manor of Girly, and the advowson of the vicarage there, with appurtenances in Ballygarnagh; with remainder after their deaths to Thomas, their son, and his heirs male; with contingent remainders to Robert, Rowland, Edward, and Christopher, other sons, and their heirs male, and to Christopher, son of John Plunket, and his heirs male; with further remainder to said Sir Chris. and Joan Cusake his wife, and the right heirs of the latter. The said chaplains had obtained the manor, etc. by fine from said Sir Chris. and Joan. Dated 12 Aug., 20 Hen. VI.

Grant by Wm. Young, archdeacon of Meath, and Ric. Awell, chaplain, to Sir Chris. Plunket, of the manor of Kyllen, which they had of the gift of Thomas, son of Geoffrey Cusack, and Ric. Rath, clerk; to hold for life, with remainder to Christopher, son of John [Plunket], in tail of Joan Bellewe his wife; and with contingent remainders to the heirs of his body, to Elizabeth, daughter of said John, and her heirs, to Christopher, Thomas, Robert, Roland, and Edward, sons of Sir Christopher, and their heirs male, to said Sir Christopher and his heirs, by Joan his late wife, Lady of Killene, and to said Joan's right heirs. Dated 9 May, 13 Hen. VI. (With a sketch of the pedigree.)  MS 608, f. 22  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 22
Language:  Latin

Grant by Gerald Courcey, Baron and Lord of Chrithchr. siagh (sic), to John, son of Robert Myaghe of Cork, merchant, of exemption from serving the office of portreve in the town of Kinsal, even though he should be elected by the town-council. Kinsall, 2 Nov. 1559, 1 Eliz.  MS 608, f. 22b  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 22b
Language:  Latin

Contents:
The seal of this Gerald Lord Courcy, which was fixed to this deed, had impressed in it an eagle displayed, double-headed, and the inscription about it was: Sigillum Patricij filij Nicholai Courcye.

Inspeximus by Edw. III. of a fine in the Chancery of Ireland made at Dublin 32 Edw. III. between Miles, son of Miles de Courcy, and John de Roche.  MS 608, f. 23  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 23
Language:  Latin

Contents:
The former acknowledges the manor of Rincorne, with the homages and services of William, son of John de Barry, knight, Philip, son of William, son of John de Barry, Gerald FitzHenry, Edmund Herford, Rob. FitzJohn, John de la Mare, and Walter Cogan, to be the right of the latter, who holds of his gift; and for this acknowledgment Roche grants the same to Courcy in tail male, to hold of the King; with contingent remainders to Nicholas, son of John de Courcy in tail male by Anastasia, formerly his wife, and John son of Edmund de Courcy, John son of Miles de Courcy, Patrick son of Nicholas de Courcy, John son of Nicholas de Courcy, Patrick son of David de Courcy, Henry son of Edmund de Courcy, Philip son of Patrick de Courcy, Almaric son of Philip de Courcy, Patrick son of Edmund de Courcy, and the heirs male of each of them respectively; and with further remainder to [the said] Miles, son of Miles de Courcy, and his heirs. (Unfinished.)
Headed: "Anno, 34 E. III., in Castro Dublin.

Writ to Roger de Hakensewe, escheator of Ireland, to seize into the King's hand the lands of Miles de Courcy, deceased, who held of the King in chief, and to make inquisition as to what lands he held of the King, and what of others, their value, the date of his death, his next heir, the heir's age, and whether the heir be married or not.  MS 608, f. 23b  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 23b
Language:  Latin

Contents:
Witness, Maurice FitzThomas, Earl of Kildare, keeper of the land of Ireland, at Cork, 28 June, 46 Edw. III.
Headed: "In Castro Dublin.

Licence by Ric. II., with the assent of his Council, to William Lord and Baron of Courcye, to purchase a ship in England, and to use it for his passage to and fro between England and France, paying the same sum to the King as is paid for other ships; provided that he carry no merchandise or other prohibited things to foreign parts. Westminster, 16 Feb., 20 Ric. II. Patent Roll, 20 Ric II. "Here followeth certain deeds and grants of lands made by sundry persons of Mounster.  MS 608, f. 24  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 24
Language:  Latin

Contents:
A true and perfect copy of an entail deed, whereby it is supposed that the lands of Knockmoane were anciently entailed.
Indenture made at Waterford 22 June the 32 Hen. VI., between Morris FitzJohn FitzThomas of the Geraldines and Pierce FitzJames Bottiller. Morris shall have for (from?) Pierce "these Lordships following, the both Ballym[ac]clodys and Bullygoner;" also Assecorne in co. Waterford; to hold to him, his heirs and assigns for ever. Pierce shall have for (from ?) Morris these Lordships--Burryne, "the both Doghaghes," Kyllcapp, Ballynbeverly, Dremeyenagh, Ballynglannye, Gragervells, Cullaghbegge, Ferneyvaggan, Ballynville, and Knokyngrontie; to hold to him, his heirs and assigns for ever. "Morris hath grant to the said Pierce all other Lordships that Dame Katherine his mother had in possession, peaceable from Mahyn to Passage," except the both Ballymacclodeys, Ballygoner, and Assecorre; also all lordships that Dame Katharine had in cos. Kilkenny and Tipperary Pierce hath released to Morris all lordships that Dame Katherine had from the water of Awynemore to the water of Mahyn. "And if any other lands which as yet be not known of the purchase of the said Dame Katherine may be recovered by deeds in the county of Waterford, that two parts of the said lands remain to the said Morris, and the third part to the same Pierce, for ever." If Pierce die without issue male, all lordships granted to him by Morrison to remain to said Morris in tail male; and if Morris die without issue male, the lordships purchased by Dame Katherine [in] the time of the Earl of Ormond, to remain to Pierce. If the Earl of Ormond vex Morris about any of said lordships, Pierce and his heirs shall put him to silence. If Pierce cannot so do, and the Earl recover by law or by strength any portion of said lordships, Pierce shall deliver to Morris all the lordships which Morris now grants him. For the observance of these covenants Morris and Pierce have sworn on the Holy Gospel, "in the Dean's house of Waterford," in presence of the said Dean, Thomas Prindergast, Morris Englishe, Richard FitzNicholas Poer, and Walter Boye Poer. Both parties put their seals hereto; and as they have no authentic seals of their own, "they have prayed the Mayor of Waterford, to the more credence, to put his seal of office to these indentures.

A true and perfect copy of a deed delivered by the Lord of Cahir to commissioners, to be perused; and it concerneth the lands of Knokmoane.  MS 608, f. 25  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 25
Language:  Latin

Contents:
Grant by Richard [Fitz]Thomas [Fitz]Maurice FitzThomas of the Geraldings, lord of Ballykerok, to Thomas his son and heir, of all his possessions in Ballykerok, Insula-Hobuck, Ballenawlorty, Balleglassyn, Ballynoye, Cassan, Nesynnagh, Fohagh, Ballen, Cnoke, Dromlowan, Gragetorsay, Ayte, Neynwooddy, Ballewalloun, Balligowyn, Garrywolowne, Rathe, Enskeloke, Balleleyane, Curragharnyle, Stradbally, Bege, Stradbally-mowre, Seskenredy, Ganyduff alias Bollykemowre, Belyebegge, Bolyebrowne, Torkera, Ballemacclode, Ballygonner, Ascowe, and Kyllmanyhin, in co. Waterford; and Pallish, Balleloccan, Forty-acres, Kylmydye, Balledegan, Ballecahill, Ballerowan, Clowneynagh, Clownpastyne, Tollogermyke, Clownequeripe, Clownconerith, Ballenekille, Lysnesspinan, Balleheynyn, Balleconnell, Breadagh, Ballefeyrode, Ballemartyn, Ballebrowne, Balleferryn, Rosuereyland, Ballynlaugh,, Mowayne, Balle-Nelacken, Caherowgoreygh, Ballem[ac]-Thomas, Ballebege McThomas, and Ballebussher, in co, Limerick; to hold after grantor's death in tail male; with contingent remainders to Maurice, Philip, and Gerald, other sons, in tail male of each of them; and further remainder to Sir Thomas Butler, baron of Cahir-Duneske, and Peter [Fitz] Edmund Butler, in tail male of each. If said Richard or his sons leave only issue female, said Thomas and Peter Butler shall provide them with honorable sustentation. As his seal is unknown to many, the grantor has procured the seal of Nicholas, bishop of Lismore and Waterford, to be affixed, 20 July 35 Hen. VIII.

Inspeximus by Master Maddy, official general of the court and of spiritual causes in the diocese of Limerick, and Master Creagh, sovereign of the town of Killoe, of the following documents  MS 608, f. 25b  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 25b
Language:  Latin

Contents:
I. Grant by Robert son of Geoffrey Cogan, captain of his nation, to James FitzGerald, Earl of Desmond, his heirs and assigns, of all his possessions in co. Cork, viz., the manors of Carrigrothan-more, Downdrinan, Rathcogan, the New-town of Monmor Mustri-Myttyn, Beaver, Coulmore, Duffglas, Shandon, O'Corblethan, Flanluo, Kerycurthy, Kynnalbeke, and Mustrelyn, and the reversion of Mustricogan, viz., Rathcogan, Beablachatha, and Jerell; together with a rent of six marks to be paid annually from the manors of Mustri-cogan, by the hands of Maurice Roche, lord of Fermoy, and his heirs; and the manor of Cogan in Glamorgan, in Wales, with advowsons of churches and chapels, services of free tenants, etc. As the grantor's seal was unknown to many, the seals of the staple and of the mayoralty of the city of Cork were affixed at his request.
Dated at Cork, 12 June, 17 Hen. VI.
II. Release by Maurice FitzJohn de Roche, lord of Fermoy, to Robert and Miles, sons of Geoffrey Cogan, their heirs and assigns, of the manors of Moretowne, Carrocroghan, Cowlemore, Beover, Doffglas, Shandon, and Downdrinan, and all lands, etc., in the same, from the water of Awnmor, as far as the South Sea in the county of Cork. Sealed by the grantor's seal and that of the town of Kilkenny, 4 January, 6 Hen. IV.
III. Grant by Richard de Burgh Earl of Ulster and Lord of Connaught to the Lord Maurice FitzThomas and Katharine his wife of all his lands and tenements in Keppakenroys, Ballisowan, Ballimyghan, Athbliard, Goutstenbeigh, Glasomore, Ballysufyn, Rathomnan, and Athmethun, together with all lands and tenements which he had of the gift and feoffment of John FitzWarrin, knight, and William Delafield, in Tilaghenan and Ballymighehan; to hold to them and the heirs of the said Lord Maurice of the chief lords of that fee.
Athishell, 12 January, 16 Edw. II. Witnesses:--The Lord John son of Peter le Poer de Donneill, John son of Robert le Poer, Reginald Russell, Richard Le Wallis, Thomas FitzGilbert, Philip Christopher, knights, Philip Le Brett, Walter de Maundevill, David le Blound, William English, and others.
Sealed and verified by the aforesaid [official general and sovereign], at Killock, 22nd May, 34 Hen. VIII.
With the notarial attestation of William Gowles, priest, notary public of the diocese of Limerick.

Power of attorney from Robert FitzGeoffrey Cogan, captain of his nation, to Maurice Starkke, clerk, and James Gowles, to place James FitzGerald Earl of Desmond in full and peaceful seizin of all his lands in the county of Cork, viz., Carrygrochanmore, Dondrinan, Rathecogan, Noueville de Moumore, Mystymyltin, Bever, Cowlemore, Doffglas, Shandon, Ocorbbelethan, Flanlo, Kyrrycurthy, Kenalbethe, and Mustylyn; and the reversion in (sic) Mustrycogan, viz., Rathecogan, Beallachath, and Jerell, with a rent of six marks anuually from the said manors in Musticogan, by the hands of Maurice Roch lord of Fermoy, and the manor of Cogan in Glamorgan in Wales, as in the charter made to him is more fully contained. In testimony whereof he affixed his seal; but his seal being unknown to many, he procured the seal of the staple of the city of Cork as well as the seal of office of the mayor of the said city to be affixed hereto; and John Murwach, mayor, affixed his seal accordingly. Dated at Cork, 12 June, 17 Henry VI.  MS 608, f. 27  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 27
Language:  Latin

Contents:
Inquisition post mortem taken at Toly, Monday next after the feast of St. James, 10 Edw. [I.] before the Lord S., Bishop of Waterford, justiciary of Ireland, the Lord F. Le Brun, chancellor of Ireland, John de Sandford, escheator of Ireland, and the lord Robert de Exeter, as to the possessions of John FitzThomas, deceased, in the county of Kildare; viz., Reginald de Typ[perary], Richard de Burleyn, Tancred Dullard, Thomas de St. Michael, Robert de Lond., John de Punchardon, Laurence Sweyn, John Russell, Martin de Offelmythe, Robert FitzOdo, Gerald de Prendergast, and William de la Muntayne; who say that FitzThomas held nothing of the King in Capite, but one "theodum" of land called Oregna, in Ofaly, of Maurice FitzGerald, by the moiety of one knight's service, as often as summoned for royal service, and doing suit at the court of said Maurice at Gesit; and that the same "theodum" was only worth 45l. per annum, as it was totally destroyed and wasted by the war of the Irish; but in time of peace it was worth 90l. 13s. 4d. per annum. Nicholas FitzAlexander holds of the heir five carucats in fee, doing the above knight service to said Maurice FitzGerald for said John FitzThomas.
(Name of heir, etc. not given).

Creation of Gerald FitzGerald as Earl of Kildare and baron of Ophaly, in tail male, with 20l. a year out of the custom in the port of Dublin. Westminster, 13 May, 1 Mary.  MS 608, f. 27b  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 27b
Language:  Latin

Pardon to John FitzThomas (in consideration of his services to Edw. I. in Scotland and Flanders, and to Edw. II. in Ireland, and of a fine), for intrusion upon certain lands without licence.  MS 608, f. 28  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 28
Language:  Latin

Contents:
It appears by inquisitions made by Nigell le Brun, escheator, and by deeds and writings exhibited by said John FitzThomas before John Wogan, justiciary, and the Council, that a certain John de Verdon in the time of Henry III. enfeoffed Maurice FitzGerald and Agnes Valentia his wife of the manors of Adare, Cronnith, Athleicah, Wrigeda, Grene, and Esgrene, in co. Limerick, which said John held of the King in Capite; to hold to said Maurice and Agnes and their heirs; and after said Maurice's death Gerald his son and heir enfeoffed John FitzThomas of the manors of Mayneth, Rathingham, and Legh, with the reversion of the manors of Geshall and Rathmore in co. Kildare, and with the reversion of said manors in co. Lymerick, which said Agnes at that time held for her life of the inheritance of said Gerald; and that after the death of said Gerald without an heir, a certain Juliana de Cogan, aunt of said Gerald and sister of said Maurice, entered upon said manors of Rathmore, Adare, etc., but soon after enfeoffed said John FitzThomas thereof, who continued his seizin for a year and more, and then demised them to said Agnes for life, on whose death he entered into the same without the King's licence. Witness, the aforesaid justiciary at Dublin, 11 July, 4 Edw. II.
County Placita, 3 (sic.) Edw. II. folio 33. "Concordat cum recordo. Ex. Dan. Molyneux, Ulster, rex armorum.

Mandate by Edw. I. to Geoffrey De Jenevile, justiciary of Ireland, (as former mandates had not been executed by James De Aldithe and Maurice FitzMaurice, late justiciaries,) to deliver the castle of Legh, with the third part of the possessions late of Maurice FitzGerald, deceased, in the barony of Offaly, to Roger De Mortimer and Matilda his wife, notwithstanding the King's grant to Thomas De Clare of the custody of said barony, as the King has learned by the record of Robert De Ufford, formerly Lieutenant in Ireland, and by the assertion of others, that FitzGerald held said barony of said Roger and Matilda, William De Cantelupe and Eva his wife, and Humphrey De Bohun and Eleanor his wife, daughters of Eva De Brewes, fifth heir of Walter and Anselm, the Marshals, by the service of 12 knights' fees, which were equally divided among the three sisters, the castle of Legh, being the chief castle in the barony, going to the eldest sister, Matilda. (Date omitted.)  MS 608, f. 29  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 29
Language:  Latin

Contents:
Headed: "In Castro Dublin., ex Rotulo Patentium de anno primo R. R. Ed. primi.
At foot: "Ex. per A. Elswige, 3° die Junii, anno Domini, 1605," etc.

Grant by Edw. II., to John FitzThomas (for his good services to Edw. I. and II.) of the castle and town of Kildare, under the honour and name of Earl of Kildare, in tail male, with all appurtenances, the office of sheriff of co. Kildare excepted; and if the said John should die without heir male the same to revert to the King.  MS 608, f. 29b  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 29b
Language:  Latin

Contents:
Witnesses, William Archbishop of Canterbury, and others.
Westminster, 14 May, 9 Edw. II.
Mandates to the justiciary of Ireland, and to the tenants, accordingly.
From the charter roll, 9 Edw. II., Tower of London. Examined by M. Heneage, 1599.
Note, that in 11 Edw. II. the King granted to Thomas FitzJohn, in tail male, the office of sheriff of co. Kildare, with all appurtenances, except four pleas, viz., rape, treasure trove, forestalling, and burning.
A Geraldine, Baron of Ophaly, anno 1270.
George Robinson, dwelling in Fanchurch street, near Al[d]gate; this man did keep the records, under Mr. Heneage.

Restoration of James FitzGerald (whom the Queen had educated in a manner becoming his noble origin) to the title and dignity of Earl of Desmond, as held by his father, Gerot, attainted; to hold in tail male, and the heir expectant always to bear the title of Baron of Inchequyn in co. Cork. Otelands, 1 Oct. 42 Eliz.  MS 608, f. 30  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 30
Language:  Latin

Inquisitions post mortem, 34 and 35 Ed. III.  MS 608, f. 30b  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 30b
Language:  Latin

Contents:
I. Finding that Sir Walter FitzWalter De Birmingham held a messuage and a carucate of land in Dunnagh for 20s., "quando scutagium currit," and ditto in Howettstowne for one mark, of Eleanor Countess of Ormond; and the manor of Lecagh for 20s. of Maurice FitzThomas, Earl of Kildare; and that Margaret, sister of said Walter, married to Rob. De Preston, is next heir.
II. Finding that said Walter held the manor of Kenlis of the King for 4s. "quando scutagium currit"; the manor of Shenbogh, of the King, for 1d.; and the manor of Tamolin of John De Carreu, of the barony of Idron, for 40s.
III. Finding that said Walter held a messuage and two carucates in Ballyterstin of the King, by suit at the County [Court] of Tipperary, and for 40d.; two carucates in Le Heathon, of John De Birmingham, by suit at his court of Rathon; 60 acres in Clonabowan, of John FitzMiles Cantwell, for 10s. a year; a messuage and land in Kilmonleghin; and 2 carucates in Le Freghami and Ballycaghfoy, of the Bishop of Lismore, by suit and service at his court of Droronan, and for 40s. a year.
IV. Said Walter held the manor of Kenlis, in co. Kilkenny, of the King, by a new feoffment; and a carucate in Dimboth of the abbess of St. Mary's of Kilkillin, at one mark a year, and suit of her court.
V. He held the manor of Castell Carbry, and two parts of the manor of Carricke, of whom the jurors know not; and the manor of Tuthmeleg, in co. Catherlogh, of John De Carreu, as of the manor of Idrone, by the service of 40d. of royal service whenever [summoned].
VI. The third part of the manor[s] of Stathirlagh, Arthurdeshe, and Le Donne, in co. Limerick, as of the inheritance of Elizabeth, formerly wife of said Walter, the reversion belonging to John, son of Robert Haverington, her son and heir, doing suit at the County [Court] of Limerick.
Headed: "Castro Dublin.

Exemplification of letters patent, dated 26 March, 11 Edw. III., restoring to William, son of Sir William De Bermingham, (in consideration of his services in the war with Scotland, and against the King's Irish enemies,) all possessions forfeited by his father. Westminster, 1 May, 17 Ed. III.  MS 608, f. 31b  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 31b
Language:  Latin

Contents:
Headed: "In Turri London." It is also stated that Sir Wm. Birmingham was attainted and executed in 6 Ed. III.
Examined by George Robins, 15 Sept. 1615.

Creation of Sir Robert Barnewell as Baron of Trimletiston, and one of the King's Council in Ireland, for life, receiving ---- from the fee farm of Salmon-leap and Capella Isoldæ in co. Dublin, by the hands of the prior of St. John's of Jerusalem in Ireland. Westminster, 4 March, 2 Edw. IV. By authority of Parliament.  MS 608, f. 32  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 32
Language:  Latin

Contents:
Extent of the rents and services of the free tenants in the Barony of Ouerke, made on Thursday next before the feast of the Nativity of St. John the Baptist, 7 Ed. [II.]
("In the Earl of Ormond's Book of Extent.")
Names of 16 jurors.
Manor of Rowir, lately held by Henry FitzHenry De Roche of Roger FitzMiles, who sold the marriage of the heir to John FitzThomas. Manor of Lostling, held by Agnes FitzMaurice. Land in Corcleyn, held by John FitzAlexander De Roche, who did fealty to the Butler (pincernæ), part of the rent being assigned to Matilda, widow of Miles FitzMiles. Town of Kilgrelan, held by Ralph De Denne. Ballycoyne, held by Michael Sparke. Waste lands [there], held by John De Balligawran. Manor of Ballymacallgorin, held by Thomas FitzWilliam De Sancto Albino, Philip FitzWalter Mauncell, the Lord John FitzRobert Le Poer, John and David, sons of Philip FitzMiles, and Theobald Le Bottiller and Joan his wife, of said Roger FitzMiles, who was ejected from the custody of one portion during a minority. Lands in Odaw, held by John FitzWilliam De Roche, John Lerchedekin, David Bronfedir, and William FitzRobert De S. Albino, coheirs. Land in Kilcrone, held by Tho. De Denne. Land in Donkitt, held by Maurice FitzDavid. Land in Oraynan, held by Philip FitzWilliam Le Archedekin. Roithforby, held by Sir Richard Le Poer. Land in Tyrmone, held by Rob. Tyrmone. Land in Portenhall, held by John FitzWilliam. Land in Coulodimore, held by Nich. Blundell; which lands were demised to Nicholas, former Bishop of Leghlin, who demised them to Eustace Le Poer, and now Arnald Le Poer holds them; Blundell's heir being in custody of said Roger Fitz Miles. Land in Polroan held by Herbert De Maneys. "Fidon in Croc" held by John de la Rokell, by suit at the court of Ballybramoth; part of the rent being assigned to Mabel widow of said Miles; and whereof said Roger [FitzMiles] was seized by the hands of James De Keting, tenant by the law of England. Land in Balnoan, lately held by Wm. Bronyn, now by John FitzMiles the Baron. Land in Audbary, held by Alicia Argentin. Land in Catribruoclagh, held by Matthew FitzOliver. Land in Ballilain, held by Walter Le Poer. Land in Ballyleni, held by Maurice FitzWilliam, of Miles FitzMiles. Land in Kelroske held by Wm. De Rokell. Land in Owninge, held by Edward LeGrace. Roger FitzMiles received from every boat fishing between Tiperath and Waterford, 6d. of rent. Lands in Hillid Ballytarsury, and Ballycorry, held by David Le Graunt. Lands in Clontory and Kymacboyth, held by Wm. Le Graunt. Land in Douncole, held by Robert Woodlock. Land in Loghmoing, held by Theobald Le Poer. Land in Polosculle, held by Gerard FitzHenry, of Miles FitzMiles the Baron; and the same Gerald received 5s. a year from the Baron of Overke.
Nearly all the above lands were held directly or indirectly of Roger FitzMiles; and Mabel his wife was dowered with a third part of them.
The rents, services, etc. are specified.
Miles Graunt Baron of Ouerk, in co. Kilkenny.
Miles Fitz Miles.
Roger Fitz Miles Baron of Ouerke, living 7 Edw. II.
John Fitz Miles.

Creation of Con O'Nele as Earl of Tyrone. Greenwich, 1 Oct. 34 Hen. VIII. [See this Calendar, under date 1 Oct. 1542, where this patent is described more fully from an official copy.]  MS 608, f. 33b  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 33b
Language:  Latin

Certain articles and conditions which the Earl of Tyrone did promise duly to observe and perform, at such time as he made his submission to the King's Majesty." [See this Calendar, under same date as the preceding patent.]  MS 608, f. 34  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 34
Language:  Latin

Contents:
Mandate by Edw, III. to John Knyvet, the King's Chancellor, to assign to Margaret, widow of Sir Bartholomew De Burghhersh, her dower from the services of the barony of Slane and Newcastle; it having been found by inquisition taken before Roger De Hakensaue, Escheator in Ireland, 45 Edw. III., returned into the Chancery of England, that Simon Fleminge, Baron of Slane, (who died Friday before Exaltation of Holy Cross. 44 Edw. III.,) held said barony of said Bartholomew, as of his manor of Divelek, by 21 marks of royal service when scutage runs; that the said manor of Divelek was alienated by said Bartholomew, with the King's licence, to Piers Houthe and Hugh Portis, chaplains, who enfeoffed Rob. Wakeman and other chaplains without Royal licence, and without power of attorney from said Simon; and that it was in the King's hand by forfeiture of said Bartholomew, according to the statute of Guildford.
If Thomas, son and heir of said Simon, be in the King's wardship, (being only 13 years of age,) the Chancellor is at present only to assign that which is due to said Margaret during the minority, according to the laws and usages of Ireland.
Westminster, 6 July, 46 Edw. III.
From a bundle of Writs of Privy Seal, in the Tower of London.
Examined by George Robson, ["Robins" before.] 15 Sept. 1615.

Grant by Humphrey de Bohun, Constable of England, to his brother Gilbert de Bohun, of all possessions of the Earls Marshals and others which have descended to the grantor from Eleanor his mother, one of the heirs of said Earls; viz., in Carneboth, Mahanne, and Athbone (sic); with all that fell to him in Newtown and Oldtown in Ossory, and the town of Thome (Tuam), by the death of Matilda widow of Anselm the Marshal; to hold in tail, rendering 60l. sterling per annum. Witnesses, the Lord Ralph De Thovy, and others.  MS 608, f. 35  Undated

Former reference: MS 608, f. 35
Language:  Latin

Grant by James Barry, Viscount of Buttevant, to John Stapleton, of all his lands of Island Cullyne in co. Cork, which he lately had of said John's gift; to hold in fee of said James and his heirs, at the yearly rent of 2s. of current money of Ireland. Dated, Monday before Epiphany, 7 Hen. V. [Or IV.? "qruti," MS.]  MS 608, f. 35b  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 35b
Language:  Latin

Contents:
Extent of the lands of the late Lord Roger de Mortimer in Ireland, made at the new town of Leys (Leix), co. Kildare, 10 March 11, Edw. I.
In the manor and honor of Dumaseke, in the holding of Leys, and in co. Kildare, two caracutes, 73 acres, and one "estangium" of arable land, valued at 13l. 8s. 10d. The heirs of the Lord Walter Oyw (sic) hold half a fee in Ballekenan; the Lord Walter de Riddlesford four fees in Thristeldermot and Kilka; the heir of Maurice FitzGerald holds four knights' services, when royal service is summoned; Walter L'Enfant, one fee in Allewyn; Nich. Gernon, half a service in Dunfynyd; Robert de St. Michael, two feee "in leiado de Rheban;" Henry Penchoit, fourth part of a fee in Penchoit. The first of these does suit of court; the rest hold without. The burgesses of the new town of Leys hold, etc.
From a bundle of "Escaet," in Dublin Castle.
Examined by A. Eslinge, 3 June 1605.

Copy of Records touching sundry persons in Ireland.  MS 608, f. 36  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 36
Language:  Latin

Contents:
David Roch, kinsman and heir of David, son of Alexander de Roch, Lord of Fermoy, attached on the plea of William FitzPatrick de Roch and Philip Beckett, to make answer to William Fitz David de Barry.--Placita, 39 Edw. III. part 2, fol. 6, in Dublin Castle.
Grant by King John to David de Roche and his heirs, of the cantred of Rossleppit in Ireland; to hold by the service of five knights. Charters, 9 John, in Tower of London.
Ballimatait, Knockedromm, Ballycullan, and Ballybrahane, granted to Rob. Stapleton and his heirs.--Charters, 9 Edw. I., in Tower of L.
Rob. Preston created Viscount. Dated at Nottingham, 7 Aug.--18 Edw. IV., Roll 45, in Tower of L.
Manor of Dunnaghmore, with the lands of Fermoy, granted to Roger de Gernon, now confirmed to the said John (sic).--42 Edw, III.; also in 50 Edw. III., part 2, memb. 31.; Tower of L.
Maurice FitzJordan de Rochford; Typerneuin market.--53 Hen. III. Tower of L.
Maurice de Rochford.--36 Hen. III. T. of L.
Typerneuin, Kilblane, Inscorthi, Kyllascy, Kilercouth, Corbin, and Duffyne, in possesion of Rocheforde, 30 Edw. I.
Ballyderacoyn, Moydeytham, etc., lands of David Canton.--Inquisitions, 28 Edw. III., m. 43; Tower of L.
Parliament held at Kilkenny, 40 Edw III., to levy a subsidy in Ireland, 5,000l.--Dublin Castle, memb. 27.
Lord de Barry; Mocallopp his inheritance.--Close, 13 Hen. III. Tower of L.
Fair and market at Buttevant and Carigknohill, granted to the Lord David de Barry, 18 Hen. III.--Tower of L.
Donations of Wm. Barry and others to the House of St. [John] the Baptist, in St. John Street, in suburbs of Cork.--(Places specified.) Escheators' Inquisitions, 29 Edw. I.
Elizabeth Caunton, alias Canton, wife of Maurice FitzJohn FitzNicholas; Balitleraven, in co. Cork, Glandowin, etc.; which John FitzNicholas was ancestor of the Lord of Kerry.--"Eschaet," 43 Edw. III., m. 4. Tower of L.
Robert de Courcy made Lord Baron at Westminster.--Among the charters, 33 Hen I. Tower of L.
Anno 23 Edw. I. The King's letters in the behalf of James Keatinge, who had lands by his wife Margaret Rockell, and had issue by her Rosea, who lived 15 days; and upon enquiry thereof made by Walter Hay, escheator, the said James enjoyed the said lands."--(No reference.)
James Earl of Desmond had custody of cos. Waterford, Cork, Limerick, and Kerry; and licence "not to come to Parliaments."--Pat. 23 H. 6, p. 2, m. 12.
Simon Roch and others of that name [mentioned in records?] from 28 Edw. I. to 13 Hen. IV. One had custody of lands in Hampshire. (No reference.)

Extract from the accounts of Wards and Escheats in the King's hand from the feast of the Purification, 32 Edward I. to All Souls, 34 Edw. I., viz., for 2¾ years, by Walter de la Haye, Escheator of Ireland. (In Dublin Castle.)  MS 608, f. 36b  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 36b
Language:  Latin

Contents:
The escheator renders account of 13s. 4d. of rent of 40 demesne acres at Kilbrittan and Ruinon set to farm by William de Caunton, sub-escheator in the county of Cork for half a year in 27 Edw. I., which Lady Annora, who was the wife of Miles de Courcye, deceased, held in dower after the death of John, son and heir of the aforesaid Miles, who held his lands of the King in Capite. And it is to be noted that for lands at Balliconig in the manor of Kilbrittan, Belagh, Barretstown, Kempeston, Oldernast, Rinron (sic), Tathsax, which were extended at certain specified sums, the eseheator answers nothing, for that a great part of said demesnes was sown before the death of said Annora, and the remainder lay fallow. He also accounts for 9s. 6d. of rent of the third part of a wear at Tathsax, of a mill at Rinron, of the prise of fish there and at Kinsale for 3 quarters of a year in 28 Edw. I.; and for the remainder he does not account, for that said Annora held these in her own hand for the first quarter of that year, and received the issues thereof. And for 10l. 2s. 6½d. of rent of a free tenement there for half a year. And for 5s. of perquisites of the court and hundred there for the same time; as appears by the extent thereof made by Walter de la Hay, escheator, and delivered into the Exchequer.
Concordat cum recordo, et ex. per Thomas Chetam.
The same [escheator] renders account of 90l. 7s. 6d. of rent of demesnes, wears, mills, the prise of fish, free tenements, and perquisites of the court and hundred at Ballyconige in Kilbrittan, Bellagh, Barretstown, Kempston, Oldernase, Rinron, Tathsax, and Kinsale in the county of Cork, which the said Annora held in dower from Michaelmas, 28 Edw. I. to 3 February, 33 Edw. I.; when custody of the same was given to William Prendergast, Henry Hackett, and William Gaynard, for their good service in Scotland. And for 2l. 12s. 11d. of rent and issues of demesnes, free tenements, rabbit warrens, prise of fish, and perquisites of the court of Ballionry, Glennardule, and Finwath in the county of Kerry, which the same Annora held in dower, as above appears by the extent made by the same Walter before he delivered the same lands to said William and the others.
Concordat cum recordo, et ex. per Thomam Chetham.

Record of the Magnates of Ireland, 5 Henry III.  MS 608, f. 37  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 37
Language:  Latin

Contents:
The King wrote to Thomas FitzAntony that he had removed Geoffrey de Mariscis from the office of Justiciary of Ireland for bad government, and appointed H. Archbishop of Dublin, in his place. W[estminster], 17 July.
In the same manner it was written [to the following]:--
K. King of Connaght, O. King of Kenelean, Duncan O'Bren, Muriardac O'Bren, Dermond McCharte, Lineth McDonewhad, Walter de Lascy, Thomas de Galway, Earl of Athol, Robert de Mandevill, Walter de Logan, John de Cestria, Roger Pipard, Geoffrey de Constantin, Walter de Ridlesford, Richard Tirrell, Miles LeBrett, Roger Waispail, Richard Cogan, Eudo de Barry, Richard de Burgo, Robert de Carren, Patrick de Courcy, Robert LePoher.

A Parliament Roll of Ireland containing the Summons to Parliament." In the Roll of 48 Edw. III.  MS 608, 37b  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, 37b
Language:  Latin

Contents:
Similar writs were directed to the Earls, magnates, and chief men underwritten." [This quotation shows that the copyist has omitted the form of the summons, which probably contained the name of one of the Irish peers not given in this list.]
Maurice FitzThomas, Earl of Kildare; Gerald FitzMaurice, Earl of Desmond; Thomas FitzJohn Patrick de Laffreigne, knight; Robert de Laffreigne, knight; Richard de Burgo, knight; John FitzNicholas, knight; Thomas Clifford, knight; Robert Swarney, knight; Walter Lanston, knight; David LeBarry, knight; Walter L'Enfant; Nicholas Howth; Richard Weston; William of London, knight; Robert Calfe, knight; Simon Cusake, knight; Nicholas Castlemartyn, knight; Thomas Tuyt, knight; Thomas Brune, knight; Thomas Vernaill, knight; Walter Cusake; Thomas Talbot, knight; Hugh Bysset, knight; Henry Savage, knight; Roger Gernon; Richard Taaffe; John Taaffe; Richard Plunkett; John Hussey, Baron of Galtrym; John Bedelewe; Maurice FitzRichard; Thomas Oge Butler; Nicholas Poer; Thomas FitzWilliam Barry; Geoffrey de la Haunder; Matthew FitzHenry; William Wellesley; Richard Wyney; Oliver FitzEustace; Geoffrey Valor.
This is a true copy, for so much as can be well read thereof, and is contained in the Roll above mentioned, amongst the summons[es] of a Parliament, in Castro Dublinæ.
Examined by James Newman, Clerk in the office of the Mr. of the Rolls.

The names of the Lords of the Parliament holden at Dublin the 26th of April, anno 1585, before Sir John Perrot, knight, Lord Deputy of Ireland then.  MS 608, f. 38  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 38
Language:  Latin

Contents:
Archbishops of Armagh (Primate), Dublin (Chancellor), Cashel, and Tuam; Bishops of Meath, Kildare, Ossory, Ferns, Limerick, Elphin, Down, Leighlin, Ross, Clonfert, etc.; Earls of Ormond and Ossory (Treasurer), Kildare, Tyrone, Thomond, Clanricard, Clancart; Viscounts of Barry alias Buttevant, Gormanston, Roch alias Fermoye, and Mountgarret; Lords Athenry, Coursey, Slane, Delven, Killene, Howth, Trymleston, Dunsawny, Dunboyne, Upper Ossory, Lowth, Curraghmore, Inchquyn, Bourke of Connell, and Cahier.
The Lord Lixnawe is omitted because he was absent.
Examined by Daniel Mollineux, Ulster.

The Lords of Ireland, according their antiquities, and as they were marshalled in Parlirment in the Upper House, in May 1613, before Sir Arthur Chichester, Lord of Belfast, Lord Deputy,"; Archbishops of Dublin, Armagh (Primate), Cashel (also Bishop of Killala and Ardconragh), and Tuam; Bishops of Meath, Kildare, Cork, Clonfert, etc.; Earls of Kildare ("within age"), Ormond and Ossory (absent; his proxy with the Lord of Dunboyne), Thomond, and Clanricard (absent in England; no proxy); Viscounts Barry of Buttevant, Gormanston, Roch of Fermoy, Mountgarret, and Butler of Tullagh Phelim; Lords Bremingham of Athenry (absent, no proxy), Courcye of Ringroane (absent, his proxy with Viscount Barry) FitzMorrice of Lixnawe (absent, his proxy with the Earl of Thomond), Slane, Delvyn, Houthe, Dunsany (within age), Trimeleston, Dunboyne, Upper Ossory (died before the Parliament, his son absent), Lowth, Poer of Curraghmore (within age), Incequine (within age), Burgh of Castle Conell (absent by reason of the controversy between the uncle and nephew), Cahier, and Chechester (sic) of Belfast, Lord Deputy (not called).  MS 608, f. 38b  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 38b
Language:  Latin

Contents:
Partition of the lands of William the Marshal, Earl of Pembroke in Ireland, in the Records of 13 H. III.
Partition made between Matilda, Joan, Isabella, Sibilla, and Eva, daughters and heirs of William Marshal, and of his five sons, viz., William, Richard, Gilbert, Walter, and Anselm, of their possessions in Ireland; at Woodstock, in the court of King H. III., 3 May, in the 31st year of his reign.
Portion of Matilda Countess of Norfolk and Warwick, eldest daughter, in co. Carlagh. The borough, 24l. 12s. 3d.; borough of Rosse, 51l. 14s. 4d., "Corpus Comitatus," with the assizes and perquisites, 24l. 2s. 0d.; Ballidongan, 11l. 17s. 2d.; the Island, 43l. 6s. 0d.; Fothyrd, 52l. 5s. 2d.; Thaghmolyng 38l. 15s. 1d.; Sum 349l. 0s. 11d.; and it exceeds the fifth part 117l. [Sic; qu. 117s. (See below.)] 1s. 9½d., and is assigned to the portion of "dunus" [Sic; but see below.] in Ballyfax.
Portion of Joan de Monte Ganiso (Monchensey), second daughter, in the county of Wexford. The borough, 42l. 1s. 5d.; Caryg, 23l. 15s. 0d.; "Corpus Comitatus," with the assises, perquisites, and pleas, 50l. 0s. 6d; Ferma, 25l. 15s. 0d.; Odogh, with Kilkenny, 1l. 15s. 2½d.; Rusolar, 68l. 19s. 11d.; Banna, 31l. 0s. 10d.: Sum 343l. 5s. 11½d.
Portion of Isabella, wife of Richard de Clare Earl of Gloucester, third daughter, in co. Kilkenny. The borough, 73l. 3s. 10d.; "Corpus com.," with the assises and perquisites, 130l. 16s. 3d.; Brenam, 10l. 8s. 10d.; Dunfert, 38l. 16s. 3d.; Loghmeran, 19l. 8s. 6½d.; Summa 346l. 7s. 4½d.; and it exceeds the fifth part 2l. 12s. 10d.; "assignatur Dñmas.
Portion of Sibilla de Ferrers, fourth daughter, in co. Kildare. The borough, 23l. 3s. 10d.; Covernib, 52l. 1s. 6d.; "Corpus comitatus," with the assizes and perquisites, 73l. 11s. 0d.; Clemen, 98l. 18s. 8d.; Ballymaddan, 53l. 19s. 10d.; Thughman, 7l. 17s. 2d.; Carbry, 60l. 19s. 8d.; Mone, 83l. 19s. 2d.: Sum 445l. 3s. 11d.; and it exceeds the fifth part 1l. 18s. 4d.; "assignantur parti de Dñmas," in the town of Mone; 3s. 1d. and 1l. 15s. 2½d. to the portion of Wexford in the town of Thughmon.
Portion of Matilda de Brewys, daughter of Eva, fifth daughter of William the Marshal, and of her two sisters, Eleanor and Eva, in Dñmas. The borough, 104l. 19s. 1d.; in the town of Ballicar, of the surplus of Carlow, 5l. 17s. 5d.; Obay, 82l. 8s. 5d.; in the town of Callan, of the surplus of Kilkenny, 3l. 1s. 10d. (sic); Aghtelbon, [Sic; but see below.] 72l. 7s. 5d.; in the town of Mone, of the surplus of Kildare, 3s. 1d.; Carneboth, county Wexford, 75l. 5s. 6½d.: Sum 343l. 5s. 6½d.
Portion of Hugh de Spencer the younger and Eleanor his wife of the lands and tenements late of the Earl of Gloucester and Hereford in Ireland.
The castle of Kilkenny, with the rents, mills, demesne lands, and other appurtenances, extended at 35l. 1s. 5¾d.; manor of Dunfert, 31l. 1s. 6¼d.; borough of Rosbarcon, with the mill and appurtenances, 7l. 12s. 9½d.; manor of Kildermogh, 3l. 10s. 3d.
Assize rents of Callan, 33l. 17s. 3d.,; land set to farm at Callan, 16l. 10s. 0¾d. Farms of lands of escheats in the same town, 7l. 6s. 0½d. Turbary, demesne lands, pannage, pedage, etc., in the same town, 7l. 6s. 0½d. (sic.) The rest of the lands there, 12l. 7s. 10d. Serjeantcy of Ouercek, 5l.: Sum 147l. 1s. 0¼d.
Portions of houses and places which, as the pourparty of each [heir], are assigned in every franchise for the holding of county pleas;" viz., the pourparties of Hugh de Audley, junior, Margaret his wife, and Elizabeth de Longo, of the lands of the said Earl in Ireland. (Note by the copyist, that these are not copied on account of their prolixity.)
Sum of pourparty of said Hugh and Margaret, 157l. 16s. 11¼d. Ditto of said Elizabeth, 178l. 11s. 11½d.

Grant by King John to Miles FitzHenry and his heirs of three cantreds, viz., Akunkary and Hierbon, in Kyery; and Onaght-lokhelean, which is the land of Humurierdagh in the land of Cork. Winterburne, 28 Nov., 2 John.  MS 608, f. 39b  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 39b
Language:  Latin

Contents:
Headed: "A grant of three cantreds of land made by K. John unto Miles FitzHenry, of whom the Lord Roch, as he conceiveth, is descended, and is the heir male. Inter chartas de anno 2° Johannis Regis.

A record of the knights' fees in Ireland, in anno primo Ewd. II. Cast. Dublin.  MS 608, f. 40  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 40
Language:  Latin

Contents:
Same as the Book of Howth, ff. 155 to 158. [This copy was evidently derived from the Book of Howth itself, which therefore, if the heading quoted above be correct, was at one time among the archives of Dublin Castle.]

Deed of Mary de St. Paul, Countess of Pembroke, Lady of Wexford and Montague, [certifying] that Arnold De Pinkey clerk, Ric. Titeshall, clerk, and others, had granted to Aymer De Athol, knight, and Mary his wife, in tail male, the reversion of the manor of the Forest of Felton. Dated at her manor of La Mote, 6 May, 46 Edw. III. "Turr. London.  MS 608, f. 42  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 42
Language:  Latin

Contents:
Miles De Courcy rendered 40l. for 30 services in the time of John Archbishop of Dublin, justiciary. John De Courcy rendered 115l. 7s. 9d. for his relief. Pipe Rolls, 26 Edw. III., in Dublin Castle.
Grant by John De Burgh, son and heir of Hubert formerly Earl of Kent, of the manor of Chartre to the monks of Bermondsey. Dated A.D. 1270. With the confirmation of John, son of said John.
In libro Monasterii de Bermondsey.

Grant by Henry III. to Hubert De Burgh, Earl of Kent, of 50l. a year, "for the third penny of the county of Kent." Westminster, 10 Dec. 13 Hen. III. This charter was renewed in 15 Hen. III. "Turr. London.  MS 608, f. 42b  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 42b
Language:  Latin

Contents:
Sir Christopher Plunket, of Dunsanie, made his last will, 2 Edw. IV., and died the same year.
In Castro Dublin." (See f. 20.)
At the request of the commons, it is ordained and established, that the Bishop of Meath, Sir Robert Preston, Sir Christ. Plunkett of Killeene, Sir Richard Newgent of Delvin, Barnaby Barnwell, John Cornewalsh, Walter Chevens, and John Dillon shall have full power, etc." (Nothing further.)
Anno 5 E. IV. in the Parliament Rolls in Dublin.
An Act at the request of Jennet, late wife of Christopher Plunket, late of Killeene, etc." (Nothing more.)
Anno 33 H. VI. in the Parl. Rolls in Dublin.
The Lord of Hothe holdeth 240 acres in Kilbarroke in the lordship of Kildare.
Anno 3 Ed. IV. in Castro Dublin.

Note of a grant by John Ashe and Ric. Avell to Chris. Plunkett, Lord of Dunsanye, of the manors of Willinston and Loghlogh, with remainder after his death to his son Robert in tail male, etc.. 6 March, 17 Hen. VI. "In Scaccario, Dublin.  MS 608, f. 43  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 43
Language:  Latin

Contents:
Note of a grant by King John to Rotheric, who called himself Monarch of Ireland, of the third part of Connaght, for 100 marks, 7 John.
Turr. London.
Letters of Protection by Henry VIII. (with the assent of Gerald, Earl of Kildare, Deputy of Ireland,) to all the tenants and inhabitants of the towns of Luske and Rathan, co. Dublin; so that they shall be free from all liveries and "coyngnes" and other oppressions for ever.
Witness the said Deputy, 10 June 4 Hen. VIII. [Signed:] Nangle.
In Castro Dublin.
Thomas FitzMaurice [had ?] five knights' fees in the "theod" of Elenry, which is in the cantred of Fermoyll; and five in the "theod" of Everemith, "quod est Thomet, (sic) Burgadg. in Limericke.
Anno primo R. Johannis, m. 28. Turr. London.
Creation of Robert Bold as Baron of Rathouth in Ireland, in consideration of his services to Richard late Duke of York, and to Edw. IV.
Witness, [John Earl of Worcester, Deputy of George Duke of Clarence, Lieutenant,] at Drogheda, 13 Aug. 8 Edw. IV. (Quoted at length.)
In Castro Dublin.

Creation of Donald MacCarti, called McCartimore, as Earl of Clancare and Baron of Valentia. Dated 28 June, 7 Eliz, (Quoted at length.) With the Earl's oath of fealty. [See this Calendar, Vol. I. p. 365, 366.] (No reference.)  MS 608, f. 43b  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 43b
Language:  Latin

Pleas of assize of novel disseisin at Dingill before Tho. Coppinger, seneschal of the liberty of Kerry, 1 Hen. VII.  MS 608, f. 44b  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 44b
Language:  Latin

Contents:
The question was whether Richard FitzJohn, FitzEdmund, FitzThomas, and others mentioned, had disseized Edmund FitzMorrice, Baron of Kerry, of his free tenement in Morrogane, Fillyn, Formoyle, etc. The defendants did not appear. It was considered that the plaintiff, having been forcibly disseized, should recover seizin, with 20s. damages.
(No reference.)

Notarial instrument, 5 Edw. VI., testifying that John FitzGerard FitzGerald, of the sept of Ric. FitzMorice, granted to Lord Thomas FitzMorrice, captain of his nation, Baron of "Kierrigia," all his action against the Lord O'Brien on account of damages done him, especially the prey and slaying of his men by Thady in Toteani (sic) O'Brien, Donogh brother of McMahown, and Theodoric of the same nation, restitution of said damages having been adjudged by the Lord Deputy at Cork. Dated at Artifert. (Names of witnesses.); Signed by the Bishop of Ardfert and John FitzGerard. Notary, John FitzMoris. (No reference.)  MS 608, f. 45  1551

Former reference: MS 608, f. 45
Language:  Latin

Contents:
Inquisition, 34 Edw. III. (in Dublin Castle). David Baron of Naas enfeoffed Baldwin FitzRobert, knight, of 20 carucates in the barony of Naas.
The heir general of this Baldwin afterward married Johannem De Carreu.
David Baron of Naas, 30 Edw. I. (Molineux, Ulster King of arms.)
Almaricus De St. Amand, Lord of Gormanston, 32 Edw. III. "Records in Dublin Castle.
Lords David and Miles de la Roch, temp. Edw. II.

Pedigree showing the descendants of William Ferrers, Earl of Derby, and Sibilla 4th daughter of William the Marshal, Earl of Pembroke and Lord of Leinster; including Mohuns, Vescys, a Carru, etc. "Ex legiario monasterii de portu S. Mariæ de Dunbrothy in Hibernia.  MS 608, f. 45b  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 45b
Language:  Latin

Contents:
Extracts from the Red Book of the Exchequer of Ireland.
Execution of Maurice De Caunton, felon, in the mountain of Slewmarge, by Wm. De Roche and his brothers. (No date of year).
Gilbert De Roche slain by the Burgesses of Ros, 1318, 11 Edw. II., in Leinster.
David FitzDavid FitzAlexander De Fermoy, with nine of the Roches, slain, and the son of George De Roche, son-in-law of Lord Wm. Bermingham, captured, 1331, 5 Edw. III., near Fernogiter (sic).
The Lord John FitzGeorge De Roche slain by the Ketinges and Hordenets, 1346, 20 Edw. III.
Letter from the Lords Commissioners for the office of Earl Marshal of England to the Lords Justices of Ireland, allowing the claim of the Baron of Kerry, commonly called the Lord of Lixenawe, to precedency before the Baron of Slane; the matter having been argued by counsel before the Commissioners. January, 1615.

Submissions of the Irish, 18 Ric. II.  MS 608, ff. 47-53b  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, ff. 47-53b

15 Pages.
Language:  Latin

Contents:
I. Notarial instrument certifying that on 16 Feb. 1394, the sixth year of Pope Boniface IXth, in a field called Ballygory near Cathlagh, on the side of Clemargy, in the diocese ef Leighlin, Thomas Earl of Nottingham, Marshal of England, being present with his retinue, in the hearing of Gerald O'Bryn and Donald O'Nolon, captain of his nation, and of many other Irishmen, coming to the Earl from a woody place distant two furlongs, where there were many armed Irishmen assembled together, caused certain letters patent of King Richard II. dated 12 Feb. 18 Ric. II. to be read by John Melton, clerk, of Lincoln diocese, empowering the said Earl to receive Arthur McMourgh and others to the King's fealty and obedience, and to distribute lands and habitations to the captains and leaders of men of war who quitted Leinster; and charging the Earls of Ormond and Desmond to aid the said Earl in this matter. This was expounded in Irish by Edmund Vale, Master of the Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem in Ireland. Then Gerald O'Bryn, removing his girdle, sword, and cap, on bended knees, with lifted hands, took an oath (in Irish) of allegiance to the King, and an oath to observe the covenants in an indenture between the King and himself and other Irishmen, or in default to pay 20,000 marks to the Papal Chamber. The same was done by Donald O'Nolan, Malachias O'Morth, Rory Oge and Shane, son (sons ?) of Maurice Booy of Slemergy, Arthur McMoroughe (who rode a black horse), and Murgh O'Connogher de Faly; all doing homage, and binding themselves in certain sums of money.
On the morrow, 17 Feb., in a house within the castle of Cathlagh, said Edw. Vale took oath faithfully to expound in English the liege homages of the above-named, and did so. Then David O'Murarghe McManus and E. MacGerold of Kensele did liege homage in the same manner. Then came Geoffrey O'Brennan, Fennyn McGillpatrick, Henry Tallon (an English rebel), Thomas Karragh, and Shan son of O'Nolane, and did not do homage, but swore to submit to the King's ordinance and disposition.
On the 18th, in the church of the Friars' Minors near Thristel-Dermond, in presence of said Earl Thomas, Guy L'Enfant took oath to [...] faithful.y expound the said homages in English; which done, Lysagh Ferison and O'Connor, of the nation of Hyrth and O'Tothill, did homage as above.
On the 19th, in a chamber in Dublin Castle, in presence of Richard King of England, John Malachie, clerk of Dublin diocese, [interpreted] in English, the sayings of Donogh O'Bryn, who, kneeling before the King, swore to observe the said covenants, on pain of paying 1,000l. ster. to the Apastolic Chamber.
Then follows a copy of an indenture, dated 7 Jan., 18 Ric. II., in the field between Tyllagh and the said castle, between Thomas Earl of Nottingham and Arthur McMoroghe, receiving the latter and his followers to the King's peace, on his taking the oath of fealty and promising to deliver to the King all his possessions in Leinster, and to obey the laws. He swore that before the first Sunday in Lent he would quit Leinster, saving to him his moveable goods, and give the son of Thomas Carraghe Cavenaghe as a hostage. The King to treat said Arthur as his liege man, and to provide him and his heirs with 80 marks a year, together with his wife's inheritance of the barony of Norragh. He and his men to make war upon the King's rebels, and to have all the lands they may acquire, holding them of the King. In the same indenture there were also covenants between the said Earl Marshal and O'Bryn, O'More, O'Nollan, and others, and all those of Kensley, to deliver all their possessions in Leinster to the King, as above, to receive wages from the King, to make war on his rebels, and to deliver hostages. If they broke these covenants said Arthur swore to make war on them. The names of witnesses to this indenture are given.
The notary, Thomas Sparkford, made this instrument, at the request of all the said Irishmen.
(No reference given.) [The reference given below probably applies to this document also.]
Memoranda of the Exchequer, 18 Ric. 2. Trinity term, on the side of the King's Remembrancer.
Memorandum, that John Bishop of Salisbury, Treasurer of England, delivered to the court on the 25th of June two hampers, of which one contained 39 public instruments touching Ireland, and the other letters sent to the King, indentures, and other records, to the number of 36; of which letters 23 were written on paper.
The bishop stated that the King delivered them to him, and commanded him to cause them to be enrolled in the Exchequer, and to be safely kept in his Treasury. Thereupon the barons ordered them to be enrolled as follows.
III. Notarial instrument, certifying that on 16 March 1394, in a chamber in the cloister of the Friars' Preachers in Drogheda, in the presence of King Richard, Shane McDonnel, of the diocese of Ardagh, divested himself of his girdle, dagger, and cap, knelt at the King's feet, and holding his hands between the King's hands, took oath in the Irish tongue, (which was expounded in English by Thomas Talbot, interpreter,) to be faithful and obedient, and to come to the King at his Parliament and Council whenever he should be sent for. The King then admitted him as his liege man, and Shane requested the notary to make him a public instrument. Witnesses: Thomas Archbishop of York, Robert and Richard Bishops of London and Chichester, Thomas Moubray Earl of Nottingham, Marshal, Thomas Percy, the King's steward, and William Scrope, the King's chamberlain. Notary: Thomas Sparkeford, clerk, of the diocese of Bath and Wells.
[Similar] submission of Catholius McMoryertowgh O'Hanlon.
Submission of Donogh O'Byrne.
Submission of Arth O'Demesey in Leinster, with a rope tied about his neck.
Submission of Arthur MakMurghe Melachye Canerawgh, and John Glasmorghe, tenants of part of Leinster, by William Beg and others their substitutes (proepositos).
Submission of Tady O'More, of Leinster.
Letters of Tegge McKarthy, Prince of the Irishmen of Desmond, sent to the King, to excuse him from coming to the King's presence, are enrolled.
IV. Notarial instrument, certifying that on 16 March 1394, in Drogheda, as above, in the presence of the King, the Lord Nellan Juvenis O'Nel, captain of his nation, took oath in Irish, which was interpreted by Thomas O'Locheran, to the same effect as before, binding himself to pay 20,000 marks sterling to the Apostolic Chamber should he break his oath. Witnesses: Thomas Archbishop of York, John Archbishop of Armagh, Primate of Ireland, Robert, Richard, and Tydeman, Bishops of London, Chichester, and Landaff; Thomas Moubray, Earl of Nottingham, Thomas Percye, master of the King's household, and William Scrope. Notary, Thomas Sparkeford, clerk.
[Similar] submission of Maurice MacGenisse.
Submission of Nelan O'Hanleyn.
Submission of Adam Richard Fyn Tobyn.
Submission of Moris FitzMoris de Geraldus, knight.
Submission of William Barret and Magu Barett Carraghe.
Submission of Desmond O'Brien, Prince of Thomond.
Submission of Gerald O'Byrne, Donald O'Nolan, Malachy O'Morho, Rowry Oge, and Schane, son of Maurice Booy of Slemargy, Arthur MacMourghe, Murghe O'Conor of Faly, Brother of Edward (Edmond ?), Master of the Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem in Ireland, David Murghe MacMannus, E. MacGerold of O'Kenshelawghe, Geoffrey O'Brenan, Fergenamyn Makkilfatryke, Henry Talon, Thomas Karraghe, Shan, son of O'Nolane.
Submission of Guy Lenfant, Leynagh Ferisson O'Connour, of the nation of Hyrthe and O'Tohill.
Submission of Donogh O'Byrne. [This seems to be an abstract of No. 1., but the writer is wrong in including Edmund Vale and Guy L'Enfant in the list of submissions. They were merely interpreters.]
V. Patent of Nellan O'Neyll, junior, captain of his nation, appointing his father, Nellan O'Neyll, senior, as his procurator to appear before Richard King of England and France and Lord of Ireland, and before the Lord Roger Mortimer, Earl of March and Ulster; to treat for the peace of them and each of them for himself, his nation and subjects; to restore all the lands which he has unjustly seized, together with liberties, services, and customs, and especially with the bonathtagh of the Irishmen of Ulster; to offer amends and satisfaction for the injuries and excesses done to the King and the Earl, their lands and subjects; and to seal or sign indentures and other writings with his seal. He will undergo temporal and spiritual penalties or ecclesiastical censures in the event of his breaking any agreement.
Also to take the oath of allegiance, homage, fealty, and obedience. Dated at Madoyn, 6th of January 1394.
[Similar] submissions of Terrelagh O'Conor of Connaught, William De Burgh, Bernard, son of Tadey O'Brien, Dermot, son of O'Brien of Thomond, Odo O'Keinedie, Fenicius and Thomas O'Kenedy, Lord (Don), of Munster, Theobald Fitz Walter, Davy Galle De Burgh of Munster, and the venerable fathers in Christ, Patrick and Gregory, bishops by the grace of God of "Fynaborensis" and "Uwacensis," of Connaught.
Submission of Bernard O'Brien and Taddey O'Kerwll of Munster, Tadey O'Kelly of Connaught.
Submission of Arthur McMurgh, of Terrelaghe O'Concour Lord (Don), of Connaught.
William De Burgh and Walter Birmingham, created knights by the King.
Submission of Malachie O'Morho, Conohore O'Cally, Philip O'Cally, O'Tohyle.
Submission of O'Ferroll Bane, O'Ferroll Boy, O'Molaghlyn, Magaghgan, Nell. A'Molmoy.
Submission of Schane McMahon, Dermot O'Conhour of Faly, Cormac O'Molaghlyn of Meath, Thomas Karragh Cavenaghe, David More O'Morghe, Gillpatrick, Reoghe O'More, Donald O'Nolan.
VI. Notarial instrument, certifying that on 19 January, 1394., in a chamber within the cloister of the House of Friars Preachers at Drogheda, Nellan O'Neyll, senior, did liege homage to King Richard, for himself, his sons, nation, and subjects, in the Irish tongue. (The words of his oath are here given.) The said Nellan presented a proxy to the King in the name of his son to the effect previously mentioned; by virtue of which proxy Nellan O'Neyll, junior, became the liege man of the King. (The words of his oath are here given.) Then the said Nellan, senior, made an agreement with Roger De Mortimer, Earl of March and Ulster, before the King, concerning all lands wrongfully detained of long time from the said Roger; the damages to be restored. He then took an oath to perform the above on the gospels, on the missal, and on the cross of the Archbishop of Armagh. Thereupon King Richard and Nellan requested the notary to make them public instruments.
Witnesses, John, Richard, Tydeman, and Robert, bishops of Armagh (Primate), Chicester, Llandaff, Waterford, and Lismore.
[Similar] submission of Tegg MacKarthy, Murgh O'Conghire of Faly, Malachy O'Keally, Terrelaugh, FitzMaurice O'Brien, of Munster, Teotric O'Conor, Lord of Connaught, Cormac, son of Dermot MacKarthy, Donald Morgh his son, the Lord Magaule, Moriertagh Magoghan, Conhore O'Molaghlyn, Giles O'Rayle, Thomas O'Ferrell.
VII. Letter of the Lord Nellan O'Neyll to King Richard II.
The last time he was with the King at Tresteldermoth the King conferred many honours upon him, and commanded him immediately after Easter to repair to the King. Is unable to come to the King's presence this time, owing to great and troublesome affairs and grievances, because the King's grant to him is not observed that he should have buying and selling in the King's markets and towns.
According to the King's license he sent his men and servants to Ballymorire to buy divers necessaries for this feast, and the men of that town rose up against his men, despoiled them, and detained them. Moreover, the Irishmen of Kinusley came to him, and made preys of thirty head of mares of his stable, and also took his son, and detained him as a hostage. He therefore prays the King to excuse his absence this time, and not to listen to any complaint against him until the truth be enquired into before the King. Cannot subsist without buying and selling. Desires the King's letters patent that he may obtain the same in the King's markets and towns for the future.
(No date).
VIII. Letter from Nellan O'Neyll, Prince of the Irishmen of Ulster, to King Richard II.
When he heard of the King's joyous advent to Ireland, he rejoiced greatly, and rejoices now, hoping to obtain justice for the many injuries done to him and his people by the Englishmen of the Marches. If he has excessively injured the King's subjects, he has not done so to deny the King's Lordship, but has always acknowledged his authority. If he could have obtained justice from any of the King's ministers he would not have done what he did. Is willing to make satisfaction for any offence against his Royal Majesty. Desires to be received into protection, and that the King will be to him a helmet and shield of justice between his Lord the Earl of Ulster and himself, in case the Earl should exact from him more than he ought of right. Is ready to render all duties, and to make amends for things committed. Was informed by his spiritual father, the Lord Primate of Ireland, that the King was offended because he came with his men too near to the King's Marches of Dundalke. Did not do so with any bad intent, but out of reverence and respect to the Crown.
IX. A writing, (scriptura) witnessing that on 20 January 1394, in the presence of King Richard, in the King's Parliament Chamber, in the cloister of the Friars Preachers of Drogheda, Nellan O'Neyll, senior, Procurator of Nellan O'Neyll, junior, on bended knees, by words uttered in the Irish tongue, became the King's liege man for himself and his son, and took oath on the gospels and the cross of St. Patrick. Also he surrendered to the Earl of March and Ulster the bonaght of all the Irishmen of Ulster, and all other services which the said Nellans and their ancestors were wont to render to the Earl's ancestors. There being a dispute beteen the said Earl and Nellan as to the immediate subjection of certain Irishmen of Ulster, the King took the arbitration of it into his own hand before the feast of St. John the Baptist, giving fifteen days' warning to both parties; provided that the same Irishmen of Ulster do come personally to the presence of the King or the Earl, to take the oath of allegiance and fealty to the King, and the oath of fealty to the Earl. The King also wills that the said Nellan shall come to the presence of the King and the Earl before the second Sunday in Lent next, at Drogheda or Dublin, to make oaths and recognizances of allegiance and homage to the King, and fealty to the Earl; otherwise neither the said Nellan nor the other Irishmen of Ulster shall be secure of the peace of the King and Earl. Also the King took into his own hands the ordination, taxation, or limitation of the amends or satisfaction [to be done] by the said Nellans for the burnings, homicides, preys, depopulations, and other injuries done by them to the King and his lieges, and to the Earl or his subjects; to be determined before the said feast of St. John the Baptist.
To this writing the said Nellan, senior, affixed his seal.
Examinatur, et concordat cum recordo, per me, Henricum Fanshawe." (In a different hand).

Ordinances made in the Great Parliament at Dublin, 12 July, 33 Hen. VIII. [They have already been calendared in Vol. I. p. 180, (12 July 1541,) from Carew MS 603.]  MS 608, f. 54  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 54

5 Pages.
Language:  Latin

Division of the county of Ossory among the three daughters of the Lord Gilbert De Clare, Earl of Gloucester; showing the pourparties of the Lord Hugh Le Dispenser and Eleanor his wife, the Lord Hugh d'Audele and Margaret his wife, and the Lord Roger d'Amory and Elizabeth his wife. Dated by Carew, "Edw. II.  MS 608, f. 57  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 57

4 Pages.
Language:  Latin

Richard II. to the Mayor and Commons of Dublin. Has relieved his uncle the Duke of Glouscester from the government of Ireland to which he had been appointed, and charged the Earl of Marche instead, to go thither as soon as possible. In the mean time appoints the Earl of Ormond [Lord] Justice, and sends over the Archbishop of Dublin, who is appointed Chancellor, with men-at-arms and archers, and money. Hopes that they, with the Bishop of Meath and the rest of the Council, will set Ireland in good order. Windsor Castle, 24 July. (Regnal year not given.); "Copied out of the original.  MS 608, f. 61  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 61
Language:  French

Contents:
Richard II. to the Bishop of Meath.
Discharges him from his office of Chancellor, to which the Archbishop of Dublin is appointed, and from that of Justice, which the Earl of Ormond is to hold till the Earl of March's arrival. Windsor Castle, 23 July (no year).
Copied out of the original.

Remembrance de parler á nre sire le roy [Ric. II.], en son Conseil, pour l'estat et gouverneall de la terre d'Irland; par les Signuers et Communs de Parlement au dit terre.  MS 608, f. 61b  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 61b
Language:  French

Contents:
(1.) That the Lieutenants or Justices be ordered to keep the full number of the retinue appointed for the wars, as they keep but the third part, to their own private gain.
(2.) That fines and amercements at sessions and forfeitures of war go the King instead of the Lieutenant.
(3.) The Great Seal in the Chancery of Ireland used to render 2,000 marks and more, besides officers' fees, to the Exchequer, but now they are insufficient to pay the Chancellor alone, because the fines, which used to range from 100l. to 20l., now vary from 10l. to 40d.
(4.) The King receives no profit from lands seized into his hand, as the inquisitions are allowed to be traversed and others are forged.
(5.) The revenues are so small, because the great taxes and talliages (sometimes 20s. on the ploughland) have been levied by the armed men of every country, who were made accountable, not to the Exchequer, but to various persons, such as the Prior of Holy Trinity, Dublin; also because the former great subsidies on merchandises (cloth, grain, iron, salt, hides, wool, wine, salmon, etc.) have not been granted to the King since his departure from Ireland.
(6.) The issues of the King's Bench are not sufficient to pay the fees and wages of the justice, who will not therefore do justice in cases of misprision. It is the same with all other offices.
(7.) The Chancellor refuses to receive the Treasurer's bills ordering letters patent to be made for the custody of lands, etc.
(8.) The Mayors of Dublin and Cork and other cities will not suffer searches (?) to be made by the Treasurer within their bailiwicks.
(9.) The English rebels, as the Butlers, Tobines, Powers, Burkes, Geraudines, Barets, and many other sects, by sufferance of their chieftains, make such riot that the liege people is destroyed.
(10.) It is to be learned from the King and his Council, whether, in the case of Irish captains who have waged war since the King's departure after becoming liege, the annuity granted to them is to be continued.
(11.) All offices to be filled from England.
(12.) James Cotenham, pretending to be Deputy to the Earl of Rutland, Admiral of Ireland, has taken inquisitions, contrary to the laws, touching concealed customs, and received fines to his own use.
(13.) The said James has also levied a subsidy of 12d. from every weigh of wheat passing out of port, and from every man or woman crossing the sea from 40d. to 12d., without authority.
(14.) When the lieutenant of the Treasurer lately rode towards Drogheda and elsewhere in Meath, to inquire for the King's profit, and to levy their debts for the payment of the Irish, the said James with a large number of armed men, and one Lawrence Newton, serjeant-at-arms, searched all the country through to arrest said lieutenant, who knows not even now for what purpose.
(15.) The said James thrice sent his ships to Scotland with wine, flour, etc., contrary to the statute, and brought false money from Scotland to Ireland.
(16.) Charge should be given to certain faithful lieges to inquire into the misprisions, disturbances, and violences done by said James against the King and his ministers.
Headed: "Tempore Regis Ricardi II.
Copied out of the original.

Richard II. to the Duke of York and [the Council in England].  MS 608, f. 63  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 63
Language:  French

Contents:
Desires to have constant news from his realm [of England]. A parliament is to be held at Dublin on Monday in the octave of Easter. There are three kinds of people in Ireland:--the wild Irish (Irrois savages), the King's enemies; the Irish rebels; and the obedient English. As the Irish rebels have become rebels owing to the griefs and wrongs done to them on the one hand, and to the default of a remedy being applied to them on the other, the King and Council are of opinion that, unless they are wisely treated and put in good hope of grace, they will doubtless join the King's enemies, which the King will not permit by any fault of his. A general pardon should be offered them; and if a fine or fee were paid for every pardon under the King's seal, much good would follow to the King and his said land. Will not, however, do such an important thing without the advice of the Duke and the others. Has taken all the Irish rebels generally into his special protection till the quinzaine of Easter next, in order that they may come and shew the causes of their rebellion. Desires advice as soon as possible. Given under signet at Dublin, 1st February.
Dated "16" Ric. II. by Carew.
Copied out of the original.

Richard II. to Thomas Duke of Gloucester. As it is uncertain whether peace or war with France will ensue, revokes his appointment to the government of Ireland. Windsor, 23 July 16 Ric. II. "Copied out of the original.  MS 608, f. 63b  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 63b
Language:  French

Contents:
Richard II. to the Earl of Ormond.
Thanks him for his services in the "salvation" of Ireland. Has discharged the Duke of Gloucester from its government, and ordered the Earl of March to undertake the same as soon as possible. In the mean time appoints Ormond as Justice, as will appear by the letters patent; he will be assisted by the Archbishop of Dublin, now appointed Chancellor, and by the Bishop of Meath. Sends over the Chancellor with men-at-arms and archers, and with 2,000 marks, to be delivered by the King's serjeant, John Elingham, to the Treasurer of Ireland. Desires credence for the Chancellor respecting the revenues. Windsor Castle, 25 July.
Dated "16" Ric. II. by Carew.
Copied out of the original.

The Lords of the Parliament in England to Richard II.  MS 608, f. 64  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 64
Language:  French

Contents:
Are gratified by the good news from Ireland related by the Duke of Gloucester, the King's uncle, and by Lawrence Dru, the King's esquire, and others, in presence of the Lords and Commons assembled in Parliament; how the rebels MacMorough and the great O'Nel, and others of the strongest captains there, have submitted to the King, and sworn to be faithful lieges in future. It is evident that the King has conquered the greater portion of that land. Commend his proceedings, and pray him, for certain urgent causes, to return to England, leaving deputies in Ireland, who will treat the people with justice.
Signed by archbishops, bishops, dukes, earls, and others.
Dated "16" Ric. II. by Carew.
Copied out of the original.

Richard II. to the Bishop of Meeth, and to the Keeper of the Great Seal, the Treasurer, and others of the Council--; Signifying the appointment of the Earl of Ormond. Windsor Castle, 23 July [16 Ric. II.]; "Copied out of the original.  MS 608, f. 64b  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 64b
Language:  French

Les pointes pur la sauvegarde de la terre d'Irlande, demandez par le Conte Marshall, Thomas Plantagenet.  MS 608, f. 65  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 65
Language:  French

Contents:
To have sufficient commissions of lieutenancy for seven years, in same manner as the Earl of March and William of Windsor. To have 500 men-at-arms and 1,000 archers. To be paid for the first year beforehand, and afterwards every half year in advance; and if payment fail, to be allowed to discharge his retinue. To have a fee of 1,000 marks a year, and the expenses of his men in crossing and recrossing the sea. The customs, or some other royal revenues, to be assigned for the payments of Ireland, as ordained for the town of Calais. To have power to diminish or increase his retinue according to the seasons of the year; to remove officers; to give benefices with cure and without; and to remove the Common Pleas and the Exchequer, The musters of his retinue to be viewed from time to time, so that he may have due allowance from the Exchequer. If the King go to war in person, he may go in the King's company, leaving a lieutenant in his place. To have from every one or two parishes in England a man and his wife to inhabit the destroyed parts of the Marches; such men to have lands given them in fee. To have the travelling expenses of all future additions to his retinue. All patents granting appurtenances of the Crown to be annulled, and the statute of absentees to be put in force.
Headed: "Temp. Hen. IV.
Copied out of the original.

A Complaint of the Commons of Parliament in Ireland, in the time of King H. the V. or H. VI.  MS 608, f. 66  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 66
Language:  French

Contents:
(1.) Whereas Ireland was formerly brought to good order, and subject to the laws, the greater part is now destroyed. The Commissioners appointed call before them all kinds of pleas, to the hindrance of the Chancery, King's Bench, Common Pleas, and Exchequer. In cos. Dublin, Meath, Kildare, and Louth the commissioners rob the husbandmen of their goods by great summonses and distresses, so that the latter are unable to render their rents and duties to their lords, and many towns and hamlets are wasted. Many lords and commoners are indicted without cause before the commissioners, and the King's pardons and writs de supersedendo are disregarded. Lands are so suddenly and privily seized into the King's hands that owners are uncertain whether their lands have been seized or not; the lands being seized three or four days before the term of the rent, in order that the owners may lose it. This has happened to the Earl of Kildare, John his brother, the Lord of Rathfaith, Thomas Harie of Dublin, and the abbot of St. Mary's, Dublin, whose lands at Lucan, Kildroght, Rathfaith, and Blowike are farmed by John Slane, Baron of the Exchequer, by the Treasurer, by Wm. Synbegh, Chief Baron of the Exchequer, and by John Dike, secretary. The commissions of the former justices of the shire contained only 8 lines, but those of the commissioners, who assume the jurisdiction of the shire, comprise 40 or 60 lines. If England could not support the jurisdiction of justices of the shire, which was repealed temp. Edw. III., how can the said four counties do so?
(2.) The soldiers take liveries without payment, and three times more than are needed; and also 20d. a week per man, by way of "coynge." In default, they distrain. This happened to the Earl of Ormond at Eghtrin, where the soldiers and kernes took victuals, to the value of 140 marks.
(3.) Contrary to Magna Charta, the King's lieges are daily imprisoned without indictment, their goods seized, etc. by the King's ministers, soldiers, and others. This happened to the Abp. of Armagh, Archdeacon of Kildare, Bp. of Leighlin, and others (named).
(4.) It was customary that when a liege took an Irish enemy prisoner in time of war, he should ransom him at his own pleasure; but lately, when Thomas Vale and his men captured Con O'Nolan, the Baron of Galtrim and Ric. Wellesley took him out of their possession, by the Lieutenant's command, to the destruction of cos. Cathirlagh and Kildare. Shane Boy Connor was likewise taken from Thomas Wolfe and James Wolfe by one Everingham, esquire, and Maurice Fitz Gerald.
(5.) The land is greatly destroyed by "coynges" of kernes and idle men, on foot and on horseback, who pay nothing for victuals for man or horse, and take distresses in default of victuals. The lieges are also oppressed by the "hoblours" and kernes maintained by the Geraldines, Bourkeyns [Burghes, in margin], Powers, and others.
(7.) A commission was issued under the Great Seal to Walter Plunket, John Clinton of Keppoke, and others, to assess Oghy McMahowne, and other Irish enemies, in the county of Louth, who will not accept such meat and drink as the poor commons use, but take pledges with them till they have their pleasure; and they have their "caifs norys" and infants with them, and act as spies. The commons pray these men may be sent out of the said county, or it will be destroyed.
(8.) Extortions by purveyors for the Governor's household; among others from the Abbot of Mellifont, and Sir John Belynge, Chancellor of St. Patrick's.
(9.) It is to be remembered that in the message sent by the Earl of Ormond the King's brothers and the Council the King's presence is greatly desired.
(10.) The King's right to Ireland is shown by reference to Cambrensis and other ancient histories of England. Henry II. did no act of war in Ireland, which was granted to him by the Pope. The legate Vivian excommunicated all contraveners of the King's allegiance. Gillomarus, formerly King of Ireland, was tributary to King Arthur; etc. etc. [Cf. the Book of Howth.]
Copied out of the original.
Ex Albo Libro Scaccarii, Dublin.

Warrant by Edw. I. to the Chancellor of Ireland, to enrol certain statutes lately made [by Parliament] at York to be observed in Ireland; and to issue mandates for their publication in all counties and places. Nottingham, 20 Nov., 17 Edw. I.  MS 608, f. 68b  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 68b

Contents:
Extract from a letter of Henry VIII. to the Earl of Surrey, in 1520, touching "martial law.
And whereas you write it hath been accustomed heretofore, that our Lieutenants General of that land have not only had full and ample commission to proceed and execute our authority royal against criminous persons, but also to give order of knighthood to such noblemen, from time to time, as should deserve the same, you make instance to have such commissions and authority from us; we, in consideration of your laudable right and agreeable service, and having full trust and confidence in your wisdom, soberness, and circumspection, and that you will not proceed to the condemnation or executing of any noble person of name till you be advertised of our pleasure, and not to advance any man or personage to the honour of knighthood but such as shall merit the same, we, according to your desire, send unto you our ample commission and authority to that purpose accordingly.

Grant by Thomas Bullen, Earl of Ormond, to Piers Butler of Tullyphelim and Arkeloe. [See Vol. I. of this Calendar, p. 128, where this is quoted at length.]  MS 608, f. 69  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 69

Note of an inquisition, 10 Edw. II., on the death of Joan de Valentia, Countess of Pembroke, who held in fee simple the county palatine of Wexford, &c., which descended to George Talbot, Earl of Waterford and Shrewsbury, and so to the Crown, by the Statute of Absentees. By the survey in 32 Hen. VIII. the value of the lands had greatly decreased  MS 608, f. 69b  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 69b

Contents:
Note of an inquisition, 13 Hen. VI., on the death of John Talbot Lord Furnivall, who held the manor of Loghsendie, which contained all co. Longford and all West Methe, except the manor of Rathwier. It came to the Crown by the Statute of Absentees.
Note of a letter from the Earl of Surrey, Lord Lieutenant, to Henry VIII., in 1520, mentioning Preston Viscount of Gormanston, and styling Barry and Roche "Lords," not "Viscounts." ("This letter remaineth in the custody of Sir Robert Cotton.")
In 1537 the King's revenue in Ireland was not full 5,000l. per annum.

Writ to the Sheriff of co. Hants, to make proclamation that no person bring groats or "pence of twopence," bearing the print of the Harp, out of Ireland. Westmr., 19 Nov., 32 Hen, VIII. [More fully described in this Calendar under date 19 Nov. 1540.]  MS 608, f. 73  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 73

Names of witnesses [to a charter?] in Pat. [Roll]. 42 Ed. III., part 2:--John de Courcy, conqueror of Ulster, and Affrica his wife; John de Courcy, nephew of the Lord Wm. de Courcy, brother of John de Courcy, conqueror of Ireland.  MS 608, f. 73b  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 73b

Contents:
In libro Margat.":--Hervey de Montmorency, to whom Richard Earl of Buckingham gave Salveden, gave the same to the nuns of Margat.
Claus. 5 Hen. III.:--Geoffrey de Mariscis, Justiciary of Ireland.
Anno 1509 (sic.) Thomas Earl of Ormond and Lord Rochferd; in the register of FitzJames Bp. of London, among the patrons in the diocese of London.
John de Carreu, sheriff of Cork and Escheator of Ireland; in the "Rotulus de Proficuis," temp. Ed. III., m. 25, in the office of the rolls of the Exchequer at Dublin.

Writ to the Justiciary of Ireland to certify the King what Englishmen were "sufficient" to be justices both of common pleas and of those which followed the justiciary.--Rot. Claus. 12 Edw. III., p. 1, m. 23, dorse.  MS 608, f. 74  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 74
Language:  Latin

Contents:
Grant by King John to Hugh de Lacy and his heirs of all the land of Ulster, on his creation as Earl, in the same manner as John Courcy held it on the day when he was captured in the field by said Hugh; doing one knight's service for all service, "salva nobis ordinatione crocearum.
Anno 7 Regis Johannis; numero 109; Chart.

A complaint from the Lords and Commons of Ireland to King Henry 6, against James Butler, Earl of Ormond.  MS 608, f. 74b  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 74b

Contents:
All the Lords Spiritual and Temporal of the said land and the Commons of the same in your Parliament holden at Dublin the Friday next after the feast of St. Martin in winter last past were fully advised and assented that I and my fellow messengers for the said land should desire of your sovereign lord[ship] to ordain a mighty lord of this your realm of England for to be your Lieutenant of the said land; that time being there present the Earl of Ormond as Deputy to the Lord Wells, then your Lieutenant there.
Please it your Highness to be informed how that if it had been seen good and profitable for you and for your said land for to have had the said Earl your Lieutenant, he should have been named at the said Parliament; doing you to understand that they all, both the Lords Spiritual and Temporal and the Commons there assembled, considered in their wisdoms, that it was most expedient to your sovereign lord[ship] to have to your Lieutenant there a lord of birth, of this noble realm, whom your people there will more favour and obey, than any man of that land's birth; for men of this realm kept better justice, execute your laws, and favour more the common people there, and ever have done before this time, better than ever did any man of that land, or ever is like to do.
May it may please your Highness to consider, how that it behoveth that he, that should be your Lieutenant there, be mighty, courageous, and a laborious man to keep the field, and to make resistance ever against your enemies, in comfort and supportation of your true liege people there. And none of these be seen or found in the said Earl, for both he is aged, unwieldy and unlusty, for he hath, for lack of labor, lost in snbstance, all his castles, towns, and lordships that he had within your said land; wherefore it is not likely that he should keep, conquer, ne get any ground to your sovereign lord[ship], that thus hath lost his own.
Moreover, pleaseth you to wit, that at divers Parliaments (when the said Earl hath had the rule there) he hath made and ordered Irishmen (grooms and pages of his household) knights of the shire, the which would not in no wise assent to no good thing that should profit and avail to your sovereign lord[ship]; and also hath suffered divers lords, spiritual and temporal, to absent them from the Parliament heretofore, taking from them great fines to his singular avail, where the profit should be yours.
Also, afore this time, when the said Earl stood your Lieutenant, he took the Prior of Cullen, one of the Lords of your Parliament there, and sent him to O'Dempsie's castle, that is an Irishman and your enemy, the which put him in great duresse of prison, and ransomed him at 100 marks, without any reasonable cause. And likewise made to be imprisoned in the lands of your enemies Jenkin Galan, one of the citizens of your city of Dublin, and David Shemais, gentleman, and ransomed each of them at 10l.; and one Nicholas Cabbarry, likewise ransomed at 100 marks.
Also, pleaseth you to consider, how at the last departure of the Lord Wells out of your land, it was desired by the substance of the gentills and commons of the said land, that the said Earl should be in no wise his Deputy, because of his great rigour, and breaking of peace, that they dread him to do the like that he had done before time; whereupon at last he was bound by indenture tripartite to keep the peace and be of good rule during the time that he were Deputy to the said Lieutenant. And sithe it is so, he [Sic.] feebleness of rule was so much dread to be Deputy, it is to be supposed, he were more to be dread, if he were your Lieutenant, and had rule himself.
Also, please it your Highness to be remembered how that afore this time, my Lord of Marche, my Lord Gray, (whose souls God assoyle,) and my Lord Talbot, that have been Lieutenants of your said land, have afore this time appeached the said Earl, severally, of many great treasons, the which stand yet undetermined; the which is a great proof, that the said Earl hath not been of good rule, and unable to have your said land in governance.
Also, there been many and divers other great things misdone by the said Earl, which I may not declare, because of mine order; for declaration of which, please it your Highness to do come before you, the Lord Wells, the Baron of Dudley, Sir Thomas Stanley, sometimes Lieutenants of your said land, Giles Thornton, your Treasurer there, and others that have borne and bear offices there, charging them, by the faith they owe to God and you, to report to your Highness the rule of the said Earl done for the time that they have stood officers there.
Also please it your Highness, the premises considered, to discharge the said Earl of the said office of Lieutenant, and to direct a commission to certain commissioners, to inquire within your said land of the matters comprised within the said articles, and of the rule and governance that the said Earl hath been of, in the time that he hath stood Lieutenant there, heretofore, over that as is rehearsed above; and thereupon to certify you by writing (under the Great Seal of that kingdom) as they find by inquisitions. And so you may have clear knowledge, whether it be for your profit and avail, for the ease and welfare of your land, that the said Earl be your Lieutenant there or not. And the said Earl must be discharged before the said inquisitions be taken, for he hath so rigorously intreated your poor of your said land before this time, that they dare not say the truth while that he standeth your Lieutenant there, without that he be first discharged; lest that, for their soothsaying, he would be more rigorous to them hereafter than he was unto them before, the which they might not bear.
Headed: "Anno 20 Hen. VI.
Copied out of the original.

These been the articles which Giles Thornton, Treasurer of Ireland, showeth and declareth unto the full, honorable, and right wise Council of the King our Sovereign Lord.  MS 608, f. 76b  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 76b

Contents:
First the said Giles excuseth him and him acquitteth by the faith which he oweth to God and to the King our sovereign Lord, that the things which he saith and expresseth by the writing hereafter following, it is for the weal and profit to the King and good governance of his foresaid land and people, and for no manner of singular lucre ne avail for himself, ne for no hindering hate or malice which he hath against person or party in that land, as he will acquit him at all times, in such wise as you like or you liketh to assign him, to his power; considering to your gracious and honourable directions that he hath been sent and drawn forth in the King's service that dead is, whom God assoyle, and also in the service of our Sovereign Lord (that now is) these 38 winters and more, and never had fee ne reward but only of them twain; and now in his old age, that he should do or say any thing that should be shame or reproof to him, God defend, and so he trusteth to his mercy that he wolle. ["wotte," MS.]
The first article is, that it is known of the discord, partialities, and divisions which is in the land of Ireland and long hath continued, between the Earl of Ormond and his affinity on that party, and the Lord Talbot and the Archbishop of Develin his brother on the other part, sithe that the said Giles hath be Treasurer, there hath be such party sitting in the King's Council, and in all his courts there, that no matter for the King's avail, ne for suit of party, may have due process ne execution in the law, where it toucheth any of the two parties, to great hindering to our said Sovereign Lord and to all his said land, as it appeared by a Parliament there late holden; and so it is like to continue, [un]less that remedy therefore be provided.
Item, as the said Giles is informed by the officers in the Exchequer there, where great sums been due and leviable to the King's use and profit, for which sums the officers dare not make due process, for dread of putting out of office, at every exchange of Lieutenant or Justice. And so it is in all the King's courts there, to the great loss of our said sovereign Lord.
Item, sithe the time of King Harry the fifth hitherto, there hath been granted out of the King's revenue there (without authority or power to them given by the King's grace), annuities and pardon of debts, accounts, and arrearages of accounts to divers persons by the Justices and Lieutenants there, against the form and ordinance made and sent thither by King Ed. 3, which amounted to 1,452l. 5s. 9¼d., like as the said Giles hath them to shew ready written.
Item, it were right profitable, necessary, and needful that the Chief Baron of the Exchequer there was a sufficient man of law, and that he nor none other officer of the same place be in fee with no other lord, but that they may occupy their office in their proper persons, and by no deputies, for that place is greatly hindered by deputation.
Item, liketh your honourable and gracious discretions to give in knowledge to the said Giles how he shall be demeaned, as for annuities and grants of the King's feefarms and demesnes within the said land, grants of pardons, debts, accounts, real services, prize of wines, given by any Justice there of their own authority, as well in the time of the King that dead is, as in the time of our sovereign Lord that now is; and whether they shall be allowed or no.
Item, where divers annuities were granted of the King's feefarms in the time of King Henry 4 by Thomas of Lancaster, that time his Lieutenant, being to divers persons for term of life, he having no power thereto, but only to grant forfeitures; and in as much as the said grants were confirmed by both King Harries the 4 and 5, and by our sovereign Lord that now is, it is to be inquired whether the said grants and confirmations be good or naught.
Item, liketh you to understand that the great frosts and weathers that hath been these 3 years have so impaired and hurt the walls of the castle of Dublin and Wicklow, which will draw to right great and notable sums of money, [un]less than they been the sooner repaired and amended.
Item, it is to be remembered that at the next Parliament to be holden in England, that it be ordained and enacted in the same Parliament that all manner of merchandizes passing out of the land of Ireland and coming into the same pay to the custom in likewise as it is used in England, [un]less than, any such merchandizes be customed in England tofore; because the King hath no custom of no manner of merchandize there, save only of hides, wool, and fell.
Item, it is to have in mind that the charges of the Justice of Ireland and his officers. this year, exceeding [Sic.] the revenues of the same land 1,456l., like as the said Giles can presently shew in writing.
Item, it is to be remembered of an article put in by Sir Edward Eustace, knight, touching that the men born in Ireland should go home and dwell in the same land, and else to pay to the King a certain sum of money, like as it is contained in the said article.
Item, the said Giles beseecheth unto your gracious Lordships that he may have, in strengthening his said office, letters patents under the King's seal after a tenor and form of a letter patent granted to the Treasurer of Ireland by King Edw. 3, anno 31 of his reign, the tenor of which letter patent followeth in this form.
Dated: "Anno 20 Hen. VI.
Copied out of the original.

Letters patent of protection for the Treasurer of Ireland; the King having learned that heretofore the Treasurers have not dared to levy the King's debts from persons under the protection of the Justiciary; reserving to the King himself the punishment of the Treasurer if he offend in anything, and removing the same from the Justiciary's jurisdiction. No protections or injunctions of the Justiciary, without the assent of the Chancellor, Treasurer, and others of the Council, are to prevent the levy of the King's debts. Westminster, 31 March, 31 Edw. III. Headed: "Turr. London.  MS 608, f. 78  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 78
Language:  Latin

Contents:
Miscellaneous Notes and Abstracts.
Grant by to his clerk, Thomas Dominic, of the abbey of Glendalagh, as granted by the charter of Earl Richard ["Clare" in margin]. Anno----Hen. II.
Malachias, Archiep. Ardmacanus, apostolicæ sedis legatus, ab Innocentio II. impetravit quartum episcopalem per totam ergaliam [sic] dari Episcopo Clogherensi, sicut in pontificali ejusdem ecclesiæ combusta continetur, quam vidimus, legimus, et approbavimus.
The castle or manor of Dungarvan and the Black Castle granted to William of Windsor and his heirs.--Pat.43 Edw. III., part 1, m. 27. Turr. Lond.
Thomas De Clare and Maurice FitzMaurice; a fine concerning Inshiquin manor and Yoghall.--Fines, 20 Edw. I., No. 117. Turr. Lond.
Grant to Rowland FitzEustas, knight, Wm. Griffeth, and James De Kerney, and their heirs, of Dunboyne and Moymet in Meath, forfeited by Wm. Butler, Esq.--Pat. 1 Edw. IV. part 2, m. 13. Turr. Lond.
The King committed the barony of "Atrio-Dei," and the town of Mandivill, to Ric. De Tuit.--Fines [Roll?], 3 Edw. II., m. 4. Turr. Lond.
George De Roche, temp. Edw. II., was amerced 200 marks for not coming, though summoned, to the Parliament at Dublin; and the King now pardoned the sum aforesaid to Ro[bert] his son, except 10l.--[Pat. Roll?] 8 Edw. III., p. 1, m. 14. Turr. Lond.
Grant to James Butler, Earl of Ormond, and Elizabeth his wife, of the manors of Dunboigne and Grenaghe, late of Eustace, son of Arnold Le Power hanged for treason.--[Pat. Roll?] 49 Edw. III., p. 1, m. 34. Turr. Lond.
Eustace De Roche held Luske manors.--Anno 8 John, m.--, Turr. Lond.
Eustace De Roche held Radmilton, and David De Roche, Rosslip.--Anno 9 John, m. 3. Turr. Lond.
Grant to Edmund, Butler of Ireland, of Carrigmacgriffin Castle, with the honor of the Earl of Carrick, and the manor of Roscrea.--[Ibidem?]
Theobald De Verdun, son and heir (sic), and Margaret his wife, kinswoman and one of the heirs of Walter De Lacy, formerly Lord of Meath and of the liberty of Meath.--Claus. 8 Edw. I., m. 6, adorso. Turr. Lond.
Inishonan, with the fair, granted to Philip De Barry.--[Claus.?] 24 Hen. IV. Turr. Lond.
Grant to Geoffrey De Genevile and Matilda De Lacy his wife of the liberty of Meath, as held by Walter De Lacy her grandfather.--Claus. 36 Hen. III., m. 6, Turr. Lond.
Eustace Le Power had possessions in various places (mentioned) in cos. Waterford, Tipperary, Kilkenny, Catherlogh, Kildare, and Connaught.--Claus. 30 Edw. I., m. 35. Turr. Lond.
Eustace Le Power had free warren in Flesco.--[Claus.?] 32 Ed. I., m. 25. Turr. Lond.
Grant to Richard FitzJohn of a cantred in Thomond, in which were 40 townships (villatas).--[Claus?] 26 Edw. I., m. 19. Turr. Lond.
David de Caunton held Balliderawin, Moydnithan, etc.--
[Claus.?] 28 Edw. III., m. 43. Turr. Lond.
Ossuerus cantred," in Ireland, granted to John FitzNicholas (ancestor to the Lord of Kerry), and his heirs, rendering to the Exchequer at Dublin, yearly, one falcon gentle.--[Ibidem?]

Notes out of the Earl of Desmond's evidences, unto fol. 82." ["unto fol. 82" is added by G. Carew.]  MS 608, f. 80  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 80

Contents:
The baronies of Kilsecle and Kilshelan, with the royalties and services were entailed by Maurice FitzThomas, Earl of Desmond, to his heirs males, in 26 Edw. III.--"In Scaccario Dublin.
King Henry III. did give unto his son Prince Edward all Ireland, the cities of Dublin and Limerick excepted, to him and to the heirs males of his body, so as he should not alien or separate the same from the Crown. The Prince, in the life of his father, sent letters unto his tenants of Desmond, to be attendant to John FitzThomas, ancestor to the Earls of Desmond, as they had been in former times unto Thomas FitzAnthony; and Stephen Longespee, Lord Justice of Ireland, was appointed to put him in possession thereof. Longespee appointed a time to do it, but John FitzThomas would not tarry the time, but, without any farther warrant, took possession thereof.
Henry VIII. (sic) granted to Maurice FitzGerald a market every Saturday in his manor of Yoghall, and two yearly fairs there, of 15 days each.--"Anno 10 Hen. III. (sic) Rot. Angliæ.
In 4 Hen. VI. the Barretts, by indenture, covenanted to be obedient to the Earls of Desmond.
In 20 Hen. VI. Geoffrey FitzPatrick Gallway enfeoffed James FitzGerald, Earl of Desmond, of the manor of Gale in Kinaley, and all other lands in co. Cork, which he had from John FitzGeoffrey Britt.
In 5 Edw. IV., William FitzGerald, Knight of Kerry, exchanged with James Earl of Desmond the towns of Mogille and Athecrosse in co. Cork, for those of Ballingolin and Clugher in co. Kerry.
In 3 Edw. VI., John Roche, son and heir to Philip Roche of Kinsale, enfeoffed James Earl of Desmond of the manor of Nogbell, etc. etc.
In 18 Hen. VIII., Wm. White granted to Thomas, son to the Earl of Desmond the town of Thomikine in Kerry-Currihye.
In 7 Edw. VI., Cahir McDermond O'Connor, of Carrickfoyle, and his next kinsmen of the O'Connors, granted to James Earl of Desmond all their lands and tenements in Athoc, Clogharshenaghe, etc., in co. Limerick.
In 2 Edw. VI., Sabina, heir to Robert McLearnye, granted to James Earl of Desmond the Great Castle in Tralighe.
In 35 Hen VIII., the King granted to Maurice FitzThomas Earl of Desmond the advowson of the parsonage of Dungarvan.
In 24 Edw. IV., Thomas Mandevile and Anastace his wife granted to Maurice FitzThomas Earl of Desmond the manor of Kilmaynham, for life, with remainder to Thomas FitzJohn FitzThomas in tail male.
In 4 Edw. VI., Corbally, in co. Limerick, was granted by Maghon O'Brien to David Arthur, chaplain, to the use of James Earl of Desmond and heirs.
In 7 Edw. VI., John McPhilip, of Glankine, granted to the Earl of Desmond the town of Ballymaghie.
In 6 Edw. IV., Richard FitzThomas FitzStephen granted to Maurice Earl of Desmond his lands of Downye, Ahedaghe, etc., etc.
In 3 Hen. VIII., William FitzJohn Burke granted to Maurice Earl of Desmond the manor of Carrigkittell.
In 3 Hen. VII., James Bollerye granted Bwyfeston to John son to the Earl of Desmond.
In Edw. ---- ----, [Blanks in MS.] Barret granted to Wm. Barret the manor of Cariggcohanmore.
In 6 Edw. VI., John FitzGibbon, the White Knight, and his kinsmen, granted to James Earl of Desmond all the[ir] lands in Ogonill.
In 4 Mary, John Oge FitzGibbon, and his sons David, Gilbert, and Thomas, released to said James all their lands in Conologhe, viz., the manors of Meane and Ballytine, the Short Castle at Asketin, etc., etc. "He also released all his right unto Ballinecurlye.
In 37 Hen. VI., Wm. Barry of Oleghan granted to Thomas FitzJames, Earl of Desmond, and Ellis Barry his wife, all his possessions in Mocolpe, Ballitarsney, etc.
In 25 Eliz., a commission to Sir Henry Walloppe and others to inquire as to the escheated lands of the Earl of Desmond and others. [This commission is quoted at length at f. 97. of this MS.]
In 27 Eliz. a commission to Sir John Perrott, Lord Deputy, and others to take the surrenders of O'Moloy and others of the Irishry, etc. [This is quoted in full at f. 98 b.]
In 28 Eliz., four commissions under the Great Seal of England to Tho. Norris, Vice-President of Munster, Sir Henry Wallop, Sir Valentine Browne, and others; (1.) to survey the escheated lands in Mounster, to divide them into seignories, and to rate them at yearly rents; (2) to survey and divide the escheated lands in co. Limerick; (3.) ditto in the country of Connologhe; (4.) to inquire by jury as to all escheated lands in cos. Waterford, Tipperary, Crosse, Kerry Cork, Desmond, and Limerick. The first three were dated at Westminster, 5 July, 28 Eliz.; the fourth [at Dublin?] 1st Sept. 28 Eliz., "teste" Sir J. Perot, Deputy.
In 36 Eliz., 16 Nov., a commission to Sir Rob. Gardener and others for the plantation in Munster. [This commission is calendared in Vol. III. p. 102, from another MS.]

Submission of Shane O'Neale, Twelfth Day, 4 Eliz. [This submission is calendared in Vol. I. p. 312, from another MS.]  MS 608, f. 83  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 83

Bull of Indulgence by Pope Clement VIII. to the Irish, [This is calendared in Vol. III. p. 523.]  MS 608, f. 84  18 April 1600

Former reference: MS 608, f. 84

Grant by Miles Archbishop of Ardmaghe, Primate of Ireland, with the assent of the Dean and Chapter, to William and Arthur McBrin, sons of Master Arthur McBrin, of lands in Kilmore, "cum pleno jure herenaciæ," etc.; to hold so long as they shall be pleasing and obedient to the church of Ardmaghe, and not to lease any part of said lands to any strange layman. The premises to be enjoyed by said Master Arthur during his life, according to his charter. Yearly rent, one mark and eightpence sterling. Dunum, Headed: "A grant of an erenachy made by Milo Archbishop of Ardmaghe, to be found in the Register of that see.  MS 608, f. 85  21 Nov 1365

Former reference: MS 608, f. 85

Grant by John Swayne, Archbishop of Ardmaghe, keeper of the spiritualties and temporalities of the see of Dromore, to Maurice McBrin, "herenacho," of the lands of Laireacht [and] Dyrke, Dromore diocese, till the church of Dromore shall be provided with a pastor; rendering the usual rent, in English money, and services. "In the register of that see.  MS 608, f. 85b  1427

Former reference: MS 608, f. 85b

Confirmation by John Maye, Archbishop of Ardmaghe, to Patrick McKassayd, and his heirs, of the herenachy of Twynha, as granted to his ancestors, with renewed investiture; yearly rent, 5 marks 2s. sterl., and the customary services; to inhabit and cultivate the lands, and not to lease them to any layman stranger; said Patrick being created the archbishop's herenach in the church of Twynha. Dated at Armagh, the 12th year from the Archbishop's consecration. "In the register of that see.  MS 608, f. 86  9 Aug 1455

Former reference: MS 608, f. 86

Appointment by John Walton, Archbishop of Dublin, of Tadeus Oskolly, clerk, of the town and church of Glindelagh, as keeper of the office of "corbanatus" there, which the Archbishop has sequestered, until the Archbishop's visitation of the church and people of Glindalagh; the disposition of said office belonging to the Archbishop, as appears by search made among the muniments and charters of the church of Dublin. Dated at the Archbishop's manor of Finglas, the 2nd year from the Archbishop's consecration. Headed: "In the Archbishop of Dublin his register.  MS 608, f. 87  11 Dec 1473

Former reference: MS 608, f. 87


Related information: (Same as that on f. 68b, No. 104.)

Contents:
Warrant by Edw. I. to the Chancellor of Ireland.

Copies of Evidences taken out of the Abbey Book of Tristernathe.  MS 608, f. 87b  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 87b

Contents:
I. Liberties claimed by the Prior of Tristernagh; viz., in his court and demesne of Kilbixi, pleas of illegal distraint, of bloodshedding, and of hue and cry; amends of bread, ale, etc., and of fullers and cloth-shearers; also toll of animals and hides sold within his demesne. He claims these liberties in right of the church of Kilbixi, as granted by the charter of the Lord Geoffrey De Genevile, with the consent of Matilda De Lacy his wife, Lady of Meath.
II. Charter of Geoffrey de Genevile, (with the consent of Matilda de Lacy, his wife,) confirming the charters of his magnates of Meath and their ancestors, viz., of those who came with Hugh de Lacy, senior, at the Conquest, and of those who were enfeoffed by Walter de Lacy, son and heir of said Hugh; granting them pleas of illegal distraint of all their tenants in their own courts. If such a plea should be moved by any of said magnates against any other magnate who holds of the grantors in chief, the same to be tried in the court of said Geoffrey and Matilda, and of the heirs of the latter. If a hue or cry be raised in the lands of said magnates, the sheriff of Trim shall take an inquisition whether such trespasses belong to the Crown or not; if so, they are to be determined in the court of said G. and M.; if not, in the courts of those within whose tenements they arose. Also granting to said magnates the chattels of all their Irishmen convicted of crime or felony, even if tried in the court of said G. and M. If one Englishman wound another Englishman within said magnates' tenements, they may attach both, and retain their goods until certain of the life or death of the wounded man; and if the latter have a maim, or die, he and his goods shall be restored to said G. and M. If the wound be slight, the trespass shall be amended in the courts of said magnates. If an Englishman slay an Irishman, the former is to be detained till he give sufficient security for payment. The sheriff of Trim shall make his tourn in the demesne of each magnate twice a year, or, if requested by said magnates, oftener. "Limites quoque non regales prædictis magnatibus quiete remaneant." (No date.)
III. "The names of the founders and benefactors of the Abbey of Tristernagh, within the liberty of Methe, in Ireland.
Geoffrey de Costentin, the first founder of the Abbey of Tristernagh, in the territory of Kilbixi; John de Costentine, Knight, son of Geoffrey de Costentine; Hawis de Breidishall, wife of Geoffrey de Costentine; Fulco Fleming, Roger Fleming, son of Fulco; Agnes Hembrond, wife of Adam Hembrond; Hugo Burnell, Ralph de Ayton, Simon the miller, son of William Aldebert de Kilbixi; Robert Bennet, Matilda, daughter of Benedict Black; Robert Abus, [Sic; qu. Albus (White).] Robert Welch, John Prior of the hospital of St. John of Drohedagh; Bernard Lord (Dns.) of the hospital of St. John of Drogheda; Henry de Teitner (?), David de Balliport, William de Arcy (Darcy), Hugh de Arcy, John Tirrell, Adam de Ledewich, Geoffrey de Travers, Jordan Dardis, knight; Hugh Tirrell, Thomas de Stokes, son of Helias de Stokes; Peter de Stokes, William Bossard, Geoffrey de Genevile, Lord of Trim; John Travill, Michael Travill, Anthony Travill, Leticia Travill, John Terrill, Bartholomew Tirrell, Thomas de Ledwitche, Lord of Athlekagh; John Russell, John de la Mare, Thomas de Molendinis, Walter de Lacy, Lord of Methe; Herbert de la Mare; Herbert, son of Herbert de la Mare; Peter de Tuit, John de Tuit, Richard de Tuit, Joan de Tuit, William de Furtis, Hugh de Furtis, Eva de Taveria, Robert, son of Ysolda de Demby; Walkelin Fleming, Roger de Ledwitche, John Tirrell, Lord of Corkri; Stephen de Kent, son of John De Kent; Thomas de Rossell, William de Rossell.
IV. Agreement, 25 Edw. I., between John Hacket, Prior of Tristernagh, and his convent, of the one part, and the Lord John de Tuit, Lord of Sunnaghe, son and heir of the Lord Richard de Tuit, of the other part. The said Lord John confirms to the Blessed Virgin of Tristernagh the conduit and watercourse which the prior and convent formerly bought from the Lord John de Tuit, grandfather of the said Lord John, afterwards confirmed by the grant of the Lord Richard his father; viz., from Sumagh to their land of Tristernagh, through his land, by a large and sufficient canal, in breadth 20 feet, and as deep as they please; to have and to hold to them, their heirs and assigns for ever. The said Lord John further grants the digging of sufficient earth in his land adjoining the said watercourse and canal, on both sides of the water of Mulle, for making and repairing the causeway (calcetum) of said canal, etc. The prior and convent to make two bridges over said water[course]. Lord John and his heirs to have the presentation of one canon in the congregation of the convent, for the salvation of their souls; provided that the manners (mores) of the person thus presented be first approved in the convent. Lord John accordingly presented a clerk of Sunnaghe, who was admitted as a canon. Witnesses, the Lord Thomas de Ledwitch, of Athleckagh; Richard Bocher.
V. Final concord, in the court of Lord Geoffrey de Genevile, at Trim, 2 Edw. I., before Ralph de Curtasse, steward, Ric. FitzJohn, Nich. Tayff, and their fellows, between Muriel, widow of William de Went, and Richard prior of Tristernaghe, concerning a carucate of land in Athlalichaneni.
VI. Release by Walter de Lacy (for the soul of himself, his wife and his ancestors,) to the prior and convent of Kilbixi, of the service they do for the land of Kenvard in Moybrekiny, to Lord Herbert de la Mare, for Thomas de Molendinis. Witnesses, Lord Nich. de Ebrit, Seneschal of Meath, Lord Henry de Werun, Lord Geoff. de Alleton, Lord Adam de Cusacke, Wm. de Poute, clerk. (No date.)
VII. Grant by Walter de Lacy (for the souls of himself, Margery de Lacy his wife, Gilbert de Lacy his son, and his ancestors,) to St. Mary's of Tristernagh and the canons there, of the lands called Rachin and Dunkywin, in Kenlis. Witnesses, Ric. de Tornera (Turner), Bp. of Meath, Nich. de Ebritis, seneschal of Meath, Adam de Cusacke, Geoffrey Alleton, Walter Little, Almaric de Lacy, Wm. de Ponte, clerk, notary. (No date.)
VIII. Confirmation by Walter de Lacy to the prior and convent of Kilbrixi, of all grants of lands, churches, liberties, etc. in his land of Meath, made or to be made to them. The said (sic) canons to have free buying and selling throughout the said land, "sine actione alicujus consuetudinis." Witnesses, Simon de Clifford, Walter FitzAlfred, Walter Little, Adam Fael. (No date.)
IX. Grant by the Lord John de Tuit to St. Mary's of Tristernagh and the canons there of a free conduit and watercourse from his mills of Sunnagh, through his land, by a large canal, to their own land. The prior and canons to make and maintain two bridges, according to a perambulation to be made, so that carts drawn by four or two horses, and waggons, may cross freely. Witnesses, Lord Richard de Tuit, Lord Adam de Ledwitch, Lord Herbert de la Mare, Lord Nicholas de Tuit, and many others. (No date.)
X. Grant by Lady Joan de Tuit (for the soul of her late husband, John de Tuit,) to the prior and convent of Tristernagh, of free common, for digging slates in her quarry of Corkri. Witnesses, Ralph Colmor, Nicholas Bennett, Peter Blund. (No date.)
Here end the collections out of the abbey-book of Tristernaghe.

List of extinct dukes, marquises, earls, viscounts, and barons in the Kingdom of Ireland, from Hen. II. to James I.  MS 608, f. 93b  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 93b

List of "earls, viscounts, and barons now living in Ireland, in annis 1616, 17, 18.  MS 608, f. 94b  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 94b

List of "barons or baronets in Ireland extinct, as they are found upon record, but when they had their beginning, it is uncertain."--(Loundres, Grant, Calfe, St. Ledger, Marward, Sarjant, Cusake, FitzOwen, Tirrell, Power, Misset.)  MS 608, f. 95  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 95

List of "barons or baronets remaining in Ireland in anno 1616.  MS 608, f. 95b  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 95b

List of barons, viscounts, and earls created by King James.  MS 608, f. 96  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 96

Commission for the survey of the rebels' lands in Ireland, [Calendared in Vol. II. p. 373.]  MS 608, f. 97  [-4] January 1583

Former reference: MS 608, f. 97

Commission to the Lord Deputy to take the surrenders of certain Irishmen, [Calendared in Vol. II. p. 408.]  MS 608, f. 98b  Nov 1585

Former reference: MS 608, f. 98b

A rate of the yearly charges of the King's army in Ireland, 34 Hen. VIII." [Calendared in Vol. I. p. 200, from another MS.]  MS 608, f. 99b  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 99b

An abridgement of an Act of Parliament made in the tenth year of Hen. VII. in Ireland;" being a general Act of resumption of all grants from the death of Edw. II. "Abridgement of another Act, dated 12 Edw. 4.  MS 608, f. 103  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 103

Contents:
There shall be from henceforth a fraternity of arms of thirteen persons of the most honourable and faithful disposed in the counties of Kildare, Dublin, Meath, and Louth, three of every of the said counties and four of the other; viz., for the county of Kildare, Thomas Earl of Kildare, Sir Rowland Eustace, Lord of Portelester; Sir Robert Eustace, knight; for the county of Dublin, Robert Lord of Houth, the Mayor of Dublin for the time being, Sir Robert Dowdall, knight; for the county of Meath, the Lord of Gormanston, Edward Pluncket, seneschal of Meath, Alexander Pluncket, Esq., and Barnaby Barnewall; for the county of Louth, the Mayor of Drogheda, Sir Lawrence Taffe, knight, and Richard Bellewe, Esq.; the which brethren and their successors shall yearly assemble at Dublin on St. George's day, and there chose one of them for to be captain for the next year; the which captain and brethren shall be created by the name of Captain and Brethren at Arms. The captain shall have at his commandment 120 archers on horseback, 40 horsemen, and 40 pages. The archers shall have per diem 6d. for meat, drink, and wages; the horsemen per diem 5d. for him and his page, and four marks wages. The captain and brethren and their successors shall have towards their [Sic.] and finding of the said men 12d. of every pound of all merchandizes sold in Ireland, at the sale and return, which come and go out of this land (hides except, and freemen of Dublin and Drogheda except); the mayor[s] of Dublin and Drogheda to be receivers of the same poundage. They shall have authority to make laws for the good governance, to elect a new brother in the place of any deceasing; which captain shall have authority to apprehend all persons which are or shall be outlawed rebels, or that will not be justified by the law.
The said two former Acts are written at large, and remain in the Parliament Rolls of the dates above written, in [the] Master of the Rolls' Office in the Castle of Dublin.

Feoffment made by Gerald Earl of Desmond to the Baron of Donboyne and others, [Calendared in Vol. I. p. 481.]  MS 608, f. 104  10 Sep 1574

Former reference: MS 608, f. 104

Acts not extant in the printed book." [Ibidem, p. 316.]  MS 608, f. 106  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 106

Creation of Pierce Butler as Earl of Ossory, [Ibidem, p. 37.]  MS 608, f. 121  1527

Former reference: MS 608, f. 121

Ceremony of creating Con O'Neal Earl of Tyrone, 1 Oct., 34 Hen. VIII.  MS 608, f. 123  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 123

Ceremonies at the creations of the Earls of Thomond and Clanrickard and the Baron of Ibrakan, 1 July, 35 Hen. VIII. [Nos. 140 and 141 have been calendared in Vol. I. pp. 199, 203.]  MS 608, f. 124  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 124

Restoration of the Earl of Kildare and his brothers and sisters to their blood, 11 Eliz. [Calendared in Vol. I. p. 400.]  MS 608, f. 125  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 125

Patent of creation of William Hervy, knight and baronet, as Baron Hervy, of Rosse in co. Wexford, in tail male of his son William Hervy, knight and baronet, Gorhambury, 5 Aug., 18 James I.  MS 608, f. 126b  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 126b

Creation of Maurice FitzThomas of Ireland as Earl of Desmond, in tail male, with all the royal liberties which he had in co. Kerry, except four pleas, viz., of burning, rape, forestalling, and treasure-trove; and also except profits of saffron ("croceis") in said county. Gloucester, 27 Aug., 3 Edw. III. Memoranda of the Exchequer, Mich. 3 Edw. III.  MS 608, f. 128b  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 608, f. 128b

The EARL OF SURREY, LORD DEPUTY.  MS 608, p. 68a  1520

Former reference: MS 608, p. 68a

1 Page.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 11.

Contents:
Anno 1520.--The Lord Thomas Howard, Earl of Surrey, at his going into Ireland to be the King's Lieutenant there, had no power to execute martial law or to make knights; which authority by petition was granted unto him, as appeareth by the King's letters, the words whereof" are given.
Copy.

EARL OF SURREY.  MS 608, p. 69a  1521

Former reference: MS 608, p. 69a

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 20.

Contents:
Anno 1521.--In a letter of Thomas Howard, Earl of Surrey, Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, unto King Hen. VIII., he nameth Preston Viscount of Gormanston; and, speaking of Barry and Roche, he omitted the title of Viscount, and styled them but Lords. This letter remaineth in the custody of Sir Robert Cotton.

EARL OF OSSORY.  MS 608, p. 121  22 Feb 1528

Former reference: MS 608, p. 121

4 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 28.

Contents:
The creation of the Lord Pierce Butler to be created Earl of Ossory, anno 1527, 19 H. 8.
The said Lord honorably accompanied, on Saturday 22 February, 19 Henry VIII., rode from London to Windsor Castle, where his lodging was prepared for him. "How be it, because that his coming thither was somewhat late, and also for that he was a little diseased, he remained for that night at his lodging in the town." On the morrow he went to his lodging in the Castle, "which was right honourably prepared for him, called the Lord Chamberlain's lodgings, near to the Chapel, where was made good fires in both chambers, and his breakfast was prepared for him and others that did accompany him, and there remained until a little time before that the King was going to his high mass; and somewhat before the King's coming forth, the said Lord well accompanied went unto the King's chamber, where he was honourably received of all the Lords there being present with others. And immediately after his obeisance done unto the King, he went before his Highness according to his room, to the King's closet, and there tarried until the sacring of high mass; and after the sacring was done, incontinent returned unto his chamber.
The Marquis of Exeter, the Earl of Oxenford, Great Chamberlain of England, and the Earl of Rutland went also to the said chamber, where they all put on their robes of estate. The Marquis of Exeter and the Earl of Oxenford led him; the Earl of Rutland bare the sword, the pommel upward; Sir Thomas Wriotesley, Garter, Principal King at Arms, bare the patent of his creation; and other officers of arms went before, and also certain gentlemen of the King's. The trumpets tarried at the King's great chamber door, the residue of the gentlemen entered into the chamber of estate, the King being under his cloth of estate, nobly accompanied. "And the third obeisance made, the said Sir Thomas Wriotesley, Garter, presented the letters patents of the said Lord unto the Earl of Oxenford, being Lord Chamberlain of England, which presented them to the King, and his Grace delivered the said patent to Doctor Sampson (Dean of the King's Chapel and of his college of Windsor) to read, which in an audible voice read it; and at the words of cincturam gladii the Earl of Rutland presented the sword to the King, and the King girt the said sword about him baudrewise, the said Lord kneeling and the other Lords standing; which act done, the King commanded the the new created Earl to rise and stand up; which done, the said Mr. Dean read out his patent and redelivered it to the King, and the King with good words gave it unto the said Earl of Ossory, which gave his Grace thanks for the great honour done unto him.
That done, the King departed to his chamber, and the said Earl, bearing his patent himself, led as before is said, the Earl of Rutland going on the left hand, and the Earl of Oxenford and all other officers and gentlemen, returned to his lodging in like manner as they went thither; the trumpets going before all blew till they came near to his chamber, and there stood apart, and blew continually till all the company was entered the said lodging. And when the said Earl of Ossory was entered into his chamber, Sir Thomas Wriotesley, Garter, took his patent of him for to have a copy thereof. And after the said new created Earl did off his sword and mantle, having his surcoat and hood upon him, the other Lords did off all their robes, and after went together to dinner; the Earl of Ossory kept the estate, and the other Lords sat according to their estates and ancientness, where they were right honorably served, and all at the King's charges. And the said Earl right honourably agreed with Sir Thomas Wriotesley, Garter, Principal King of Arms for his apparel, which is the fee accustomed of his office of Principal King of Arms, that is to say, --------. [Blank in MS.] And because the King kept no household, there was no largess proclaimed; how be it the King and the said Earl of Ossory gave unto the officers of arms their rewards. The King gave as he is accustomed, and the said Earl gave for his reward twenty nobles. The trumpets had for their reward 20l., which were but five in number.
The dinner done, the said new Earl did off his surcoat, and did on other apparel, and my Lord Marquis of Exeter took him by the arm and accompanied him to the King, where after certain communication he took his leave of the King and Queen, [and] my Lady Princess. My Lord the Viscount Rochford accompanied him to his chamber and divers other noblemen. And after that the waiters had dined, he sent to the gentleman usher Mr. Lye and to others that gave him attendance forty shillings for their rewards, and took his leave of them, and so returned to his lodging in the town; and on the [morrow?] rode to London, and there took his leave of my Lord Legate and Cardinal of York, and after returned to his country.
Copy. At the end: "This is a true copy of Sir Thomas Wriotesley's book, who was Garter, Principal King at Arms.

EARL OF OSSORY AND ORMOND.  MS 608, p. 69  1537

Former reference: MS 608, p. 69

1 Page.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 106.

Contents:
Thomas Bullen, Earl of Ormond, made a deed of gift unto Peers Butler (afterward Earl of Ossory and Ormond) of the manors of Tully Phelim and Arkeloe to him and his heirs, yielding unto the said Earl Thomas and his heirs the fourth part of all the profits growing out of them, the charges in keeping the same being defrayed; for the said manors had been intruded upon by the Irish for the space of 200 years, which the said Pearce Butler recovered from them, as appeareth in letters written by the said Pearce (and now remaining in Sir Robert Cotton's custody) to Mr. Cromwell, the King's secretary, and to the above-named Thomas Bullen, Earl of Ormond and Wiltshire. The rents of the said manors were paid to the Earl by the said Pearce Butler, and also he wrote to the said Earl to be his tenant of his manor of Carrick McGriffin.
Pearce Butler, afterward Earl of Ossory and Ormond, upon the death of Thomas Butler, late Earl of Ormond, was by office found to be next heir male to the said Earl, and thereupon sued out his livery and was styled Earl of Ormond, as well by the King's most gracious letters patents, as by his Grace's letters missives, and so reputed and accepted, and now Sir Thomas Bullen, Earl of Ormond and Wiltshire, is contented he be named Earl of Ormond in Ireland, semblably as the two Lords Dacres be named the one of the South, the other of the North. This is to be seen at large in Sir Robert Cotton's custody.

JAMES BOTTILLER, LATE BARON OF DUNBOYN  MS 608, p. 17a  3 Feb 1540

Former reference: MS 608, p. 17a

1 Page.
Language:  Latin

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 141.

Contents:
Inspeximus and exemplification by the King, at the request of Thomas Brokton, of an inquisition taken at Dunboyn before James Boyxe of Ballevollan, escheator of Meath, 25 Hen. VIII., whereby it was found that James Bottiller, knight, late Baron of Dunboyn, died seized of the manors of Dunboyn and Moymett, Meath; and that the same James on the 20th May, 24 Hen. VIII., leased to Walter Brokton, of Grang[e], the town of Begistowne, parcel of the said manor (sic), for 20 years. Witness, Patrick Whyte, Secondary Baron of the Exchequer of Ireland, at Dublin, 3 February, 31 Hen. VIII. Examined by William Golding and Patrick Mole, clerks.
Copy.

HENRY VIII. to the SHERIFF OF SOUTHAMPTON.  MS 608, p. 73  19 Nov 1540

Former reference: MS 608, p. 73

2 Pages.
Language:  English and Latin

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 151.

Contents:
We command you to cause public proclamation to be made in all places within your bailwick, that whereas the King has for a long time maintained a great army in Ireland, as well for the conservation and defence of the said land as for the annoyance of his enemies, and has, for the relief of the said army and of his subjects, ordered a coin of money, as well groats as pence of twopence, to be current only within Ireland, "bearing the print of the Harp of the one side thereof;" and divers persons have lately transported and brought the said coin out of Ireland, and uttered the same in England: the King straightly commands that no person shall from henceforth bring out of Ireland any of the said coin of groats or pence of twopence, or utter the same in England, Wales, Berwick, Calais, or the Marches of the same, upon pain of forfeiting the treble value of the said coin, and of being imprisoned and fined.
Westminster, 19 November 32 Hen. VIII.
Copy.

Creation of CON O'NEALE EARL OF TYRONE.  MS 608, p. 123  1 Oct 1542

Former reference: MS 608, p. 123

1 Page.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 174.

Contents:
Sunday, 1 October 34 Hen. VIII., at the manor of Greenwich, Con O'Neale was created Earl of Tyrone, in manner and form following.
The Queen's closet at Greenwich was richly hanged with cloth of arras, and well strewed with rushes, and after the sacring of the high mass, these Earls (sic) in company went to the said closet, and there put on their robes of estate. And immediately after the King's Majesty, being under the cloth of estate, accompanied with all his noblemen, councillors, and others, came in the Earl, led between the Earl of Oxenford and the Earl of Hertford, the Viscount Lisle bearing before him his sword, the hilts upwards, Garter before him, bearing his letters patents; and so proceeded to the King's Majesty, who received of Garter the letters patents, and took them to Mr. Wriotesley, Secretary, to read them openly. And when he came to centuriam [Sic. Error for cincturam.] gladii, the Viscount Lisle presented unto the King the sword, and the King girt the said sword about the said Earl baudrickwise, the foresaid Earl kneeling, and the other Lords standing that led him. And so the patent read out, the King's Highness took him his letters patents, and he gave him thanks in his language, and a priest made answer of his saying in English; and there the King made two of the men that came with him knights. And so the Earls in order aforesaid took their leave of the King's Highness, and departed unto the place appointed for their dinners, the Earl of Tyrone bearing his letters patents himself, the trumpets blowing before him unto the chamber, which was the Lord Great Master's under the King's lodging. And so they sat at dinner. At the second course Garter proclaimed the King's style, and after the said new Earl's in manner following: Du treshaut et puissant Seigneur Con, Conte de Tyrone, en la Royaulme d'Irlande. He gave unto Garter for the fine of his gown 20 angels, and to the whole office of Arms, 10l., and so to the trumpets 40s., and other officers were honorably rewarded, according to the old and ancient custom.
Copy.

REVENUES of IRELAND  MS 608, p. 99a  1542

Former reference: MS 608, p. 99a

7 Pages.

Contents:
Copy of MS 602, p. 144. Also dated 34 Hen. VIII.

CREATIONS.  MS 608, p. 124  1 July 1543

Former reference: MS 608, p. 124

2 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 178.


Related information: This document is printed in "State Papers," III. 473, from a paper in the British Museum, Cott. MSS. Titus, B. XI. f. 388.

Contents:
On Sunday, 1 July 35 Hen. VIII., at Greenwich, Moroghe O'Brien was created Earl of Thomond, William Burgh Earl of Clanrickard, and Donoghe O'Brien Baron of Ibrakan, in manner and form following.
The Queen's closet at Greenwitche was richly hanged with cloth of arras and well strewed with rushes. And after the King's Majesty was come into his closet to hear high mass, these Earls and the Baron aforesaid in company went to the Queen's closet, and there, after sacring of high mass, put on their robes of estate. And immediately after the King's Majesty, being under the cloth of estate with all his noble Council, with other noble persons of his realm, as well spiritual as temporal, to a great number, and the ambassadors of Scotland, the Earl of Glankerne, Sir George Douglas, Sir William Hamelton, Sir James Heyremouthe, and the Secretary of Scotland, came in; the Earl of Themond led between the Earl of Derby and the Earl of Ormond, the Viscount Lisle bearing before him his sword, the hilts upwards, Garter before him bearing his letters patents, and so proceeded to the King's Majesty. And Garter delivered the said letters patents to the Lord Chamberlain, and the Lord Chamberlain delivered them to the Great Chamberlain, and the Lord Great Chamberlain to the King's Majesty, who took them to Mr. Wriotesley, Secretary, to read the[m] openly. And when he came to cincturam gladii, the Viscount Lisle presented to the King the sword, and the King girt the said sword about the Earl baudrickwise, the foresaid Earl kneeling, and the other Lords standing that led him. And so the patent read out, the second Earl, being brought into the King's Majesty's presence by the two Earls aforesaid, was created there in everything according to the ceremony of the first Earl. That done, came into the King's presence the Baron in his kirtell, led between two Barons, the Lord Cobham and the Lord Clinton, the Lord Mountjoy bearing before him his robe, Garter before him bearing his letters patents in manner aforesaid, who then proceeded to the King's Majesty, and his Highness received the letters patents in manner aforesaid, and took them to Mr. Paget, Secretary, to read them openly; and when he came to Investimus, he put on his robe, and so the patent read out, the King's Majesty put about every one of their necks a chain of gold with a cross hanging at it, and took them their letters patents, and they gave thanks unto him. And there the King's Majesty made five of the men that came with them knights. And so the Earls and the Baron in order took their leave of the King's Highness, and were conveyed, bearing their letters patents in their hands, to the Council chamber, underneath the King's chamber, appointed for their dining place, in order as hereafter followeth: the trumpets blowing before them, the officers of arms, the Earl of Thomond led between the Earl of Derby and the Viscount Lisle, the Earl of Clanrickard led between the Earl of Ormond and the Lord Cobham, the Baron of Ibrackan led between the Lord Clinton and the Lord Mountjoye, and thus brought to the dining place. After the second course, Garter proclaimed their styles in manner following:
Du treshault et puissant Seigneur Moroghe O'Brien, Conte de Thomond, Seigr. d'Insecoyne, du Royaulme d'Irlande.
Du treshaut et puissant Seigr. Guileaume Burgh, Conte de Clanrickard, Seigr. de Donkelli, du Royaume d'Irland.
Du noble Seigr. Donoghe O'Brien, Seigr. d'Ibrackan, du Royaume d'Irlande.
The King's Majesty gave them their robes of estate and all things belonging thereunto, and paid all manner of duties belonging to the same.
Copy.

EARL OF KILDARE.  MS 608, p. 27a  13 May 1553

Former reference: MS 608, p. 27a

1 Page.
Language:  Latin

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 203.

Contents:
Creation of Gerald FitzGerald as Earl of Kildare and Baron of Ophaly, in tail male, with an annuity of 20l. from the custom in the port of Dublin.--Westminster, 13 May 1 Mary.
Copy.

SHANE O'NEILE  MS 608, p. 83  1562

Former reference: MS 608, p. 83

2 Pages.

Contents:
Copy of MS 614, p. 178

ACTS NOT EXTANT IN THE PRINTED BOOK.  MS 608, p. 106a  1562

Former reference: MS 608, p. 106a

28 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 234.

Contents:
18 Hen. VI.--Abridgment of statutes established in a Parliament held at Dublin before Richard [Talbot,] Archbishop of Dublin.
Cap. 13. That none of the King's liege people shall bring any "creaghes," that is to say, horses, oxen, kine, veals, porks, sheep, goats, &c., out of the march ground into the peaceful ground or pale called Magherie, without the King's licence, and the licence of the lords of the lands within the same peaceful ground or English pale, whether it be in time of war or peace.
Cap. 14. "Certain amercements assessed and discharged in the Exchequer upon the commons of the county of Dublin for not answering of carriages to a journey.
3 Edw. IV.--Parliament at Waxford by Thomas Earl of Desmond, Deputy to George Duke of Clarence, Lieutenant of Ireland.
Cap. 45. That one common share shall be levied in all the towns of the county of Wexford, and spent upon the common walls of the town of Wexford, where the sovereign of the town for the time being, by the advice of the wisest men of the town, will think best. If any man do contradict it, to forfeit 40s., to be bestowed upon the said walls.
5 Edw. IV.--Parliament at Tryme, before Thomas Earl of Desmond, Deputy to George Duke of Clarence.
Cap. 4. That none should lade any wheat or other corn with purpose to transport the same, after the peck of wheat exceeds the price of 12d., and of other corn 8d. The offender to forfeit his corn, the one half to the King and the other to the seizer.
Cap. 45. Authority given to the Primate of Ardmaghe, being justice of peace in the county of Louthe, to make deputy or deputies under him.
Cap. 47. 10l. granted upon the county of Kildare for the edifying of the castle of the Norraghe by Wellesley, Baron of the Norraghe.
10 Edw. IV.--Parliament at Dublin, before Thomas Fitz Maurice, Earl of Kildare, Deputy to George Duke of Clarence.
Cap. 34. Molaghidert and Cloneshallagh, within the county of Dublin, to be cessed in the subsidy after the rate of one carrucat of land.
11 Edw. IV.--Parliament at Dublin, before, ut supra.
Cap. 59. That no manner of possessor, master, purser, or mariner of any ship or boat shall take for freight of a horse betwixt Ireland and England, or Ireland and Wales, but 5s.; for a runlet but 12d.; or for a hawk but 12d. Any offender to incur the penalty of 100s., one half to the King and the other to the person grieved.
Cap. 61. The office and seneschalship of Methe granted to Robert Bolde, Lord of Ratothe, for life; "and that he might grant a deputation under him.
12 Edw. IV.--Parliament at Dublin, before, ut supra.
Cap. 4. The liberty of Methe, with the officers of the same, dissolved.
Cap. 5. The Baron of Slane made sheriff of the county of Methe for one year, with 20l.
Cap. 6. John Cornwallis, Chief Baron of the Exchequer, deprived of his office.
Cap. 8. Assignments made by the Treasurer of Ireland for payments of judges' fees to be good and effectual.
Cap. 12. John Dawson, farmer of the parsonage of Athboy, to pay 20l. to the Bishop of Methe for a recovery had by him against the Primate of Ardmaghe for certain duties and expenses due to him upon the said parsonage, "and adjudged by authority of delegacy.
Cap. 13. Letters patents of the Chancellorship or Keeper of the Great Seal sent to Rowland FitzEustace, Lord of Portlester, and John Campton, clerk, for term of their two lives, ratified and confirmed.
Cap. 18. That the Baron of Slane might lawfully re-enter into the messuages, tenement[s], lands, rents, and services, with their appurtenances, in the granges by Collmollen, Salvadgstowne and Gormanstowne in the barony of Slane.
Cap. 24. That if any persons carry hides or any other staple ware out of Ulster into Scotland, not paying the customs, the same to be forfeited, or the value of them; and for that the King's writs pass not current in Ulster, the Justices of the King's Bench shall have power to inquire, by twelve men of the next county adjoining to Ulster, of all persons which carried hides into Scotland not customed, and all process upon their presentments to be executed by the sheriff of the county adjoining.
Cap. 26. Licence to the Mayor of Droghedagh to go on pilgrimage to St. James. [St. James of Compostella, in Galicia. There is below a similar licence to the Mayor and Bailiffs of Waterford, in the 1st year of Richard III.]
Cap. 27. Harriestowne in the county of Kildare discharged of subsidies.
Cap. 33. For the appearance of the Bishop of Kildare.
Cap. 35. "Kilbride, Kellestowne, Robertstowne, &c., of the lands of Robert Rocheford made free.
Cap. 37. For the appearance of the Prior of Kilmaynham at a certain day.
Cap. 38. That Richard Caddle might re-enter into Daviestowne in the county of Methe.
12 Edw. IV.--Parliament at Dublin, before, ut supra.
Cap. 43. The liberty of Methe revived, and the act for repealing the same repealed.
Cap. 44. For payments and services to the landlords upon the Marches.
Cap. 45. That every merchant bringing ware out of England into Ireland to the value of 100l. shall bring into the realm bows to the value of 100s., "and after that rate over or under unto the sum of 20l. The merchant offending shall lose and pay the value of the bows which he ought to bring, the one moiety to the King and the other to the searcher.
Cap. 47. That no person lade any grain out of this land if the peck exceed 10d., upon pain of forfeiture of the grain and of the ship.
Cap. 48. Liberty granted to the merchant[s] of Ireland to pass and repass into England without stay.
Cap. 49. The Earl of Kildare to have the Earl of Ulster's goods.
Cap. 50. The Prior of Kilmaynham discharged of subsidies.
Cap. 53. For the stopping of a highway by Sigeneston.
Cap. 54. Oliver Pluckenet discharged of 5 marks yearly, with a pardon for certain debts.
Cap. 60. Certain archers appointed for the defence of the country.
Cap. 61. John Cornwallis, Chief Baron of the Exchequer, restored to his office, grants, and goods.
Cap. 62. Order taken for the defence of the county of Dublin.
Cap. 66. Certain lands and tenements in Rathbeggan, which were seized into the King's hands by virtue of an inquisition, restored to John Fiant.
Cap. 67. Huntstowne, in the county of Louth, assured to Rich. Gouldinge of Tippersoule.
Cap. 69. That all the lands and tenements in Ballabrenne, Balgeth, Ballinekerie, and Cappagh be not cessed but after the rate of a carue of land, which was done at the request of Maurice Bourghell and Margaret his wife, and Thomas Dowdall and Elizabeth his wife.
Cap. 73. An Act for the appearance of Robert Barnwell, Lord of Trimletiston, made void.
Cap. 76. For the building of the burgages in the town of Ratothe, out of the which eight marks was accustomed to be paid to the lord of the town for the chief rent.
Cap. 77. "For choosing of proctors to the chapel of St. Macheline in the parish of Holliwood, within the towns of Grallaghe and Curraghe, for ever, with licence to purchase 10 marks and one carue of land in Mallahow given unto the same.
14 Edw. IV.--In a Parliament holden at Dublin before William [Shirwood], Bishop of Methe, Deputy to George Duke of Clarence.
Cap. 8. "For that divers take pledges and the same detain and convert to their own use; whosoever from henceforth shall take pledges contrary to the common law shall be adjudged a felon, and the lands and goods to be forfeited, unless that he from whom the said pledges be taken be not amenable to the common law.
16 Edw. IV.--Parliament at Dublin before, ut supra.
Cap. 1. "After the death of any archbishops or bishops the guardian or guardians of the spiritualities of the same shall have the keeping of the manse[s] with their demesnes, and all other the commodities within the same, the which of ancient time have been occupied and tilled by the said archbishops, for the reparation of the said manses, during the time of vacation, and thereof shall yield accoumpt to the successor.
Cap. 2. "If any person sue to the court of Rome any bulls or apostiles against any person of the Holy Church for any benefice, that as well he that sues the same as he in whose name it is sued, so soon as they or any of them publish the said bulls, or attempt to put them in execution, to the hurt of any incumbent, their counsellors, maintainers, proctors, delegates, and judges, be traitors, and incur all penalties in the statutes of provision, and that all men may them arrest and put to the gaol, no pardon or release to show; saving to all men the benefit of appeals.
Cap. 3. "Every freeman and citizen of the city of Dublin impeached or appealed of felony or treason shall be delivered out of gaol upon mainprise, and put to their acquittal and purgation by 24 free men, residents of the said city, before the Mayor and one of the King's judges. This Act shall not be beneficial to Sir James Keatinge, Prior of Kilmaynham.
Cap. 10. The lands manured by John Newterville, of Bellgard, are made free of subsidies and tallage.
Cap. 5. "Where the county of Louth, alias Uriell, hath been extended to 360 plowlands, and have been charged accordingly, certain persons are appointed, whereof the Abbot of St. Mary Abbey by Dublin, Sir Thomas Bathe, knight, Lord Baron of Louthe, be of the quorum, to extend the said shire, and make it to be but 30 plowlands, and the said extent so made to return into the Chancery, there to remain of record; according which new extent the said shire to be from henceforth taxed, and all old extents are made frustrate and void.
Cap. 11. The lords spiritual and temporal sitting in Parliament shall wear their robes, upon pain that every lord shall forfeit 100s. The judges and barons of the Exchequer also shall wear their habits in term time, as judges do in England.
Cap. 12. It is ordered that the barony of Delvin shall be in extent but six plowlands.
Cap. 22. The King granted to the Primate of Ardmaghe the temporalities of the same bishopric (being in his hands) by his letters patents, which are now confirmed.
Cap. 23. "Certain soldiers being waged by the Lord of Gormanstowne, whose wages amounted unto 360l., is unpaid, and therefore a certain subsidy is granted by the spirituality.
Cap. 17. If any person of Irish name, not sufficient or amenable to the common law, commit any offence to any of the King's subjects, it shall be lawful to him and his aiders to arrest and take such Irish persons as shall be sufficient, being of the nation of him which committed the offence, and to retain them with their goods and chattels until they and the remnant of the same nation make amends, according to the discretion of the Governor and Council.
Cap. 26. The Mayor and Common Council of the city of Waterford shall from henceforth elect the sheriff of the county of Waterford.
18 Edw. IV.--Parliament at Droghedagh before Henry Lord Grey, Deputy to the said King's son, -----, [Blank in MS.] Lord Lieutenant of Ireland.
Cap. 5. That the Parliament holden before Gerret, Earl of Kildare, pretending to be Lord Justice of Ireland, at the Naas, the Friday next before the Feast of St. Petronell last, there begun and divers times adjourned, and all the statutes therein enacted, be utterly void.
The rest of the Acts passed in that Parliament were private.
20 Edw. IV.--Parliament at the Naas, and from thence adjourned to Dublin, before -----, [Blank in MS.] Lord Deputy of Ireland.
Cap. 8. Henry O'Neale was made denizen, and his son Con O'Neale by consent in Parliament married to Elinor daughter to Thomas late Earl of Kildare, and their issue was made English to all purposes.
Eodem anno, at Dublin.
Cap. 1. [This Act is printed in "Statutes at Large," vol. 1. p.40.] "Every merchant that taketh any hawks out of this realm shall pay for every goshawk 13s. 4d., for every tassell 6s. 8d., for every falcon 10s. custom, upon pain to forfeit 20s. every time they do the contrary.
Cap. 3. That no English merchant carry any goods or merchandise to any of the merchants of Cavan, Grenard, Longford, or any Irish country out of the English pale, or bring any goods from the said marches, upon pain to forfeit the same goods, and their bodies to be at the King's pleasure. It shall be lawful to any of the King's subjects to arrest and attach such as attempt to do the contrary, and to commit them to gaol. One moiety of the goods forfeited to be the King's, the other his that makes the seizure; wine, ale, and bread excepted.
3 Edw. IV.--Parliament at Wexford before Thomas Earl of Desmond, Deputy to George Duke of Clarence.
Cap. 40. That the Baron of Delvin might call before him one man out of every house four times by the year, which were dwelling or residing within the said barony, to make fortresses for the defence thereof. "This act should have been placed in anno 3 Edw. IV.
1 Ric. III.--Parliament at Dublin before Gerald Earl of Kildare, Deputy to Edward, the said King's eldest son, and Lord Lieutenant of Ireland.
Cap. 1. An aid of labourers given out of the baronies of Castleknock, Dounboyne, and Ratothe, for trenching and fortifying at the manor of Kildare.
Cap. 2. That the Earl of Kildare and his heirs shall have a market in the town of Mynouth every Thursday, and a free warren within the whole manor of Maynouthe.
Cap. 23. "A revocation under the Great Seal of this land, being counterfeited by James Collin, clerk, and that he shall appear before the Justices of the Common Pleas at a certain day, if not to for (sic) judged out of the King's courts of Ireland.
Cap. 24. A licence to the mayor and bailiffs of Waterford to go in pilgrimage to St. James in Spain, and to make deputies in their offices during their absencies.
Cap. 26. That the sovereign, portrive, burgesses, and commons of the town of Rosse may pursue such Irish enemies and English rebels, as do rob and spoil them of their goods, into the countries where the same be succoured, and take from them so much goods as shall amount to the value of the goods taken from them, and retain the same till restitution be made. Also, that no person of that town, having freehold within the said town or fringes thereof, shall sell or mortgage their freeholds to any foreign person without the licence and assent of the sovereign, portriff, and council of the same town.
2 Ric. III.--Parliament at Dublin before Gerald Earl of Kildare, Deputy to John Earl of Lincoln, Lieutenant of Ireland.
There were only six private acts.
Eodem anno, at Trimme.
Cap. 1. The foundation of a chantry at Dundalke.
Cap. 2. John, late Archbishop of Dublin, assured of the manor of Swordes for his life, in consideration he surrendered the same bishopric to Walter Fitz Symons.
Cap. 5. The manor of Killroo to be held of the manor of Ratothe.
Eodem anno, at Dublin.
Cap. 1. A subsidy of 13s. 4d. granted upon every plowland to the Deputy towards his charges in service; and that O'Connor should have 3s. 4d. of every plowland in Meath, as reward for his service done to the King in the wars of this land.
8 Hen. VII.--Parliament at Dublin before Walter Fitz Symons, Archbishop of Dublin, Deputy to Jasper, Duke of Bedford, Lieutenant of Ireland.
Cap. 2. That the Archbishop of Dublin and his successors may lawfully confer and present clerks of Irish nation to such benefices as be of his patronage amongst the Irish enemies, upon every avoidance of the same benefice[s].
Cap. 12. That Edward Birmingham, gent., shall enjoy the office of chief serjeant in the county of Meath to him and his heirs for ever.
Cap.--. A general resumption of all grants, farms, licences, &c. made since 1 Hen. VI., with divers provisoes, one of which is for Edward Birmingham, chief serjeant of Meath, and his heirs.
Cap.--. A grant made to the Prior of Holmpatricke and his successors of poundage for vessels coming to the pill or creek of Skirries.
10 Hen. VII.-- Parliament at Droghedagh, before Sir Edward Poynings, Lord Deputy.
Cap. 1. That Holy Church be free, and have and enjoy the liberties, franchises, and privileges thereof.
Cap. 2. That this land of Ireland have and enjoy the liberties and franchises thereof.
Cap. 3. That Dublin, Waterford, Droghedagh, and all other cities and towns within the realm have and enjoy their liberties and franchises.
Cap. 4. That the King shall have yearly of every 120 acres arable land of temporal possession occupied and manured 26s. 8d., provided that the Lieutenant and Deputy with the Council "shall have authority to add, in their discretions, more acres of land unto such 120 acres, as are not fertile, whereof any acre exceed not 2d., that the value of such acres of arable being of small value, be made equal to the 120 acres which is good and fertile.
Cap. 8. "That the King shall have 12d. of every pound of merchandise brought into this land, as well by strangers as by denizens, from any parts beyond the sea, hides and wine excepted; and also the freemen of Dublin, Droghedagh, and the Mayor and commons of Waterford; and a repeal of all grant[s] to all persons of any poundage to this time.
Cap. 11. That there be resumed into the King's hands all lands, castles, rents, customs, &c., whereof the King or any of his noble progenitors was at any time seized in fee simple or fee tail from the last day of the reign of King Edward II. to this present Act; and that all those granted for term of life or term of years be void in law. Nevertheless there were these provisions ensuing; viz., for the Prior and convent of Christ's Church in Dublin; for the Prior of Langthony in England; for Sir James Ormond; for the sovereigns, port-rives, burgesses, and commons of the town of Kells in Meath; for Walter FitzSymons, Archbishop of Dublin; for Thomas Earl of Ormond; for the corporation of Dundalke; for the Lord of Dunboyne; for the Dean and chapter of the cathedral church of the Trinity in the city of Waterford; for the corporation of Waterford.
10 Hen. VII.--"A note of certain schedules fastened to the Roll.
Provisions for the Act of Resumption before specified for William Darcy of Rathway; William Darcy of Rathwyer; Sir Peter Talbot of Mallahide; the Choral Vicars of St. Patrick's, Dublin; Gerald FitzGerald, Earl of Kildare; the Mayor and Commons of Dublin; our Lady Abbey of Trimme; the corporation of Droghedaghe; Rowland FitzEustace, Lord of Portlester.
10 Henry VII., before, ut supra.
Cap.--. That upon the death of the Deputy or Lieutenant of this land, or upon surrender of their authorities, the Treasurer of Ireland shall be Justice or Governor of the realm, till the King do otherwise determine for the rule thereof.
Cap. 14. "An Act for the cancelling and revocation of all records, process, pardons, or any such done in the name of the pretended King lately crowned in Ireland. Whosoever the[y] be do receive the above-named ordinance, conceal or keep the same, they so doing after the proclamation, shall be adjudged traitors attainted.
Cap. 15. That he that shall be Prior of St. John's of Jerusalem in Ireland, shall be of English blood, and such a one as shall have livelihood by the religion within England.
Cap. 16. A resumption of all grants made by Sir James Keatinge, late Prior of St. John's of Jerusalem in Ireland, or by any of his predecessors.
Cap. 17. An order for restitution of certain reliques pledged and sold by Sir James Keatinge, pretensed Lord of St. John's, and other his predecessors.
Cap. 18. An order against certain commanders made by Sir James Keatinge.
Cap. 24. That the Earl of Kildare, Sir James of Ormond, and all persons adherent to them shall be clearly acquitted of any action, vexation, or trouble of any person for murder, robbery, or any offence done in their quarters.
Cap. 26. That whensoever this land shall fortune to be void of a Governor, the Treasurer shall be Justice and Governor, till the King do send his Lieutenant or Deputy.
Cap. 27. "A repeal of all annuities, fees, [and] leases granted to [Qu. mistake for by? See Caps. 43, 44, and 45.] any subject spiritual or temporal to any manner of person within this land, out of their lands upon the marches and borders," from 1 Edward IV.
Cap. 31. A confirmation of an Act against Lollards and heretics.
Cap. 33. That the Chancellor shall have authority to continue, adjourn, prorogue, and dissolve this Parliament in the absence of the Lord Deputy, and shall have like authority for all things to be done therein, as if the Lord Deputy were present.
Cap. 34. An order for making of ditches in the marches of the four shires of Dublin, Kildare, Meath, and Uriell, and for the continuance of the same.
Cap. 41. An attainder of the Earl of Kildare for high treason.
Cap. 42. An attainder of James FitzThomas and others named in the bill of high treason.
Cap. 43. An order for examination of alienations, grants, leases, and other writings made by prelates and other of the clergy and by religious persons, and for judgment to be given thereupon.
Cap. 44. An authority given to the Chancellor for examinations of pensions and annuities lately granted by men of the church, by compulsion, fear, or menace, and for the cancelling and damning of the same.
Cap. 45. An act for the restitution of lands and possessions to monasteries and houses of religion, which were extorted, taken away, and withheld from them.
Cap. 46. An order for payment of 454l. to Thomas Garthe, Esquire, for certain soldiers retained by him for the defence of the King's subjects.
Cap. 47. A repeal of pensions, fees, grants, and leases made by the Bishops of Ardmagh and Dublin, and the Archdeacon of Methe to the Earl of Kildare and others named in the bill.
Cap. 48. A resumption and revocation of all alienations, feofments, grants, leases, and confirmations made of any lands, tenements, or hereditaments belonging to the house of St. John's beside Waterford, from 9 Hen. VI.
Cap. 49. "An order for Richard Arnold of Dublin to have a quare impedit for a disturbance made to him in a presentation made to the vicarage of St. David's in the Naas, by reason of a grant in the next avoidance made to him by the House of St. John's Jerusalem in Ireland; and that in the same quare impedit, the incumbent or other defendant shall not aver that the church was full six months before the writ sued.
24 Hen. VII.--Parliament at Dublin before Gerald, Earl of Kildare, Deputy to the King's Lieutenant in Ireland.
Cap. 1. That Holy Church be free and have and enjoy the liberties thereof.
Cap. 2. That the land of Ireland have and enjoy the liberties and franchises thereof.
Cap. 3. A grant of a subsidy of 13s. 4d. of every plowland manured and occupied, during 10 years.
28 Hen. VIII.--Parliament at Dublin before Leonard Lord Grey, Deputy to Henry, Duke of Richmond and Somerset, Lieutenant of Ireland.
Cap. 6. A revocation of an Act made 7 Edw. IV. for the the legitimation of Edmund and Theobald Butler, sons to James Butler, with a proviso.
Cap. 9. That no offender in any kind of high treason shall have the benefit of sanctuary, and that treasons practised out of the realm shall be inquired and presented by 12 men.
Cap. 24. That the liberty of the county of Waxford shall be continued and put in execution in like manner and in the same strength and effect as George the now Earl of Shrewsbury had since the first grant of the said liberty.
Cap. 25. That the King and his successors shall enjoy a yearly rent or pension of the 20th part of all revenues appertaining to the clergy.
Cap. 27. That the King and his heirs shall have and enjoy the monasteries and religious houses of the Becty, St. Peter's beside Trim, Douske, Duleeke, Holmepatrick, Baltinglas, Tagmollin, &c.
Cap. 32. That the liberties, jurisdictions, customs, and commodities be granted to the burgesses and inhabitants of Waxford, as they were granted by the late lords of the liberties, and as they came to the King's hands.
Cap. 35. An Act for confirmation of pardons granted by the Lord Deputy or the King's Commissioners.
Cap. 41. An Act declaring the meaning of the Parliament touching a subsidy granted to the King of 13s. 4d. upon every plowland yearly, leviable and payable at Michaelmas and not at Easter.
Cap. 42. The orders taken by the Commissioners and others, by force of the Act written in the 39th chapter of this Parliament.
33 Hen. VIII.--Parliament at Dublin before Sir Anthony St. Ledger, Lord Deputy.
Cap. 6. [Printed in "Statutes at Large," MS I. p. 193.] That St. Ledger and others "shall have full power to erect and interprelate one vicarage of one vicar in every parish church," reserving the 20th part and first fruits.
Cap. 10. "That every person taking distress for rents shall not sever them into several pounds or places, but shall keep them in one town till they be repleved.
Cap. 14. [Printed in "Statutes at Large," MS I. p. 195.] A confirmation of an Act made in England, 21 Hen. VIII., how impotent persons should be relieved and vagabonds punished.
33 Hen. VIII.--Session at Limericke, before, ut supra.
Cap. 6. "That rents, services and rents sects going of lands, while they be in the King's hands, be paid by way of reward out of the Exchequer.
Also, that leases or grants made by any of the late governors within two years next before the dissolution of the abbeys, shall be void and of none effect.
Also, that leases made in reversion within two years before the dissolution of the religious houses, for or above the number of 24 years, shall be good only for the term of 24 years.
In the said Act there were sundry other provisions, as for the avoiding of leases and grants made or to be made by any abbot, prior, &c., as also a confirmation of exchanges, bargains, and purchases since the 4th of February to the King in the 27th year of his reign, &c.; and further that all letters patents [and] writings made under the Great Seal of Ireland, by the King's warrant under his hand or Privy Seal, or under his Great Seal of England, of any manors, castles, &c. shall be good and effectual in law.
Note, that this Act, with many other clauses, is in the printed book at large.
34 Hen. VIII.--At Dublin, before, ut supra.
Cap. 1. A grant of a subsidy of 13s. 4d. throughout the land to the King, for the term of 10 years.
Cap. 3. That every plowland within the counties of Meath and West Meath used to be charged with subsidy, and not free from impositions, shall be, during the time of four years, charged with the sum of 3s. 4d. towards the building of the walls of the town of Navan.
35 Hen. VIII.--At Dublin, before, ut supra.
Cap. 1. That James, Earl of Ormond, son and heir to Peter, late Earl of Ormond, and the heirs male of the body of the said Peter, shall have and enjoy the name of Earl of Ormond, and a yearly annuity of 10l. from the fee-farm of Waterford.
3 and 4 Philip and Mary.--Parliament at Dublin, before Thomas, Earl of Sussex, Lord Deputy.
Cap. 1. [Printed in "Statutes at Large."] An Act declaring the Queen to have been born in just and lawful matrimony, and repealing all Acts of Parliament and sentences to the contrary.
Cap. 2. [Printed in "Statutes at Large."] An Act declaring that the regal power of the realm is in the Queen, as absolutely as ever it was in any of her progenitors, Kings of Ireland.
Cap. 3. [Printed in "Statutes at Large."] An Act whereby certain offences be made treason, and also touching and concerning the King's and Queen's issue, agreeable with the statute of England with the same title.
Cap 4. [Printed in "Statutes at Large."] An Act for reviving three statutes made for the punishment of heresy, agreeable to the statute of England.
Cap. 5. [Printed in "Statutes at Large."] An Act repealing statutes and provisions made against the See Apostolic of Rome since 20 Hen. VIII., and for the establishment of all spiritual and ecclesiastical possessions and hereditaments granted and conveyed to the laity.
Cap. 6. [Printed in "Statutes at Large."] A grant of subsidy of 13s. 4d. upon every plowland, &c., from 30th September 1556, to the end of 10 years then next ensuing.
Cap. 10. "An Act for revocation of bargains and sales, alienations, discontinuance, and grants of leases, and demises made or suffered to be made by George Browne, late Archbishop of Dublin, and for restitution to the late Archbishop of Dublin of all such lands and tenements as are at this present wrongfully and by strong hand, usurpation, fraud, or any other unlawful way taken, kept, or held by any wild Irishman or rebel.
Cap. 12. [Printed in "Statutes at Large."] An Act for the discharge of first fruits.
2 Elizabeth.--Parliament at Dublin before Thomas, Earl of Sussex, Lord Deputy.
Cap. 8. That James Barnwell of Brymore and Margaret his wife, and [the] heirs of Margaret, shall have the tithe fish within the road of Brymore, towards the building of a quay or harbour and fisher town in the same road, paying to the vicar of Balrudery and his successors, when the said building is finished, a yearly rent of 6s. 8d., and the vicar and his successors to have power to distrain for the same rent upon the manor of Brymore, and upon any part thereof, or sue for the same by action of debt at their pleasure.
Cap. 9. Proclamation to be made, that Sir Oswald Massinberd, the pretensed Prior of St. John's of Jerusalem, should appear by a day, &c., otherwise to be adjudged and taken as a traitor.
Copy.

THE FITZGERALDS.  MS 608, p. 125  1569

Former reference: MS 608, p. 125

3 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 269.

Contents:
A restoration of the Earl of Kildare, his brother and sisters, to their blood, anno 11 Reginæ Eliz.
Petition of Gerald FitzGerald now Earl of Kildare, Edward FitzGerald, brother to the said Earl, Margaret, Elizabeth and Cicely, sisters to the said Earl; to the Queen.
At a Parliament holden at Dublin, 28 Hen. VIII., before Lord Leonard Grey, then Lord Deputy, Gerald FitzGerald, late Earl of Kildare, father to your suppliant, and Thomas FitzGerald, son and heir to the said Earl, and elder brother to your suppliant, were attainted of high treason, by force of which act your suppliants are corrupted in their blood and lineage, and disabled to claim anything by descent from their said father and brother, or from any other collateral ancestors or cousins. After the said attainder your suppliant, the now Earl, being an infant and put in fear, travelled in the countries of strange and foreign potentates, till he was called home by King Edward VI., who restored him to the greatest part of his father's lands; and afterwards Queen Mary gave your suppliant the title of Earl of Kildare. Of late, moreover, your Highness has restored your suppliant to a portion of his living which hitherto was thought to hang in some doubt. But your suppliant finds in himself a great defect, for that he is not restored to his blood. He therefore beseeches your Majesty that it may be enacted by this present Parliament, that your suppliants shall be restored to their blood and lineage; provided always, that this act shall not make void any grant or lease made by King Henry VIII, King Edward VI., Queen Mary, your Highness, or the said Gerald, now Earl, and his feoffees.
Copy.

EARL OF DESMOND.  MS 608, p. 104  10 Sep 1574

Former reference: MS 608, p. 104

4 Pages.
Language:  Latin

Contents:
A true copy of the feoffment made by Gerald, Earl of Desmond, testified under the Lord Deputy and Council's hands, which appeareth to be made 7 weeks after the combination, 1574.
Charter of Gerald FitzGerald, Earl of Desmond, Lord of Decies and Ogonull, and Lord of the liberty of Kerry, granting in fee to James Butler, Lord Baron of Donboyne, John Powar, Knight, Lord Baron of Curraghmore, and John FitzGerald, FitzEdmund, all his baronies, manors, lands, tenements, and other hereditaments in the counties of Kerry, Limerick, Cork, Waterford, and Tipperary, or elsewhere in Ireland. He has appointed Maurice Shighan and Robert Liston, his bailiffs and attorneys, to enter and take seizin in all the said hereditaments, and to deliver them to the said Barons and FitzEdmund.
Dated 10 Sept. 1574; 16 Eliz.
Whereas I, the aforesaid Earl, have enfeoffed James, Baron of Donboyne, and Redmond Everett and their heirs, 15th March, 13 Eliz., of the baronies of Glinogry, alias Glinoger, Any, Fidemore, and others, in co. Limerick; the true meaning of the same feofment, and also of the last recited feofment, is, that the several feoffees be seized of all the premises, to the use of me, Gerald, Earl of Desmond, and Dame Elinor, my wife, and the survivor of us. The intent also of the above written feofment is, that the said feoffees be seized of the residue of my lands in Ireland to my use during my life, and afterwards for the payment of my debts, until they be fully paid; and after that my feoffees, their heirs and assigns, shall receive so much of the profits of my lands as shall amount to 1,000l., for the preferment of each of my daughters, which at the time of my death shall not be preferred; and after that my feoffees shall be seized to the use of my son and heir Lord James and of his heirs male; the remainder to the use of the heirs male of my father James, late Earl of Desmond; the remainder to the heirs male of my grandfather John, late Earl of Desmond; the remainder to the heirs male of my great grandfather Thomas, once Earl of Desmond; the remainder to my brother Thomas FitzGarrald, and his heirs male; and for lack of such heirs male, the remainder to my said son James and his heirs for ever.
Signed: Gerott Desmonde.
Present at the ensealing and delivery hereof to the feoffees and to Shighan and Liston: John Synott, Roger Skiddie, William Galway, Thomas Copinger, Richard Power, Edmond Gould, Charles Bay.
Present when Morice Shighan and Robert Liston, attorneys to the said Earl, delivered livery and seizin in Traly, in co. Kerry, to the within named feoffees, in name of seizin of all the said Earl's lands in the said county: Richard Butler, John Oge McCragh, Gille Duffe McMahowna, John Gradie, Edmond Scone.
Present when Shighan and Liston delivered livery and seizin in Carigrogham in co. Cork to the feoffees, in name of seizin of all the Earl's lands in the said county: Richard Power, James Roch, Mahowne O'Leine, Thomas FittsEdmond Butler, Bary Oge Bary, Nicholas Roche.
Present when Shighan and Liston delivered seizin in Mocolpe in co. Waterford to the feoffees, in name of seizin of all the Earl's lands in the said county: John Sinott, Morice FittsGerrott, John Oge McCraghe, Charles Boy, Nicholas Roche.
Present when Shighan and Liston delivered seizin in Beladrohill in co. Tipperary to the feoffees, in name of seizin of all the Earl's lands in the said county: Richard Butler, Charles Boy, Edmund Comy[n ?], Thomas Hurley.
Copia vera." Signed: J. Perrott; Ad. Dublin.; R. Gardner; Edward Brabason; Edward Waterhowse; Geff. Fenton.
Copy. The charter in Latin.

SURVEY of the REBELS' LANDS.  MS 608, p. 97  Jan 1584

Former reference: MS 608, p. 97

3 Pages.
Language:  Latin

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. II, document 518.

Contents:
Commission to Sir Henry Wallopp, Sir Valentine Browne, Thomas Jenison, Lancelot Alforde, and Christopher Payton to make inquisition by jury respecting all lands and possessions which ought to come to the Queen's hands by the rebellion of Gerald Garret, late Earl of Desmond, James Eustace, late Viscount of Baltinglasse, John of Desmond and James of Desmond, brothers of the said Earl, or others; to survey all the ancient possessions of the Crown; and to perform the commands of the Privy Council respecting the revenue. Additional commissioners to be appointed by the Lord Deputy if necessary.
Dated in the margin, "January 1583.
Copy.

The QUEEN to the LORD DEPUTY (PERROT).  MS 608, p. 98a  7 Dec 1585

Former reference: MS 608, p. 98a

7 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. II, document 584.

Contents:
Commission to take the surrender of O'Molloye, chief of his nation, and sundry other loyal subjects of Ireland, regranting their lands, liberties, &c. on English tenures. "Given under our sign manual.
Dated in the margin, "November 1585;" but in Morrin's Patent and Close Rolls, "December 7, 28 Eliz.
Copy.

The EARL OF DESMOND.  MS 608, p. 80  16 Nov 1594

Former reference: MS 608, p. 80

7 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 150.


Related information: MS 608, pp. 97-98a

Contents:
Notes out of the Earl of Desmond's evidences;" sc., of the following documents:--
Entail by Maurice FitzThomas [FitzGerald], Earl of Desmond, 26 Edw. III. Grant by King Hen. III. to his son Prince Edward of all Ireland. Royal charter to Maurice FitzGerald, 10 Hen. VIII. Indenture between the Barretts and the Earl of Desmond, 4 Hen. VI. Deed of grant by Geoffrey FitzPatrick [of] Galway to James Earl of Desmond, 20 Hen. VI. Exchange between William FitzGerald, knight of Kerry, and Earl James, 5 Edw. IV. Feoffment by John Roche, son and heir to Phiiip Roche, of Kinsale, to James Earl of Desmond, 3 Edw. VI. Deed of grant by William White to Thomas, son to the Earl of Desmond, 18 Hen. VII. Grant by Cahir McDermond O'Connor of Carrickfoyle, and his next kinsmen of the O'Connors, to Earl James, 7 Edw. VI. Grant by Sabina, the heir to Robert McLearnye, to Earl James, 2 Edw. VI. Grant by the King to Maurice FitzThomas, Earl of Desmond, 35 Hen. VIII. Grant by Thomas Mandevile and Anastace, his wife, to Earl Maurice, 24 Edw. IV. Grant by Maghon O'Brien to David Arthur, chaplain, to the use of Earl James, 4 Edw. VI. Grant by John McPhillip of Glankine to the Earl of Desmond, 7 Edw. VI. Grant by Richard FitzThomas FitzStephen to Earl Maurice, 6 Edw. IV. Grant by William FitzJohn Burke to Earl Maurice, 3 Hen. VIII. Grant by James Bollerye to John, son to the Earl, 3 Hen. VII. Grant by ---- Barrett to William Barrett, -- Edw.----. Grant by John FitzGibbon, the White Knight, and his kinsmen to Earl James, 6 Edw. VI. Release by John Oge, David, Gilbert, and Thomas FitzGibbon to Earl James, 4 Mary. Grant by William Barry of Oleghan to Thomas FitzJames, Earl of Desmond, and Ellis Barry, his wife, 37 Hen. VI. Commission to Sir Henry Wallop, Sir Valentine Browne, and others, to inquire what lands were escheated by the rebellion of Gerald FitzGerald, Earl of Desmond, his brethren, and others, 25 Eliz. [A copy of this commission is to be found in MS 608, p. 97.] Commission to Lord Deputy Perrot and others to take the surrenders of O'Moloy and others. 27 Eliz. [A copy of it will be found in MS 608, p. 98a.]. Four commissions to Thomas Norris, Vice-President of Munster, Sir Henry Wallop, Sir Valentine Browne, and others, to survey and divide the escheated lands in Munster, &c., dated 5 July and 1 Sept., 28 Eliz. Commission to Sir Robert Gardener, Sir Henry Wallop, Sir Robert Napper, Sir Anthony St. Leger, Roger Wilbraham, &c., authorizing them, as the former commission for the plantation of Munster is determined by the death of some of the commissioners that were of the quorum, to give warrant to her Majesty's learned counsel in the laws of Ireland to draw up books for disposing of the escheated lands in Munster to the Undertakers; dated at Westminster, 16 November, 36 Eliz.

BULL of INDULGENCE by POPE CLEMENT VIII.  MS 608, p. 84  18 April 1600

Former reference: MS 608, p. 84

2 Pages.
Language:  Latin

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 5.

Contents:
To the archbishops, bishops, prelates, chiefs, earls, barons, and people of Ireland.--Whereas, encouraged by the exhortations of our predecessors and ourself, you have long struggled to recover and preserve your liberty,--first under James Geraldine, of good memory, who endeavoured to throw off the yoke of slavery imposed on you by the English, deserters from the Holy Roman Church,--then under John Geraldine, cousin of the said James,--and lastly under our beloved son, Hugh O'Neale, styled Earl of Tyrone, Baron Dungannon, and captain general of the Catholic army in Ireland: we grant to all of you who follow and assist the said Hugh and the Catholic army, if you truly repent and confess, and if possible receive the holy communion, plenary pardon, and remission of all sins,--as usually granted to those setting out to the war against the Turks for the recovery of the Holy Land. A copy hereof, subscribed by a public notary and sealed by a dignitary of the Church, shall have the same validity as these presents.
Rome, 18 April 1600, ninth year of our pontificate.
Signed: M. Vestrius Barbianus.
Copy.

Carew Manuscript  MS 609  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 609

REPORT of the EARL OF SUSSEX.  MS 609  1562

Former reference: MS 609

43 Pages.

Vellum.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 236.

Contents:
Having travelled seven years as Lieutenant or Deputy to your Majesty and Queen Mary, I have thought it my duty to set forth in this short note, written with my own hand, what I have conceived for the reducing of your English subjects in this realm to live under the obedience of the law, and of your Irish subjects to live under the direction of certain constitutions more agreeable to their natures and customs.
The opinion of the Earl of Sussex, Lieutenant-General, as well for the ordering of Ulster as the government of the whole realm, after Shane O'Nele shall be expulsed.
The-----day of----- [Blank in MS.] 1562.
Ireland is to be divided into six parts, viz., Ulster, Connaught, Upper Munster, Nether Munster, Leinster, Meath. The people inhabiting the whole be governed either by English laws, or by the Brehan law, which is a corrupt kind of civil law, or by Irish customs grounded upon the will of the lord; that is to say, the English people by English law, except where great lords, to maintain their extortion, use the other; and the Irish people by the Brehan law and customs. The Brehan law doth admit th' eldest of every nation to be by election captain of his nation, which by custom hath of late been so abused as for the most part the strongest of every nation is chosen to be captain; which kind of election causeth great numbers of idle men of war to be maintained, who bring in quoyny, livery, bonowght, and all other kinds of exactions. And although the English people ought not to use any such election, yet the same is in many places used, and no part in effect is free from quoyny, livery, and all Irish exactions, to maintain idle men of war, under colour that without such maintenance the Irish would be too strong for the English.
To devise how the English may be governed by English law without the use of these extortions, and the Irishry induced to leave their election, and, upon states granted them from the Prince, to be governed by the same law, or by certain constitutions to be made by their own assents, (which I take to be the easier to be compassed at the first,) is the matter I mean to take in hand. No government is to be allowed in Ireland where justice is not assisted with force.
Ulster.--It will be necessary to expel Shane O'Nele out of Tyrone, who usurps all rights belonging to the crown and the earldom of Ulster, and by spoil and ravine keeps the most part of the Irishry of Ulster in his subjection, and in rebellion against the Queen. He molests all others that acknowledge their duties to her, and seeks to join with the Scots and to procure aid out of Scotland, contemning to observe the indentures made between the Queen and him at his late being in England.
In Ulster are these countries; viz., the county of Lowthe, O'Donell's country, O'Cane's country, McGwyre's country, McMahon's country, Fernye O'Hanlon's country, Clandonell's country, McGenysse' country, Tirone, McWylli's country, the Glynnes, Clandeboye, Kylwowltoughe, Arde, McArtan's country, Le Cayle, Kywarlyne, the Dufferne.
Tirone far exceeds in bigness and force any of the rest (saving O'Donell's country) and is placed in the midst of these countries, and the force thereof being in one man's hand, overrules the weaker adjoining. Therefore it will be needful to divide that force into divers men's hands; "which may well be begun upon this ground, that the child claiming to be Earl being of so young years, the country must be ordered in the time of his minority, and may after upon further respects be continued when the possession is settled.
It will be fit to divide Tyrone into three parts. "The order of the hither part on this side the great water is to be given to Henry O'Nele, son to Phelym Roo; the order of the middle part is to be given to Phelyme O'Nele, son to Tyrlowghe O'Nele, son to the late Earl of Tyrone; the order of the third part is to be given to Tyrlowghe Lenowghe: which three persons be of best service of the name of the O'Neles, and likest to continue their obedience.
To levy the Queen's rights and to see all orders kept, it will be needful to build a strong town at Armawghe, and to continue there a martial President of England birth, a justice and council, with 100 English horsemen, 300 English footmen, 200 galloglasse, and 200 kerne in continual pay, that the President may always be the strongest man in Ulster. He must also have the ordering of all other forces in Ulster, which belong by prerogative to the crown, by inheritance to the earldom of Ulster, or by usurpation to O'Nele.
The President and Englishmen must have wages of the Queen, and grain of the Queen's provision. The galloglasse and kerne are to be found and victualled upon the country as they now be. The English soldier may pay 20s. for every quarter of wheat, and 20s. for every quarter of malt, at which prices the Queen may victual them without loss in Ireland or out of England; and "the flesh for their provision is to be levied upon bonowght or by cess upon the Irishry in Ulster at prices.
The President's stipend, 300l. The Justice's stipend, 150l. 100 horsemen under the leading of the President, 1,491l. 3s.; 300 footmen under the leading of two captains fit to be or counsel with the President, 3,682l. 8s. Total, 5,623l. 11s.
Towards the payment whereof there may be levied yearly of the bonowght of Ulster to be converted into money and victuals, rating every galloglasse at 8d. per diem, as followeth, viz., [Note in the margin of the MS.--"There is no mention of Tyrone in this note for sundry respects."] --McMahon for 120 galloglasse for one quarter, or in lieu thereof in money, 360l.; McGwyer for the like, 360l.; McGenysse for the like, 360l.; O'Chane for the like, 360l.; Ferny for that bonowght, 220l; O'Hanlon for his bonowght, 110l.; McArtan for his bonowght, 110l.; Lecayle for that bonowght, 110l.; Kylwarlyn for that bonowght, 110l.; Kylwoltowghe for that bonowght, 110l.; Ard for that bonowght, 110l.; Clandeboye for that bonowght, 600l.; McWylly's country for that bonowght, 240l.; the Glynnes for that bonowght, 240l.; O'Donell for his bonowght, 600l.; Clandonell for their bonowght, 110l. Sum total, 4,070l. The canes, impositions, and forfeits that may be leviable by contributions, bloodsheds, breaches of orders, and divers other ways be uncertain.
The castles and possessions belonging to the crown or the earldom of Ulster, may either be seized unto the Queen's hands or let for rent to Irishmen.
All the havens be to be seized into the Queen's possession; and where any castles be, wards be to be put into them, and where no castles be, castles may be builded at the charge of the country, whereby the Queen shall have the havens towards Scotland at her commandment, and be answered her due custom of all things that issue or enter; and the castles, with their territories, will maintain the wards without charge to the Queen.
To draw the people of those parts to a more civility a walled town is to be made at Knokefergus, and another upon the river of Lowghefoyle, at the charges of the countries adjoining or at the Queen's charges, upon a rent reserved in fee farm; at which two ports all merchandises should be laden and unladen that were to be laden or unladen between Carlyngford and Gallawaye northwards." To encourage traffic thither, those towns must have great privileges. They will be a great means to keep all the parts adjoining in obedience, when they shall be able upon all occasions to receive the President and his whole force.
A like town is also to be made at the Newery, if the Queen exchange possessions with Sir Nicholas Bagnoll. The farm of those possessions will be a great help to the maintaining of the President.
When the President is thus placed, he must use great diligence in executing of justice, and see that every breach of order be punished by fines. "He must also many times lie in camp, and call for the Irish captains in Ulster to attend upon him with their risings out, and so go from place to place as he shall see cause to execute justice, which shall breed the love of the people towards him, and shall keep all men in such fear of him as they will not be easily drawn into any conspiracy against him." For the more surety he must often use to take and discharge pledges at his pleasure.
He must severely punish all offenders in capital crimes within Tyrone; and when any person having possessions shall be executed, he must give the possessions for reward of service to some soldier, reserving a rent to the Queen, and cause the country, with some help of money from the Queen, to build a castle upon that land in a fit place. Thus the Queen's possessions will encrease, the name of the O'Neles in short time decay, and English inhabitors step up in their places.
For the defence of the country he must cause certain castles "to be builded upon the principal strengths and straights of the country," and bridges upon the principal rivers, which must be guarded by his own constables.
He must go twice every year into every man's country under his rule to see justice ministered to such as either cannot or dare not come to him to complain.
His ordinary doings he must monthly advertise to the principal Governor; and if any extraordinary matter of importance fall out, he must advertise with expedition, that speedy remedy may be provided. And for his better assistance it is convenient that the force of the county of Lowthe should be at his discretion and order, and that he should have authority to execute the martial law.
All this accomplished, "it will be convenient to draw, O'Donell, McGwyer, and all others in Ulster to give up their Irish tenures by election, and to receive from the Queen's Majesty states tails of their possessions and captainries, with reservations to her Majesty of all matters thought fit; and therewith to give states of nobility to such as be fit to receive them, which they already earnestly seek.
Till these matters be thus settled with the Irish, the Queen "should not only tolerate with the Scots of Jeames McConell's sept now in Ireland, but should also gratify them in their requests, and by all the mean that may be retain them in her service, which they earnestly seem to desire." Thus the Queen would divide them from the Northern Irish, and bring her purpose to more speedy effect with less charges; and that finished, she may easily expel them also out of the realm.
Connaught.--In Connaught are these countries, which may pay bonowght to the Queen yearly: ["Md, that the Earl of Thomond is not in this book laid to the government of Connaught or of Munster, but, as a person lying as it were between both governments, is to answer justice to either of them as his people shall offend, and is to assist either of the Presidents as occasion shall serve, and therefore is appointed to be of both Councils, although he do lie fittest for Munster."] --The Earl of Clanricard's country,----- [Blank in MS.]; McWylliam Burke, 360l.; O'Conor Slego, 360l.; O'Connor Donne, 360l.; O'Conor Roo, 220l.; McDermote, 360l.; O'Kelly, 360l.; O'Madden, 220l.; O'Flarty, 220l.; The Annaly, 360l.; O'Mayle, 220l.; O'Rwrerke, 360l. Divers small countries under the obedience of these Lords.--Sum total, 3,400l.
O'Raili's country is taken to be within Connaught, but because it lieth fitter for another government and bordereth upon the English pale, I leave it out of the government of Connaught.
To levy these and all other duties and rents, and to minister justice in these countries, it will be fit to have a President of England birth," who may best reside at Gallawaye and Athelone. With him are to be joined in commission as a Council, the Archbishop of Toome, the Earls of Clanrykard and Thomond, the Bishops of Clonfert and Kyllalowe, the Lord Bremyngham, McWylliam Burke, a Justice, the Mayor or Gallawaye, and the Portrefe of Athanrey.
As McWilliam Burke is of English nation, he is first to be induced to give up Irish tenures, &c., and to receive state of honour.
All causes to be heard and decided before the President and Council. The President must have 40 horsemen, and at his commandment the risings out of all the Irish under his rule, with certain kerne to be found upon the country, with the assistance and forces of the forenamed Earls and Council. ["Md, that although this allotment is thought to be sufficient for the ordinary charge, yet it is meant that greater matters should be attempted in Connaught, which will require a greater charge for the time, and be not for respects to be touched here."] He shall not intermeddle with the havens, though he must see that no goods be laden or unladen but at Gallawaye. He must use a direction differing from the President of Ulster, as he is placed in a better country, and amongst better or less dangerous people, with a smaller force. The force of the county of Westmeath must be at his order.
The President's stipend, 300l.; the Justice's stipend, 150l.; 40 horsemen with all officers, 674l.--Total 1,124l.
Munster.--"The Nether Munster on the south and east side of the river of the Shenon is all shire ground, saving O'Carroll's country, which I leave to the government of the captain of the King and Queen's counties and marches adjoining, for that it bordereth upon them; and upon the north and west side is th' Earl of Thomond's country called Thomond, who seeketh to bring his people to live under the obedience of the law. In this Munster be the counties of Cork, Kerry, Limerick, Tipperary, Waterford, which counties be inhabited with the noblemen ensuing, their kinsmen and followers:-- the Earl of Ormond; the Earl of Desmond; the LL. Baryes, More, Oge and Roo; The L. FytzMoryshe; the L. Roche: the L. Courcye; the L. Power; the L. of Kayer; the L. of Donboyne; Teg McCormake, of Irish nation, but holdeth his lands of the Prince by grant from King Hen. VII.; McBryan Ara, McBryan O'Gonaught, O'Carroll, O'Kenedye, O'Mawher.
The strongest of the nobility inhabiting these counties leave for the most part the use of the laws of the realm, and oppress the people and all others weaker than they, at their pleasure, with all kinds of Irish exactions and extortions, by reason whereof, and of contentions amongst themselves for such causes, the greatest part of the counties be grown to wildness." To reform this mischief, it is necessary to compel all the great lords "to live within the bounds of the law, under which they be born, and by which they hold all that they justly have, and by holding anything contrary to that law, they incur the danger of that law at the Prince's pleasure, and so living under the law to renounce all unjust claims that be contrary to the law, and for their better direction to follow the course of certain articles to be to them by the Queen's Majesty prescribed.
This done, it will be necessary to appoint a President of England birth, and a Justice, who may reside at Limerick, Cork, or Waterford. The President must have 40 horsemen. There is to be joined in Council with him the Archbishop of Cashell, the Earls of Ormond, Desmond, and Thomond, the Bishops of Limerick, Waterford, Cork, Emely, and Killaloe, the Lords Barris, More, Oge, Roo, Fytzmoryshe, Power, Roche, Courcye, Kayer, and Donboyne, a Justice, Teg McCormake, the Mayors of Waterford, Limerick, Cork, and Youghall, and the Sovereigns of Kinsale and Clonmell. He should have authority to execute the martial law in times of necessity, but only against persons that have no possessions. The President's stipend, 300l.; the Justice's, 150l.; 40 horsemen, 674l.
When this Munster shall be settled, the President should travail to procure the Irishry inhabiting the other Mounster [Note.--"There is nothing spoken here in particular for the reform of the Upper Munster for sundry respects."] to give over all their Irish tenures, and to receive states tails of the Queen's Majesty, with places of honour fit for them, whereof the chief of them, called McArtemore, has showed himself to be very desirous. I treat but generally of this Munster, "for that the Prince never had any duties leviable in those parts, neither have they seemed to acknowledge any duty to the Prince till of late.
Leinster and Meath.--Leinster has within it these countries:--the counties of Dublin, Kildare, Catherlawgh, Wexford, and Kilkenny; "the Byrnes, Irish, and within the county of Dublin; the Tooles, Irish, and within the county of Dublin; the Kavenawghs, Irish, and within the county of Catherlowgh; the Lord of Upper Ossory, Irish, but holdeth his land by state tayly; O'Dunne, Irish; O'Mawher, Irish;" the Queen's and the King's counties lately conquered. Meath has in it these countries:--the counties of Meath and Westmeath; O'Mulloy and the Fox, supposed to be in Westmeath; McGohegan, McCowghlan, and O'Mullawhlen, supposed to be in Westmeath.
The two which parts of Leinster and Meath be to be divided as ensueth. All these English counties with the county of Lowthe joining together be in effect the principal stay of the whole realm. And for that the principal Governor doth for the most part reside within one of these counties, it is not needful to have any other governor, as is appointed in the remote parts, for that every person with in any of them may with security repair to Dublin to the ordinary courts of judgment there, or to the principal Governor at his will, for the hearing and ordering of all his causes, as the nature thereof shall require. And yet it is convenient that, for the good order of the Irishry either being within any of those counties or supposed to be in any of them, or bordering upon any of them, certain ministers should be appointed as hereafter followeth.
The Kavenawghes being heretofore the strongest nation in Leinster, whose principal captain always claimed to be King of Leinster, by the name of McMorowe, have of late submitted themselves in such sort as they now live in obedience, and answer every term to all the Queen's courts at Dublin, and be there impaneled upon quests and juries as other freeholders of English blood be. To continue this it will be necessary to continue them under the government of an England born captain, as they now be, who for his better maintenance must have the use and custody of the Queen's castles of Lawghlen, Fernes, and Inyscorthy, and their territories, with the allowance of 20 harquebuziers to guard them and 20 horsemen to attend upon him, with certain kerne to be found upon the country; which force will be sufficient to direct those people in all ordinary causes; and if any extraordinary cause arise, he is to be further aided from the principal governor as occasion shall serve.
This captain must see levied all rents, duties, &c. belonging to the Queen, together with 360l. for the bonowght of the galloglasse upon the Kavenawghes. He must have at his direction the forces of the counties of Catherlawghe and Wexford, and authority to execute the martial law. The captain per diem, 4s.; the petty captain, 2s.; the "gydon," 12d.; 20 horsemen, 9d. a piece; 20 harquebuziers, 8d. [Total yearly,] 664l. 14s. 8d.
The Byrnes and the Tooles be in like sort reduced to come termly to Dublyng to answer all the courts." To continue them in this order, it will be convenient to appoint a like captain of England birth as there now is, to direct them. He must have the use and custody of all the Queen's principal castles and their territories, with 20 harquebuziers to guard them, and 20 horsemen to attend upon him, with certain kerne, to be found upon the country. He must see the Queen's rents levied, with 360l. for the bonowght of the galloglasse upon the Byrnes. "He must have the direction of the forces of the borders of the counties of Dublin and Kildare," and authority to execute the martial law.
The King's county and the Queen's county, newly conquered and inhabited, do border upon these Irishmen's countries; viz., O'Carroll, O'Mulloy, the Lord of Upper Ossory, McGohegan, O'Donne; and at the back of O'Mulloy and McGohegan do lie McCowghlan and O'Mullawghlen; which seven countries do all lie between those two counties and the river of the Shenon, and have been always till of late given to rebellion, and be of themselves naturally disposed thereto, if, by the planting and well governing of these two counties on the one side, and by the settling of the Earls of Clanrycard and Thomond beyond the Shenon on the other side of them, they were not forced to continue in obedience. And therefore, although the people inhabiting those two counties may well, for all their causes with any of the English, repair to Dublin to the ordinary courts or to the principal Governor, yet considering their late planting, the nature and disposition of their neighbours, and the danger that for lack of good government in those parts might arise, it will be needful to continue an England born captain, as there now is, to have the charge and guarding of those counties with the two forts in them, and to have the order and government of the foresaid seven Irish countries adjoining; and for his better maintenance to have in ordinary wages 40 horsemen, 200 footmen, and 200 kerne, whereof 20 horsemen, 100 footmen to be placed in the fort in the Queen's county, 20 horsemen, 100 footmen to be placed in the fort in the King's county, and the 200 kerne to be abroad in the counties with their captains, as they now be, at the finding of their captains, which, with the forces of the counties, will be sufficient in all ordinary causes; and in all extraordinary causes he may be speedily assisted by the principal Governor, as the case shall require." He must have authority to execute the martial law, "which he may use more liberally than the captains of the Kavenawghes and Byrnes may." Bonawght leviable within his rule; viz., upon the Lord of Upper Ossory, 220l.; O'Carroll and O'Mawher, 360l.; O'Mulloy and the Fox, 360l.; McCowghelan, 110l.; McGohegan, 110l.; O'Mullawghlen, 220l.; O'Donne, 55l. Total, 1455l. The Lord of Upper Ossory and McGohegan are willing to have their countries made shire ground; the first to be put within the Queen's county, and the other within the King's county. The captain's stipend, 200l. 40 horsemen, with all officers, 674l. 14s. 8d.; 200 footmen, with all officers, viz., 100 at 8d. and 100 at 6d., 2,454l. 18s. 8d.; 200 kerne with officers, 1,227l. 10s. 4d. Total, 4,556l. 18s.
O'Raili bordering upon Meath, and lying by situation of his country unfit for any of the other governments, is to be under the order of the principal Governor, only he doth offer to give up his Irish tenure and to receive state tayly at the Queen's hands, with the creation of an earl, which were good to be received; and such services and duties to be reserved in the state as to the Queen's Majesty shall be thought fit, which be to be levied and answered into the Exchequer by order from the principal Governor, with 360l. for the bonowght of the galloglasse to be put upon him.
The principal Governor is to reside ordinarily within the English pale, from whence aid must be sent to all other parts that need. He must have 100 horsemen and 200 footmen "to be placed in two forts upon two borders;" also 300 galloglasse in continual bonowght or wages, at 6d. the man by the day. "He must every year go as in visitation from government to government through the whole realm for many respects, and every month he must ordinarily advertise to the Queen's Majesty his intelligence from all parts of the realm." His stipend, 1,500l.; 100 horsemen, 1,622l. 2s.; 200 footmen, 2,454l. 18s. 8d.; 300 galloglasse, 3,155l. 16s.
How the Irish may be induced to leave their Irish tenures. --The Irish election to the captainry of their nations is the chief cause of all their disobedience, rebellion, and other enormities. "The hope that every Irishman hath to come in time to be elected captain of his nation is the cause why every of them keepeth idle men of war, that thereby he might be stronger, and so thought the worthiest to be elected upon the next vacation; which men of war, nourished in idleness, be hardly to be restrained from stealing, preying, burning, making of boderags, and a number of other enormities, whereupon the civil wars and rebellions first begin; and for their maintenance they have finding and expenses upon the country, whereby is brought in quoyny, lyvery, bonoght, and a number of other exactions that cons[u]me the people, and without the which the possessioners might convert into a rent for their own gain that which they now bestow upon the finding of these people." Therefore every person now possessed of the captainry of his nation should be induced to leave that tenure, and to take the same from the Prince to him and his heirs male. The captain may then be persuaded to keep no more men of war within his country than are needful for his ordinary defence, "and to convert the rest to a reasonable penny rent to his own commodity; and the freeholders, answering him after that sort, may also raise an ordinary penny rent to themselves of such things as before they did wastefully consume.
Constitutions.--The Irish might be induced to live under such constitutions as would keep them in common justice and good order. I will remember certain principal matters to be contained in those constitutions.
All men within the limits of that government should answer before the Governor and Council of those parts, and all causes, real, personal or criminal, should be heard and determined before that Governor and Council according to the constitutions, with liberty to appeal to the Queen in certain cases, and in her absence out of the realm to the principal Governor.
All kind of stealing, burning, and wilful murder should be death, and the moiety of the goods and lands of the offenders should be to the Queen, and the other moiety to the captain of the country.
All capital offences should be tried before the Governor and Council by 12 freeholders of the country.
All variances for lands should be tried by 12 freeholders of the country, and for chattels by 12 honest men, before the Governor and Council.
The Governor and Council should have two officers in every man's country, to be called the Queen's serjeants, carry maces with the Queen's arms, and have authority to levy the Queen's rents and duties, "to arrest all persons for all causes," to levy all forfeits, and to put in execution all orders taken by the Governor; for which they should have for their travail a tenth part of all the forfeits; and it should be finable to resist forcibly any of them, and death to strike any of them with weapon, in the execution of his office.
Any man who invades with force the country of another to be fined.
The Brehans may be admitted to plead before the Governor and Council in all constitutions after the order of them, and in all other matters after the order of the Brehan law or allowed customs, and to have fees to be appointed for their travail.
Every man shall upon a pain deliver yearly a book of all the men he keeps to the captain of the country, and the captain to the Governor and Council, and every man shall bring forth his man to answer for his offence within the year, and for lack thereof shall satisfy for the offence. The forfeit to be to the captain. And if the captain deliver not his book, he to forfeit to the G.
No captain to keep any stranger within his country without licence of the Governor and Council, upon a pain of forfeiture.
No man to give "any bying" to any man not dwelling within his own country.
Every man that receiveth any stealth, and hath any part thereof handled with him, or proved upon him, and cannot put it upon a sufficient warrant, shall pay the whole stealth and forfeit the value thereof, one moiety to the Queen and the other to the captain of the country.
No man, not being within the captain's book, may wear any weapon.
The other matters needful to be remembered in these constitutions may be hereafter considered.
The Englishry.--"These matters thus settled with the Irishry, the English that now maintain coyny, livery, and other kinds of Irish exactions under colour of their defence against the Irish, may, without danger, either leave off the whole or the greatest part thereof, so as if it be thought necessary to continue amongst them certain idle men of war to be so found, yet shall it not be needful that any greater number be continued than every man may find upon his own land and tenants, whereby the great exactions and oppressions that the weaker now receive at the hands of the stronger shall be taken away, and the possessioners, finding their men upon their own land, will not overcharge their own tenants for their own commodity. Here may arise great question whether quoyny, livery, and all Irish exactions might not be utterly left off, and such a way devised for maintaining of men of war as without spoil might defend the English, with better order and as much surety as the other, whereof I will not treat at this time.
For the government of the English laws must be provided, fit and sufficient, and be put in print. As the laws are many, it will be necessary for them to be perused before they are printed. Some laws are fit to remain in force, some must be repealed, and some altered and qualified, and where lack is, new ones must be added; for the doing whereof it will be necessary to have a Parliament. All the Acts should be abridged and sent into England, to be there considered. I will refer to such of them as are to be altered or newly made.
The taking of quoyne and livery upon other men's lands is treason, which penalty is so great, and the offenders therein being many, and the fault common, the law is in no part executed, when no man hath commodity thereby." Therefore it were good to qualify the penalty thus--for the first offence, a moderate fine and imprisonment; for the second, a greater fine and longer imprisonment; and the third offence to be treason, or rather forfeiture of goods and lands during life. The moiety of the two first penalties and of the goods in the third to be to the landlord upon whose land the quoyne and livery shall be taken, and the rest to the Queen. Any landlord taking reward to conceal the fact "to be in case of the principal offender.
All captains are bound to book their men yearly, to answer for them during the year, to deliver their book to the sheriff of the county, and to find their men upon their own lands, and the offenders in any of these be felons, which, for the causes expressed in the other article, is to be qualified with like penalties and uses, wherein divers matters be to be further devised for the order for delivery of the books and executing of the law, and for fathers to answer for their children.
Marrying or fostering with the Irish is treason, which is to be qualified with loss of goods and lands during life.
The Act for men to dwell upon their lands on the borders, or to find able persons on them, is to be qualified with convenient penalties; and there is to be added to it, that if they do not fulfil the tenor of the Act, the principal Governor may lease those lands for 30 years to any person of English blood, reserving a yearly rent to the landlord, "wherein the preferer of the offender is to be specially considered, if other respects move not the contrary."
The people greatly fear to find guilty by verdict any person that is of a strong nation or that serves a strong man, for fear of burning, killing, spoiling, or other inconveniences. Therefore it will be necessary to provide by Parliament, that all persons not having states of inheritance may be tried for capital crimes within any shire of the realm.
"The stealing of bestial and robbing of houses be the greatest matters that annoy the English people and disorder the whole government within the shire ground; which stealths and robberies be committed by light persons that have no dwellings of themselves nor places to keep their stealths in, and therefore they be forced to provide receivers for their stealths that have houses of their own and places to hide the stealths, or else be means to shift them away to others; without which receivers the thieves know not what to do with their stolen goods, and then by likelihood would forbear to venture their lives by stealing when they know not what to do with their stealths; which receitors, being but accessories, cannot without a long process and circumstance of outlawry of the principal be condemned, when the principal is not attainted, who, knowing his offence to be discovered, flieth into some Irish country until his pardon may be obtained, or the party compounded with; and so the receitor within this realm is worse than the thief, remaineth for the tediousness of the suit unpunished, and the thieves thereby maintained.
"For remedy whereof it is necessary that either all kind of stealing be by Parliament made treason, whereby the receitors, before accessories, may be made principals, as was done for burning in the time of the Earl of Surrey's government here, whereby that mischief, by report daily practised before, is seldom now but in time of rebellion committed; or else that the accessories in all causes of felony may be at all times and in all shires indicted, arraigned, tried, and judged, although the principal be not attainted, which I do not so well like as the other, for that this offence, being in effect the root of all other mischief in this realm, cannot be too severely punished, to breed a terror.
"The people be much oppressed with that every man that hath force taketh of the weaker stresses at his pleasure for all causes by day or night; and as the matter quickly followed turneth but to a stress, so if it be slackly followed, it proveth a stealth, and the party utterly loseth his goods; for remedy whereof it is necessary to provide by Parliament, that no man take any stress within shire ground but by daylight, and in causes permitted by the law, and if any person take any stress otherwise, to be taken as a felon, and to forfeit as in cases of felony.
"Great numbers of disorders and riots and taking of possession by force be daily committed and left unpunished, for that there is no place to hear and determine those matters but at the Council Board, which for the most part is occupied with other affairs of greater weight; and therefore it were necessary to have a like court of record established here by Parliament as the Star Chamber is in England, to order the like causes here.
"Many persons within the English pale set their lands to tenants of Irish birth and blood, to enhance their rents, whereby the English people decay and the Irish increase, and have their kinsmen and friends in the English pale for their spiall in all time of war, and to put forth stealths to them in time of peace; for remedy whereof it will be necessary to provide by Parliament, that no man let any land for years or at will lying within shire ground to any man of Irish blood, and if he do, the same to be void, and that the Governor for the time being may make a lease thereof to any man of English blood for 30 years, reserving to the landlord such yearly rent as to the Governor shall be thought fit."
Many within the English pale keep their lands waste to enhance their rent, whereby the people lack sustenance, the Queen lacks people, and the prices increase; for remedy whereof it is necessary to be provided by Parliament, that every man shall keep sufficient tenants upon his land, and that if any landlord do leave his land waste for two years, then the Governor may make a lease thereof to any man of English blood for 30 years, reserving a rent to the landlord.
"Many landlords within the English counties do take canes, bloodsheds, and other Irish forfeits and exactions upon their tenants by Brehan law, and keep their Brehans to order and judge their causes," to the great derogation of the Queen's laws. It is necessary to provide by Parliament, that no man use the judgment of any Brehan in any cause against any of the Queen's subjects inhabiting within shire ground, and that the offender herein be taken for a felon; foreseeing that this Act shall not extend to any judgment given upon the borders between any of the Irishry and of the English according to the laws and customs of the Marches.
Total of all the men to be retained in pay in Ireland:--horsemen, 360; footmen, 740; galloglasse, 500; kerne, 400.
The yearly charges for the government of the realm "in this sort:" Ulster, 6,623l. 11s; Connaught, 1,124l.; Munster, 1,124l.; the Kavenawghes, 664l. 14s. 8d.; the Byrnes, 664l. 14s. 8d.; the Q. county and K. county, 4,556l. 18s.; the principal Governor in the English pale, 8,743l. 16s.= 22,501l. 14s. 8d.
There is to be levied in Ireland towards these charges:-- the ordinary revenue, 8,000l.; bonowght of Ulster, 4,070l.; bonowght of Connaught, 3,400l.; of the Kavenawghes, 360l.; of the Byrnes, 360l.; by the captain of the K. and Q. counties, 1,455l.; of O'Rayly, 360l.:--18,500l. The bonowght of Upper Munster and other casualties, escheats, and forfeitures are uncertain, but it is supposed they will yearly rise to 3,000l. or 4,000l. "So do the charges surmount the receipts 4,001l. 14s. 8d., which by conjecture will be supplied by the casualties."
By this book Ireland should be reduced to a government by justice, and to bear the charges itself within a year and a half after it shall be begun to be put in execution.
At Armawghe, the ---- day of ----- [Blank in MS.] 1562.
Signed: "Your Majesty's most humble and faithful subject and servant, T. Sussex."

Carew Manuscript  MS 610  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610

MISCELLANEOUS NOTES AND ABSTRACTS.  MS 610, f. 1  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 1

Contents:
Records in Westminster, temp. Regis Richardi I.
Fine between Theobald Walter ["Walter sive Butler," in margin (by Carew).] and William Hervei. The former grants to the latter the town of Boxted, with the appurtenances in Hulmested and Belag, which last Peter Walter holds. The said William quitted claim of all other lands of Hervei Walter, grandfather of Theobald.--Fines in co. Suffolk, 6 Ric. I.
Odo de Karrio (Carew) put William, his son, in his place, against Geoffrey de Chause, in a plea touching land at Moleford, Berks.--Roll 3, 6 Ric. I., Mich. term.
Richard Dean of Sparham cited William de Munchanse, touching the church of Brandewell, Norf., the advowson of which Theobald Walter claims.--Roll 1, 6 Ric. I.
Similar citation respecting the cemetery of Beningham, Norf.
William de Cariow made a fine with the King that he should not be impleaded touching his land of Muleford, Berks.--Roll 5, in dorso, 7 Ric. I. and 9 John.
Fine between the abbot and convent of Shrewsbury and Theobald Walter, touching the advowson of Kirkeham Church, in Amundernesse, Lancashire.--Fines, Lanc., 7 Ric. I.

Parliament Roll, 23 Edw. I.--John FitzThomas of Ireland was accused in Parliament for divers offences and felonies done in Ireland. He protests he could acquit himself of them by the law, but because he would not cum ipso Domino Rege placitare, he submits himself wholly to the King's favour, into which he was received, upon giving pledges of his demeanor.  MS 610, f. 2  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 2

Records of Ireland, collected out of the Records in the Tower of London.  MS 610, f. 3  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 3

19 Pages.

Contents:
Extracts from the Charter, Patent, Close, Oblate, and Liberate Rolls of King John; [These rolls have been edited by Sir Thomas Hardy.] all relating to Ireland.

Records collected out of the Records remaining in Tur. London.  MS 610, f. 13  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 13

Contents:
Geoffrey de Mariscis, justiciary of Ireland.--Pat. 1 Hen. III., m. 2, and m. 4.
Hubert de Burgh, justiciary of England.--Ibidem, m. 2, 5.
Mandate by the King to the Abp. of Dublin and the barons of Ireland to be assistant to Geoffrey de Mariscis, justiciary of Ireland.--Ibidem, m. 5.
Richard de Mariscis, chancellor, [and?] Bishop of Dublin.--Ibidem, m. 6.
Walter de Lacy has the castle[s] of Droheda and Ayremayle.--Ibidem, m. 5.
Mandate to Peter de Manley to deliver to Walter de Lacy his niece Roesia, daughter of Hugh de Lacy.--Ibidem, m. 10.
The men of Ireland have the liberties of England.--Ibidem, m. 13.
William de Londen (Londres), nephew of Henry Bishop of Dublin.--Ibidem, m. 13.
Mandate to the knights and free tenants of the archbishopric of Armagh to be assistant to Ric. de Mariscis, chancellor, to whom the King has committed the custody of the abpric.--Ibidem, m. 13.
Ric. de Burgh is to deliver the castle of Carlingford to Geoff. de Mariscis, justiciary; date, 17 Jan.--Ibidem, m. 13.
Mandate to G. de Mariscis, justiciary, to restore to the citizens of Dublin the prises [taken?] by Henry Abp. of Dublin when justiciary; date, 16 Sept.--Ibidem, m. 14.

Then follow similar extracts from the Close Roll of 1 Hen. III. [The close rolls from 1 to 11 Hen. III. have been edited by Sir T. D. Hardy.]  MS 610, f. 14  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 14

Contents:
Margery, wife of Walter de Lacy.--Pat. 2 Hen. III., m. 2. Safe conduct to the King of the Isles to come into England to do homage, and to make amends for the injuries done by his men to England and Ireland.--Ibidem, m. 4.
Walter de Lacy.--Ibidem, m 7.
Mandate to G. de Mariscis, justiciary, to give seisin to Isolda Bissett, of two ploughlands in Fingal, late of Henry Bissett, her husband.--Ibidem, m. 8.

The King writes to the Irish to levy money in aid of the debts to Louis, son of the King of France.--Ibidem, m. 9.  MS 610, f. 15  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 15

Contents:
Hubert de Burgh, justiciary of England.--Fines, 2 Hen. III., m. 4.
Roger de Chester, father of John de Courcy of Ireland.--Ibidem, m. 5.
Gilbert de Lacy, knight.--Ibidem, m. 5.
Similar extracts from Close Roll, 2 Hen. III.
William de Mariscis.--Pat. 3 Hen. III., m. 2.
Geoffrey de Mariscis, justiciary; date, 16 Sept.--Ibidem, m. 2.
Thomas FitzAdam has the custody of the whole forest of Ireland.--Ibidem, m. 2.
Mandate to G. de Mariscis, justic., to cause Philip Marc to have full seisin of all the lands late of Geoffrey Luttrell, whose daughter and heir has been given to said Philip to be married to his son; date, 22 Aug.--Ibidem, m. 2.
J. Countess of Strigull "in Netherment."--Ibidem, m. 4.

Henry Abp. of Dublin made ruler and keeper of Ireland 23 April, because Geoffrey de Mariscis was called to England to do his homage, and to speak with the King touching the state of the kingdom of Ireland.--Ibidem, m. 4.  MS 610, f. 16  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 16

Contents:
Safe conduct for Alan de Galloway to do homage to the King for lands held in chief; date, 5 March.--Ibidem, m. 5.
Geoffrey de Mariscis, justiciary, 21 Jan.--Ibidem, m. 5.
Hubert de Burgh, justiciary of England.--Ibidem, m. 5.
Thomas de Galloway, Earl of Athol; dated, 10 Sept.--Ibidem, m. 6.
Henry Abp. of Dublin, legate to the Pope.--Ibidem, m. 6.
Similar extracts from Close Roll, 3 Hen. III.
Hugh de Bernewall and Havicia his wife.--Fines, 3 Hen. III., m. 2.
Geoff. de Mariscis, justic.--Pat. 4 Hen. III., m. 3, 5.
Hubert de Burgh, justic. of England.--Ibidem, m. 3, 5.
Letter from the King to William de Lancaster, that he had rendered to Theobald, son of Theobald Walter, his sister Matilda, whom King John had committed to Geoffrey, son of Reinfr., father of the said William, to be nursed.--Ibidem, m. 5.

Similar extracts from Close Roll, 4 Hen. III.  MS 610, f. 17  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 17

Contents:
Mandate to G. de Mariscis, justiciary, that William Baron of Nas, and Eva his wife, had made a fine with the King for 100 marks, to have the manor of Gren as the dower due to said Eva, from the free tenement of Philip de Breosa, her former husband; date, 12 Sept.--Fines, 4 Hen. III., m. 2.
Hernald de Bernewell.--Ibidem, m. 4.
Havicia, daughter and heir of Thomas de London (Londres).--Ibidem, m. 4.
Hub. de Burgh, justic. of Eng.--Ibidem, m. 4.
Emma, wife of Maurice de London.--Ibidem, m. 4.
John Bissett.--Ibidem, m. 7.
Gilbert de Lacy.--Ibidem, m. 9.
Grant to the citizens of Dublin for strengthening the enclosure of Dublin, of 3d. from every sack of wool sold, 6d. from every last of leather, and 2d. from every tun of wine.--Pat., 5 Hen. III., m. 3.

Appointment of Henry Abp. of Dublin as Keeper of Ireland; date, 3 July.--Ibidem, m. 3.  MS 610, f. 18  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 18

Contents:
Thomas de London.--Ibidem, m. 3.
Similar extracts from Close Roll, 5 Hen. III.
Henry and Wm. de Birmingham.--Fines, 5 Hen. III., m. 2.
Protection to Richard de Burgh, going to St. James [of Compostella].--Pat., 6 Hen. III., m. 2.
Heny Abp. of Dublin, justiciary.--Ibidem, m. 2.
The King wrote to all the ports of Ireland to make galleys for its defence.--Ibidem, m. 2.
Mandate to the Abp. of Dublin, justiciary, (at the petition of the magnates of Ireland,) to alter the form of writs de morte antecessoris, that they may be the same in Ireland as in England, viz., instead of the words "post primam coronationem Henrici Regis, avi nostri," it shall be written thus, "post primam coronationem Ricardi Regis, avunculi nostri." Tower of London, 18 July, 6 Hen. III.--Ibidem, m. 2.

Geoffrey de Mariscis, formerly justiciary, 28 October; who surrendered that office to Henry Abp. of Dublin.--Ibidem, m. 6. Similar extracts from Close Roll, 6 Hen. III.  MS 610, f. 19  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 19

Contents:
John Marshal has the custody of Ulster, with the castles of the same; date, 7 Oct.--Pat., 7 Hen. III., m. 2
Thomas de Galloway, Earl of Atholl.--Ibidem, m. 3.
Abp. of Dublin, justiciary.--Ibidem, m. 3.
Johannes de St. John relaxatur a curia Scaccar. Dublin. ut possit esse Episcopus."--Ibidem, m. 3, vel. 4.
Richard Bp. of Salisbury has the custody of the land and heir of Richard de Mariscis.--Ibidem, m. 6.

Similar extracts from Close Roll, 7 Hen. III.  MS 610, f. 19b  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 19b

William de Mariscis.--Fines, 7 Hen. III., m. 3.  MS 610, f. 21  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 21

Contents:
Hub. de Burgh, justic. of Eng.--Ibidem, m. 4.
Richard de Burgh has the seneschalcy of Munster, with the castle of Limerick, and custody of same, as the King's bailiff.--Pat., 8 Hen. III., m. 3.
Ralph de Ralegh, with the Earl Marshal, in the King's service in Ireland.--Ibidem, m. 8.
William Earl Marshal, justiciary of Ireland, was sent, 2nd May, against Hugh de Lacy, the King's rebel; and it is written to Henry Abp. of Dublin that the King had given the land of Ireland, with the castles, to William the Marshal, Earl of Pembroke, as justiciary.--Ibidem, m. 8.
Mandate to Walter de Lacy to deliver to Wm. de Ginninges the castle of Ludlowe.--Ibidem, m. 9.
An aid for enclosing the town of Waterford.--Ibidem, m. 9.
Roger Waspaill has the seneschalcy of Ulster, with the castles of Carrickfergus and Derragh, 1st March.--Ibidem, m. 9.
Theobald Walter has the custody of Roscrea Castle.--Ibidem.
Hub. de Burgh, justic. of Eng.--Ibidem, m. 9, 12.
Concord between the King and Walter de Lacy, concerning the misdoings of same Walter in Ireland.--Ibidem, m. 9, dorse.

Similar extracts from Close Roll, 8 Hen. III.  MS 610, f. 22  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 22

Contents:
William, son of John de Harpetre, made a fine of 280 marks, which he owes to the King, for a fine which he made with King John for the custody of the land and heir of William de Carrio (Carew).--Ibidem, m. 8.
Protection for Henry Waspaill about to proceed in Ireland.--Pat. 9 Hen. III. m., 3.
Reginald be Bernewall sent into Gascoigne to Richard the King's brother.--Ibidem, m. 3.
Protection for Wm. de Lacy in the King's service in Ireland.--Ibidem, m. 4.
Ric. de Burgh has the seneschalcy of Munster with Limerick Castle.--Ibidem, m. 4.
Hub. de Burgh, justice of England.--Ibidem, m. 8.

Similar extracts from Close Roll, 9 Hen. III.  MS 610, f. 23b  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 23b

Contents:
Wm. de Birmingham.--Fines, 9 Hen. III., m. 2.
Theobald Walter, who has Roscrea Castle, is to deliver [it] to Geoffrey de Mariscis, justiciary. Pat. 10 Hen. III., m. 1.
Walleran de Wellesley going to Ireland in the King's service,--Ibidem, m. 2.
Geoffrey de Mariscis again made justiciary in the feast of St. Peter ad Vincula, and has 500 marks a year from the Exchequer at Dublin.--Ibidem, m. 3.
Grant to Walter de Lacy, for three years, of the castle[s] of Karrickfergus, Antrim, and Rath, all the land which Hugh de Lacy had in Ulster, the castle of Nober, and whatever he held of the marriage [portion] of Celina his wife, and of the fee of Nicholas de Verdon, with the castle of Carlingford, etc.; all which the said Walter or Gilbert his son, or any other who shall be his heir, shall surrender to the King without difficulty; "saving Alan and Thomas de Galloway, William and Geoffrey de Sireland, and Frank de Bresse, his neighbours."--Ibidem, m. 3.

Mandate to Geoff. de Mariscis, justiciary, to cause Richard de Burgh to have seisin of the land of Connaught, which Oechus ["O'Connor" in the margin.] son of the late King of Connaught held, and which has been forfeited by the attainder of his father; paying for the first five years 300 marks a year, and afterwards 500 marks, at the Exchequer at Dublin; date, 30th June.--Ibidem, m. 3. "vel. 4.  MS 610, f. 24  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 24

Contents:
Leges Angliæ sicut Johannes Rex præcepit."--Ibidem, m. 4.
Geoffrey de Mariscis, justiciary.--Ibidem, m. 4.
William the Marshal, Earl of Pembroke, on Monday before the feast of St. John Baptist, 10 Hen. III. [became?] justiciary of Ireland, and rendered (reddidit) the whole land to the King; so that within 40 days after he arrived in Ireland, he rendered his account there of all things belonging to his office from the time he received it; date, 23rd Jane. Ibidem, m. 4.
Protection for Simon and Andrew Blund, nephews of the Abp. of Dublin.--Ibidem m. 5.
Thomas de Galloway, Earl of Athol.--Ibidem, m. 9.
Walter de Lacy has the lands of Hugh de Lacy his brother, in Ulster, for three years, and gives certain hostages (named.)--Ibidem, m. 9, dorse.
The pope writes to the bishops of Ireland to give subsidy to the King of England.--Ibidem, m. 3, dorse.
Hub. de Burgh, justice of Eng.--Ibidem m. ----.

Similar extracts from Close Roll, 10 Hen. III.  MS 610, f. 24b  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 24b

[no title or date]  MS 610, f. 25b

Former reference: MS 610, f. 25b

Contents:
Hubert de Burgh, Earl of Kent, justiciary of England, and Margery his wife.--Pat. 11 Hen. III., m. 2, 5, and m. 3 dorse.

The King has an aid from Ireland.--Ibidem, m. 3.  MS 610, f. 26  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 26

Contents:
Reymund de Burgh.--Ibidem, m. 4.
Geoff. de Mariscis, justiciary; 21 May.--Ibidem, m. 6.
Grant to Hugh de Lacy of all his lands which were in the custody of Walter de Lacy by the King's command; 20 April.--Ibidem, m. 7.
Letter from the King to the barons, knights, and other free tenants of Leinster, reminding them that when King John came to Ireland he brought with him men learned in the law, by whose advice, and at the instance of the Irish, he commanded that the English laws should be observed in Ireland, and left them in writing under his seal in the Exchequer at Dublin. As therefore it is the custom and law of England that any man who marries a woman or a widow, having an inheritance, and has a child by her whose cry is heard within four walls, shall, if he survive his wife, have the custody of her inheritance all his life, although she may have an heir of full age by her first husband; the King commands that said barons, etc. shall not presume to do justice in any other manner in the suit which is in [the court of] [Supplied from the Patent Roll.] William Earl Marshal, between Maurice FitzGerald and Geoffrey de Mariscis, justiciary, or in any other case. Ibidem, m. 12.
Pope Honorius writes to the clergy (clericis) of Ireland to give an aid to the King of England.--Ibidem, m. 12, dorse.
Hub. de Burgh, Earl of Kent, justic. of Eng. Cart. 11, Hen. III., part 1, m. 2, 14, 26.
Grant to Ric. de Burgh, for his homage and service, of all the land of Connaught, forfeited by Oechus (O'Connor) formerly King of Connaught; yearly rent, 300 marks for first five years, afterwards 500 marks; saving to the King the five best cantreds nearest the King's castle of Athlone; date 21 May.--Ibidem, m. 3.
Henry Bissett.--1b., m. 4.
Hugh de Lacy, Earl of Ulster.--1b., m. 6.

Lands of Henry and Adam de Aldethely (Audeley), brothers. Henry was constable of all the land of Hugh de Lacy, Earl of Ulster, and had lands in England and Ireland.--Ibidem, m. 6.  MS 610, f. 27  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 27

Contents:
Ralph de Turberville has, for his homage, the manor of Ballymacdon, which Hubert Rufus had of the gift of King John; to hold to him and his heirs, rendering a pair of gilt spurs yearly at the Exchequer at Dublin; 6 May.--Ibidem, m. 7.
Henry de Aldethely (Audeley) has a market on Thursdays at his manor of Bettelegh, and a yearly fair for three days; 2 May. The same Henry and his heirs have certain liberties and exemptions. Ibidem, m. 7.
Grant to Hubert de Burgh, Earl of Kent, justic. of Eng., and Margaret his wife, of the manor of Soghan, for their homage.--Ibidem, m. 24 and 25.
Confirmation by the King to Margaret, eldest daughter of Hubert de Burgh, (who had her by Margaret his wife, sister of Alexander King of Scotland,) of the donation made to her by said Hubert.--Cart. 11 Hen. III. p. 2. m. 3.
Ralph FitzNicholas has custody of the lands of William Pipard, both in England and Ireland, during the heir's minority. Ibidem, m. 3.
Hubert de Burgh, justic. of Eng.--Ibidem, m. 5, 6, 8.
Said Hubert has custody of the lands of William Earl of Arundel.--Ibidem, m. 8.
Royal grant to the hospital of St. Mary, Dover, founded by said Hubert. Ibidem, m. 9.

Similar extracts from Close Roll, II Hen. III. [As stated before, the Close Rolls from 1 to 11 Hen. III. have been edited by Sir T.D. Hardy.]  MS 610, ff. 27b. to 29  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, ff. 27b. to 29

Briefs of records remaining in the Tower of London." Extracts from the Patent Rolls of King John. [These rolls have been edited by Sir T.D. Hardy.]  MS 610, f. 31  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 31

Contents:
Patent Roll, 11 Hen. III.
Protection of all the lands and possessions of the abbey of St. Mary, Dublin.
Charter Roll, 16 Hen. III. [The numbers of the membranes are not specified.]
Confirmation of a fair to Hugh Terrell, at his manor of Newtowne in Fertullagh.
[Grant] to Hubert de Burgh, Earl of Kent, justiciary of Ireland (sic.).
Grant to the citizens of Waterford that they shall have their city at fee-farm for 100 marks, with many privileges and immunities.
Grant to Richard be Burgh of the custody of the lands and heir of Walter formerly Butler of Ireland, with the heir's marriage.
[Grant] to Peter de Rivaux, Treasurer of Ireland.
Charter Roll, 19 Hen. III.
Grant to Olave, King of Man and of the Isles, for his homage and service, of the custody, at his own costs, of the sea coast of England towards Ireland and towards the Isle of Man; and likewise of the sea coast of Ireland towards England and the Isle of Man.
Grant to William de Lunda of the town of Ballymadden in Ireland.
Patent Roll, 41 Hen. III.
Charter for Geoffrey de Leriniaco of the manor of Lowethe and Castle Fraunc'.

Patent Roll, 4 Ed. III.  MS 610, f. 32  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 32

Contents:
For the abbey of St. Thomas the Martyr, Dublin. The King will send William FitzDudell, sewer, to treat of their matters in Ireland, as the King is occupied with business.
Grant to the citizens of Corke of the fee-farm of their city for 20 marks.
Grant to the citizens of Waterford of the fee-farm of their city for 100 marks.
Grant to Roger de Mortimer in co. Uriell.
Patent Roll, 20 Edw. III.
Grant to ---- of custody of the inheritance of the Earl of Ulster, during the minority of Philippa [his daughter?], who was afterwards married to Lionel the King's son.
Grant of land to John Wilkmore, in the King's service in Ireland.
Joan de Mortimer, Countess of March, has letters of attorney in certain courts of Ireland.
Letters of attorney for John Islep in Ireland.
Appointment of a secondary justice in the Common Pleas (in Banco), at Dublin.
Appointment of a secondary justice of Pleas following the justiciary.
Appointment of a chief justice of Pleas following the justiciary.
Appointment of a Chancellor in Ireland.
Office of chief serjeant of Offelan, in co. Kildare, granted to John Brwis.
Titulus Reginæ Philippæ: par le grace de Dieu Royne de Angleterre, Dame de Irelande, Duchesse de Aquitañ;--pro Waltero Rossinton.
Geoffrey Stuicley, keeper of the hospital of St. Stephen near Dublin.
Patent Roll, 21 Edw. III., part 2.
Exemplification for the priory of Naas.
Confirmation for the same.
Grant to James son of James Le Bottiler, late Earl of Ormond.
Pro custod' admissis pro Com' de Ormonde infra etat' existent'.
Office of chief serjeantcy of Waterford.
The prise of wines in Ireland granted to the Earl of Ormond.
The bailiwick of the chief serjeantcy of Waterford.
Pro episcopo Fernen' de Hib: electio.
The Bishop of Fernes, staying in England, has letters of attorney.

Grant to John son of Thomas Talbott, of custody of the castle of Allone.  MS 610, f. 33  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 33

Contents:
Thomas de Beauchamp, Earl of Warwick, has letters of attorney to levy the profits of the Marshalsea in all courts in Ireland, "he himself being absent in England.
Thomas de Kent, dwelling in Ireland, has letters of attorney to gain [or lose] in any courts in England.
The office of chief serjeantcy of Meath, forfeited by John Baron for a false return in the seneschalcy of the liberty of Trim, is restored [to said John?]
Richard Bp. of Ossory, dwelling in Ireland, has letters of attorney [in England?]
Licence to Hugh de Calce, chancellor of St. Patrick's, Dublin, to export 300 qrs. of grain either to England or Aquitaine.
Patent Roll, 21 Edw. III., part 2 [1?]
Office of chief engrosser in the Exchequer of Dublin.
Commission of oyer et terminer in Ireland.
Patent Roll, 28 Edw. III., [part 2?]
Appointment of third baron of the Exchequer.
Grant to Thomas de Southwell of the office of bailiff of the serjeantcy in co. Cork.
Power to the Abp. of Armagh to appoint an attorney, as he is far removed from the courts in Ireland.
Pro Ricardo filio Radulphi, et aliis, pro viseribus [sic] in Hib. pro beneficiis.
[Grant] to William de Burton, Secondary Remembrancer of the Exchequer in Dublin.
Ratification for Peter Le Mercer, vicar of St. Mary's, Youghall.
[Grant] to the Abp. of Armagh, Primate, Justiciary, Chancellor, and Treasurer of Ireland.
[Grant] to the priory of St. Mary de Urso near Drogheda.
De officio summonitur' in Scaccar' Dublin,' commiss'.
[Grant] to the brothers of the Order of St. Augustine in Dublin.
Licence to Maurice FitzThomas, Earl of Kildare, to enfeoff.
Grant to John Dammartin [of the custody] of the lands of all minors of the name of Clifford.
John de Segue [Segrave?] and his wife have letters of attorney for Ireland.
The brethren of the order of St. Mary of Mount Carmel in Ireland to remain in England for study, that they may the better instruct the people in Ireland.
[Grant] to the merchants of the town of Galloway in Ireland.
Office of chief Engrosser in the Exchequer at Dublin.

Letters of attorney for Geoffrey Stuicley, to whom the King had granted the serjeantcy of co. Cork.  MS 610, f. 34  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 34

Contents:
Office of Secondary Baron of the Exchequer in Dublin.
[Pardon?] to Wm. Chamberlayne, who had received felons within the manor of Kilfer, Ireland.
The Abp. of Armagh to treat for peace between the English and the Irish.
[Licence?] to Irishmen to use the English law.
[Grant] to the brethren of the order of St. Mary of Mount Carmel in Ireland.
Exemption to William Draper, citizen of Cork, from being placed on assizes,
Grant to Thomas de Colley, of the office of gauger of wines in Ireland.
Pro Johanne de Wellesley, qui manucepit Mauricium fil' Thomæ Comit' Desmoniæ, in Castro Dublin' arrest', tradere Justic'.
Patent Roll, 22 Edw. III., part 1.
Confirmation of an indenture granting the cantred of Ossurres in Ireland to John Fitz Nicholas, in recompense of 100 marks which the King promised him.
Appointment of an attorney to the King in Ireland.
Appointment of a secondary justice of the King's Bench in Ireland.
[Letters patent] for Hugh de Calce, the Pope's procurator in Ireland.
[Grant] to the Friars Minors in Ireland.
Restitution of the temporalities of the see of Fernes.
[Letters patent] for Fulk de la Fresne, who, with others, mainprised Maurice Fitz Thomas, Earl of Desmond, imprisoned in Dublin Castle.
Protection for the men and merchants of Gallway.
Custody of the Abbey of Dunbrothy.
Office of chief serjeantcy of Offelan in co. Kildare granted to Thomas Bruys.
John Boyes and others to be captured by Andrew de Guldeford, Admiral in the parts of Ireland.
Patent Roll, 25 Edw. III.
Partition of the lands of Giles Badlesmer in Maycavenagh made between Sir Thomas Blunde, John de Vere, Earl of Oxford, William de Bohunne, Earl of Northampton, John de Tiptoft, and their wives, next heirs of said Giles, before John de Carru, Escheator of Ireland, at Kilmehallock.
Patent Roll, 20 Edw. III.
De intendendo literis et brevibus Leonelli Comitis Ultoniæ in eodem Com' Ultoniæ.
Patent Roll, 21 Edw. III., "part 1, vel. 2.
Grant to Walter de Birmingham of lands in Kenlis in Ireland.
Grant to James Le Botteller of the office of Butler in Ireland.
Patent Roll, 22 Edw. III., part 2.
Powers given to the Chief Justice of Forests.
Grant to Roger de Mortimer of various lands in Ireland.

Patent Roll, 21 Edw. III., part 3.  MS 610, f. 35  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 35

Contents:
Pro Matilda Comitissa Ulton. de ingrediendo prioratum monialium de Campesey, etc.
Patent Roll, 22 Edw. III., part 1.
Grant to Roger de Mortimer of divers castles and manors in Ireland.
[Grant] to----de Hastings of----in Ireland.
Patent Roll, 22 Edw. III., part 2.
Grant to John Dammartin of rents in Rogetesworth in Ireland.
Pro Edwardo Principe Walliæ, pro Caneford." (On the dorse.)
Grant to Henry Earl of Lancaster and others of custody of the lands and possessions of the abbeys of St. Evraud and Caen, to the use of Matilda Countess of Ulster. (On the dorse.)
Patent Roll, 22 Edw. III., part 3.
Grant to John de Bitterley of the constableship of Wexford Castle.
Patent Roll, 36 Edw. III., "Charter," m. 6.
The King created Lionel Earl of Ulster, his son, as Duke of Clarence, in tail male.
4 Chart., E. 3., pro amplis libertatibus in terr' de Trym et Midia in Hib.; tit' 71.

Briefs of Records remaining in the Tower of London.  MS 610, f. 37  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 37

Contents:
Hubert de Burgh, Earl of Kent, Justiciary of England and Ireland. He held that office in the latter country for life, and had an attorney to exercise the office when he was absent.--Charter Roll, 17 Hen. III.
Richard de Burgh made a fine for 3,000 marks, "prohabend', viz., de terr, Connactiæ, quam habuit antequam disseisitus, occasione compoti sui, etc., tempore quo fuit Justiciar' Hiberniæ, content', motam inter Regem et Hubertum de Burgo, avunculum suum, etc."--Pat. Roll, 18 Hen. III.
Roger de Mortimer made Keeper and King's Lieutenant in Ireland.--Pat., 10 Edw. II., p. 1., m. 8.
Articles touching the state of Ireland and the King's ministers there, ordained by advice of the King's Council at Nottingham.--Pat., 17 Edw. II.
5,000 qrs. of grain sent ont of Ireland for victualling the King's army in Aquitaine.--Vascon., 18 Edw. II.
Mandate to John Wogan, Justiciary, to proclaim among the Irish the statute of Winchester and other statutes touching money.--Claus., 1 Edw. II.
Summons to all the noblemen of Ireland, and others who owe services to the King, against Robert Brus and other Scottish rebels.--1b., m. 1, 2.
Mandate to the Justiciary and Treasurer of Ireland to levy the King's debts there and the issues of that land.--Rot. Vascon., 5 Edw. II., m. 10.
Inquisitio and process concerning the lands and towns of Down and Lethcale between Richard de Burgh, Earl of Ulster, and Thomas, Bishop of Down in Ulster.--Rot. Vascon., 6 Edw. II, m. 24, 26.
Proclamation against unlawful conventicles and congregations.--Ibidem, m. 24.
Names of noblemen in Ireland (not given).--Claus., 8 Edw. II., m. 34.
Letters obligatory of John Fitz Thomas [Fitz Gerald] and certain other magnates of Ireland for observance of fealty and allegiance to the King.--Pat., 9 Edw. II., part 2, "dors. claus.," m. 9.
Names of the noblemen in Ireland to whom the King gave thanks for their praiseworthy conduct against the Scots, viz., Edmund Le Bottiler, Earl of Carrick, and others (not named).--Claus., 10 Edw. II., m. 9, dorse.

Grant to Thomas Fitz John, Earl of Kildare, that he may receive to the law of England all his tenants in Ireland who desire to come to the same.--Pat., 12 Edw. II., p. 2., m. 9.  MS 610, f. 38  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 38

Contents:
Grant to the same of his service in Ireland [i.e. the services of all his tenants] for avenging the death of Richard de Clare, slain by the rebels there, provided he can obtain the assent hereto of the magnates of that land.--Claus., 12 Edw. II., m. 1.
Wines and other victuals to be provided in Ireland for the King's army in Scotland.--Ibidem m. 3.
Ordinance by the King in Parliament that all Irishmen admitted to the law of England do use the laws touching life and members, saving the goods of natives there called betaghs. "De pardon' pro morte hominis per Justiciar' ibidem, Rege inconsulto, non confidend'."--Pat., 14 Edw. II., p. 2, m. 20, 25.
In the abbey of Mellifont this great error grew up, that no one was admitted into the house aforesaid unless he first took oath that he was not of the English race.--Claus., 15 Edw. II.
Tenths to be levied in Ireland according to the new taxation. Ibidem, m. 27.
Errors of pleas to be surveyed and corrected, and the officers to be removed.--Pat., 15 Edw. II. p. 1, m. 7.
Revocation of a grant to the Abp. of Cashel because the King was deceived therein.--Ibidem, p. 2, m. 14.
Pope John XXII. imposed a tenth for two years on the clergy of Ireland for the King of England; and he [the King ?] commanded the Dean and Chapter of Dublin to levy the said tenth; which [mandate] the prelates and clergy of the land aforesaid refused to obey, unless the original bull were exhibited to them.--Claus., 16 Edw. II., m. 2.
Commission to John Hotham "de ordinando de statu terr' Hib'."--Pat., 9 Edw. II.
The King granted to R. M. that he and his heirs, being natives of Ireland, might use the English laws.--Ibidem.
Names of many Irish magnates coming to England.--[Claus. ?], 7 Edw. II.
2,000 "hobilar" and 6,000 footmen of Ireland to be armed for the Scotch war.--Pat., 15 Edw. II., part 2, "claus.," m. 19.

English lords and others that had lands in Ireland summoned to come to Westm. to advise with the King touching the defence thereof; and Lionel the King's son sent over thither. John Carewe amongst those was summoned."--Claus., 35 Edw. III.  MS 610, f. 39  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 39

Contents:
Power to Thomas de Burgh, clerk, the King's Treasurer, to receive the oaths of the King's officers of Ireland.--Claus., 8 Edw. III.
Summonses to divers magnates to proceed with the King to Ireland, among whom is the heir of Nicholas de Carew.--Claus., 6 Edw. III.
A deputy [appointed] to receive rebels to the King's peace in Ireland.--Ibidem.
Archers to be levied in divers counties [in Ireland ?] by the advice of divers magnates.--Ibidem.
Johannes de Carru was summoned de deputando sufficientes custodes in terris quorundam magnatum Angliæ in Hib. Domino de Carru et Com. Marescallo, etc.; and sundry other matters there touching Ireland.--Claus., 5 Edw. III., part 2.
A survey to be made of the state of the Exchequer of Ireland.--Ibidem.
[Licence] to the men of Ireland to use the law of England.--Ibidem.
Wm. de Epworth or Nicholas de Sniterby--whichever is the more fit--to be admitted to the office of Secondary Baron of the Exchequer at Dublin.--Claus., 14 Edw. III., part 2.
Letters deprecatory to the magnates of Ireland, for obedienoe to the Lord Justice.--Claus. 1 Edw. III., part 2.
Les petitions ove les responses d'Irland; long, and hard to be read; the writing almost worn out."--Claus. 16 Edw. III.
Memorandum of the delivery of a commission to the Justices of the Common Pleas ["de Communi Banco," in text; "King's Bench," in margin.] at Dublin.--Claus. 18 Edw., part 2.
Direction for making two seals, one for the Common Pleas, the other for the King's Bench, in Ireland, etc."--Ibidem.
Mandate "to the Treasurer, Barons, and Chancellor of Dublin" to make certificate into the Chancery of England of all lands and tenements given by the King in Ireland.--Ibidem.

Mandate to the Justiciary of Ireland to inquire touching liberties of Ireland.--Claus. 20 Edw. III.  MS 610, f. 40  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 40

Contents:
Ditto, to make proclamation touching the currency of gold and silver money.--Ibidem.
Fees of ministers in Ireland to be reduced.--Ibidem.
Inquiry to be made touching lands in Ireland given by the King for the salvation of the Marches of Ireland.--Ibidem.
The sheriffs of Ireland to exercise the office of escheator in their respective counties.--Ibidem.
De clameis de libertatibus in Hibernia concessis proponendis."--Ibidem.
Pro Communitate terre Hib., dir[ectum] Canc[ellario] Hib."--Clause. 22 Edw. III.
Indenture between the King and Thomas Rookbye, Justiciary of Ireland; by writ of privy seal.--Claus. 23 Edw. III.
Mandate to the Justiciary, Chancellor, and Treasurer of Ireland to make certificate of all insufficient officers in Ireland.--Ibidem.
Many constitutions touching the administration of justice in Ireland.--Claus. 25 Edw. III.
Articles touching the state of Ireland (in French).
The Justice, Chancellor, and Treasurer of Ireland inform the King of the defects by way of articles, and the King maketh answer unto them."--Claus. 26 Edw. III.
Mandate to the Chancellor of Ireland to make proclamation in Ireland "that owners of lands there should not withdraw themselves in times of rebellion."--Claus. 27 Edw. III.
Mandate to the Treasurer of Ireland to come into England "to counsel with the King."--Claus. 28 Edw. III.
Mandate to the Justiciary [and] Chancellor of Ireland to make proclamation that both English and Irish "personaliter morentur super custodiam terrarum suarum in Hib."--Claus. 30 Edw. III.
Mandate to the Justiciary, Chancellor, and Treasurer of Ireland to certify into England the doings of Robert de Hollywood, one of the Remembrancers of the Exchequer at Dublin.--Claus. 31 Edw. III.

Mandate to the Abp. of Armagh to be assistant to the King's Chancellor in Ireland.--Claus. 33 Edw. III.  MS 610, f. 41  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 41

Contents:
Mandate to the Justiciary and Chancellor of Ireland "that no Irishmen should be admitted to temporal or ecclesiastical charges or offices." By petition of Parliament.--Claus. 35 Edw. III.
Summonses to a Council at Westminster in the quindene of Easter, to treat about the defence of Ireland; among the rest, John de Carru; [dated] 15 March.--Ibidem.
De proclamatione facienda pro terra Hib."--Ibidem.
Indenture between the King and the Earl of Ulster, who was then going into Ireland.--Ibidem.
De veniendo ad Consilium, de tractando de statu terræ Hib.; directed to sundry who had lands in Ireland, as well unto the magnates as to their widows, that all should send forces into Ireland, and the magnates themselves should come to confer with the King's Council before their going, and the widows to send some for them."--Claus. 36 Edw. III.
Mandate to the Keeper and Chancellor of Ireland to settle debates between Englishmen in Ireland.--Claus. 38 Edw. III.
Mandate to the Justice, Chancellor, and Treasurer of Ireland "de ordinatione de statu terræ Hib."--Claus. 42 Edw. III.
Summonses to all magnates having lands in Ireland to come and confer with the King's Council touching the defence of that land.--Ibidem.
Ordinance made in Ireland, "that possessioners of lands in Ireland should by a day depart [from England], and dwell there, or forfeit their possessions to the King."--Ibidem.
Licence to the Chancellor of Ireland to come into England.--Claus. 51 Edw. III.
The King willed that John Darcy, his Justiciary of Ireland, together with his Chancellor there for the time being, should survey his Treasury twice every year, and his things therein existing, that the King might be certified thereof as often as necessary.--Rot. Vascon, 2 Edw. III., m. 13.
Mandate to John Darcy [Justiciary] to ascertain the opinion of the magnates of Ireland in the next Parliament to be holden there, whether the King may without damage assent to the supplication of the men of Ireland that he would grant by statute that all Irishmen desiring to use the English laws may do so without obtaining charters from the King.--Ibidem m. 13.

Mandate to the Justiciary, Chancellor, and Treasurer of Ireland to lease to farm the King's demesne lands lying in perilous places and exposed to war; the leases not to exceed 20 years. Rot. Fin. 2 Edw. III. m., 7.  MS 610, f. 42  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 42

Contents:
[Summonses] to come from Ireland to Portsmouth with men-at-arms, "hobilar," etc.; "per Mauricium fil. Thome Com. Desmond."--Franc., 18 Edw., m. 14, 16.
Consimile" in 21 Edw. III., part 1, m. 30, 36.
Summonses to various magnates of Ireland to come to him with horses and arms against the Scots.--Claus. 16 Edw. II., m. 18. dorse.
De ordinatione et statu Hib. reformand', viz., quod episcopus ibidem tenens, etc., quorum valor annus 20l., vel 40l., vel. 50l., non excedit, et qui reguntur per mere Hibernicos, et sedibus archiepiscopalibus et episcopalibus, civitatum et locorum insignium uniantur; et quod injungatur abbatibus et prioribus monasteriorum, etc., ut in monasteriis Anglicos admittant, etc."--Rot. Rom. (sic) 17 Edw. II., m. 5.
Letters to the Justiciary of Ireland for ships; and certain articles touching the state of Ireland and the King's ministers there ordained by the advice of the King's Council. [Dated] at Nottingham.--Pat. 17 Edw. II., part 1, m. 3, dorse.
The Marshalsy of Ireland, which Robert de Morley holds of the inheritance of his wife, is taken into the King's hand, for that neither the same Robert nor any other in his name, at the first arrival of John Darcy, Justiciary of Ireland, came to exercise that office, and to replevin the Marshalsy aforesaid, with the issue received therefrom.--Claus. 18 Edw. II., m. 39.
Letters to Thomas FitzJohn Earl of Kildare, and to many other magnates and prelates of Ireland, to be assistant to John Darcy, whom the King has appointed his Justiciary there.--Ibidem m. 37, dorse.
5,000 quarters of wheat and 1,000 qurs. of beans to be provided in Ireland for the King's army about to proceed to Aquitaine.--Rot. Vascon. 18 Edw. II. m. 23.
Letters to numerous noblemen and merchants of Ireland to furnish succour for the King's expedition to Aquitaine.--Rot. Vascon. 18 Edw. II., part 1, m. 25 dorse.

Mandate to Philip Courtney, the King's Lieutenant in Ireland, to annul erroneous judgments passed there, on his arrival.--Claus. 8 Ric. II.  MS 610, f. 43  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 43

Contents:
Annual pension for Billingford, Archbishop of Dublin.--1b.
Mandate to the Bishop of Meath and other Irishmen to arrest Philip De Courtney, the King's Lieutenant, for oppressions by him used.--Claus. 9 Ric. II.
Mandate to Robert De Vere, "duci Hiberniæ," or his lieutenant, to restore to Philip De Courtney the profits arising in Ireland during the time of his Lieutenancy.--Claus. 10 Ric. II.
Proclamation to be made of the King's purpose to go into Ireland, and that therefore all natives of that land should resort thither.--Claus. 17 Ric. II.
Precept to the sheriff of Somerset to make proclamation for the carrying of provisions to the King's army in Ireland.--Claus. 18 Ric. II.
Proclamation "that all born in Ireland should repair thither for the defence of that land."--Claus. 5 Hen. V.
The Duke of Clarence appointed the King's Lieutenant in Ireland; William De Cerezay, the King's protonotary.--Franc. 49 Hen. VI.
Patrick De Haliburton and other ambassadors of the King of Scotland for arranging a truce with John De Islis, ["McDonnell" in margin.] Lord of the Glens, and with the Lord of the Isles, Earl of Rosse.--Franc. 21 Edw. IV., m. 13.
Amendment to be made of the laws of Ireland, viz., that no man's death be compounded for (redimenda); and that parliament be held there once every year.--Claus. 10 Edw. II., m. 28.
The King, being about to send an army into Ireland to repel the hostile attacks of the Scots, commanded many noblemen of England who had lands in Ireland to send subsidy according to the quantity of such lands.--Ibidem m. 15.
[Commission] to treat with Godfrey FitzJohn De Yle (McDonnell), late Lord of the Isles, for amity and mutual aid.--[Rot. de] Scotia, 12 Ric. II., m. 6.

Inquisition, 14 Edw. II., touching part of the lands and tenements of Thomas, son of Richard De Clare, deceased, in Ireland; viz., the castle of Bonratti in Connaught, castle of Corkmoyth, castle, manor and barony of Inskisey, manor and honor of Duy, lough of Duy, third part of the cantred of Rotheba, cantred of Ossurres in co. Kerry. The pourparty of Robert De Wells and Matilda his wife, one of the heiresses of said inheritance, was put to lot, "ut in dorso Kalendarii continetur.  MS 610, f. 44  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 44

Contents:
Appointment of John De Athy as captain of a ship to proceed to Ireland in the suite of Roger De Mortimer of Wigmore; and, after the arrival there of said Roger with his men-at-arms, armour and harnesses, to remain there at sea for custody of Ireland, and of the King's land of Scotland; dated Clarendon, 28 March.--Pat. 10 Edw. II., or III., part 2, m. 22.
Grant to John the bastard of Clarence of the manors of Esker, Newcastell, Lyons, Cromelyn, and Tassagard, in Ireland; dated 11 July, 6 Hen. VI.--Pat. 6 Hen. VI., part 2, m. 7; Pat 7 Hen. VI., p. 1, m. 3.

Briefs of Records remaining in the Tower of London.  MS 610, f. 45  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 45

Contents:
Copy of a writ to John De Dufford, Escheator in Ireland, to seize into the King's hand the possessions of Thomas, son of Richard De Clare, deceased, and to make the usual inquisition. Gloucester, 10 April, 14 Edw. II.--Inquisition, 14 Edw. II.
The laws of England to be used in recovering wardships, notwithstanding the custom there by which the chief lords have the wardship of heirs to lands held of them by homage.--Claus. 5 Edw. III., p. 1, m. 25.
Letters deprecatory to the magnates of Ireland, "to obey the King's Justices there."--Claus. 1 Edw. III., p. 2.
Order to John de Carru and other magnates of England to depute sufficient keepers in their lands in Ireland and Wales. "One of the offenders was the Earl Marshal; and sundry other matters there touching Ireland."--Claus. 5 Edw. III., p. 2.
Release to Master William de Carru and Thomas de Carru of co. Pembroke "from a matter of felony.--Ibidem.
Summonses to divers magnates to go with the King to Ireland; among others the heir of Nicholas de Carru.--Claus. 6 Edw. III., in dorso.
Confirmation, by authority of Parliament, to St. John's of Jerusalem, of the lands of the Templars, granted in 17 Edw.II.--Claus. 6 Edw. III., p. 1. m. 12; and Patent, 6 Edw. III., p. 3. m. 7.
Ordinance that none of the King's ministers in Ireland shall have the custody of any man's possessions, or any other office, while in the King's service.--Claus. 10 Edw. III., m. 23, dorse.
Power to Thomas de Burgh, clerk, Treasurer, to receive the oaths of the officers of the realm of Ireland.--Claus. 8 Edw. III.
Bond of Ralph de St. Saviour['s] to Ric. de Carru in 115l.--Ibidem.
[Custody] to John de Carru of the manor of Apple-Penne in Devon, until the majority of Almaric de St. Amand.--Claus. 10 Edw. III., m. 38.
Letters from the King to the Justiciary and other officers in Ireland to administer equal justice there.--Ibidem m. 23, dorse.

[Order] by the King and Council respecting the coinage in Ireland.--"Fines," 10 Edw. III., m. 15, and 12 Edw. III., m. 10.  MS 610, f. 46  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 46

Contents:
Remembrances to the King touching the land of Ireland.--"Bundell Brian," 16 Edw. III., part 1.
Ordinances touching ministers' fees, the seal in the King's Bench, the custody of the rolls of pleas, the offices of sheriff and escheator, and liberties usurped there [in Ireland].--Claus. 18 Edw. III., p. 2, m. 20, 17, 9, dorse; and 2 Edw. III., p. 1, m. 5, dorse; and 25 Edw. III., m. 30.
The Commons in Parliament desire that it may be enquired how it comes to passe that the King hath no benefit of his land of Ireland, considering that he had more lands therein than any of his ancestors."--"Anno 21 Edw. III., m. 40.
Appointment of John de Pembroke as Chancellor and Third Baron of the Exchequer, receiving for both offices the same fee as he had hitherto had for that of Chancellor, only because there are more Barons in the Exchequer than necessary, and the King reduces their number to three; Westminster, 12 July.--Pat. 29 Edw. III., p. 2, m. 10.
De feodis pro officio Marescalli Angliæ in Hibernia colligendis."--Pat. 27 Edw. III., p. 1, m. 13.
Grant to John Bottleton of the constableship of Wexford Castle, and the chief serjeantcy of co. Wexford, during the minority of the heir of John De Hastings, Earl of Pembroke.--Pat. 1 Ric. II., p. 2, m. 23.
German Linch made master and guardian of the King's mint and money in Ireland, with a limitation of such sorts and kinds of coin as he ought to make."--Pat. 4 Edw. IV., p. 2, m. 25.
George, the King's son, made Lieutenant of the King in Ireland.--Pat. 18 Edw. IV., p. 2, m. 28.
Licence to transport 100 weighs of beans into Ireland.--"Franc. Claus." [French Roll] 22, 23 Edw. IV.
In anno 1170, Robert FitzStephens built the castle of Carricke, near unto Wexford."--Lib. Scaccar. Anglioe.

Grant to Thomas De Stafford of the office of Marshal in Ireland.--[Pat.?] 38 Edw. III., p. 1, m. 39.  MS 610, f. 47  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 47

Contents:
Charters and liberties [in Ireland?] granted by the King to be surveyed and examined.--[Pat.?] 38 Edw. III., p. 2, m. 27.
John FitzMorris, Earl of Desmond, made Justiciary of Ireland.--[Pat.?] 41 Edw. III., p. 1, m. 29, and p. 2, m. 20.

Briefs of Evidences concerning Darcy of Ireland.  MS 610, f. 47b  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 47b

Contents:
Final concord 6 Edw. III., between John Darcy le Cosin, knight, and John de Finchenden, concerning the manor of Knayth; to be enjoyed by said Darcy in tail male, with various remainders.
Philip and John Darcy le Cosin, summoned to Parliament. [All the summonses to Parliament are printed by Dugdale.]--Claus. 6 Edw. III., m. 9, dorse, and m. 36.
Grant to John Darcy le Cosin and his heirs of the manors of Louth and Ballygary.--Pat. 18 Edw. III., p. 2. m. 2.

Confirmation to same, and Joan his wife, of the manors of Rathwyre and Kildalke, granted 9 Edw. III.--Ibidem (same memb.)  MS 610, f. 48  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 48

[Patent Roll.]

Contents:
[Order] respecting the dower of Joan, wife of John Darcy le Pere, formerly wife of Thomas FitzJohn, late Earl of Kildare.--Claus. 20 Edw. III., m. 18.
Livery to William, son of John, son of John Darcy, (which last held in chief of King Henry VI.,) of the manors of Rathwyre and Kildalke, and all other lands of his said father and grandfather in Ireland. Westm., 8 May, 1 Hen. VII.--

Sheriffs' accounts for sundry years remaining in Archivis Castr Dubliñ."; Account of the county of Kerry for the whole of the 38th and 39th years of Henry III., by Walter de Brackleger, then sheriff.  MS 610, f. 49  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 49

Contents:
Rents and other things received during the war and after the war, and after the proclamation of the King's peace. Aids to the King from various cantreds, &c. for sustaining the war. Fines for licences of concord. A loan from the bishopric of Ardfert, which went to the Exchequer at London. Moneys received from various persons for wines wrecked for the King's last army, for [using] false weights and measures, etc. Pleas and perquisites of the county, and farm of the serjeantcy of the same. [Total not specified.]

Account of co. Limerick for 39 Hen. III., by Walter Wansell, sheriff.  MS 610, f. 49b  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 49b

Contents:
Moneys received from various persons and places, viz., for 55 ounces of gold (price of each ounce, 10s.); "for the war of Marshal;" for not coming at the King's summons against Richard Mareschall; for the escape of a thief; for a relief; as an aid for the war in France; for arrears of accounts; from a coroner [for the goods?] of a man hanged; as security for delivering hostages; for various fines; for the ward of the castle of Mayncoud; as fines for [false] weights and measures, and for selling wheat at mills without regard to the price fixed by the assize, etc. Total, 3,486. 1s. 4d., whereof there was delivered into the Treasury that year 1,023l. 4s. 8d.

Account of co. Waterford with the honor of Dungarvan from the Invention of the Holy Cross, 38 Hen. III. to the same feast 39 Hen. III., by William Rupell (Roche?), sheriff.  MS 610, f. 50b  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 50b

Contents:
Money received from said honor, "cum duabus fabricis ibidem et piscariis," etc. Expenses of the sheriff in remaining at Waterford 28 days for the purpose of delivering "fanes" (fines?) to John FitzWalter, Justiciary of Ireland, and others, who were crossing the sea to the King in Gascony. Moneys received from two persons (according to the number of their services) for the army of the Bann and for the army of Kenell.

Account of Meath for 37, 38, and 39 Hen. III., by Ric. de Wodeton and Henry de Stratton, seneschals there.  MS 610, f. 51  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 51

Contents:
From the heirs of Walter de Lacy, 2,747l. 1s. 10d., for two fines of the same Walter; and 100l. for an aid from 50 services to the King for marrying his sister to the Emperor, viz., from every shield 40s. An aid for the war in France from the Barons of Meath. An aid for the war in Wales from the town of Athlone. A fine paid for having a suit removed from Dublin to Tipperary. 200l. levied on the heirs of Walter de Lacy, for the armies of the Bann and Kennell; and 20l. which they were bound to pay to the King during the vacancy of the bishopric [of Meath], and which the bishop had been accustomed to pay every year.

Account of co. Tipperary for the year 39 Hen. III. by William de Waylande, sheriff.  MS 610, f. 51b  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 51b

Contents:
An aid from the Abp. of Dublin for the war in France, 33s. 5d. The manors of Clonmell and Kilsilan in the King's hands. Margaret Butler paid part of a fine of 500 marks for licence to marry. Arrears of the goods late of Theobald Butler. Fine for selling wine contrary to the assize, and for false weights and measures. Moneys paid [by] various persons for repair of the pond (stagnum) of Dufuskie. Fine of 3l. 14s. levied on the town of Cashel for the escape of a thief from the prison of the parish church, for default of custody. Several persons fined for promising [to allow?] a thief to go from the church of Ardfinnan. Walter de Burgh was in the King's wardship. Names of persons owing services to Theobald Butler, whose heir was in the King's wardship.

Account of co. Cork from Whitsunday, 38 Hen. III., to St. Simon and St. Jude's Day next following, and for the whole of the 39th year, by Wm. de Rupell (Roche), sheriff.  MS 610, f. 52b  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 52b

Contents:
Aids for the war in Poitou, for the King's last army of Kennelin, etc. Farm of co. Cork for the 33rd year, 10l. Farm of the serjeantcy of co. Cork, for Michaelmas, 34th year, 4 marks. 100l. paid by Miles son of Patrick de Courcy, for his relief, and 100 marks for having seisin of his lands. Farm of Kilmehallocke. Issues of the wear at Cork, 5s. Moiety of the manor of the Island in the King's hand by the death of Stephen de Cerbroyt. Other entries as in the preceding accounts.

Account of the city of Dublin for the 39th year [of Henry III.], by William the Clerk, [sheriff?]  MS 610, f. 53b  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 53b

Contents:
Farm of the city, 200 marks. 10 marks paid for the freight of three ships carrying 2,000 "craiñ" of wheat from Dublin to Bordeaux, for the Castle of the Lord [Prince] Edward in Gascony. An aid from the city for marrying the King's eldest daughter, 77l. 6s. 8d.; and for the war in Gascony, 100l. The city also paid 20l. "ne occasionaretur." Farm of Ballymacdou. Prises of wines.

Account of the borough of Drogheda on the side of Meath, for 38 and 39 Hen. III., by Walter Wyvien, [sheriff.]  MS 610, f. 53b  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 53b

Contents:
Farm, 40 marks a year. An aid for the war in Gascony. prise of wine.

Account of the borough of Drogheda on the side of Uriel, for 38 and 39 Hen. III. by John le Taylor, [sheriff?].  MS 610, f. 54  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 54

Contents:
Wine and wheat sent by the bailiffs of the borough for provisioning the castle[s] of Athlone, Molionoth, and Rendon 200 cran of wheat and 100 bacons sent by the same to the King in Gascony; and wages of two "lodemen" and of masters and sailors conveying said provisions to Bordeaux. 46s. 8d. paid for one day's food of 2,000 soldiers (satellit'), who were sent to Kennelin to (against?) Brian O'Neale and his accomplices in rebellion, according to [the King's writ.]

Account of Ulster from Easter 38 to Easter 39 Hen. III., by Peter de Repentenye, seneschal there.  MS 610, f. 54b  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 54b

Contents:
Rent of Carrickfergus. Rent of a house there. Rent of two ploughlands. 100l. granted by the King to said Peter to sustain him in the seneschalship of Ulster. 30l. allowed for custody of Carrickfergus Castle, and other sums for other castles. Repair of the houses of the said castle.

Inquisitions, 34 & 35 Edw. III.  MS 610, f. 55  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 55

Contents:
Walter de Birmingham died seized of the manors of Kenlis, Castle-Carbye, Curry, Tathmelin, Stathuclegh, Arthuredishe, Ledone, Leckagh, and Shenbath, and other lands in various places. Some are held of the King in capite; others of the abbess of St. Mary's of Kilkenny, Joan de Carru (as of the manor of Odrone), Eleanor Countess of Ormond, Maurice FitzThomas Earl of Kildare, John de Birmingham (whose court is at Rathtowne), John son of Miles Cantwell, and the Bishop of Lismore; and others of the inheritance of Elizabeth formerly wife of said Walter, the reversion thereof belonging to John son of Robert Haverington, and son and heir of said Elizabeth. Margaret sister of said Walter, married to Robert de Preston, eight years ago, is next heir.

Copies from the Close Rolls, &c. [Probably all of these will be found printed in Dugdale's "Summonses."]  MS 610, f. 57  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 57

Contents:
Summonses to various noblemen, etc. of Ireland (names given) to come to Carlisle for the Scotch war, with horses and arms. Claus. 16 Edw. II. m. 18.
Similar summonses for the defence of Aquitaine. (A long list of names.) Vascon., 18 Edw. II. in. 25. dorse.
Letters deprecatory to the magnates of Ireland, [commanding them] to do fealty. (Names not given.) Claus. 1 Edw. III. p. 1. m. 26.
Similar letters (names given.) Ibidem, m. 16 dorse.
Similar letters (names given.) Ibidem, p. 2. m. 21.
Mandates to numerous magnates of Ireland to be assistant to the Justiciary with their counsels and aids. Claus. 5 Edw. III. p. 1. m. 22 dorse, and p. 2. m. 12.
Mandates to Wm. de Burgh Earl of Ulster, Sir William de Birmingham, and Walter de Burgh, touching the King's intended visit to Ireland. Claus. 5 Edw. III. p. 2. m. 12 dorse.

Records remaining in the Castle Tower of London.  MS 610, f. 61b  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 61b

Contents:
Grant to Edmund le Botteler of Karrick-ma-Griffin, with the honor of Carricke Ormond, [and] Eli O'Kerroll. Chart. 9 Edw. II. m. 5.
Grant to Morrice FitzThomas (FitzGerald) of "Desmond, Kerry, comitat', et regales libertates. Chart. 3 Edw. III. m. 28.
Grant to Roger de Mortimer of Trym, with royal liberties. Chart. 4 Edw. III. m. 7.
Donomasse and the honor of Leys (Leix) found to be Roger Mortimer's. "Escheat. et Inquis." 11 Edw. III. No. 28.
All the particular honors and manors and their knights' fees in Thomond, expressed at large." Escheat. Inquis. 16 Edw. I. 71.
Idowgh mentioned to be the land of William de Valence Earl of Pembroke." Escheat. Inq. 24 Edw. I. 56.
Thomas de Carrew held the lordship[s] of Desmond and Dunemarke. "Esch. Inq." 5 Edw. III. No. 104.
William de Burgo found to die seized of all his lands in Ulster and Connaught; [viz.] 15 cantred in Connaught. The several septs of the Burkes entered after his death." Esch. Inq. 7 Edw. III. No. 39.

An office after the death of Lionel Duke of Clarence, [in which?] many of the honors and manors found after the death of William Bourke de Connaught are omitted, for the rebels had overrun that province, and held those lands by force." Esch. Inq. 43 Edw. III. No. 23.  MS 610, f. 62  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 62

Contents:
Drofida hath a grant of the river de Boyne ex parte Urielis; ergo, the Boyne a royal fishing." Pat. 16 Edw. II. p. 2. m. 1.
The Bishop of Durham has all pleas before him in his temporalities, except treasure [trove], etc. "Anno 6 E. 2. Clas. 23. Escheat.
Creation of the Earl of Desmond, with great liberties. Pat. 28 Edw. III. [m.] 28.
Confirmation of those liberties." Pat. 10 Edw. III. p. 2. m. 23.
Repeal of all his liberties. Anno 15 Edw. III.
See also for Desmond in anno 8 Edw. III. m. 4. and m. 31.
Waterford and Lismore united. "Anno 12 Hen. III. Clas. [Claus?] dors. m. 5.
A writ directed to Lionel Duke de Clarence to examine all charters in Ireland, if they were prejudicial, to certify the same into England." Pat. 38. Edw. [III.] p. 2. m. 27.
[Proclamation?] that neither the Justiciary nor any other minister in Ireland should acquire lands without the King's licence. Pat. 34 Hen. III. p. 2. m. 30, 35; and p. 1. m. 18, 19, 40.
[Proclamation?] that the mere Irish be not made King's ministers in Ireland. Pat. 34 Edw. III. p. 3. m. 7, 35; and 35 Edw. III. p. 1. m. 4.
The number of Barons of the Exchequer reduced to three. [Pat.] 29 Edw. III. p. 2. m. 10. [See f. 46. in this MS.]
Articles touching the state of Ireland, by the Council, with the King's answers. (Abstract.) Claus. 26 Edw. III. m. 1.

Royal charters of liberties resumed and revoked. "Anno 15 E. 3. m. 24.  MS 610, f. 63  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 63

Contents:
Grant to James Botteler, Earl of Ormond, of the prise of wines. Pat. 2 Hen. IV. p. 3. m. 5.
Sr. Anthony Lucy fait le Justice. Rex concessit ei quingentas libras, et qd sit vicesimus hominum ad arma.
Adam de Bowes, Capitalis Justic ad placita Justic nostrum Hiberniæ sequeñ; et mandatum est Anthonio Lucy, Justic, qd ipsum Adam admittat in forma prædicta.
Willielmus de Burgo fait Lieutenant, issint q'il fait vien sans counsell del Anthony Lucy.
Claus. 1 Edw. III. m. 1.; 11 Edw. III. p. 1. m. 7.; et anno 5 Edw. III.
Articles to be observed in Ireland. (Abstract.) Pat. 5 Edw. m. 25.
Recital" that King Henry II. enfeoffed Miles de Cogan and Robert FitzStephens of the whole dominion of Desmond, except the city of Cork "et terris Austmannorum;" that Robert was a bastard, and that Thomas de Carrew entered as heir of said bastard, and enfeoffed Maurice FitzThomas before he was Earl of Desmond, without the King's licence.--"Escheat." 5 Edw. III., No. 104.
Mandate to the Chancellor and Treasurer [of Ireland], on a petition from the people of that land, for the observance of the law touching the execution of every Irishman who should kill an Englishman.--Claus. 10 Edw. II., m. 28.

(A repetition of ff. 62b to 64.)  MS 610, ff. 54, 65  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, ff. 54, 65

Grant by Henry III. to Ralph Chichester, Chancellor of England, of the Chancellorship (Cancellariam) of Ireland, for term of his life. Westm., 4 March, 17 Hen. III. (No reference.)  MS 610, f. 65b  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 65b

Mandate to cause Eleanor, consort of the King's eldest son (who has the land of Ireland of the King's gift), to have queen-gold in Ireland in the same manner as Queen Eleanor in England.--Pat. Roll. 52 Hen. III., m. 25.  MS 610, f. 66  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 66

Contents:
(ff. 66b to 70 are blank.)

Records relating to the See of Ossory.  MS 610, f. 71  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 71

Contents:
Grant to Roger Bishop of Ossory, of a market and fair at his manor of Seikeran, co. Dublin, dated 6 June, 17 Edw. I. (No reference.)
Abstract of a rental of the Bishop of Ossory's lands in 1375, 49 Edw. III., "as Friar Clinne, in his chronicle (the original whereof is remaining in the city of Kilkenny) affirmeth.
(f. 72 is blank.)

Rental of [the manor of] Seyrkeran for the year 33 Edw. I. showing the "redditus firmarum," "redditus villæ," "firmarii," and "cotag.  MS 610, f. 73  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 73

Contents:
This is a true copy extracted out of an ancient book belonging to the Earl of Ormond; which copy was delivered to the Lord Bishop of Ossory by direction of the said Earl.--Robert Rothe.
(f. 74 is blank.)

A brief abstract of the present estate of ------ [Blank in MS.] the bishopric of Ossory;" showing the great decrease of rents of the manors of Durrogh, Upper Court, Aghore, Kilkenny, Bishop's Lough, Insnaghe, Seirkeran, Fynkor, etc. "Besides these, many other small parcels which I omit to lay down, are both detained and diminished, to the great decay of the said bishopric and no less disadvantage unto his Majesty, as in his Highness' records may appear, viz., in Magno Rotulo Ed. primi, anno regni sui decimo septimo, etc." Dated by Carew, "1619.  MS 610, f. 75  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 75

Extract from the Great Roll [of the Pipe] of 19 Edw. I., viz., from the account of the Escheator of Ireland from 17 to 19 Edw. I., touching some of the above-mentioned manors.  MS 610, f. 76b  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 76b

Abstracts of Acts of Parliament.  MS 610, f. 77  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 77
Language:  French

Contents:
Statutes enacted in the Parliament at Trim, 25 Hen. VI., before John Earl of Shrewsbury, the King's Lieutenant in Ireland. The only one specified is this: that if any of the King's officers be absent from Ireland by the King's command, their lands shall not be seized into the King's hands; or, if captured by pirates, malefactors, or enemies, their offices shall not be granted to others.

Statutes enacted in the Parliament at Dublin, 36 Hen. VI., before Thomas Earl of King of Kildare, Deputy of Richard Duke of York, Lieutenant of Ireland. This one only is specified; that all persons advanced to benefices in Ireland should reside on the same, or otherwise forfeit the issues and profits.  MS 610, f. 78  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 78
Language:  French

Contents:
Statutes in the Parliament at Dublin, 5 Ed. IV., before Thomas Earl of Desmond, Deputy of George Duke of Clarence, Lieutenant of Ireland. Only one is specified; that whereas certain persons enfeoff chaplains and others to their use of lands which they claim, and thus obtain writs and make suit against the real tenants, who have no challenge in law against the King's officers (sheriffs, coroners, or jurors), all persons thus sued shall have such challenge.
Statutes enacted in the Parliament at Dublin, 11 Edw. IV., before Thomas FitzMorrice, Earl of Kildare, Justiciary; that no owner, master, purser, or mariner of any ship or boat do take more freight for a horse passing between England, Ireland, and Wales than 5s., for a "romlote" 12d., and for a hawk 12d., on pain of 100s.; such persons having lately chared from 10s. to one mark for freight of a horse, and 2s. for a "romlote," whereas the prices were formerly 5s. and 10d. respectively.

Acts made in the Parliament at Dublin, 1 March, 14 Hen. VII.; that the Kidg do receive from every 20s. worth of merchandises brought into Ireland, 12d., and from ditto (except wine and oil) carried out of Ireland, 12d. All such wares to be entered in the customers' books before being removed from or put into any ship, on pain of forfeiture, half to the King, half to the "spier.  MS 610, f. 79  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 79

5 Pages.
Language:  English and Latin

Contents:
Statutes made in the Parliament at Dublin, 1 May, 28 Hen. VIII., before Lord Leonard Gray, Deputy of Henry Duke of Richmond and Somerset, Lieutenant of Ireland; continued at Kilkenny, 26 July, at Cashell 28 July, at Limerick, 19 Aug., and at Dublin, 28 Sept.; after which date it was prorogued several times, and terminated 20 December, 29 Hen. VIII.: That all wears, purprestures, millponds, engines, and other obstacles on the river Boyne and other streams in Meath and Uriell, to the traffic of boats, wherries, and other vessels between Drogheda, Trim, the Navan, and other places, and to the great hurt of the "salmon fry" in the said river, be broken and removed; that seven feet of plain ground on both sides of said rivers be free to all boatmen for drawing their boats by men or horses, etc.
Statutes made in the Parliament at Dublin, 13 June, 33 Hen. VIII., before Sir Anthony St. Leger, Deputy; prorogued several times, and continued at Limerick, 5 Feb., at Trim, 12 June, [34 Hen. VIII.], and at Dublin, 6 Nov., after which date it was prorogued several times, and was dissolved 19 Nov. [35 Hen. VIII.]: That the Act of the Parliament of England of 21-22 Hen. VIII., touching the aged poor and impotent, and "vagabonds and mighty strong beggars," be enacted for and observed in Ireland

The names of the Houses Freers sold in Ireland in anno 37 Henrici 8vi." [This and the two following articles have been calendared in Vol. I. pp. 199, 200, from the original (?) in Carew MS 602, in which the date "37 Hen. VIII." does not appear. That date is probably a mere conjecture of the copyist.]  MS 610, f. 83  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 83

Contents:
The payments made by the King's Serjeant for his purchase," 33 Hen. VIII.
The payments made by the King's Attorney for his purchase.

Proofs extracted out of Records, showing by whom the country of the Decie hath been from time to time possessed, and also a pedigree how the same hath continued by descent or grant.  MS 610, f. 85  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 85

Contents:
Grant to Thomas FitzAnthony of co. Waterford and Dungarvan Castle.--Chart. 17 John, m. 9. Turr. Lond.
Mandate to the Justiciary to seize into the King's hand the land of Desmond, alienated by Thomas FitzAnthony to various persons, and to deliver the same to Richard De Burgh, to whom the King had granted it.--Claus. 11 Hen. III., m. 5.
The realm of Ireland was given by Henry III., in his 39th year, A.D. 1255, to his son Prince Edward.--Pat. 52 Hen. III., m. 9. Turr. Lond.
Prince Edward by his grant confirmed Decye, Desmond, &c., unto John FitzThomas, who had married Margery, daughter and heir of Thomas FitzAnthony, at the yearly rent of 500 marks, in anno regni Regis Hen. III., 44."--Chart. 20 Edw. I., m. 48. Turr. Lond.
Power to the King's nephew, Henry, son of the King of Almain, to revoke all the lands alienated without licence by Prince Edward, to whom the King granted all the land of Ireland, contrary to the King's grant, which provided that the said land should not be separated from the Crown of England.--Pat. 52 Hen. III., m. 9, in schedula.
Queen-gold to be paid in Ireland to Eleanor, wife of Prince Edward.--Ibidem m. 26, (sic). [This is described more fully at f. 66 of this MS.]
John FitzThomas died seized of the Decye, Desmond, &c.--Escaet. et Inquisit. 10 Edw. I., No. 21. Turr. Lond.
King Edward I. regranted unto Thomas FitzMaurice, grandchild unto John FitzThomas, unto whom the said King (when he was Prince Edward) had granted Decye, and Desmond, &c."--Chart. 20 Edw. I., m. 28. Turr. Lond.
Thomas FitzMaurice died seized of Dungarvan Castle.--Inquisit. 28 Edw. I., No. 34. Turr. Lond.
Maurice FitzThomas, son to Thomas FitzMaurice, being the first Earl of Desmond, in anno 16 Edw. III., entailed all his lands, whereof Decye, Desmond, etc. was a part, which is to be found in the Remembrancer's Office in the Exchequer, in the Records of Trinity Term in annis 3 et 4 Phil. et Mariæ, Rot. 6; et in temp. Reginæ Elizab. ibidem existent.
Thomas Earl of Desmond, beheaded at Droghedagh, and attainted of high treason in anno 7 Edw. IV.; to be found in the Records in the Castle of Dublin.
A feoffment made by Thomas FitzThomas, Earl of Desmond, wherein the Decye was by him confirmed unto his cousin-german Gerald FitzJames, and his son John, in anno 21 Hen. VIII., to be found in the Protonotary's Office in the province of Mounster in Ireland.
Note, that James Earl of Desmond, father unto Thomas Earl of Desmond, attainted, did give the Decye unto his second son, Gerald, ancestor unto Sir John FitzGerald, living in anno 1619.

Pedigree of the FitzGeralds, Lords of Desmond and the Decye, beginning with Thomas FitzAnthony.  MS 610, f. 86  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 86

A summary Discourse proving the Deacis of Desmond to be as well the ancient as the immediate right and inheritance of the Crown of England.  MS 610, f. 87  1612

Former reference: MS 610, f. 87

Contents:
It was granted by King John to Thomas FitzAnthony, who died thereof seized without issue male, having one daughter, Marjery, afterwards married to John FitzThomas of the Geraldines. The said grant was confirmed by Edward I., [when Prince Edward] to the said John FitzThomas, with the yearly reservation of 500 marks and other services to the Crown in 44 Henry III.
Then, after some descents cast, the house and right line of the said John FitzThomas, the King's patentee, was corrupted by the attainder of his succeefling heir, Thomas FitzJames, Earl of Desmond, arraigned and executed for high treason at Dredaghe in the reign of Edward IV. The said house and attainder of blood was never restored by any record appearing, but rather continued more by sufferance and the opportunity which the divisions of the Houses of Lancaster and York (together with the turbulence of this kingdom) afforded, than by any other providence or matter appearing.
Then the said house was again attainted, first by Parliament in Garratt late Earl of Desmond, and then in James FitzThomas, attainted by his own confession before Sir George Carew, knight, then Lord President of Mounster.
Objections to this title.
First, it will be alleged that the grant of Edward I. is insufficient, because Prince Edward was not enabled to make any such grant in the lifetime and reign of his father.
In answer thereof, it is apparent to the world, as also in Rolls of the Tower (if not here), that the 39th year of the reign of King Henry III., his said son, Prince Edward, was married to Eleanor, daughter to the King of Spain, at which time his father granted him the kingdom of Ireland, the Earldom of Chester, and government of Gwine (Guienne) in France; so as his said grant of the Deacis and Desmond to John FitzThomas," is good.
Secondly, it will be alleged that the heirs of Deacis have continued in quiet possession these four or five descents, and that they are descended of the ancient line of Morishe, the first Earl of Desmond, before any of the said attainders. For answer thereunto, the said Morishe the first Earl being then possessed of the Deacis made an estate tail of all his lands to the use of his heirs males," dated 16 Jan., 16 Edward III.
Then cometh James, second son to Garrett the Poet, and grandchild to the said Morice, the first Earl, to be Earl of Desmond by unjust disinheriting of his nephew Thomas, son to an elder brother, which was banished into Normundy, and there died without issue; which James had two sons, viz., Thomas, which was executed for treason at Dredagh, as aforesaid, and Garrett his second son.
The said James, contrary to the intent of the said state tail, passed the lordship and country of the Deacis to the said Garrate his second son, predecessor to Sir John FitzGarrate, the now possessor of the Deacis.
It followeth then that the said James being but tenant in tail, and having no interest but for life, could pass no such estate in fee; and so consequently the said estate of James to his second son Garrett of the Deacis is void to all purposes, as well to him as to Sir John FitzGarrett that now holdeth the Deacis under the said estate.
So then the demesne land and inheritance of the Deacis is duly fallen to the Crown by the several attainders before specified as being descended in the right line of the eldest house from John FitzThomas, the King's patentee, and from Morice the first Earl before mentioned.
And that there was a continued claim made by the Earls of Desmond successively to the lordship of the Deacis may as well appear by the overthrow given at Aghvane to Garrett late Earl of Desmond when he came to distrain for his rent, as by the several other proofs which he produced soon after [of] a continual claim in his predecessors, in his pleading of that title before the Council of England.
And lasty, if Sir John FitzGarrett could derive any good title to the demesne land of the Deacis, as he cannot, yet can he never avoid the King's ancient rent reserved upon John FitzThomas by Edward I.'s grant, the rather that the same was paid as by a rent-charge found upon the Treasurer's account thereof may appear.

List of "The Lords of Parliament in Ireland as they were marshalled in the Upper House.  MS 610, f. 89  May 1613

Former reference: MS 610, f. 89

Copy of patent of the creation of Sir Richard Wingfield as Viscount of Powerscourt. Dublin, 18 Feb., 16 James. I.  MS 610, f. 91  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 610, f. 91

4 Pages.
Language:  Latin

Carew Manuscript  MS 611  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 611

CONNAUGHT and THOMOND.  MS 611, p. 234  [27 March 1574]

Former reference: MS 611, p. 234

24 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. IV, document 5.

Contents:
"The Division of Connaught and Thomond as it is now bounded, viz., the east and south parts, with the river of Shenon on the west side, with the great ocean sea on the north, with the great Logh Earne; which all are divided into several shires or counties as followeth, viz.:--
"Thomond--in the one county to be named the county of Clare.
"Connaught--in four counties to be named the counties of Galway, Mayo, Slyggagh, Roscomon.
"Summa of the counties, five,--which are divided into several baronies, and the baronies into plowlands, of so many of the counties as have been travelled by the Lord President and Council of Connaught, and the rest are set forth according such division as hath been made by Sir Thomas Cusake, Knight, and others her Majesty's Commissioners.
"The county of Clare--containeth whole Thomond, being in length from Leymeconcollen to Killalowe 45 miles, and in breadth from Limerick to Beallaleynee 25 miles; which of ancient time was divided into nine troghkyeds or hundreds, and is now appointed to be contained in eight baronies," viz., Tullaghnenaspule, containing the Mac Nemaries' otherwise Mortimers' country, in which the Baron of Inshyquyn and Donell Reogh Mc Nemare are chief; Dangen, containing West Mac Nemares' country, in which Shane Mc Nemare is chief; Cloynetherala, containing East Corkewasken, Tege Mac Mahone chief; Moyartha, containing West Corkewasken, Turlagh McMahoun chief; Tuoghmore y Conour containing Corkemroe, Sir Donell O'Brien chief; Gragans, containing the country of Buren, O'Loghlen chief; Tullagh Idea, containing the troghkeyd of Kylveroge, Sir Donell O'Brien chief; Cloynerawde, containing the troghkied of Cloynerawde and the islands, the Earl of Thomond chief. Plowlands in these 8 baronies, 140; parish churches, 79; castles, 172. The names of the parishes, gentlemen, and castles are given. [The length and breadth of each barony are stated, with the number of ploughlands, at the rate of 180 acres to the ploughland.]
Bishoprics within this county:--Bishopric of Killalowe, Muriertagh O'Brien custos; bishopric of Fyneboreñ, vacant.
Abbeys and religious houses within this county:--Abbeys of Clare (possessed by Sir Donell and Tege McConor his brother), Inish (by James Nellan), St. John's (a nunnery, by the Baron of Inshiquyn), Corkomoree, Island Chanens (by the Earl of Thomond), Kiltana, Quynhye (occupied by friars), and Inishcronan.
"The county of Galway--containing the countries of Clanricard, Imany by west the Suk, Syllanchy, Ieher Connaght, Clanconway and Corkomoe, being near 50 miles in length, and 30 in breadth--is now appointed and divided into 15 baronies," viz.:--Longford, containing the country of Syllanchy and Clonvicknoyne by west Sucke, O'Madin, Owen O'Madin, Cogh O'Madin, and Shane ne Moye being chief in the same; Letrym, containing the country Toeheloman, the Earl of Clanricarde chief; Loghreogh, containing Eraghtowge, Monteralyee, and McHubbard's lands, the Earl of Clanricarde, McOwge, and McHubbard, chief; Dunkellyn, containing the Clanhenries' lands, and Kilnalgory, Mary, and the lands of Athenry, the Earl of Clanricard, John Oge FitzJohn Fitz-Edmund, and Shane McBrene McGyllekelly, chief; Kiltaraght, containing Lynaly, Eraghtreamon, and Kielovieragh, O'Shaghnes, McRemon, O'Heyn, and Owen Mautagh O'Hein, chief; Arran, containing the islands of Arran, seven leagues distant from Galway into the main sea, Murrogh ne Doe O'Flairty, chief; Ballenehence, containing the two Conymares, Murragh ne Doo O'Flairty, chief; Muikullen, containing Cosarge, Gnovore, Gnoveg, Loghcurb, and Keildromedirge, Morogh ne Doo, chief; Beallamoe, containing Clancomvay, T. McDavy and Hubert Boy McDavy, chief: Dunmore, containing Conikue, the Lord Bremingham, chief; Clare, containing Moyntagh McHugh, Moynter Moroghowe, and Maghere Reogh, John Burke FitzThomas, MacHugh and MacCreamon, chief; Kyllihane, containing the whole Corohons and Achiart, Connor Oge O'Kelly, chief; Kilconell, containing Toehycally, Pobullkewgh and Eraght Carbery, Wm. O'Kelly, chief; Kingstown, containing Maghree Vouvoye, Maghre Altagh, and the lands of Athenry, John Wall and Ullige Oge Beg and the Dolphinagh, chief; Teagwyn, containing Dowghslighty, Kally and Corkomoe, Melaghlen and Tege O'Kelly, chief. The names of the parish churches, gentlemen, and castles in these baronies are specified.
Bishoprics within the county of Galway.--The bishopric of Duaceñ, Stephen Kirwane incumbent. The bishopric of Clonfert, Roland Burke incumbent. The bishopric of Anaghconeñ, Mr. Laly ["Latly" in MS.] incumbent.
Abbeys in Galway.--Portumna (possessed by the Earl of Clanricarde), Millik (by the said Earl), Kilcorban (by the said Earl), Cloyntoyskerte (by Redmond Burke's brother), Monaster Ogormagan (by the Earl), Clonfert (by the Bishop of Clonfert), Kynalehyne (by the Earl), Kilmacwogh, Kilbought (by the Earl), Loghreogh (by the Earl), Athenry, Galway (by the commons of the town), the Hill Abbey by Galway (by the commons of the same), Clare (by the Earl), Kilnamanagh, Rosriella (by the Gray Friars), Anaghcoyne (by the Earl), Teaghsaxin, Achrim (by the Earl), Kilconell (by the Gray Friars), Monaster Leve, the cell of Holyrood, the cell of Kaltraghne Palice, Cloynkinkerill, Knockmoy (by Nicholas Fitz-Symons of Dublin), cell of Crewan, Kilmorenetohee, St. John's in Toam, Monester ne Skryne, the Trinity Abbey, Dunmore (by John Burke FitzThomas), nunnery of Kilcrewnaght (by the Earl), Eney, Monester Connaght, the Third Abbey in Aren, St. Mary by west Galway (by the town). Sum of the abbeys in this county, 36.
"The county of Mayo--containing Ewghter Connaght and such other countries as are under Mac William Ewghter, and are divided into baronies, to be named as followeth; but the same county is not as yet divided into plowlands, by reason whereof the parishes could not be put in order of the baronies, but are written by themselves."
Baronies.--Croslwyhin, containing McMoris' country; Kilvean, containing Konyculy and Ewghterhire, in which William Burke Fitz John, Edmund Burke MacThomas Vaghery, and the Clan Jonyns, are chief; Rosse, containing the Joyes', the Walshes', and Partriches' lands, Mac Thomas and McTybod chief; Muriske, containing Owleymale and the [Qu., mistake for "other."] lands, viz., Inyshturke and Inyshoirke, Cliera and Aukilles, O'Male, chief; Bures, containing Owle Clane, Phillipin, Owle Ewghter, and Slight Mc Tybbot's lands, Richard en Iren, chief; Kunermore, containing Erest and Dondonell, Mac Vadin, chief; Many, containing Tyreawlee and the Cusakes' country, John McOlyverus otherwise Mc William and Mc Vadin, called Baron Barnett, chief; Burisker, containing Clancuan, Karee, and Moynter, Creghan, MacWilliam, Burke, and McPhillipin, chief; Beallalahane, containing Gallenga, MacJordaine otherwise Baron Dexeter, chief; Beallahaunes, containing Clancostelagh, MacCostelow otherwise Baron Nanngle, chief. The nanes of the gentlemen and castles in these baronies are specified.
Names of "certain spiritual dignities and other livings, both parsonages and vicarages and parish churches, within the county of Mayo."
Abbeys and religious houses in Mayo.--Rahrany, Killinbreanyn, Cong (by Domynicke French for Captain Collyer). The following "are possessed either by friars or rebels, so as her Majesty hath no commodity by the same:" Ballaghineaske, Ballinrobba, Mayo, Moyriske, Clyera, Inishturke, Bures-Owle, Crosmolyne, Moyne, Rosserke, Ballintubber, Bures-Caree, Teaghboyhyn, Stradin-Ballahane, Owrelare, Banyde, Beallahawnes. Sum of abbeys within this county, 21.
Bishoprics within this county.--The archbishopric of Toame and the bishopric of Mayo, Mr. Laly incumbent; the bishopric of Killale, Owen O'Galaghow, by the Pope's bull, incumbent.
"The county of Sliggagh--containing O'Connor's country, the two MacDonoghes', O'Dwyde, and O'Ruirke's country, with other, divided into nine baronies named as followeth, being not as yet divided into plowlands, nor the parishes known."
Baronies.--Ballinvotte, containing Tireherely and the Coren, the two Mac Donoghes chief in the same; Ardnery and Ardglas, containing Tirerogh and Cuelcarny ("there are 24 castles and over within these two baronies, whereof I could learn the names but [of] a very few"); Dromcheu, containing Carbery, Nagyny, Mogenee, O'Connor Sligo chief; Dromahier, containing O'Ruirke's country by west Sleven Iren and the Dartery, O'Rwirke chief; Letrym, containing O'Rwyrke's country by east Slevenyeren; Mynes, containing one of the Moynter Aleys; Raney, containing the other Moynter Aley; Beallasedery, containing Coullowen, Maghery, Leyne, and Kuelcuan.
Abbeys.--Sliggagh (occupied by friars), Ardenery (by friars), Skryne (by friars), Ballinvotte (by friars), Temple ["Tetemple" in MS.] (by friars), Grange More (by friars), the Black Abbey in Moyhell (by the Dominicans), the Gray Abbey in Moyhell (by the Franciscans), Dromahier (by friars), Beallesedery (by friars), Cowrte; total, 11.
In the same county is the bishopric of Acad' (Achonry), Owen O'Harte incumbent.
"The county of Roscomon--containing Omany by west the Suke, the Maghery Connaght, and Moylurge, with others, divided into six baronies."
Baronies.--Muikarnayn, containing Cloynvicknoyn and the Faes by east the Suk, Shane ne Moy Brene, Caragh O'Kelly, and O'Naghten being chief in the same; Athloyne, containing the Imany by east the Suk, O'Kelly, Hugh O'Kelly, O'Fallon, McCogh, O'Murye, and McEdmund, chief; Ballintubber, containing Maghry Connaght; O'Flyn and O'Flanigan's lands, O'Connor Dun, O'Flyn, and O'Flanigan, chief; Monaster Buille, containing Moyloirge, MacDermott and the sept of Owen McDermot chief; Tireone, containing Toehohanly and Tyreone, O'Birne and O'Hanly chief; Roscomon, containing Toalleg and the Clowynty in the East, O'Connor Roe and O'Hanley chief.
Abbeys.--Cloyntoyskert (hard by Beallalege), Athlone (occupied for the commodity of that house), the cell of Beallanenee (by Edmund O'Fallon), Skryne, St. John's (by Christopher Davers, now usurped by rebels), Bwyle (by Patrick Cusake) and the Trinity Abbey (by John Crofton), "both usurped by rebels", Elffen (by friars), Tuilske (by the Baron of Delvin, but now occupied by friars), Kilvoir (by friars), Roscommon, having lands, (by Mr. Strange), Roscomon, having no lands, the cell of Lysonvhy (by friars).
In the said county is the bishopric of Elffen, Rolland Burke incumbent.
"The names of certain castles and towns within the county of Clare that were builded and erected by Englishmen:-- Inshiquyn and O'Brien's Bridge, Inysh and Qwynhy, Clare and Bonratty. In old time these were good market towns, and had English jurisdiction in them, and were governed by portriffes and other officers by authority of the King of England; but now they are all wasted and destroyed in a manner, saving the castles, and no part of the towns left but old houses of stone work, broken gates, and ruinous walls.
"The names of certain towns and castles within the county of Galway which were builded by Englishmen in like manner:-- The castle of Myllyke, which was a very fair house situated upon the Shenon, and her Majesty's own inheritance, with other buildings thereabout, which was destroyed by the Earl of Clanricard's sons in their rebellion. In old time it was a good market town, and now there remaineth nothing but the abbey and certain other old buildings thereabout where the town was, and the castle is clean destroyed, the Earl and his son John (one of the destroyers thereof) being joint tenants to the Queen's Majesty for 21 years by indenture. The castle of Longford was made by Englishmen, and was a good market town, and is now all destroyed saving the castle, which doth remain in O'Madin's lands. The castle of Portumna in like manner. The town of Cloynferte in like manner. The castle and town of Cloyndaghaw. The town of Loghreogh was built by Englishmen, and besides the castle, which is a goodly place, the town thereabouts is well ditched and trenched, and fair walls begun, but not finished, having three fair strong gates made like three castles, the streets well divided and cut; and for the most part it was builded within the walls with houses of stone work, which are now partly destroyed and ruinous. The compass of it is great, and is a very convenient place for a garrison to lie in. It hath been within this thirty years a good market town, but now there is none, and from the first foundation thereof was ruled by a portriffe of English race, to be chosen by the inhabitants thereof, as in other places it is accustomed; but about three or four years past the name of portriffe with all that civil jurisdiction was put down by the Earl of Clanricarde, who committed the government of the town to his constable, whereby all English orders ceased there. Also the towns of Teaqwyn, Aghrymeomany, Callogh, Ardrahane, Kilmacwoagh, Clare, Muikullen, Anaghcoyne, Toame, Dunumayn, Dunmore, Turlaghnioghane, were good market towns, whereof some were destroyed in old time about 30 or 40 years ago, and some during the late rebellion, so as in some places there is nothing left but the castles, and in other places the bare walls and broken gates only. The town of Athenry, a fair large town, well walled, with strong towers, and hath been destroyed by the Earl of Clanricard's sons and people during the late rebellion.
"The names of certain castles and market towns which were built by Englishmen in the county of Mayo:--Shruher, Kilvean which was governed by a portriffe, Ballinrobbe, Castle-Kirke, Ballymonagh, Bures-Care, Bures-Owle, Ballalahane, Lehence, Mayo, Rosse, Castle-More-McCostelou, which were all good market towns, and for the most part were ruled by portriffes, but now (saving the bare castles in some) the towns are all destroyed, whose broken gates and ruinous walls are this day to be seen.
"The county of Roscommon.--Roscoman, Athlone, Beallaleg, Aleg, St. John's, Beallaslow, Ballintubber. All these, saving the bare castles, are destroyed. The walls and gates of the towns, broken and ruinous, do appear this day.
"And in the county of Sliggagh, the town of Sliggagh and other places, which, and all the towns aforesaid, were destroyed by the Burkes and others, to the great hindrance of her Majesty's service, and loss and discomfort of her subjects."
Copy. Undated. [In Mr. Hamilton's Calendar the date is given as 27 March 1574.]

The MARSHAL of ENGLAND'S LANDS in IRELAND.  MS 611, f. 14b  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 611, f. 14b

5 Pages.
Language:  Latin

Contents:
I. In the court of Henry III. in the 31st year of his reign the whole of the Marshal's inheritance in Ireland was divided among the daughters of William the Marshal: and this is the portion of Matilda, who was married to Hugh Bygot, Earl of Norfolk, chiefly in co. Catharlaght; viz., the borough [of Catharlaght?], Fydardia, Thamolyng, the Island, "corpus Comitatus," Ballydougan, Ballysax (in co. Kildare.)
II. Rental of the possessions of the Lord Marshal of England within the land of Ireland, viz., town of Rosse, a mill and a ferry there, town of Hervey Island, perquisites of court there, the wear of Corkery, perquisites of court at Ballykerok, meadow of Rose, and [rents?] from various persons.
III. Title of Thomas Duke of Norfolk, Great Treasurer and Earl Marshal of England, and of Maurice Barkeley, knight, to the county and manor of Catherlaghe, the baronies of Obugi, Oboy, Odron, and Forde, rent in Owristowne, the castle, island, and manor of Durbarr, in co. Wexford, the passage of the ferry, near Rosse, suit of court of Rosse, and the manor of Ballysax, as kinsmen and heirs of Thomas Brotherton, formerly Earl of Norfolk, and Earl Marshal of England, and Mary his wife (showing the pedigrees).
IV. Inquisition taken at Rosse before Henry Stanyhurst, deputy of Ralph Stanyshe, escheator in Ireland, on Thursday after St. Simon and St. Jude, 13 Hen. IV. (Names of jurors.) Thomas de Moubray late Earl Marshal, deceased, held the castle and manor of Ilon, the manor of Old Rosse, the passage of the ferry near Rosse, and the suit and service of the sovereign and commonalty of Rosse, who held of him the territory (terrenum) called the Tower of Hooke.. The said Thomas died 4 June, 6 Hen. IV., and John de Moubray, his brother, is his next heir.
V. Inquisition taken at Cath[erlagh] before the Escheator's deputy (as above), on Saturday after St. Edward the King, 13 Hen. IV. (Names of jurors). Thomas de Moubray, late Earl Marshal, held the castle and manor of Cather[lagh], the baronies of Obugye, Oboye, Dron (Odrone), and Forde, and a rent in Overstone.
VI. List of knights' fees in Ireland [belonging to said Thomas de Moubray?]

"OFFICERS in IRELAND, anno primo R. Edwardi III., with their yearly fees."  MS 611, f. 105  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 611, f. 105

2 Pages.

Contents:
The Justice of Ireland, 500l.; Thomas FitzJohn Earl of Kildare. In the 2nd year, Roger Owtlawe, Prior of St. John's, the Chancellor, 40l.; the same Roger Owtlawe, the Justice holding pleas before the Justice and Council of Ireland, 40l.; Elias de Ashborne, "a Justice itinerant," 40 marks; Roger de Werthorpe. "A Second Justice itinerant,"----; ------ [blank]. Chief Justice of the Bench, 40l.; Nicholas Fastolf. A Second Justice of the Bench, 40 marks; John de Graunsett. A Third Justice of the Bench, ----; Roger de Preston. Custos Brevium & Rotulorum de Banco, 5l.; John de la Battalke. Narrator Domini Regis, 5l.; John Garnon. "Second Narraur" (sic), 5 marks; Simon FitzRichard. "A Sergeant for the King, "5 marks; Richard Manning.
"Privata Feoda,"
The Treasurer of Ireland, 40l.; Robert Poer. Chancellor of the Exchequer, 10l.; Thomas de Monte Pessulano. A Baron of the Exchequer, 10l.; Roger de Birthorp. A second Baron, 10l. (no name). Two Chamberlains of the Exchequer, 10l. A Remembrancer of the Exchequer 10l. A Summoner of the Exchequer, 4 marks. Two Ingrossers of the Rolls, 5d. a day in the term time. The Treasurer's clerk, 5d. a day when the Chequier is open. An usher of both the Chequiers, 1½d. a day. "A chaplain of the castle and chief [sic], 50s. per annum, and for wax ij s. Note, that a pound of wax cost 9d."
"Castles with the Constables, anno primo Ed. III.";--showing the payments to [the constables of] the castles of Alone, Raundon, Mackenegan, Kregfergus, Roscomon, Kildare, Limerick, Droughdaght, and Dublin, varying from 5l. to 66l. 13s. 4d., Kregfergus taking the highest sum. "To an ingener (engineer), 18l. 5s."
"Nota, that Henry Traheron and Walter de Vally [Wale, in margin] had in reward for taking of Donholt, the son of Arte Mc. Morow, which called himself King of Leinster, 110l."
In 4 Edw. III., John de Rodiard, Dean of St. Patrick's, Dublin, was Chief Justice of the [King's] Bench.

ST. THOMAS'S, DUBLIN.  MS 611, p. 365  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 611, p. 365

1 Page.
Language:  Latin

Contents:
I. Grant by Stephen, son of Odo de Karreu, to the monastery of St. Mary and St. Thomas the Martyr without the walls of Dublin, of the church of Trummore, with tithes, etc. Witnesses, Robert de Barry and others.
II. Grant by Richard de Carrewe to St. Thomas's, Dublin, of a burgage in Dungarvan. Witnesses, Philip de Prendergast and others.
"Extracted out of the ledger book of St. Thomas' Abbey in Dublyn, without date."

Henry VIII. to the Earl of Surrey.  MS 611, p. 329  [Oct] 1521

Former reference: MS 611, p. 329

2 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 18.


Related information: State Papers II. 88.

Contents:
Copy of MS 602, p. 70 (draft), as sent to Surrey; differing in some particulars.

EARLS of ORMOND and KILDARE.  MS 611, p. 55  28 July 1524

Former reference: MS 611, p. 55

4 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 23.

Contents:
Indenture between the Earl of Ormond, Deputy to the King in Ireland, and the Earl of Kildare, 28 July, 16 Hen. VIII.
"There is and hath been of long season debate, unkindness, and variance had betwixt the said Earls for divers oppressions, wrongs, burnings, robberies, and spoilings had, done, and committed by the confederates, adherents, and [...] of the same parties," for the pacifying whereof, and for other great urgent causes touching the good order and weal of this land of Ireland, the King has sent hither his commissioners, who, by the advice of the Council, have duly heard and examined the complaints of both parties, with the depositions of their witnesses, and have devised the following articles and agreements, which the said parties promise upon their oaths to perform.
(1.) The parties of their own free wills fully forgive and remit to each other all wrongs done to them before the date hereof, and will be friendly to each other; and neither of them will maintain or make peace with any of the King's enemies or rebels to the hurt or loss of the other.
(2.) If any variance happen between their friends or adherents hereafter, the said parties shall indifferently choose two persons to order the same, and in case the said two persons cannot agree, then that matter to be directed by the Lord Chancellor and the Privy Council of Ireland. If any variance hereafter fortune betwixt the Earls, neither of them shall revenge the same, but the party grieved shall complain to the Chancellor and Privy Council, whose order the Earls shall abide.
(3.) "Where there is claimed by the same Earl of Kildare certain arrearages of the subsidy in the counties of Kilkenny and Tipperary for the time that he was Deputy of this land, and for so much as it is somewhat doubtful to the Council, whether the same Earl should have the same subsidy within the said county (sic), by reason of the Act thereof made, the said Earl is content to remit unto the said (sic) all the same arrearages, and also all such arrearages as the same Earl of Kildare claimeth of the same subsidy as executor unto the late Earl of Kildare, his father."
(4.) Whereas the Earl of Ormond promised 100l. yearly to the Earl of Kildare as long as he was Deputy for his aid and benevolence, as appears by an award made between them; "since which time there is half a year past and more;" Kildare remits the said 100l. to Ormond, and the arrearages of the same.
(5.) Kildare claims the arrearages of the rents and profits of the manor of Callan, parcel of the King's inheritance, received yearly by Ormond during Kildare's deputation, but remits the same to Ormond.
(6.) Whereas Kildare "hath his stud of mares and colts taken by James FitzGerrott['s] sons, the said Earl of Ormond granteth to do the best he can to cause the same stud to be restored;" and to restore as many of them as came within the county of Kilkenny, or the value of them.
(7.) As to the oppressions, wrongs, and spoils done by divers persons of the band and peace of Kildare to the servants, tenants, adherents, and allies of Ormond, the latter remits the same to Kildare; and Kildare remits similar wrongs to Ormond.
(8.) Kildare grants to Ormond to gather and levy for Ormond "all the arrearages of the subsidy of the county of Kildare that is leviable and due" to Ormond during his deputation, and to pay the same to Ormond, except 100 marks, which for the business, and for the remission before specified, Ormond grants to Kildare.
(9.) If any doubt or grudge hap or grow hereafter betwixt them respecting any of these articles, the same shall be determined by the Chancellor, Chief Justice, and Chief Baron of this land, or by two of them.
(10.) Each of the parties remits and releases to the other all personal actions, suits, quarrels, and trespasses between them before the date hereof.
For performance of these covenants, Ormond and A.B., by their deeds obligatory of the date hereof, have bound them to Kildare in the sum of 1,000 marks; and likewise Kildare and E.D. by their deeds obligatory have bound them to Ormond in a similar sum.--Signed: P. Ormonde, E. of Kildare, James Denton, Raufe Egerton, Anthony Fitzherbert, J. Rauson, Prior, Th. Abbas S'ci Thomæ juxta Dubl., John Plunkett of Kyllen, Sir Nicholas Lord Houth, Richard, Prior of Louth, John Richard, Dean of Dublin, P. Brymigham, Justice, T. Netterville, Justice, Patrick White, Baron.
Copy.

GERALD EARL OF KILDARE.  MS 611, p. 49  4 Aug 1524

Former reference: MS 611, p. 49

5 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 24.

Contents:
Indenture, 4 August, 16 Hen. VIII., between the King and Gerald Earl of Kildare.
(1). For the true and faithful service that the Earl has done to his Grace, for the assured trust he has in the Earl's allegiance, and for such benevolent services and approves as the Earl can do in repressing Irish and English rebels, the King by his letters patent has constituted him to be his Deputy in Ireland during the King's pleasure.
(2.) The Earl for his part grants that he shall make no war or peace with Irishmen or others to or at the charge of the country or inhabitants of the same without assent of the Lords and (of ?) Council.
(3.) "That, as oft as he shall pass through the English pale to any hostings or journeys, or to parle with any Irishman, he shall not set his men to coyne upon the King's subjects within the English pale, but by bill made by the harbinger by the advice of two gentlemen of every barony where the said coyne shall be set, and that every of his men so liveried shall be content to have such meat and drink as followeth: that is to say, every horseman, captain of kerne and gallowglasse, to have, in flesh days, flesh, bread, and ale, and in fish days, fish or butter, and his kerne and boys such as the husband hath, or else to take but for every horseman 2d. a meal, every footman 1½d., and for every horsekeeper 1d., every chief horse 12 sheaves for a night and a day, every bearing horse 8 sheaves, and but one boy for a horse. And also the said Earl granteth that at such time as he shall set his men to coyne in the Marches, that they shall not take no coyne but after the said rate, and also but one boy to one horse."
(4.) "That, being at any Parliament, Council, or in his own private business in the Irish pale, [he] shall not take coyne or livery of any person but only upon his own tenants, but for to pay for man's meat and horse meat of every of his men and their horses, in manner and form following: that is to wit, for a horseman 2d. every meal, and for a horse boy 1d., and for every six reasonable sheaves of oats 1d., and for a bushel of oats 8d.; and that his said horsemen, yeomen, and horseboys shall be content with such meat and drink as the husbands have, paying 1d. for a meal therefor."
(5.) That at such time as he shall ride through the English pale to parle with any Irishman or otherwise, he shall take with him as small a company as he may conveniently for the safeguard of his person.
(6.) That he shall ordain musters to be kept in every barony every year or every two years; and also command every man to have harness and artillery according to his degree, as English spears, bows, and bills.
(7.) That he shall "compel no man to pay livery for any man that will not appear personally to receive the same, saving galloglasses, which shall have but sixteen in a battayle; which men so making default be commonly called blackmen in this land."
(8.) "That at such time as he shall put his men to livery within the English pale, he shall not livery them in one place but for one night, except Sunday; and if they have livery for the next night, he shall not livery them within the space of 9 or 10 miles to that place where they had livery the other night."
(9.) "That whereas his men take livery for a night or receive payment for the same, that then he shall in nowise take livery for them at any other place for the same night."
(10.) He shall not make any band or assurance with any Irishman that shall be prejudicial to the King, his heirs, deputies, and subjects of Ireland; nor grant pardons for heinous offences, as treason, murder, riots, routs, and unlawful assemblies, or like offences, but only by the advice of the King's Council.
(11.) "He shall not suffer any man to occupy the King's manors and lands that are yearly (sic) the King's and have been in the King's possession, but only such as have letters patents to show therefor."
(12.) He shall not purchase any lands depending in controversy between any of the King's subjects during the time of his deputation.
(13.) He shall endeavour to cause the shrives, coroners, and other the King's officers to execute their offices and all processe[s] to them directed.
(13.) He shall not make any officers of the King's Court, as the King's Bench, Common Place, and Exchequer, but such as shall be thought meet and able therefor, by the advice of the Council or the Justices and Barons of the said courts.
(14.) He is to cause sheriffs, escheators, coroners, and other officers to be made yearly in the shires of Meath, Dublin, Louth, Wexford, Kilkenny, Tipperary, Waterford, and Limerick; to cause justices of the peace to be made within the same shires, or as many of them as he may conveniently, and to cause them to keep quarter sessions yearly; and to allow the same justices for their costs of the fines and amercements that shall be assessed or made in the same sessions.
(15.) He shall dispend and lay out upon the reparations of the King's castles and manors of Dublin and Tryme, and others, of the King's rents and revenues of Ireland, the first year 40l., and [afterwards] 40 marks yearly during the time of his deputation.
(16.) "He shall endeavour himself to cause the King's subjects of the four shires to go in English apparel after their degree and power, and to use the English language, and to have the upper beards to be shaven and not to suffer them to grow, upon certain pains to be assigned by the Deputy and Council."
(17.) "He shall not procure, stir, or maintain any war against the Earl of Ormond, nor the Baron Delwyn, nor Sir William Darcy, nor against their sons nor servants, ne revenge any quarrel for him or for any other man against them or any of them, without the assent and advice of the King's Council."
(18.) He shall cause the ordinances devised by James Denton, clerk, Sir Rauf Egerton, and Anthony Fitzherberte, the King's Commissioners, and the Council, to be put in execution.
(19.) He shall provide that the Justices of this land and the Barons of the Exchequer may be yearly paid their fees and wages.
(20.) "He shall suffer and cause the same Earl of Ormond to have and receive the whole rents, revenues, and profits coming and growing of the King's manors, lordships, lands, tenements, rents, customs, fee-farms, and profits within Ireland, before the feast of the Nativity of St. John Baptist last past before the date hereof, and to have and enjoy all other profits and casualties that the same Earl of Ormond hath received before the date hereof; and the same Earl of Kildare to have all rents, revenues, issues, and profits, that be or shall come, grow, or be due of the same manors, lordships, lands, and tenements, customs, and fee-farms, since the same feast of the Nativity of Saint John Baptist, which be not received by the same Earl of Ormond."
(21.) He shall content and pay to the Earl of Ormond, within one year after Michaelmas next, the one half of the subsidy that shall be due to the King or his Deputy at the same feast, except only 10l. thereof, due to William Bushe, serjeant of the King's pantry, as Chamberlain of the Exchequer in Ireland; and also except 45l. thereof, which Kildare shall pay to Sir Bartholomew Dyllon for the arrearages of his fee as Secondary of the King's Bench in Ireland and Chief Remembrancer of the Exchequer.
For performance of these covenants Kildare binds himself, his heirs, and executors to the King in the sum of 1,000l., Irish money.
Copy.

PIERS BUTLER, EARL OF ORMOND, and MARGARET his wife.  MS 611, p. 7  5 Nov 1526

Former reference: MS 611, p. 7

3 Pages.
Language:  Latin

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 27.

Contents:
Letters patent stating that whereas on 13 May, 16 Hen. VIII., the King appointed Gerald, Earl of Kildare, to be Deputy of Ireland during pleasure, he revokes that pleasure with respect to the lordships of Tallan, [Callan?] Ballicallan, Damaugh, Kilmanaugh, and the chief rent of Downomogan, in co. Kilkenny, and the lordships of Lisronaugh and Kylmore O'Russhinge, in co. Tipperary, which he grants to Peter le Butler, Earl of Ormond, and Margaret his wife, and the heirs male of the same Earl, by the service of the fourth part of one knight's fee, to be paid to the Chief Baron of the Exchequer of Ireland. Provided that, if the premises exceed the annual value of 13l. sterling, the said Peter and Margaret shall pay to the King annually all rents and profits beyond that amount.
Witness, Gerald Earl of Kildare, Deputy. Dublin, 5th November, 18 Hen. VIII. "By the bill of the Lord King signed with his own hand, and directed to his Chancellor of Ireland of the date aforesaid, by authority of Parliament."
Copy.

SIR WILLIAM SKEFFINGTON, DEPUTY.  MS 611, p. 69  1528

Former reference: MS 611, p. 69

7 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 32.

Contents:
Instructions given by the King to Sir William Skeffington, Master of the Ordnance, appointed Deputy to the Duke of Richmond and Somerset, Lieutenant of Ireland.
He shall deliver the King's letters to the Chancellor and other councillors of Ireland, showing them the cause of his repair thither and his letters patent. The King sends with him 200 horsemen, and money for their wages. He is to reform all particular grudges and displeasures among the King's subjects, and chiefly between the Earls of Kildare, Desmond, and Ossory. He is not to employ the said horsemen or any other of the King's subjects in making any hosting or main invasion upon the wild Irishry at such charges of the country as are used without the express consent of the whole Council; but they are to attend to the sure preservation and defence of the said land.
"The said Deputy shall also take with him the letters patents under the King's seal of Ireland, devised upon all such articles and points as there were thought good to be enacted and passed by authority of the Parliament of his said land, which Parliament the Deputy shall call." He and the Council are to endeavour to pass such acts as by the King shall be devised, and consult together for the immediate attaining of a subsidy towards the alleviation of the King's charges, "payable for one year, to be ended at Michaelmas next, and that failing, for half a year, ending the same day, if they can so conduce it, and also to endure for as many years as they can attain the same; which thing is not to be tracted or retracted till the Parliament, forasmuch as percase the same shall not be assembled till Michaelmas next, but is with all convenient diligence to be practised and brought to pass before the said Parliament, if it may be." The same subsidy, and all other revenues, are to be paid to the Prior of Kilmainham, Under Treasurer there.
The Earl of Kildare has made faithful promise to the King to employ and endeavour himself for the annoyance of the King's rebellious subjects of the wild Irishry. When the Deputy shall not fortune to go in person, he shall, "at the acquisition (sic) of the said Earl," send to him part of the men of war now sent. "And the profits of such impositions, that is to say, of beasts or other things, that at any entry or exploit shall be imponed or had by way of patisment or agreement upon the enemies, always the moiety to be answered to the King's Highness to the hands of the said Under Treasurer, and the other moiety to remain to the Earl of Kildare (if he shall make the exploit and put the imposition), and to his company (not having the King's wages), to be ordered and divided by his discretion, as hath been accustomed."
Copy. Headed: Anno 1533. [This date does not appear in the original document, which exists in the Public Record Office, and is printed in "State Papers," II., 147.]

EARL OF OSSORY.  MS 611, p. 22  31 May 1534

Former reference: MS 611, p. 22

4 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 42.

Contents:
Indenture, 31 May, 26 Henry VIII., for the testimony and remembrance of such articles as Sir Peter Butler, knight, Earl of Ossory, at his departure from the King the day of these presents, has promised to observe, for himself and the Lord Butler his son and their heirs.
(1.) They will continue the King's faithful and liege subjects.
(2.) In consideration of the trust which the King has in the said Earl and his son, and of the "continual truth which always hath continued in him and his blood to the crown of England," the Earl promised that they would do their utmost for the suppression of the King's rebels; and the King is contented that the said Earl and his son shall have the leading and governance, under his Grace and his Lieutenant and Deputy, "of his subjects and inheritances of the counties of Kilkenny, Tipperary, and Waterford, and the count[ries] of Ossory and Ormond and elsewhere."
(3.) Whereas the King, upon manifold enormities alleged and proved against the Earl of Kildare, late his Deputy there, has not only discharged him of that room, but also appointed his trusty counsellor Sir William Skeffyngton, Master of his Ordnance, to repair thither at this time as his Deputy; and whereas the said Earl of Ossory has alleged that "the presence of the Earl of Kildare there, and such bonds of Irishmen and others as he made against him and to his annoyance heretofore" have hindered him from doing service to the King; the King has "restrained the said Earl of Kildare of repair into that his land."
(4.) The Earl of Ossory has promised that he and his son will assist the said Deputy, and rise out with him with their powers in all the King's causes, and invade the King's Irish and English rebels.
(5.) The said Earl and his son, "without the Deputy's assent, shall not make ne maintain the making of every Irish lord or captain, as of MacMorghe, O'More, O'Chonour, O'Karraile, and such other like," but assist and maintain the Deputy "for the making and admitting of such persons to those rooms and lordships; ne shall retain any of them upon their peace or war, but all those to be under the protection, war and peace" of the King.
(6.) The said Earl and Lord Butler shall assist, everywhere above the water of Barrowe, and elsewhere, the King's judges and other officers in the execution of his laws; compel all men under their rule to be obedient to the King's laws and officers; and provide sufficient jails within the counties of Kilkenny, Waterford, and Tipperary, for the sure keeping of felons and other transgressors.
(7.) They "shall do their best, with all their possible power, to attain to the King's possession his castle and honor of Dungarvan."
(8.) After the death of James late Earl of Desmond, notwithstanding his rebellion and offences, the King, trusting that Thomas, now Earl, according to his letters of submission and petition, would have demeaned himself like a true subject, granted livery of all the lands of the said James to the said Thomas, who, in Waterford before Sir William Skevington, then Commissioner, and others of the Council, "did not only give a solemn oath accustomed for an Earl to the King's Highness, but also did bind himself by indenture to his Grace" for the observance of his obedience and duty, and the reducing of his subjects in those parts to good order and subjection, which he has untruly transgressed. Therefore the Earl of Ossory binds himself and his son to endeavour to reduce the said Earl and other the King's English subjects in "these" parts to due obedience.
(9.) The Bishop of Rome's provisions and usurped jurisdiction have been the chief cause of the desolation and decay of Ireland, "by the abominable abuse whereof the cathedral churches, in monasteries, parish churches, and all other regular and secular, for the more part, in effect through the land, been in utter ruin and destroyed; for the said Bishop of Rome commonly hath preferred by his provisions to the administration and governance of them not only vile and vicious persons unlearned, being murderers, thieves, and of other detestable disposition, as light men of war, who, for their unjust maintenance therein for some time to expel the rightful incumbent, and other seasons by force of secular power to put the true patrons from their patronage, and other their misorders, have not only spent, wasted, and alienate such lands as the King, his noble progenitors and his nobles gave to the augmentation of God's divine service in the churches of that land, the exhibition and maintenance of the ministers of the same, and the utensils and ornaments there, but also by occasion of the same great wars hath been stirred amongst the King's people and countries virent (sic), brent in the copy in the Record Office, bishops and divers other persons spiritual and temporal murdered, and many other detestable things have ensued thereby." Therefore the King has willed his Deputy to resist with all his power the abuse and usurped jurisdiction of the said Bishop of Rome; and the Earl of Ossory has promised that he and his son will resist the said provisions with all their power.
(10.) Such of the Irish or English as shall be brought to good conformity by means of the said Earl and his son shall be favourably accepted, entertained, and aided by the Deputy and Council.
Copy.

MURDER OF THE ARCHBISHOP OF DUBLIN.  MS 611, p. 63  1534

Former reference: MS 611, p. 63

5 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 44.

Contents:
"The Excommunication of Thomas Fitzgerald and his uncles, for killing of the Archbishop of Dublin. Anno 1532." [This date is incorrect. The Archbishop was murdered 28 July 1534.]
Whereas Thomas FitzGerald, eldest son to Gerald late Earl of Kildare, not only procured John Telyng and Nicholas Wafer to put violent hands upon John Alen, late Archbishop of Dublin, Primate of Ireland, taking him prisoner at Hothe within the diocese of Dublin, and from thence conveying him to Tartayne, in the said diocese, but also in the same he, the said Thomas, accompanied with John FitzGerald and Oliver FitzGerald, brethren to the said late Earl, James Delahide, Edward Roockes, and divers other evil disposed persons, murdered the said Archbishop; we publish and declare all the said persons to be excommunicated. We also declare interdict the place where the Archbishop was killed, and likewise all cities, lands, towns, castles, villages, chapels, and other places wherein the said cursed persons are, or shall be; commanding all spiritual persons of this province of Dublin to cease from administration of divine service as long as any of the said persons shall be present, and to continue three days after their departure. We decree them to be deprived of all spiritual dignities and profits. To the terror and fear of the said dampnable persons we have rung these bells, erected this cross, and quenched these candles. And we cast these three stones towards their inhabitations.
Copy.

CONACIUS O'NEYLL  MS 611, p. 1  26 July 1535

Former reference: MS 611, p. 1

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 56.

Contents:
Copy of MS 603, p. 128.

HENRY VIII. to the LORD DEPUTY AND COUNCIL.  MS 611, p. 29  1535

Former reference: MS 611, p. 29

3 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 65.

Contents:
We have been advertised, to our no little displeasure, "that as well the musters of our army have not been taken monthly as at such time as view thereof hath been had, so as not only divers and many defaults both in lack of number and otherwise hath been perceived and noted, but also divers other abuses commonly practised among the captains of our army in giving passports by their own authority, fulfilling of numbers, and receiving of soldiers into wages, contrary to our pleasure, robbing and rifling our subjects, with such other misbehaviours too long here to be expressed, which hitherto hath not been repressed nor duly corrected." For reformation thereof we have appointed Lord Leonard Grey, Chief Marshal of our army there, Sir John Sentlowe, William Brabazon, Treasurer of our Wars, and John Allen, Master of our Rolls, or three or two of them at the least, "both for the two months last past at this present time, and at all other seasons from henceforth monthly before payment of any wages, to a view of muster of our said army, wherein we will they shall use their circumspection that none be allowed to take wages but such as be able persons, that is to say, every horseman with an able horse and otherwise furnished as appertaineth to a horseman, and every footman as to him belongeth; and [not only] upon the death or departure of any soldier by authority of any passport to be granted, upon causes and considerations to you and them or three or two of them, but also upon the offence, contempt, or misbehaviour of any captain or other of our army, they, three or two of them making relation thereof to you, to punish and amend the same indelayedly according to justice: wherein we will ye shall not only assist them at all times, but also advertise the captains and army of our pleasure as well in this behalf, as declare unto them that percase they or any of them shall continue to follow the same, they shall be assured of our high displeasure and indignation.
"And where heretofore ye have accustomed, for the more part, in your letters and advertisements unto us of the successes of our affairs, to write singularly by yourself, without making those that be of our secret Council privy thereunto, and part of them on the other side have semblably at divers times written unto us, both which conferred together we have noted in them some discrepance and confusion of matter, to our no little marvel; our pleasure is that from henceforth as well in all our causes and affairs ye follow the advice of our Privy Council, especially the counsel and advertisements of our said counsellors the Lord Leonard, the Treasurer of our Wars, and our Chief Justice, in all your proceedings, as ye, together with our Privy Council, and specially at the least with the same Treasurer of our Wars, our Chief Justice, and the most part of our Privy Council, by your writings jointly advertise us from time to time of the success of our affairs there, and none otherwise.
"Ye shall also understand that we, thinking you to be a man of activity, great knowledge, and experience, do consider not one [Sic; mistake for only.] the great charges which we have sustained by your counsel and persuasion for the repressing of the Geraldines, being the let as ye said of strength, profits, and commodities within that land, but also Thomas FitzGerald being now absent out of the land, it is not necessary to have footmen there at our charges, specially all this winter season, being no time propice for them to travail; will that percase ye and our Privy Council, consulting together, shall consider no great cause of necessity to retain them there for all this winter, ye discharge them all, or as many of them as by you and our Privy Council there shall be thought requisite, out of wages; assuring you that, if ye and the said Privy Council shall think necessary and expedient to have them or a more number to repair thither for executing of any exploits the next summer, they shall be appointed to arrive at such ports and places as ye shall advertise us by the 20th day of May at the farthest. Willing you with all celerity not only to be vigilant and industrious with the advice of our said Privy Council, as well in taking the hostages of such Irishmen and rebels of the North of Ireland and other borderers to our subjects, as [a]s hitherto de[li]vered none to you; not a little marveling that ye have omitted heretofore to take pledges of such as ye have parled and pacted with, whose pacts and promises ye know to be of no force without pledges, which nevertheless we remit to you and our said Privy Council's discretion; but also specially exclude Neile More out of our shire of Uryell, who, as we be informed, is the untruest man towards us within those parts; using further all your industry, travail, and diligence as politicly as you can for the more speedy apprehension of such traitors as this bearer, the Master of the Rolls, shall prescribe unto you; and setting order, redress, and reformation in the Marches of our Englishry and other our subjects there, as the Treasurer of our Wars and Chief Justice with the most part of our Privy Council shall advertise you, together with the advancement of our causes in our Parliament, with that diligence and dexterity as we may see success to follow of your fruits and doings that we daily expect, in and about the effectual increase of our strength, jurisdiction, revenues, and profits there, according to your many persuasions and writings unto us. Willing you also that ye, the Treasurer of our Wars, our Chief Justice, and Master of the Rolls, with the advice of such other of our Council as shall be present with you, shall advertise us with all celerity [of such] manors and lands as either the late Earl of Kildare or any other traitors attainted had, and of all other our revenues there, with the true value of the same without concealment; divers parcels whereof, upon considerations to us and our Council first certified and duly declared, we shall thereupon be contented to grant from us, upon reservation of reasonable rents, to certain persons being our subjects, such as we shall by the advice of our Council think good and expedient, to the intent that they, having the same, shall be more able to defend our frontiers against the rebellious Irishry, by reason whereof we shall be the less charged in resisting the spoils and robberies of the Irish rebels hereafter.
"Letting you understand further that, having assigned Lord Leonard Grey to repair thither again at this season in the same room and authority that he had there before, the leading and ordering of our army, we have willed and commanded him to demean himself in due reverence and obedience towards you, as to the honour and authority of your room, wherein ye represent our estate, doth appertain. Nevertheless we think it shall be your part on the other side to consider his nobility, being of our blood, and to use him and entertain him both according to the same, and our authority and trust committed unto him there. Willing and commanding you further that, for the due punishing of such as shall rather incline to the disordering of our army in robbing and spoiling of our subjects, as such other misdemeanours, than to the conservation of any good rule and quietness in the same, ye do from time to time be assistant to the Marshal of our said army, unto whom we have committed the order and direction thereof, as appertaineth to a Marshal; adding thereto our power, your industry, and endeavours for the undelayed execution of such malefactors and offenders after such sort as justice may take place and our subjects live in good conformity and quietness accordingly."
Copy. Headed: Anno 1535.

HENRY VIII. to the UNDER TREASURER OF IRELAND.  MS 611, p. 26  1535

Former reference: MS 611, p. 26

1 Page.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 66.

Contents:
We have been advertised that at all times when any exploits have been done against our rebels there, you have been ready to put yourself in armour, and have adventured your body against the same. Although we cannot but take your good mind and endeavour in very good part, yet, as you are our Under Treasurer and Receiver General of our revenues there, unless you set all other business apart, you will not be able to serve us either to our honour or profit. Therefore we command you not to adventure yourself in person at such exploits, unless it be in case of great necessity, or where you may be present to the advancement of our honour without the hindrance of your necessary business.
Copy. Headed: Anno 1535.

HENRY VIII. to the PARLIAMENT OF IRELAND.  MS 611, p. 27  1535

Former reference: MS 611, p. 27

1 Page.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 67.

Contents:
"The King's letter to the Commons assembled there in Parliament, moving them to contribution towards his charges in suppressing the Geraldines in Ireland. Anno 1535."
A certain motion was made to you in the last session for a benevolence to be granted to us by you our subjects of our lay fee within Ireland, but you made a certain argument and stay therein. We doubt not but you do all consider what importable charges we have been at lately for your defences, and that you would, though none instance were made to you, devise how to gratify us with some recompence, and to condescend to such an augmentation of our revenues there as might be able to defend you from the violence of all traitors and rebels. It shall be much to our contentation if you lovingly grow to some resolute point in the grant of the said benevolence, which we desire not for any notable gain, but for that we have such a zeal to reduce that land to a perfect conformity, that we would have some convenient furniture of yearly revenues there. We therefore desire you so to proceed in this matter, that we may have cause to think you have the stomachs of faithful subjects.
Copy.

HENRY VIII. to "the LORDS OF THE CLERGY IN IRELAND."  MS 611, p. 28  1535

Former reference: MS 611, p. 28

1 Page.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 68.

Contents:
By the relation and advertisement of our Deputy and Council we have learned that, "having regard to the great charges we have been at for your defences against the malicious attemptates of the Geraldines and others our rebels there, and minding partly some gratuity to 'redubbe' the same, and so to increase our revenues as we may the better defend you in all events without exhausting of our treasure here, you have granted unto us a certain yearly and continual rent, in augmentation of the revenues of our Crown, of the twentieth part of all and every your promotions, benefices, and possessions within that our land of Ireland." We give your our right hearty thanks, and desire you to be diligent in the leviation thereof.
Copy. Headed: Anno 1535.

EMBEZZLING of RECORDS.  MS 611, p. 33  1535

Former reference: MS 611, p. 33

1 Page.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 69.

Contents:
"Petition of the Commons of the Parliament in Ireland touching the embezzling of records of the King's lands. Anno 1535."
That, as the earldoms of March and Ulster, and the lordships of Trym and Connaught are annexed to the Crown, and all the records, rolls, and inquisitions in the treasury of Trym, which entitled the King to all the revenues of the said earldoms and lordships, of late were taken and embezzled by divers persons of malice prepenced; it be enacted by this present Parliament, that whatever person have any of the said records or know where they be, and do not deliver them or show where they be to the King's Council in the said land within two months, shall be deemed felons attainted; that it be lawful to the King and his heirs to re-enter and seize all such lordships and their appurtenances; that the King "may present to all and every manor, advowson of church or free chapel appending to any of the said honors, manors, or lordships, or to advowsons in gross, any presentation, confirmation, or ratification to the patron notwithstanding, and to seize all and every manner ward or wards, escheat, waifs, felons' goods, and all other things appertaining or belonging to the said earldoms and lordships," whereto the King's title cannot be shewed; and that this act extend not nor be prejudicial to such grants as were made by Richard, late Duke of York and Lord of Trym, to the Abbot and convent of Our Lady of Trym.
Copy.

HENRY VIII. to [the TOWN OF GALWAY].  MS 611, p. 42  28 April 1536

Former reference: MS 611, p. 42

3 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 75.


Related information: State Papers II. 309.

Contents:
For the furtherance of your weal, profit, and commodity, and the extirpation of all abuses, we command you to observe the devices and articles ensuing perpetually.
That no merchant or any other in Galway, go with merchandise or victuals into the country within 20 miles compass of the said town, save only to market towns, but sell their wares in the market of the town.
That all the inhabitants "do shave their over lips, called crompeaulis, and suffer the hair of their heads to grow till it cover their ears; and that every of them wear English caps."
That no man or man child do wear mantles in the streets, but cloaks or gowns, coats, doublets and hose, shapen after the English fashion.
That no man, woman, or child do wear saffron in their shirts, smocks, or any other garments, or have more cloth in the same than five standard ells of that country cloth.
That every man provide long bows and English arrows, "and haunt shooting, and specially every holyday," and leave all other unlawful games.
That the inhabitants endeavour to speak English and use themselves after the English fashion, and specially that "you do put forth your children to school to learn to speak English."
We are informed that, contrary to your privileges and jurisdictions, "to hold before the Mayor and his bailiffs there all manner pleas and actions and to be judges of the same," certain young commoners presume to have their voices in such processes and judgments, "inclining inordinate affection to their adherents and friends, to the raising of schism and controversy amongst you, and the disturbing of administration of justice." We therefore will that the Mayor and bailiffs there, calling to them four of the aldermen, do minister justice in all causes; "and if any person find him grieved for lack of indifferency, to complain to our Deputy and Council in Ireland; and if any commoner do rebuke the Mayor and his assistants, or repugn to obey their decrees or judgments, that it be lawful for the Mayor to put them to ward, and punish them according to their demerits."
We are also informed that "malefactors committing robberies and spoils be succoured and maintained with the Friars Minors and others, near that our town, who take upon them to have privileges as a sanctuary." We command you not to allow any such privileges or sanctuaries, but attach and bring before our judges all such malefactors. In case any friars will make resistance against you in executing the premises, you shall take them and bring them before our judges to be punished. "And read this clause to the friars."
That when O'Brene or any other Irishman is at war with our Deputy or our subjects of Limerick, you suffer no victuals, iron, salt, or other commodity to pass from you to them; and that none of you resort with any merchandise amongst Irishmen at any time.
We are informed "that at such seasons as strangers repair within the haven of Limerick, certain of you forestall the market of our said city, alluring and procuring the stranger merchants to repair out of the haven of Limerick to you, offering them advantage above the proffer of the said city, to their great disadvantage and commodity, and enhancing the price of foreign and alien merchandises to the profit of aliens." We command you to abstain from so doing.
Greenwich, 28 April, 28 Hen. VIII. Facsimile of the King's signature at the beginning.
Copy. Headed: "Ordinances for Gallwaye."

LORD CONATIUS O'NELE  MS 611, p. 4  1536

Former reference: MS 611, p. 4

2 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 80.

Contents:
Copy of MS 603, p. 77.

HENRY VIII. to the [LORD DEPUTY and] COUNCIL OF IRELAND.  MS 611, p. 32  1536

Former reference: MS 611, p. 32

1 Page.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 89.

Contents:
We have perused letters from you, our Chancellor, and others of our Council there to Lord Crumwell, Keeper of our Privy Seal, containing as well your proceedings against O'Bren and the pretended Earl of Desmond, as the mutiny in our army for want of money. We had already dispatched money to you, upon the arrival whereof we doubt not but you have taken order for the advancement of some notable exploits. We desire you to signify to us "what number of persons shall be meet to be retained there this winter, how and what sort ye will dispose the same, and upon what grounds and respects ye shall establish your determinations in that behalf;" and also to advertise us of "the names of such as were ringleaders and most brave in the refusal to do that to you was thought convenient, and so the chief occasioners of the said mutiny," to the intent we may cause them to be dismissed. "Finally we recommend unto you eftsones and the effect of our former letters touching the augmentation of our revenues there, and the establishment of the same in such a certainty as we may know at the return of William Budyr [Mistake for Body.] the perfect extent as nigh as the same may be conceived thereof."
Copy. Headed erroneously: Anno 1535.

The LORD DEPUTY and COUNCIL of IRELAND to HENRY VIII.  MS 611, p. 34  20 April 1537

Former reference: MS 611, p. 34

8 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 98.


Related information: Printed in "State Papers," II. 426, from the original in the Record Office.

Contents:
Your letters dated Westminster, 25th February last past, addressed to the whole Council, were delivered to me your Deputy on the 2d inst. I directed my letters to the Earl of Ossory and all others of the Council for their assembly together on the 6th. We whose names are subscribed, assembling accordingly, considered that one of the chief points contained in your letters was "that with such money as was to be had here, which ye willed us to levy immediately, we should dispatch as many of your army as we might; so as until we see what money might be had for that purpose," we thought we could not resolutely answer your letters, and agreed to defer our answer till this time.
To the first part of your said letters "concerning your revenues, and the usage of ourselves in the vain consumption of them," we answer that you "have appointed particular officers which have had only the trust and meddling with your revenues, and that we, the residue of your Council, had no dealing therewith, neither the charge thereof."
"To that point where your Majesty noteth in us a remissness that ye have spent so much money sithence the apprehension of Thomas Fittz Gerald, and how little honour or profit ye have received for the same; thereunto we say that none of your Council there, having the experience of this land, nor your Council here, judged it meet, immediately upon his apprehension, to discharge any part of your army, considering that his uncles and kinsmen, with all the Irishmen in manner of the whole land, were as then nothing stayed. And yet, immediately upon his committing to the Tower, 500 of your army were discharged out of wages, and afterward, upon the apprehension of his five uncles, which was done by great policy, far beyond the hope and expectation of all men in these parts, it was thought that there had been seen no better ne no more like time, within the remembrance of any now living, to proceed to a further reformation. And over that, at that season O'Brene, the pretended Earl of Desmond, O'Chonnor, and divers others being combined together, it was not thought meet then, being the beginning of a summer, if your Grace had been minded to a further reformation (as all we trusted), to abate your army, but rather increase the same. Nevertheless afterward, when we perceived all the summer in manner passing over, and your army not paid of their wages, so as they could do no service, but mutinied amongst themselves, whereby such misorders and inconveniences did grow amongst them, that in manner we had as much or more trouble to stay them as we had our adversaries; we advertised you and your Council divers times what hurts and hindrances the lack of money did in your Grace's affairs; in default whereof the more part of your army did but lie still, vainly consuming your treasure and impoverishing the poor inhabitants of the country.
"To that your Highness doth write that (as we write) your revenues be worth 7,000 marks by the year, besides your first fruits, tenths, and such other things as ye be entitled unto, which is thought will amount to as much more, and then will your casualties amount to no small thing, ne that grant which ye doubt not but your loving subjects of the lay fee will make unto you both of Munster and other places:-- truth it is, that we did write to your Grace that your revenues amounted to 7,00[0] marks a year, which we did upon this ground. Your Highness did write unto us to advertise you of the extent of your revenues; whereupon we called your Under-Treasurer to us, demanding of him the knowledge thereof; who showed us that your revenues of record in your Exchequer by the attainders and other grants by Parliament by estimation should mount to 5,000l. yearly, whereof he showed us he had advertised your Council. And to the first fruits they have been but lately granted, and few benefices have been void since the grant; and what the yearly extent of them will amount unto, it cannot be known but after the receipt of them a year or two.
"Concerning the tenth, there is no such grant made. As to your casualties, your Grace knoweth they be not certain; for wards, marriages, relieves, escheats, felons' goods, and such like, may be some year less or more than some other. Therefore that person of reputation of whom your Highness in your said letters maketh mention to be sent hither, at his coming may examine by his wisdom the certainty thereof.
"As to any grant which is made or like to be made by your subjects of the lay fee, there is none such, neither is like to be; for at the being here of William Bodie, it was demanded of the Commons, for the augmentation of your revenues, that they should grant the 20th part yearly of all men's revenues, spiritual and temporal; whereat they of the lay fee sticked, insomuch as they sent thither two of the Common House to your Majesty, to declare their inability therein."
None of us have the receipt of your revenues, but only the Under-Treasurer, who has sent to you and your Council, by William Body, a declaration of his account from the time of his hither coming until a certain day; and from that day hitherto he is ready to yield his account.
"Though the extent of your revenues amounteth to the sum of 5,000l. yearly, a great part of that came in but lately by the grant of this Parliament. And further, albeit that the extent is 5,000l. and above yearly, yet having now examined the Treasurer and Barons of your Exchequer how they be paid, they have informed us that a 1,000l. thereof by the year is waste, not leviable ne paid, [In the "State Papers" a fresh paragraph is made to commence here.] forasmuch of your revenues as appertained to the Earl of Kildare, in the county of Limerick, your Grace hath nothing of it, nor shall not have, until the pretended Earl of Desmond be at some point; [In MS 608, p. 69a is the following statement, evidently derived from this letter:--"Anno 1537, the King's revenue in Ireland was not full 5,000l. per annum."] of whose offers, I, your Grace's Deputy, have at several times advertised you and your Council, to the intent I might know your pleasure therein, whereof hitherto I have not been advertised. The promise was, that by May day he should have had his pardon for him and his brethren under your Great Seal of England. If he shall see no answer made unto him, he will be in more fear and suspicion than he was before, especially now upon the death of the other Geraldines.
"Besides this, many parcels of your manors be desolate and waste, whereof hitherto your revenues hath not been paid by reason that Thomas FitzGerald, his uncles, and complices, first so oppressed them, and after the arrival of your army for the expugnation of the same rebels, your Deputy and army burnt, robbed, and destroyed the inhabitation of divers parcels of them, whereby the tenants were exiled. And afterward your Deputy, by [your] Grace's advertisement, distrusting to commit the custody of divers of the March garrisons to any of [t]his land's birth, but being in the guard of divers of your army, whatsoever more by that occasion was wasted there was little inhabited; trusting that there will be few wastes after this year, if your Grace ensue our devices in two points.
"One is, no man in this country will manure and inhabit your ne any other man's lands, especially to any fruitful purpose, unless he may have a security of continuance therein, so as when he hath edified the same he shall not be expelled from it.
"Another cause there is, which hath been the chief cause of the continuance of these wastes, and shall be the occasion of more wastes, if it be not remedied immediately. The inhabitants of the county of Kildare and other wheres where the most of your Grace's lands be, were most principal offenders in this rebellion; whereby they be in such fear (especially now since the execution of the Geraldines) as they dare not trust to abide in the country, but wandering about, so as the possessioners there endeavour not themselves to inhabit and manure their own lands, fearing more the loss of their lives than the decay of their goods and their lands; and therefore out of hand it were good they had their pardons, as we have divers times moved ere now, for the which they would gladly fine; which, if it were done, many of your waste lands would be taken to farm at this May.
"And to that your Grace is put in understanding that your revenues stand you in no stead when any thing is to be paid, your said Under-Treasurer showeth us that he hath paid divers notable sums of your said revenues to your army here, so as nothing remaineth in his hands, as he saith, but that he is greatly indebted by borrowing, as your Grace's commissioner, which ye shall send hither, at his coming may know.
"And to that especial point whereupon in manner dependeth all the effect of your said letters, wherein your pleasure is, that we should lay our heads together to devise not only how your revenues here may be increased and augmented, but also that such direction may be taken touching the same, as they may be conserved, maintained, and received duly in a certain order, that they may stand you in stead for such purposes as your Grace shall allot the same; declaring further that your gracious mind and purpose is to continue here as many men of war as may be well maintained with your revenues here, reserving a convenient portion to maintain the reparation of your fortresses, and for the edifying and erection of such others as may serve to the expugnation of your rebels:"--although it is needful that your Grace shall reward at your pleasure such men as have done you service with part of your lands; yet may it please you to consider the value of them before you grant them, the places where they lie, and whether they be within the country where no charge shall be to defend them, or in the March, so as your reservations may be according, or else your revenues shall be soon diminished.
"Another thing is, your lands in the Marches must be inhabited with men of war, as the Earl of Kildare used them, or else the Marches shall not well be defended.
"Item, an especial thing is to be noted for a great augmentation of your revenues, that like as your Grace hath been hitherto advertised, your Grace do take an order with the Earl of Ossory and his son that your revenues may be levied in the four shires about the Barrowe, that is to say, the counties of Kilkenny, Tipperary, Wexford, and Waterford, where (besides all the manors which appertained to the Earls of Kildare and the heirs general of the Earl of Ormond, and divers other things within three of the same shires, which in effect be under their rule,) the subsidy and the first fruits be granted there as they be in these four shires, the same would greatly, and no one thing more, amend your revenues. Let them be contented to suffer your Highness' officers to meddle with your revenues without their interruption. And it shall be necessary that your Majesty appoint officers there for the ministration of justice to your subjects of the same four shires.
"Another thing we have concluded among us to be passed in this Parliament, which shall so augment your revenues as we can see none other shall, that there shall be no money current here but after the rate of sterling, which now at the first shall increase your revenues 2,000 marks by the year and above, so as after your officers paid, your Highness shall have, for the payment of your Deputy and army which shall remain, for every 13s. 4d. ye had before, 20s.; where you had before but 100 marks ye shall have 100l.; for every 1,000 marks 1,000l.; after which rate your coin is current in all places of this land, except in these parts. Albeit this order can never be observed here, unless your Grace appoint a mint here immediately, the profits whereof will be somewhat to your Grace.
"And concerning the manner of the appointment of this garrison, and what men they shall be, peradventure it shall not be hurtful that your commissioner, which shall be sent hither, shall partly ensue our devices therein, which know the land; for if the soldiers should be after the order of Caleyes (Calais) or such like places, it will not be best perchance so here.
"And further where your pleasure is, that we shall not only, against the coming of the said person of reputation whom your Grace will send hither as is aforesaid, make a perfect extent of all your revenues, we shall accomplish the same, God willing; albeit your Grace may, by the view of these present letters, consider in manner the extent of them; but also in the mean season, with such money as your Highness suppose to be here already, dispatch as many of the worst of the army as we should amongst us think meet."
In the last article you charge us with disregard of your letters to us for the alleviating of your charges. We beseech you to pardon us thereof. Nevertheless, if you peruse our letters to you when Patrick Barnewell came thither, we trust you will perceive that we have not offended in that point; for at that season, upon the receipt of your letters, your Deputy and Council made a shift upon their credence for 400l. Irish, wherewith they dispatched out of wages 250 of your army; and at this season your Treasurer has dispatched 50 horsemen, having no money to dispatch any more, for they have been so long unpaid that the revenues of a year and a half would not suffice to content them. Therefore we request that your Treasurer may speedily be furnished with money. We think you should not trust to have money of the compositions for the general pardon sufficient to discharge them. The gentlemen and others who will fine for their pardons have not such substance whereby they should be able to make immediate payment, "but he which will stick to pay 10l. in ready money will be better contented to pay 20l. by days."
"When your army shall be all dispatched except only those which shall tarry here to be found upon your revenues, your half year's revenues shall not be due till the feast of Saint Michael, and the most of the same shall not be paid before the Hilary term next, so as all this summer the garrison shall remain unpaid, by occasion whereof they shall not be able to do any service;" wherefore we beseech you that they may be entirely paid until the said feast.
"As to the suppression of certain monasteries expressed in a commission under your Great Seal, we shall proceed thereunto with such convenient speed as shall be most for your Highness' profit."
Dublin, 20 April.
Signed: Leonard Gray; [J.] Lord of Trimleston, your Grace's Chancellor; Georgius Dublin.; Edward Miden.; J. Rawson, P. of Killmaynam, R. B. of Delvyn; Willm. Brabason; Gerald Aylmer, Justice; Thomas Lutrell, Justice; Patrick Fyngles, Baron; John Allen.
Copy. Headed: A.D. 1536.

EARL OF OSSORY and LORD JAMES BUTLER.  MS 611, p. 10  23 Oct 1537

Former reference: MS 611, p. 10

2 Pages.
Language:  Latin

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 107.

Contents:
Letters patent for Peter Butler, Earl of Ossory and Ormond, and James Butler, Lord Butler, Treasurer of Ireland, (who has shed his blood in the wars against the Geraldines and other rebels,) granting them the manors, castles, and towns of Ballinganran, Dunfert, Knoktoffer, Kylkenny, Glasshare, and Rosbarkan, in co. Kilkenny; Carrikmagriffyn, Bellenale (sic) alias Kyldanale, Knokgraffyn, Castellcorte, Thurlies, the Nenagh, Roskree, Ballynryte, and Channoston, in co. Tipperary; Ratheville, Clonmore, Tullagh, Offellym, Kallasue, Powerston, and Leghlyn, in co. Catherlagh; Durbrordyesland alias the Great Island, in co. Wexford; the Little Island, in co. Waterford; Oughterard, Castell Warninge, Donadaa, and Clyntonskourte, in co. Kildare; Ruysshe, Ballyskaddan, Curduf, and Portrany, in co. Dublin; Blakcastell and Donamore, in co. Meath; the Baron's Innes in or near the city of Dublin; a house or messuage in Casshell; a house or great messuage with a garden to the same annexed in the parish of St. Nicholas, Dublin, (which house by the attainder of Gerald Fitz Gerald, late Earl of Kildare, came to our hands); and the manor of Arkloo;--to hold in survivorship, and to the heirs male of the body of the same Peter, by the service of one knight's fee.
Westminster, 23 October, 29 Hen. VIII.
Copy.
At the end are the following notes:--"Anno 27 Hen. 8, 3. die Martii, Tur. Lond. Rex etc. concessit etc. Thomæ Comiti Wiltoñ et Domino Rotchford, &c.--Anno 21 Hen. 8, 24 die Jan., Tur. Lond. Rex etc. concessit etc. Thomæ Comiti Wiltoñ et Ormond custodiam Roberti Knevett, etc.--Anno 21 Hen. 8, 8 die Dec., Tur. Lond. Rex etc. creavit Vicecomitem Rotchford in Comitem Wiltoñ et Ormond."

LORD BUTLER.  MS 611, p. 12  24 Oct 1537

Former reference: MS 611, p. 12

2 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 108.

Contents:
"Lands granted to the Lord Butler and to his heirs males, 24 die Octob., in anno r. R. II. 8. 29."
County Kilkenny.--Ballyganeran 23l. 10s. 3d., Dumfert 24l., Knoktofer 18l.16s. 6¼d., Kylkenny 27l.2s.10½d., Glasshare 66s. 8d.
County Tipperary.--Carrik Magriffyn 12l. 10s. 3d., Kellenale, otherwise called Kildanale,---- [Blank in MS.], Knokgraffyn 21l. 6s. 8d., Castelcurr 4l., Thurles----, the Nenagh----, Roskree----, Ballynrye 40s., Chanoston----, a house or messuage in Casshell----.
County Catherlagh.--Rathville 75l. 2s. 8d., Clonmore 26l. 13s. 4d., Tullaghyn, Offeulym----, Kallasue----, Powerston----, Leghlyn----.
County Wexford.--"Durbardisyland, otherwise called the Great Island, [and] Arcloo," 10l.
County Waterford.--The Little Island, 40s.
County Kildare.--Oughterard 8l. 7s. 7d., Castelwarninge 13l. 13s. 2½d., Donadaa----, Clyntonscourte 40s.
County Dublin.--Ruyshe 66l. 10s. 9d., Ballyskaddan 8l. 18s. 10d., Curduff----, Portrarne 6l. 18s. 9d.
County Meath.--Blackcastell [and] Donamore 31l. 5s. 11d.
County Dublin.--Barons Innes 13s. 4d., a house or great messuage with garden annexed, in the parish of St. Nicholas, Dublin,----.
Copy.

The late EARL of KILDARE.  MS 611, p. 157  1537

Former reference: MS 611, p. 157

3 Pages.
Language:  Latin

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 111.

Contents:
Anno 29 Hen. VIII. Issues of the lands of the late Earl of Kildare, attainted of high treason in the time of Hen. VIII.
Co. Meath.--Manors of Portlester, by the year, 46l. 11s. 8¾d.; Kildalkye, 10l. 14s.; Moylaghe, 71l. 4s. 2¾d.; Moynalwey, 13l. 6s. 8d.; Owgkhillaghe, 7l. 16s. 8d.; Coulcurre, 16s. 4d.; Cullendraughe, 50s. 8d. Manor of Coyneston, or lands in Dongheston, Barreston, Jenkenston, Warrenston, and Woodcokkeston, nothing, because they remain waste. Lands in Blackhalle, 40s. Lands in Pierston Marshall, 14s. 10½d. Manor of Ardnilham, 37l. 18d. Lands in Screne, called Toppeslandes, 4l. 13s. 2d. Manor in (sic) Fertullaghe, 19l. 3s. 4d. Manor and lands in Kynalyaghe, 41l. 18s. 8d. Lands in Beall, Bernegon, Clongnoyllan, Loveston, Ballintoughir, and Crew, 6l. 10s. Manor of Clancoughor, 7l. 16s. 8d. Manors of Stonton and Marganan, Killennere, Le Carne, and other manors in Maghircorik, 44l. 2s. 4d. Lands in Castelbarre, Lesserdunlagh, and Newcastell, 4l. 6s. 8d. M. of Rathbegan, 8l. 15s. M. of Kiltale, 6l. 5s. 4d. M. of Carbreston, 66s. 8d. M. of Ballybarrok, 4l. 10s. 8d.--Total, 344l. 6s. 2d.
Co. Kildare.--M. of Kildare, yearly, 50l. 23½d. Farm of Kilkale, 4l. Castles and manors of Ley and Morette, nothing; granted to James FitzGerrard. Ms. of Moreston, Viller, Mibton, and Boranston in Allowne, in the barony of Connall, parcel of the m. of Kildare, 9l. 7s. 6½d. Land in Ballikenon and Ballycrodan, nothing, because waste. Ms. and lands in the barony of Clane, 17l. 4s. 8d. Ms. and lands in the barony of Clane, Oughterun, and Okeyth, 14l. 6s. 2d. Ms. of Maynouth and Mynoultey, 137l. 17s. 10¼d. Turbary in Redmore, 56s. 8d. M. of Kildrought, 23l. 5s. 3d. Farm of Kildrought, 6l. 13s. 4d. Chief rent issuing from the m. of Blackewoode, 13s. 4d. Lands in Donada, 100s. M. of Rathmore, 26l. 12s. 11d. Lands belonging to the castle called Lady Castell, nothing, because waste. Ms. of Kilka and Thristelldermott, 79l. 18s. 9d. M. of Morraghe, 6l. Ms. of Glashele, 34l. 0s. 7d. M. of Rathangan, 38l. 6s. 2½d. Ms. of Woodstoke and Athie, 13l. 6s. 8d. M. of Thymolyn, 77s. 11d.--Total, 473l. 9s. 9¾d.
Co. Carlow.--M. of Cloneogan, nothing, because waste. Farm of Killeston, 66s. 8d.
Co. Dublin.--Ms. of Lucan and Waspayneston, 31l. 5s. 4d. Ms. and tenements in Newcastell, Cromlyn, and Agoo, nothing, because granted by Gerald Fitzgerald, late Earl, [to] P. Sampson. Chief messuage in Dublyn, nothing, because occupied by the Under-Treasurer. A garden there, 4s. 4d.--Total, 31l. 8s. 8d.
Co. Louth.--Bailiwick of Athird, 13s. 4d. B. of Molenston, 66s. 8d. M. of Marshialrath, 53s. 4d. M. and lands in Downgoill, Warmgistane, Castelton, Dowcawan, Killenen, Balleregan, and Rathskiagh, nothing, because waste. Castle and m. of Arglasse in Frakale, the price of 40 cows yearly, 13l. 6s. 8d. Ms. of Priourton near Termonseighen, and Cnocke, 40s. A tenement in Drogheda, 40s.--Total, 24l.
Co. Limerick.--M. of Adare, with members in Adare, Kilgobban, Castell Robert, and the m. of Crom, nothing, because James Fitz John of Desmonde received the profits, "unde est r. domino Regi." Ms. of Rathcaman, Tiburneus, and Carrickittell, nothing, because waste.
Co. Kilkenny.--M. of Glasshaire, 66s. 8d.
Co. Tipperary.--M. of Knockraffyn, 4l. 13s. 4d. M. of Castellcurre, 40s. M. of Siffyn, 26s. 8d. M. of Ballenry, 26s. 8d.--Total, 9l. 6s. 8d.
Co. Cork.--Lands near Corke, 4l.
Co. Wexford.--Tithes of the rectory of Killeugh, 27s.
Sum total, 894l. 11s. 7¾d.
Copy.

EARL OF KILDARE.  MS 611, p. 19  1537

Former reference: MS 611, p. 19

3 Pages.
Language:  Latin

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 112.

Contents:
"Regale servicium Geraldi Comitis Kildar' in com' Kildar'."
First part.--Wm. Lundres holds four knights' fees, for which rent is paid by Lord Wm. Preston and Lord John Bernewall; "et distringendum est apud Whitechurch, Baron Rathe, Kyllyn et Clomyn;" 8l.
Second part.--Geo. Roche (de Rupe) holds four knights' fees, for which rent is paid by the heirs of Margaret and Anastasia Flatesbye; to be distrained at Lady Castell; 8l.
Third part.--Philip Britt holds four knights' fees, for which rent is paid by the heirs of Sir Rouland Eustace; to be distrained at---- [Blank in MS.]; 8l.
Barony of Naas.--Cromaliston yields a rent of 20s. Phillippiston, 10s. Hitheleston, 5s. Teghgaret, 20s. Walcheston, 20s. Blakehall, 20s. Edriston, 20s. The heirs of Wm. Eustace for his lands in Cradokiston, 20s. Typper, 20s.
Barony of Saltu.--Griffynrathe, 10s. Castle of Kyldragh, 10s. Manor of Liones, 20s. Clonaghlis, 20s. Balmascollog, 20s. Denmoraghill, 20s. Donaghda, 20s.
Barony of Conall.--Old Connall, 40s. Ladyton, 20s. Ballymany, 5s. Ballytagy in Allon, 5s. Morstonmomagh, 20s. Whilam, 10s.
Barony of Offaly.--Ballysonan, 20s. Mylton, 40s. Donmorry, 20s. Leakagh, 20s. Rathmok, 5s. Donhene, 20s. Henryeston, 40s. Ellyeston, 5s.
Barony of Norragh.--Norragh; to be distrained at Norragh and Calviston, 6l.
Barony of Othymy.--"Penkiston de Ballykeppagh, et distringendum est apud Ballykeppagh, 40s." Downinges, 40s. "Le Mote de Kilbeg," 40s.
Barony of Robane.--Robane, 4l.
Barony of Okethy.--Okethy, 100s.
Barony of Kilcullyn.--Kilcullyn, 20s.
Barony of Oghteryn.--Cloncurrey, 4l.
Barony of Carbre.--Dunffetherd, 40s. Dergard, alias Dirfyt, 23s. 4d. John Bermyngham, 10s. Carrik, 5s. 8d. Kilmore, 10s. Clonken, 40s.
Barony of Donlost.--Monmehonok and Rowe, 40s. Brenermoy near Athy, 40s.
Barony of Kilca.--Kilca, 8l. Belane, 20s.
The Distchenys for a footman, 5s. Thotay, 5s. Rathgulby, 10s. Rathnedon, 10s. Galyn, 4l. Wilkynlowe, 20s. Loghbregan, 10s. Dongarn, 40s. Rathgulby, 40s. Simon Flatisby, 10s. Offythesy, 40s. Stythan, 4l. Clongale, 10s. McKany, 10s. Thenull (or the mill ?), 13s. 4d. Typpercoghill, 10s. Ballymony, 10s.
Copy.

CAYHYR O'CONOUR.  MS 611, p. 45  6 March 1538

Former reference: MS 611, p. 45

1 Page.
Language:  Latin

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 117.

Contents:
Submission of Cayhyr O'Conour, brother of Barnard O'Conour, late captain of Offaly, made to the King before the Lord Deputy, the King's Commissioners, and others of the Council at Dublin, 6th March, 29 Hen. VIII.
(1.) He promises that he will be a faithful and liege subject.
(2.) He will not admit the jurisdiction or authority of the Roman Pontiff.
(3.) He will not exact or claim any black rents or exactions from any subjects of the King.
(4.) He petitions that the King by letters patents would make him and his issue of a free estate and liege men after the manner of the English.
(5.) He promises to hold that portion of lands which he has in his own country and in Offaly of the King according to English laws, and that he and all others and his heirs will pay to the King annually for each carucate of land 3s. 4d., and as often as it shall seem necessary to the Deputy, he shall be burthened with men of war for the defence of the King's subjects.
(6.) Finally he promises all other things which O'Conour promises.
Copy.

HENRY VIII. to SIR ANTHONY SENTLEGER.  MS 611, p. 263  [Dec] 1540

Former reference: MS 611, p. 263

3 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 152.

Contents:
We have received sundry letters from you and the Council, whereby we perceive the quietness and stay in which our land there is. Like as we wrote that we would prepare a convenient sum of money to be conveyed to you, so have we sent to you at this present 2,000l. in harp groats. "You write to us for an aid of money towards the reedifying and building of certain towers, piles, and fortresses upon the straights and passages of the Irishmen, as well upon the frontiers of O'Chonor as also in the fastness of the Tooles;" but considering that the season of the year serves not for building, so that the delay of sending to you any aid of money shall nothing hinder the same, we have thought good to signify to you our pleasure, that in the mean season you shall cause plots to be made of such fortifications, and send them to us with an estimate of the charges, "and what aid, besides the fines which ye write of, ye will require of us toward the same." Being informed that some of you are of opinion that we may diminish and abate fifty of our number of footmen in the lieu of those charges, we will that you do advertise us jointly of your opinions whether we may so do conveniently or no.
Touching our Parliament to be holden there, as it is thought most convenient to us and our Council that the same shall be kept in the Lent season, we have sent you our licence under our Great Seal for the summoning of the same, to begin in crastino Purificationis next. "As to the articles engrossed to be set forth and passed as acts in our said Parliament which ye have sent unto us, we have forborne to remit and send them again to you, as well because ye have not sent us the whole contents of such acts as ye intend to set forth in our said Parliament, as for that we have not received from you the transumpt of such acts as were passed in our last Parliament there, which are very necessary to be conferred and perused by our Council here." You shall send us both the said transumpt and the residue of your acts now to be set forth, and also therewith our serjeant, our attorney, or our solicitor there, or some other person learned, "being riped and sufficiently instructed, to answer to all such points as in the same shall appear to us or our Council here to be doubtful or ambiguous."
"Touching the Prior of Kylmaynam, like as we have already answered you in that part by our last letters, so we are still resolved thereupon, and also are content that he shall have his pension of 500 marks allotted and yearly paid unto him within that our land; for the assurance whereof, albeit as we perceive ye have devised an Act to be passed by Parliament within that our land, yet, considering that it is already sufficiently provided for in our last Parliament here, we have therefore thought it rather convenient to make him further assurance thereof our letters patents under our Great Seal of Ireland; for warrant whereof, and also his creation and advancement to the state and dignity of Viscount Clontorfe, with the annuity of 10l. annexed to the same, as we wrote in our last letters to you our Deputy, if ye shall send unto us two several bills conceived in due form for the same purpose, we shall remit the same unto you signed with our hands accordingly."
We understand that Osborne Itchingham at his own charges has kept 12 men in his retinue, for the better executing of his office of Provost Marshal, without any allowance for the same. "Ye shall not only allow him his 12 men in wages from the time of his entry into the said office hitherto, and so from henceforth during our pleasure, but also that ye shall in lieu thereof defalke and diminish so many of some other captain's number at your discretions, so that we [be] no further charged than appertaineth."
We also understand that although we have granted to John Travers, Master of our Ordnance there, the farm of the site of the house of St. Mary's Abbey, by Dublin, with the demesnes and farms lately in the hands of the Abbot there, "both for the maintenance of hospitality, and also for that it is a place very propious and meet to lay in our ordnance and artillery," yet he is deferred from the possession of the same because you have no warrant from us. Our pleasure is that indelayedly you put our said servant in possession of the same, "to enjoy it at such reasonable rent as it is or shall be surveyed at, for the time of his abode in Ireland in our service, and no longer, with a convenient regard to the maintenance of the necessary edifices thereof."
We are informed that our servant Matthew Kynge, since his entry into our service there, has had no certain allowance either for himself or his retinue, for the better executing of his office of clerk of check of our army there, "saving only a prest upon a reckoning." For the time he has been and shall be in the said office, you shall make him allowance and payment of his wages after the rate of 12d. by the day for himself, and the wages of ten horsemen after the rate now appointed.
Copy. Headed: "Hen. VIII. -- Ireland. -- The minute of the King's letter to Ireland, Sir Anthony St. Ledger then L. Deputy."

REFORMATION OF IRELAND  MS 611, p. 107  1541

Former reference: MS 611, p. 107

5 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 157.

Contents:
Copy of MS 603, p. 28.

EARL OF TYRONE and LORD MAGONIUS O'DONELL  MS 611, p. 143  1543

Former reference: MS 611, p. 143

2 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 180.

Contents:
Copy of MS 603, p. 38.
Signed:--Con Tyrone; O'Donnell. Witnesses:--Sir Anthony Sentleger, Lord Deputy of Ireland; John Allen; George Dublin; William Brabason, Treasurer; John Travers; Thomas Houth; James Bathe; Edward Basnett.

STATUTES.  MS 611, p. 111  7 Feb 1549

Former reference: MS 611, p. 111

1 Page.
Language:  Latin

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 187.

Contents:
Statutes made and ordained at Limerick, 7th February, 3 Edw. VI., by James, Earl of Desmond, Edmund, Archbishop of Cashel, John Travers, and Thomas Howthe, the King's Commissioners.
First, it is enacted and ordained that no poet or any other person hereafter shall make or compose any poems or anything which is called "auran" to any person, except to the King, on pain of forfeiting all his goods, and imprisonment, at the pleasure of the King or his Deputy.
Further, it is enacted and ordained, that no person shall hinder the market, or prevent any one from bringing into it his wares and merchandise; except the lord of the town, castle, or territory, who, for his household and honour, may buy from his servants anything which they are able to bring to the market. [In the original:--"Qui ad domicilium et honorem ejus valet aliqua emere a suis familiaribus quæ ad ferrum [sic: mistake for forum?] secum ducere valent, quod sibi licuerit."]
Copy.

SIR JAMES CROFTES.  MS 611, p. 135  [25 Feb] 1551

Former reference: MS 611, p. 135

3 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 194.

Contents:
Instructions given by the King to Sir James Croftes, "whom his Majesty sendeth into Ireland."
The King has purposed to send Sir James Croftes for the preparation and setting forwards of especial service in Ireland. Sir James shall take with him his Majesty's letters to Sir Anthony Sentleger, Knight of the Order, and Deputy in Ireland, and participate to him the credence of these instructions following.
If at his arrival the Deputy shall not be gone to the towns of Corke and Kinsaile, or to either of them, according to the former orders prescribed to him by letter from his Highness's Council sent by Nicholas Bagnall, Croftes shall notify to him the King's pleasure, and charge him to make his speedy repair to the said parts. When he (Croftes) shall be come to the towns and havens of Corke and Kinsaile, he shall diligently view and consider the same throughly, with all the parts, isles, castles, and other houses there adjoining. He shall choose such places and grounds as are fittest to be fortified for the safeguard of the said havens and towns. He shall give order for the works of the same with all diligence to be advanced and set forward.
He shall also consider if there be any houses, castles, or piles already of old situate in convenient places to serve for the same purpose, that the King's charges may be diminished. He shall proceed to put the same into convenient strength, making the Deputy privy thereof for the composition with the owners of any such house, castle, pile, or plat of ground. He shall move the Deputy to persuade the townsmen and inhabitants to be contributory towards the furtherance of such works as shall be requisite.
Whilst these things are in hand, he shall, with the aid and help of the Deputy and the Earl of Desmond, or such other nobleman in that case requisite, repair to the havens of Balletemore and Bere, and cause a true plat to be made of them and such others betwixt them and Kinsaile as he shall think expedient, adding his opinion and advice, and sending the same to the Council hither.
He shall also consider what is necessary to be done for the other havens upon that seacoast, Waterford, Yoghall, and such like as he shall think meet to be considered and regarded. While at Corke and Kensale he shall consider what things are convenient to be done for the strengthening and fortification of those towns, "and thereof making some plat, with the aid of the Deputy, solicit the inhabitants of the said town [sic], to further and advance the same works."
He shall compare with these instructions not only the copy of the letter sent from the Council to the Deputy by Nicholas Baggnall, but also such credit and instruction as Bagnall had from hence to the Deputy. [The original instructions are in the Record Office; they are dated 25 Feb. 1551.]
Copy.

INSTRUCTIONS to SIR JAMES CROFTES, DEPUTY, and the COUNCIL OF IRELAND.  MS 611, p. 76  [May] 1551

Former reference: MS 611, p. 76

11 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 195.

Contents:
Instructions given by the King with the advice of his Council to Sir James Croftes, Deputy of Ireland; Sir Thomas Cusake, Chancellor; the Archbishop of Dublin; the Bishop of Meath; Sir Gerald Aylmer, Chief Justice of the King's Bench; Sir Thomas Lutrell, Chief Justice of the Common Pleas; Patrick Barnewell, Master of the Rolls; James Bathe, Chief Baron; Sir William Brabazon, Vice Treasurer; Thomas Hoth, Second Justice of the King's Bench; Sir John Travers, Master of the Ordnance; Sir Rauff Bagnall; Nicholas Bagnall, Marshal; Edward Basnett, clerk, late Dean of St. Patrick's; and Thomas Lockwood, clerk, Dean of Christchurch, Dublin; whom his Majesty has appointed to be his Privy Council in Ireland.
These instructions are similar to those given to Sir Anthony Sentleger and others. [See pp. 226-230.] Articles 5 and 14 of the latter are omitted. Instead of Article 8 is the following:--
Special consideration to be given to the ports in the south parts of the realm, that is to say, Waterford, Corke, Kensale, Balletymore, Berehaven, and Shepehaven, and also of the ports in the north parts, that is to say, Strangforde, Ulderflete, Knockfergus and the Banne; that these and such others may be safe and surely in our possession, and that we may be duly answered of such profits as may be levied. We have sent to the Deputy a furniture of men of war and ships, with certain masses of victuals and divers other things of great charge and expense, to be employed with all speed in the fortification of the said havens. We empower him to employ the said men of war and ships in our service there this summer from place to place. He shall practise with the port towns and such other cities and towns as do stand near any of the aforesaid, that they shall of their own charges now in time of peace fortify their towns and havens; and he shall aid them with good advice, and appoint to them "both the places and the manner of their fortifications and bulwarks."
Instead of the clause allowing farmers one or two years rent free, is the following:--"Providing, upon the sight of the survey, that in no case but upon our pleasure especially known, he let any manor in gross, or the great woods and royalties of manors; and further also that the lessees thereof shall demurre and remain upon their said farms, and be in their degrees furnished to the war, so as they may both surely keep those countries, and also do us further service in that realm, as they shall be by our said Deputy with the advice aforesaid appointed and commanded; all which leases so made by our Deputy and Council as aforesaid our Chancellor for the time being shall have full power and authority by warrant hereof to enseal under our Great Seal accordingly."
At the end is this additional article:--The Deputy shall certify to us or our Council, at the beginning of any enterprise of weight and moment, the purpose of the same, with the estimate of the charges thereof.
Copy.

STATE OF IRELAND.  MS 611, p. 112  8 May 1553

Former reference: MS 611, p. 112

18 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 200.

Contents:
"The copy of the book sent from Sir Thomas Cusake, Lord Chancellor of Ireland, to the Duke of Northumberland's Grace for the present state of Ireland."
Munster, under the rule of such lords and captains as be there, and of the Earl of Desmond, is in good quiet, so that the Justices of the Peace ride their circuit in the counties of Limerick, Cork, and Kerry, being the farthest shires west in Munster, and the sheriffs are obeyed. "The lords and captains of those countries, as the Earl of Desmond, the Viscount Barrie, the Lord Roche, the Lord FitzMorris, and divers other, which within few years would not hear speak to obey the law, beeth now in commission with the Justices of Peace to hear and determine causes." The Irish captains in those quarters do not stir, but live in such quiet that the English captains [Sic. "Captain" below.] at Cork with 40 horsemen cause the offenders to stand to right. McCartie More, who is the most powerful Irishman in Ireland, and "who beforetime always was at war with the countries under the Earl of Desmond's rule, and did not much pass upon the same Earl nor his power, but well nigh by war upon every light occasion wasted the country, and is now very comformable to good order, having of late by persuasion of the said English captain obeyed and performed certain orders taken betwixt him and others of the country." If a stout gentleman, skilful and of estimation among them, were President at Limerick, to see right indifferently ministered amongst them, and the captain appointed to attend upon him to see the orders and decrees put in due execution, no doubt but the King should not only win many good subjects, but also within short time have great revenue where now he has nothing in Munster more than obedience. "And so between the abbey land[s] and other possessions, which be now waste and worth nothing, and the same countries being charged to be contributory to subsidies and other charges upon the ploughlands (like as other shires be), will be no small yearly profit to his Highness, and besides the charges of the President and Council there, which in short space will be borne upon the amercements and fines of the courts without putting his Majesty to charge; so as without such device it would be hard to make the said countries so civil, obedient, and profitable to his Majesty, as otherwise they would be."
"Leinster is in meetly good stay at this instant, for my Lord Deputy, of late repairing in those quarters, took order with Cayre McArte and the rest of the Kavanaghes, and appointed every gentleman his territory, and placed certain English captains with their bands amongst them, part at Leighlyn, part at Fearnes and Enescorte, and some at Tymolinge, a place wherein the Cavenaghs and other malefactors before time disturbed such as brought stuff by water from Rosse or Waterford to Leyghlyn or Carlaghe; and likewise placed certain of the King's kerne, so as between them and the county of Wexford (I suppose) the Kevenaghs must be content with their portions without disturbance, and besides must be at the said captain's commandment, whereby the strength of the Irishmen shall decay, being restrained of liberty take of the freeholders and husbandmen in the countries such as will ask or exact upon them, [So in MS.], and by such liberty they retain their men and increase their strengths; and so restraint thereof decayeth the same, as now they be used, whereby they were never so weak, so as I trust that country within short time may be brought to obedience to be at the King's Majesty's commandment with small charges.
"The Byrnes and such other of Irish sort dwelling in the rest of Leinster and next to the Kevenaghs be of honest conformity, and payeth no rent to the King's Majesty, but beareth six score galloglasse one quarter yearly, yielding to every of them 4d. sterling by the day, and beeth able to make 80 horsemen with many footmen within their country, being men alway ready to stand to good order at the appointment of my Lord Deputy and Council, so as they be men of honest conformity.
"Thomond is besides Limerick, wherein the Breanes do inhabit, and since the time that O'Brean was created Earl, the same is in good order and quiet, but after the decease of the late Earl of Thomond, Sir Donnough O'Brean, Baron of Ibrackan, being by the King's grant appointed to be next Earl, for fear of his brother Sir Donnold and the rest of the gentlemen of the country, did name his said brother to be Tanest, after the Irish custom; which being repugnant to the King's grant, my Lord Deputy hearing thereof sent for the same Baron, and laid that to his charge, and upon his own confession of his misbehaviour therein, sent also his letters to the said Sir Donnold and the rest of the gentlemen to stand to the King's Majesty's orders, and to refuse their Irish custom, whereby without war or force all they applied to refuse the same Irish custom, and obeyed the Baron as Earl of Thomond, according his Majesty's grant, and refused the self name of Tanest; and now there be few countries in Ireland in better quiet than they.
"Between Limerick and the county of Tipperary be these Irishmen of good power: the McWilliams, McBrene, O'Gonaght, McBrien Are, O'Molryan, with divers other, which within few years were all wild, and not conformable to any good order; and yet be they now ordered by the sheriffs of the shires, so as men may pass quietly throughout their countries at pleasure, without danger of robbing or other displeasure; and each of them lieth in his own country quietly without hindrance of other.
"Other Irishmen's countries betwixt that and Upper Ossory, as O'Kenedy and O'Dwyre and the Carrowlles, doth bear galloglasses to his Majesty without contradiction, which were wont to be mortal enemies to the English pale. So as in all the circuit before mentioned is contained half the realm, which with small charge will be brought to civil obedience; and if all the countries were made counties that the law might have his course, then they would prosper;" for the sheriffs would "put back their Irish laws and election of captains."
Between Thomond and Galway lies Clanrickard, a plain champain country, which was governed by McWilliam, who after was created Earl of Clanrickard, and during whose time the country was in good stay and quiet. After his death, as his son Richard Bourke was but young, and "the country doubted whether he was mulier born or bastard," Sir Ullycke Bourke was appointed captain during his nonage. When he came to his full age, he began to be at war with the said captain, and between them both the country was all wasted. Being sent with a small company to see them ordered, "within one fortnight, having put certain gentlemen to execution for their offences, by terror thereof and by other means, or that I left the country, I placed the Earl quietly, and made every one of the country willing to answer and obey him, and took orders betwixt them for their contentions to the parties' contentation, and left two [hundred] ploughs manuring the land, where, at my going thither, there were not past 40 ploughs in all the country, but all waste through war; which ploughing increaseth daily, thanks be to God! whereby the country [is] universally inhabited and so brought to quiet that now the people leaveth their plough, irons, and cattle in the fields without fear of stealing. The experience thereof declareth that there can be nothing so good to be used with such savage people as good order to be observed and kept amongst them; for execution of the law is more feared when it is done in order than any other punishment.
"Mac William Bourke, second captain of most power in Connaught, is of honest conformity, and doth hinder none of the King's Majesty's subjects, and is ready to join with the Earl of Clanricard and every other captain to serve the King's Majesty in every place in Connaught, so as a president, or yet a captain with a competent number of men, continuing at Aury or at Galway, will cause all that country to be true subjects; and they two, with a captain, will be able to rule all Connaught, which is the fifth part of Ireland.
"There is in Connaught, besides, O'Connour Slyggaghe, O'Connour Doyn, O'Connour Roo, and McDermott, men of no great power. The same Slyggaghe is the King's Majesty's, and it is the best haven town in all the country; and the same O'Connour and certain his predecessors keepeth the same by usurpation. And the one of themselves continually warreth against other. O'Connour Doyne and O'Connour Roo did strive about Rossecamman, a fair manor of the King's Majesty, ye[a], one of the fairest in all Ireland, lying in the plains of Connaught; and in their contentions this Earl of Clanricard gat the house out of their hands, and kept ward in the same, by a policy. And now of late, upon my repair to Athloone for certain conclusions there, the same Earl resorted to me and condescended to deliver the same castle to my Lord Deputy, to be kept to the King's use, and he to be considered otherwise, so as between that house and Athloone, being but 12 miles asunder, all their countries would be made obedient. O'Rowerke his country is but 14 miles from Rossecamman, O'Donnell his country is not passing 9 miles from it, and Sliggagh is but 14 miles from it, so as, thanks be to God! all those countries beeth now in quiet, but when one of themselves sometime war upon another; and so, between Athloone, Rossecamman, and the Earl of Clanricard, all the rest, of force, must be obedient with small charges.
"Between Athloone and Clanricard is O'Keally his country, a captain of good power of horsemen, galloglasse, and kerne, and no men of Ireland of wilder nature than they be, and many times in time of war they have done much harm to the English pale. And now lately, my Lord Deputy being at Athloone, I attended upon his Lordship, at which time O'Kelly, by persuasion, was content to bear and yield to the house of Athloone as other in the English pale did; nevertheless, soon after, he refused to accomplish the same. And my Lord Deputy, upon his repair to Leinster, having left the oversight and charge of those of Connaught and divers other Irishmen with me, in the last week of Lent I went to O'Kellie's countries, and assembled all the gentlemen of the country before me. And then, perceiving as well their untruth and slender keeping of promise, as also how that gentleness could not prevail, I took his son and put a handlock upon him, to have him brought with me to Dublin, and appointed a band of men to take up in his country such kine and victuals as he promised to my Lord Deputy for the victualling of Athloone; and then he, perceiving the same, immediately did send his servants to the country to levy and take up a hundred beeves and other victuals for the furniture of the house of Athloone. And after that, he came into the house of Athloone, and made merry there during our abode, and willed the captain to use his country as he would the English shires; so as it is not unlike but that he and his country will from hence use honest obedience; assuring your Grace that [he] durst not come within the same castle since it was newly builded till he came to my Lord Deputy when his Lordship was there last. The same O'Kelly condescended to find a 100 of the King's Majesty's galloglas for a quarter, at my said Lord Deputy's being there; and also at my being there he was contented that they should be cessed in his country accordingly, which is a great charge, payin[g] to every galloglas 4d. ster. by the day.
"O'Connour Roo aforesaid, upon eight days before my repair thither, was preyed by McDermod of 4,000 kine and 500 stud mares; and perceiving the obedience of O'Kelly, and the orders which was taken between him and other, he came to me to complain to Athlone; whereupon, to prove their obedience, I concluded with the Earl of Clanricard and divers other captains and gentlemen which then were with me, that unless he would make restitution upon my letters, they should meet together the Sunday after May Day, [with] 300 horsemen, 400 galloglas, and 800 kerne, with seven days' victuals, to punish the same McDermott, and to see the poor men restored, whereupon all they condescended; and after the same conclusion I determined with them that they should in no wise set forward till they should hear from my Lord Deputy and to have his consent; so as it is good obedience that gentlemen in such countries would be so willing to punish such offences upon a sudden, without putting his Majesty to charge; whereby it appeareth that, if there were a President amongst them to see them kept in good order, their country would be brought to good quiet."
Between Athlone and Offaly are the countries of O'Brynne, McCoghlan the Fox, O'Molmoy, and McGoghecan--"very strong countries for woods, moors, and bogs, by mean whereof much cattle were stolen out of the English pale." All of them condescended to cut passes in their fastnesses. I sent for the same Irish captains to answer complaints, and for as many thereof as were duly proved, I caused the sheriff of Westmeath with 10 horsemen to distrain to the value of all the goods stolen. I caused them within four days to restore to the poor people 300l., and besides to pay as much more to the King for a fine. "Before this time no Irishman used to pay more than to restore the goods stolen, and for that the countries be no shire land, no thief can be punished by the law." The sheriff "with so few company will be so regarded as to put such orders in execution in so strong countries, which within seven years 800 men nor yet a 1,000 were not able to bring to pass in any of those places."
Between the Shannon and O'Raylie's country is the Annale, a strong country, where the Ferralles dwell, men of good obedience, who pay yearly to the King 100 marks rent, and find 240 galloglas for a quarter of the year after the rate of 4d. sterling the spear by the day. Lately in the absence of my Lord Deputy, I being there for the order of their contentions, they obeyed my letters.
Next to the Annalee is a large country, well inhabited, called the Breany, wherein O'Raile is chief captain, who has seven sons. He and they may make 400 horsemen of the same name, and 1,000 kerne, and 200 galloglas. "The country is divided between them, which joineth to the English pale upon a country called Plounkett's country, betwixt which countries there hath been divers murders, stealths, and robberies by night and day committed." On the complaint of the inhabitants of both parties, in the absence of my Lord Deputy, I repaired to those borders. O'Reyly was accompanied with 400 horsemen and 800 footmen, whilst I had not more than 100 horsemen and as many footmen. I required him to come to me with a few horsemen, and accordingly he did. I commanded him to deliver such pledge into my hand as I would name, and though he was loth so to do, yet at length he condescended. Upon receipt of his pledge I made proclamation that every complainant at a certain day should meet to receive his due. On the next day of meeting I caused him to restore as much goods as were stolen and taken from the English pale in 6 years before, which came to 400l. I also caused him to pay 200l. to the King as a fine for maintenance of such stealths. "The like hath not been that a man of such power as he is of, would redeliver without greater circumstance do the same, whereby it appeareth that the poor and simple people be as soon brought to good as evil, if they were taught accordingly; for hard it is for such men to know their duties to God and to the King when they shall not hear preaching or teaching throughout all the year to edify the poor ignorant to know his duty."
If the countries of Lex and Offally were made shire land, that men might have states of inheritance there by copyhold or fee farm, and both the forts were made market towns, and if other former devices were put in execution, the King's profit would much increase, the countries would be well inhabited and manured, and his Grace's charges would be diminished. "Such manurance will bring good cheap of corn and cattle, and the English pale thereby will be discharged of exceeding yearly charges, for now there lieth between both the forts 6 or 700 soldiers daily in effect, and can do service out of the same countries, which standeth the King's Majesty as though they were extraordinary; assuring your Grace that the countries be now greatly charged with the finding of them, for they eat them the peck of wheat for 5s., which is sold in the market for 20s.; they also give them the beef for 12s. which is sold in the market for 4l.; yet the country do not grudge or gainsay the same, but like obedient subjects payeth the same without exclamation, which by alteration of the fort[s] would be redressed and a great redeem besides yearly had to his Majesty.
"Next to the Breany is McMahon's country, called Orryell, wherein beeth three captains, the one in Dartarie, and other and McMahone in Loghtye; [of] which three countries McMahons is chieftain. These countries both large, fast, and strong; among whom there continued intestive wars beforetime, whereby the most part of the country was made waste. Nevertheless they be tall men of the number of 80 horsemen, 200 kerne, and 120 galloglas, and all those for the most part doth occupy husbandry, except the kerne, and yet some of them occupy likewise." Of late, before Easter, by appointment of my Lord Deputy I resorted to them, to see the countries' order. They all assembled before me, and I caused them to find at their own charges yearly 120 galloglas, to serve the King and to attend upon an English captain of the English pale, who has the order of the country committed to him for the keeping of the King's peace. I also caused them to put their pledges into my hands for the finding of the galloglas, and for the due performance of the orders which I took between them. This was done without force or rigour. "Besides this, they pay and yield for all cesses to the soldiers of Moyneghan and in other places beeves and carriages, like as other in the English pale do.
"The next country, between that and Mac Gynnose's country called Iveaghe, is O'Hanlon's country called Orrer. The same O'Hanlon is an honest man, and he and his country both ready to obey all commandments. The next to O'Hanlon is McGynnes' country aforesaid, where in the Nivorye Mr. Marshal's farm is situated. The same McGynnes is a civil gentleman, and useth as good order and fashion in his house as any man of his vocation in Ireland, and doth the same Englishlike. His country is obedient to all cesses and orders. The same Iveaghe hath been parcel of the country of Downe, and he, being made sheriff thereof, hath exercised his office there as well as any other sheriffs doth."
"The next to that country is Mac Cartan's country, a man of small power, wherein are no horsemen, but kerne; which country is full of bogs, woods, and moors, and beareth the captain of Lecaill. The next to that country is the Doufrey, whereof one John Whit was landlord, who was deceitfully murdered by McRanyll Boy his son, a Scot; and since that murder he keepeth possession of the said lands, by mean whereof he is able to disturb the countries next adjoining on every side, which shortly, by God's grace, shall be redressed. The same country is no great circuit, but small, full of woods, water, and good land, meet for Englishmen to inhabit.
"The next country to the same, eastward, is Lecaill, where McBrerton is farmer and captain, which is a handsome, plain, and champion country of 10 miles long and 5 miles breadth, without any wood growing therein. The sea doth ebb and flow round about that country, so as in full water no man may enter therein upon dry land but in one way, which is less than than two miles in length. The same country for English freeholders and good inhabitance is as civil as few places in the English pale.
"The next country to that and the water of Strangfourde is Arde Savage his country, which hath been mere English, both pleasant and fair, by the sea, of length about 12 miles and 4 miles in breadth, abouts; which country is now in effect for the most part waste.
"The next country to Arde is Clannebooy, wherein is one Moriorthagh Dulenaghe, one of the Neyles, who hath the name as captain of Clannebooy, but he is not able to maintain the same. He hath 8 tall gentlemen to his sons, and all they cannot make past 24 horsemen. There is another sept in that country of Phelym Backagh's sons, tall men, which taketh part with Hugh Mac Neill Oge, till now of late that certain refused him and went to Knockefergus.
"The same Hugh McNeill Oge (as your Grace have heard) was preyed by Mr. Marshal, who hath made preys upon other of those confines for the same, so as he is no loser but rather a gainer by his preys. He sought to have his matter heard by my Lord Deputy and Council, whereupon a day was prefixed for the same till May; and now lately I repaired to his country to talk further with him, to tract the time till grass grow, for before then, the countries being so barren of victuals and of horsemeat, no good may be done to destroy him; whereby I perceived that though he was determined (as he said) to meet me and to conclude a further peace, yet he, hearing of the arrival of certain Scots to the Glynnes, refused to come at me, contrary to his writing and sending, and went to Colloe McConnill, who landed with 6 or 7 score bows, as was reported, and thought to bring them with him to war upon his next neighbours, so as there is no great likelihood in him of any honest conformity." I planted in the country a band of horsemen and footmen for the defence thereof against the Scots if they come; and upon the assembly of the Council, which shall be within these four days, good conclusions shall be taken for the defence of the King's subjects.
"The country of Clanneboye is in woods and bogs for the greatest part, wherein lieth Knockfergus; and so to the Glynns, where the Scots doth inhabit. As much of this country as is near the sea is a champion country of 20 miles in length and not over 4 miles in breadth, or little more. The same Hugh hath two castles, one called Bealefarst, an old castle standing upon a ford out from Arde to Clanneboy, which, being well repaired, being now broken, would be a good defence betwixt the woods and Knockfergus. The other, called Castle Riough, is 4 miles from Bealefarst, and standeth upon a plain in the midst of the woods, besides the Dooffrye; and, being likewise repaired with an honest ward of horsemen, would do much good for the quiet and stay of the country thereabouts, having besides a good band of horsemen in Lecayll continually to reasient, [i.e., to reside.] and to do service abroad upon every occasion. Then such men of small power, as the same Hugh is, must be content to be at commandment: for which purpose there be devices a making."
Next to the Glynnes is McQuoyllyn's country, "adjoining by the sea, and so to the Banne, a country of woods, and most part waste by their own wars and the exactions of the Scots, and may not make past 12 horsemen; but they were wont to make 80.
"When the Scots do come, the most part of Clanneboy, McQuoyllyn and O'Cahan must be at their commandment in finding them in their countries; and hard it is to stay the coming of them, for there be so many landing places between the high land of the Rathlyns and Knockfergus, and above the Rathlens standeth so far from defence, as it is very hard to have men to be there continually, being so far from help. The water of the Banne cometh to Loghnaye which severeth Clanneboy and Tyrone and McQuoyllyne and O'Cahan's country.
"O'Cahan's country is upon the other side of the Banne, and is for the most part waste. His country joineth by the sea, and is not past 20 miles in length, and most part mountain land. They do obey the Baron of Dongannen, but what the Scots do take against their wills. The next country to that, and the side of the Banne, is Tyrone, where the Earl of Tyrone hath rule, the fairest, and goodliest country in Ireland universal, and many gentlemen of the Neyles dwelling therein. The same is at least 60 miles in length and 24 miles in breadth. In the midst of the country standeth Ardmaghe, pleasantly situated, and one of the fairest and best churches in Ireland, and round about the same the Bishop's lands. And through occasion of the Earl and Countess his wife they made all that goodly country [waste]; for whereas the country for the most part within these three years was inhabited, it was within this 12 months made most part waste, through his making of preys upon his sons, and they upon him, so as there was no redress among them, but by robbing the poor and taking of their goods, whereby the country was all wasted; whereupon my Lord Deputy appointed a band of English soldiers to lie in Ardmaghe, and left the Baron of Dongannen in commission with other to see for the defence of the country and quiet of the people, whereby the country was kept from such raven as before was used; and the Earl and Countess brought to Dublin, there to abide till the country were brought to a better stay. And they perceiving the same, and that they could not return, they sent to the Irishmen next to the English pale, and so they did to other Irishmen, that they should not trust to come to my Lord Deputy nor Council. This was reported by part of their own secret friends; by reason whereof O'Rayle, O'Kerwell and divers other that were wont to come without fear, did refuse to come to us; whereupon I went to meet O'Rayle to know his mind what he meant. He declared that he feared to be kept under rest as the Earl is. And then I told him what the cause of his retainer was, both for the wasting and destroying of his country, [and] for the amendment of the same; and if there were but one plough going in the country he would spend upon the same, with many other undecent words for a captain of a country to say. And O'Raile, hearing the same, said that he deserved to be kept, and he, if he had done the like. So said O'Carroll and other of his own country. And then Shane O'Neylle, the Earl's youngest son, came to Dongannen, and took with him of the Earl's treasure 800l. in gold and silver, besides plate and other stuff, and retaineth the same as yet, whereby it appeareth that he and she was content with the same; for it could not be perceived that they was greatly offended for the same. And the same Shane, being at peace till May, hearing of the arrival of the Scots, sent to them to give them entertainment. So he sent to divers other Irishmen to join with him, and promised to divide his goods with them, which they for the most part refused to do, but some did. And hearing the same, on May day I went to him with such a band of horsemen and kerne of my friends, to the number of 400 men, and did parle with him, and perceived nothing in him but pride, stubbornness, and all bent to do what he could to destroy the poor country. And departing from him, being within four miles to Dungennen, he went and burnt the Earl's house; and then, perceiving the fire, I went after as fast as I could, and sent light horsemen before to save the house from burning. And upon my coming to the town, and finding that a small thing would make the house wardable, what I wanted I caused to be made up, and left the Baron of Dungennen's ward in the castle; and having espied where part of his cattle was in the midst of his fastness, I took from him 700 kine, besides gerrons and stud, and then cessed in the country 300 galloglas, and joined all the gentlemen and freeholders of the country with the Baron, wherewithal they was contented and pleased, and sware them to the King's Majesty; so as, I trust in God, Tyrone was not so like to do well as within short time I trust it shall; and do trust, if a good President were there to see good orders established among them, and to put them in due execution, no doubt but the country would prosper.
"Next to that country is O'Donnell's country, named Tireconnell, a country both large, profitable, and good, that a ship under sail may come to four of his houses. And by mean of the war which was between him and his father, the country was greatly impoverished and wasted, so as he did banish his father at last and took the rule himself. And now the like was between him and Callough O'Donell, so as their wars in effect wasted all the whole country; and I, being thither sent to pacify the same, brought them to Dublin, where order was taken between them; and now there is no war between them, but as yet they keep the King's peace and perform other orders.
"The next country to O'Donelle's is Fermanagh, McGuire's country, (a strong country,) and McGuire that now is a young handsome gentleman, and may make 200 kerne and 24 horsemen. And Calloug[h] O'Donell, Terrellagh Lynnaghe, and Terrelagh O'Nelle, Henry McShane, and all the rest be joined with the Baron of Dongennyn to serve the King's Majesty; and all these be young men and most power in the North; so as, if the Earl and O'Donnell were at such liberty as ever they were, without those they had no power; and so by God's grace the thing well followe[d], as I trust in God it shall this summer, will make a quiet Ireland.
"Irishmen are now soon brought to obedience, considering they have no liberty to prey and spoil, whereby they maintain their men, and without that they could have but few men. And the policy that was devised for the sending of the Earls of Desmond, Thomond, Clanricard, and Tyrone, and the Baron of Upper Ossory, O'Kerroll, McGynnes and other into England was a great help of bringing those countries to good order, for none of them ["Who" omitted?] went into England committed harm upon the King's Majesty's subjects. The winning of the Earl of Desmoud was the winning of the rest of Munster with small charges. The making O'Brien an Earl made all that country obedient. The making of McWilliam Earl of Clanricard, made all the country during his time quiet and obedient, as it is now. The making of McGilfadrick Baron of Upper Ossory hath made his country obedient, and the having of their lands by Dublin is such a gage upon them, as they will not forfeit the same through wilful folly. And the gentleness that my Lord Deputy doth devise among the people with wisdom and indifference doth profit and make sure the former civility, so as Presidents in Munster, Connaught, and Ulster by God's grace make all Ireland without great force to be obedient, and all Ireland being made shire land that the law may take his right course, and all men through good persuasions brought to take their lands of the King's Majesty to them and their heirs for ever, and preachers appointed among them to tell their duties towards God and their King, that they may know what they ought to do. And as for preaching we have none, which is our most lack, without which the ignorant can have no knowledge, which were very needful to be redressed." Irishmen were never so weak, and the English subjects never so strong, as now.
Dublin, 8th May 1553.
"And the Privy Council, [Sic.] I have seen in my time the King's Majesty's proceedings hindered by such, both for that they would embrace too much, and also for that, as they may be compared to an ignorant physician, they do not ponder the disposition of the patient in ministering remedy." It would be sufficient "to have one only President and Council set forth in due order as I have said within the five countries of Munster, other parts of the land being neither of such perfection nor yet divided into counties or shires, so that they may receive the rule of the law, are rather to be trained and as it were by degrees brought to civility. And no doubt but the Lord Deputy having his eye only to the North, to that part of Connaught, and to the Cavanaghes, and the Lord President being charged with Munster and the residue of Connaught, shall in short time be able to divide and establish much thereof into shires and counties, so that they may be of perfection to be governed with the courts of Presidents, as they yet are not." I have set forth a little plot declaring "the variety of state or condition that the parts of that realm hath," which I am ready to show.
"Some also hold opinion that it is good, for avoiding of charge, to let the realm of Ireland remain under the governance of the lords of the same, as it was before the going thither of Sir William Skevington, Deputy; and some others that it were good with the sword to destroy all the inhabitants of that realm for their wickedness, and to inhabit the land with new: which are two extremities, for by the first the King's Majesty shall fa[r]ther the detestable and stinking abominations of murder, adultery, rapine, destruction, and all other wickedness that by such licence they use. His Highness also should lose his own duties, which by this means they appropriate to themselves, whereof in fine they grow to rebellion. And by the third [Sic. Mistake for second.] way great numbers of faithful subjects which the King hath there for the offence of few evil disposed persons should be destroyed, which were ungodly and much pity. And it is to be used against rebellious and manifest traitors, example sometime of O'Connour and O'More, and now of Hugh McNeille Oge."
"I might rehearse the customs and ordering of Batlemore and the other west havens, the great riches of laure [Sic.] mine which is in Munster, and other sundry mines whereof no part can be recovered without the said erection. [i.e., of a President and Council.]"
I pray you to take this my poor information in good part, which I have studied "in hope that, the same taking place, I might serve in some stead, whereas now I serve in danger of my life, my fellow in commission, the Baron of Bruntchurch, being lately slain only for doing justice; and yet bestow I my time, travail, and great charges to small purpose."
Copy.

PROCEEDINGS of the DEPUTY AND COUNCIL.  MS 611, p. 102  25 Feb 1557

Former reference: MS 611, p. 102

3 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 208.

Contents:
At Dublin, 25 February 1556.
Rowry and Donought O'Connour, with the rest of the gentlemen and usurped inhabitants of Offally, appeared at the Dingham the 4th of October last past before us, the Lord Fitz Wauters, gentleman of the King's Privy Chamber, captain of all their Majesties' gentlemen pensioners and men at arms in England, and Lord Deputy of Ireland, "and there, in presence of the Earl of Kildare and others of the Council, humbly submitting themselves, desired that they might be received to their Majesties' mercy, and that being taken as true subjects from thenceforth they would clearly deliver the country of Offally, which they wrongfully kept, and receive at their Majesties' hands such portions of the said country and upon such sort and condition as we, the Lord Deputy, should in their Majesties' names appoint." The said Donoghe willingly yielded himself to remain in hand with us till all orders should be fully taken by us.
On the 15th December after, at the said fort, the said Rowry, with the rest of the gentlemen and usurped inhabitants, eftsones appeared before us and the Council, and together with the said Donoghe craved mercy at "her Majesty's" hands, with some portion of the country. They made oath to be true to their Majesties and to the crown of England for ever, to be obedient to the Deputy, to maintain no rebel or outlaw, to put away all strangers from them, and to persecute all such of the country as should refuse to stand to any order taken by the Lord Deputy. We took order that Donoghe, on delivering sufficient pledges, should be enlarged, and that Rowry and Donough with the rest should remain in the parts of Towgessell till their several portions were assigned them.
Rowry and Donogh, authorized for the rest, were appointed to repair to us at Laughlin on the Thursday in Christmas next after, there to receive for them and the rest, whose names they should bring with them written in a bill, such portions of the said country as we should appoint: but Donoghe appeared not on that day. For better assurance, on the said 15th day we "received their pledges; viz., Rosse McMorghe for Donough O'Connour, Brian McPhelim for Rory O'Connour, and Murghe Oge for the rest of the country, upon condition that Rosse McOwyn should come pledge in the place of Rosse McMorghe for Donogh, Lewghe Boy in the place of Brian McPheleme for Rowry, and in the place of Murghe Oge for the country the several pledges, and such as we should appoint of every man of the country that should receive of their Majesties' any part thereof; which done, the said Rosse McMurghe, Brian McPheleme, and Murghe Oge, with all other pledges that remained in the castle of Dublin before our first entering into Offaly, should be delivered." Also, by consent of both sides, we appointed the Earl of Kildare, then absent, with the Baron of Delvin, O'Molloy and Magogh Hagan, then present, "to be slanties upon to follow them to the uttermost upon breach of any of the premises; which slantye, the said Earl, being absent, did after, by his letters to us, take upon him, and the said Baron, O'Molloy and Magogh Hagan, being present, did then and there take upon them."
Since that time the said Donogh and others have not only broken divers days of their appearance before us, but also conspired with other rebels and traitors, and upon summons resolved not to come to us and the Council then being in Offally, but combined themselves together to keep out and make war against their Majesties. It is therefore thought good that sharp war should be made upon Donogh and all others that take his part, and that they should be proclaimed traitors. The Earl of Kildare, the Baron of Delvin, O'Molloye and Mogogh Hagan shall follow slantye to the uttermost.
Signed at the beginning: T. FitzWallters; at the end: H. Dublin., Cane.; Will'mus Miden.; G. Kildare; J. of Slane; P. of Trymleteston; H. Sidney; Henry Radecliffe; John Travers; James Bathe; John Plunkett.
Note at the end: This agreeth with th'original, exemplified by me, John Chaloner.
Copy.

Earl of SUSSEX, LORD DEPUTY  MS 611, p. 97  N.d

Former reference: MS 611, p. 97

5 Pages.

Contents:
Copy of a draft of MS 628, p. 61. No date of day or month.

SHANE O'NEYLL.  MS 611, p. 130  11 Sep 1563

Former reference: MS 611, p. 130

3 Pages.
Language:  Latin

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 239.

Contents:
The form of peace made at Drym Cru, 11th September 1563, between Gerald, Earl of Kildare, and Sir Thomas Cusake, the Queen's Commissioners, and John O'Neyll, chief of his nation.
The said Commissioners have approved and confirmed the said John in the name of O'Neyll until the Queen decorate him by another honorable name. The said Lord O'Neyll to have all the preeminence, jurisdiction, and dominion which his predecessors had, and particularly over the Lords subject to him, commonly called "wrrachadh," [i.e. "urraghs."] and all other gentlemen of his nation, and generally over all others who were accustomed to pay any services to his predecessors.
Also where concord has been established between the said Lord O'Neyll [and] O'Domnaile and his son, the Commissioners approved and confirmed the said concord, and consented that O'Domnaile and his son should pay all things which they promised to the said Lord O'Neill in the said concord; and they were not loth that the Lord Lieutenant and themselves should intervene for the preservation of the said peace and concord.
As to the controversies between O'Neyll, O'Raghill, and Magydhir, it was ordained that O'Neill should choose two of his friends, and that the said O'Raghill and Magidhir should choose two honest men of theirs, to determine the same. If the said four cannot agree, the controversies shall be determined by the Barons of Slaine and Lowth, Sir John Bellew, and the Dean of Ard[magh]. The said O'Raghill and Magydhir shall put their pledges into the hands of the said four persons, for the performance of all orders and judgments made by the said four. If the said O'Raghyll and Magydhir should not observe towards O'Neill the contents of the order, it shall be lawful for the said arbitrators to deliver the pledges to O'Neill. If they refuse to stand to the decree and order of the said Commissioners of the Queen, it shall be lawful for O'Neyll to prosecute them with all his forces. They shall henceforth pay to O'Neyll whatsoever they were accustomed to pay to his predecessors. An end shall be put to all these things before Michaelmas next, and in the meantime peace shall be preserved.
He is not bound to come in person to the supreme Governor of this kingdom. No indenture before this between the Queen and O'Neill shall remain in force. This peace shall never be violated, but if any dissension should arise between the English and Irish parts in the North, two honest men on each part shall be bound to determine it. Peace to be observed between the English and Irish until the feast of All Saints, at which time Sir Thomas Cusak will return with certain petitions which O'Neill sent with him to the Queen. At the feast of All Saints the ward shall be removed from the church of Ardma[gh], and [the church] shall be restored to O'Neill, on condition that he shall in future be a faithful and true subject. If any of the Irish who dwell in the English parts (Henry O'Neill, the son of Phelom Roe, McDomnaill, and the son of the Baron or any other) should commit any damage by homicide, theft, or spoil, upon O'Neill or his adherents, not only shall the damage be restored, but those committing it shall be delivered to O'Neill and compelled to pay the expenses incurred in the prosecution of the damage.
The Lord of Lowth and Sir John Bellew are executors of the premises on the English part. The Lord O'Neill in like manner promises to fulfil all things on his part, and appoints one of the sons of Henry FitzJohn, and one of the sons of Donald Malachy, as executors.
Signed: Thomas Cusak.
II. Letter from the Earl of Sussex, Lord Lieutenant, to John, admitted by the Queen's Commissioners to the name of O'Neill.
We have received your letters, and seen what has been concluded between the Commissioners and you. We will observe the same. We have given audience to your men, and made answer to them. The war is now ended, and our former friendship remains. Arbreham, 16 Sept. 1563.
Signed at the beginning. Addressed.
III. Copy of the four articles which were agreed upon by the Lord O'Neill and Sir Thomas Cusake, by the Queen's authority.
First, that the Lord O'Neill shall not be compelled to answer or make satisfaction for the killing of the Baron's son or of the son of McDomnaill, who were both killed in time of war. All spoils which they carried away to the English parts at the time when the Lord O'Neill was in England shall be restored. Also, whereas it happened that certain of the followers of I'Neill fled to the lands of Nicholas Begnell contrary to the admonitions and commands of those to whom the Lord O'Neill had given authority and commission to govern the country ["Prima" in MS. Qu. mistake for patriam?] in peace, and in the meantime lost their goods in the said lands; it is arbitrated that no satisfaction shall be made by the said Nicholas for the said goods.
Also, whatever spoils shall be adjudged and proved before the Dean of Armagh, James Dudall, Eugene O'Hagan, and William Flemynge (who have been appointed Commissioners to examine all the spoils which the men of the Lord I'Neill may affirm to have been in English parts) shall be seized and retained by the Lord of Howth in payment of O'Neill's debts to the Queen for his pledges. When the said debts are liquidated, the pledges shall be restored to him.
Signed: Thomas Cusak.
Copies.

THE REVENUES.  MS 611, p. 160  1564

Former reference: MS 611, p. 160

2 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 245.

Contents:
Declaration of the yearly value of all the revenues within Ireland, both certain and casual, as the same were charged for the year ending at Michaelmas 6 Eliz., not according to the survey thereof, but as they be now demised and leased.
The charge of the revenue certain.--The possessions of the old inheritance, 867l. 22¼d. The possessions of attainted lands, 413l. 18d. The lands of Leix and Offayley evicted out of the possessions of the O'Mores and O'Connours by the Earl of Sussex, "over and besides the lands appointed to the forts, certain other lands yet undisposed, and the lordship of Gayshell in Offally, and the manor of Fornekolley in Leix, claimed by th' Earl of Kildare as parcel of his own inheritance:" 316l. 12s. 6½d., viz, in possession, 237l. 9s. 5d.; in reversion for 5 years yet to come, 79l. 3s. 0 [Sic.] ½d. The possessions of Saint John's of Jerusalem in Ireland, 764l. 12d. The possessions of divers monasteries and other religious houses now in charge, besides much more of the like possessions in sundry Irishmen's countries, uncharged for lack of a survey thereof, 5,773l. 5s. 4d. The tributes of certain Irishmen's countries, 27l. 5s. 4d. Escheated lands, 4l. 15s. 8d. Certain proxies delivered in exchange----- [Blank in MS.] late Bishop of Meath for the parsonage of Loughsowdye, 60l. 7s. Sum, 8,226l. 10s. 2¾d.
The charge of the revenue casual.--"The profits of subsidies in manner ordinary every year," 469l. 13s. 7d. The 20th part of the spiritualities this year as they have been yearly charged for the said [Sic.] five years, 317l. 10s. 0¾d. The revenue of wards' lands is esteemed to be worth yearly 133l. 6s. 8d., and is this year 589l. 3s. 6d. The profits of sheriffs' accounts are esteemed to be worth yearly 140l., and this year are but 90l. 3s. 0¾d. "Respects [i.e. respites?] of homage," worth yearly 20l.; this year 12l. 10s. 8d. The forfeiture of recognizances, worth yearly 26l. 13s. 4d.; this year, "null." The issues and profits of the Hanaper, worth yearly 100l.; this year, 234l. 11s. 3½d. The revenues of the first fruits, worth yearly 100l.; this year, 104l. 2s. 7½d. The revenues of bishops' lands, sede vacante, have been for five years past 1,300l. 7s. 8d.; this year 50l. Sales of wards worth yearly 66l. 13s. 4d.; this year 528l. 9s. 8d. Forfeits of merchandise have been within these five years past 1,902l. 15s.; this year, "null." Fines of liveries worth yearly 40l.; this year, 312l. 6s. 8d. The profits of the clerk of the crown's office, worth yearly 10l.; this year 6l. 9s. 4d. Sum, 2,717l. 0s. 11½d.
Sum total, 10,943l. 11s. 2¼d.
Copy.

SIR OWEN O'SULLIVAN.  MS 611, p. 137  [13 July] 1565

Former reference: MS 611, p. 137

2 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 247.

Contents:
"Hereafter ensueth such services, duties, and demands as Sir Owen O'Swlyvan, Knight, and his heirs, ought to pay and do unto the Earl of Clankarre and [his] heirs." [The original document is in Record Office. It was enclosed in the Earl of Clancarr's petition to the Queen, dated 13 July 1565.]
(1.) Sir Owen holds of him "by the service to be one of the marshals of his company in the field, and there to serve him in proper person with his whole power."
(2.) Sir Owen ought to find continually five gallaglasses or five kerne out of every quarter of land arable inhabited and manured in his country, "to be afore the guard of the said Earl's person;" and in the default of every such gallaglass or kerne to pay 6s. 8d. sterling or one beef.
(3.) The said Earl ought to have 2s. 6d. sterling out of every ship that comes a fishing or with merchandise to any port, creek, or haven in Sir Owen's country, at the hands of such as bring the said ships.
(4.) To have all kind of wares and merchandises brought there by any ships at the same prices as Sir Owen.
(5.) Sir Owen ought to find yearly for two days and two nights sufficient meat and drink for the said Earl and his train at his house called Dunboye, otherwise Beare Haven. In case the said Earl should come at any other time into his country, the Earl to have convenient meat and drink. Sir Owen ought also to find and send to the Earl's house, called Palice, sufficient horsemeat for the finding of the Earl's horses throughout the year.
(6.) Sir Owen ought to find throughout the year, upon the territories of Bentrey and Dunboye, "the hunt" and hunts of the said Earl with convenient sustenance for all his greyhounds, hounds, and spaniels.
Copy.

SHANE O'NEILL.  MS 611, p. 138  1565

Former reference: MS 611, p. 138

5 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 248.

Contents:
"The causes and matters moving my people not to suffer me to come to the Lord Deputy's presence with such expedition as his Lordship requireth, with that happened within this 20 years and in the memory of the same O'Nell, the harms done by the Governors and others here within this realm of Ireland."
"Conne O'Nell, father unto me the same O'Nell, comen by the procurement of Sir Anthony St. Leger, then went Lord Deputy into England," [Evidently a mistake for--"then Lord Deputy, went into England."] to King Henry VIII., and was created Earl of Tyrone; and for his good services he was imprisoned in Dublin by the Governor till he was inforced to deliver Tyrrilagh Lynnaghe, who had been taken prisoner by the said Earl for spoiling his country in Tyrone.
"Item. The said Earl, coming to Dundalk to the Deputy, with great comfort to the said Deputy, upon certain talk said unto the said Earl, were it that was not he was old, and such one as did no service in his years illspent, he would have off his head, and see his blood poured in a saucer or basin; and this unfriendly entertainment of the part of the said Earl not deserved.
"Item. The said Earl and his army attending upon the Lord Deputy banishing the Scots out of Ireland, and returning out of the same service to the said Earl at Ardemaghe, provided a banquet for the said Deputy, and leaving the said banquet unconsumed for haste, and at the said Ardemaghe did imprison the said O'Nell and took him prisoner to Dublin, and sent a garrison to Ardemaghe and to Dungannen, his chief manor; since which time the country was impoverished, but such portion thereof as by me was maintained.
"Item. For that the said Earl was so unjustly imprisoned as before is declared, doubting himself of the like, he, with the rest of all the Irish nation and the Scots rema[in]ing in Ireland, joined in love together, and I, understanding their conspiracy against my sovereign, I came to Sir Anthony Senleger, then Lord Deputy, and shewed their conspiracy, and offered my service to his Lordship against my father the Earl and the rest, and he thankfully accepted the same, and promised me for mine entertainment 20s. ster. per diem, and sundry good turns otherwise, whereof I received no great portion. And the said Earl my father, that knowing, spoiled me and my tenants and followers of the most portion of our goods to the value of 3,000 pounds and more. And if Sir Anthony Seintleger had continued Lord Deputy, I should have had satisfaction of that, by his Lordship's promise, and recompensed for the damages I sustained in that necessary service in so perilous time.
"Th' Earl of Sussex successed him, who refused me of protection and the payment of the said entertainment, and by means thereof and other his unfavorable doings towards me, the wars began betwixt him and me, and so continued till the Earl of Kildare came out of England [In 1561.] with my protection and pardon from the Queen's Matie and her Grace's Council, having likewise the protection of all others and nobility of this realm; by occasion thereof I went willing into England [In December 1561.] to see my Sovereign Lady the Queen, upon such security and protection, and security for myself, people, and goods.
"Item. The Earl of Sussex promised, upon my coming to the Earl of Kildare and the Earl of Ormond to the Karigebradagh, to amove the garrisons from Ardimaghe. I came to the said Earl according to my promise, and the said Sussex kept the garrisons contrary to his promise.
"Item. Contrary to the former protection and all the securities granted, I, accompanied with the said Earls of Kildare and Ormond, the said Earl of Sussex commanded the same Earls upon their duties to put a handlock upon my hand and carry me as a prisoner to time I came to the Queen's Matie.
"Item. Contrary to the former securities, after I came to England I was constrained before my return to make delivery of three the best pledges I had, and after my return to send from my country 16 other pledges; and the informer of her ["our" in MS.] Majesty's Council was not well advised so to incense their honors to have me in that mistrust that never deserved the same. Were it not I was so used in taking pledges, I would have served my Queen, my Sovereign Lady fair, and [Instead of these two words "fair, and," Carew has substituted "for I."] am and hath been always ready to serve her Grace if the same may be accepted to her.
"Item. After my return to Ireland, one devilishly disposed, rewarded to have murdered me with a dagger, appointed to have the chiefest horse that could be had, to th' intent, after he had done this ungodly feat, that his horse might carry him from my people without peril.
"Item. Seeing that practice could not take effect, devised a bottle of poisoned drink, [John Smith attempted to poison him in 1563.] by which I, with certain other of my gentlemen, was poisoned and in great peril, and by the great power of Almighty God, preserved, ["preserver" in MS.] the author of all wor[l]ds. This is sufficient for this time for my own causes."
II. "Here ensueth some other evil practices devised to other of the Irish nation that cometh to my remembrance within 9 or 10 years past."
"First, Donnell ["Onill" in MS.] O'Breyne and his brethren and his friends, and Morghe O'Breyne, his son, came from their army to Limerick, to the Lord Deputy, upon the protection of th' Earls ["theireley" in MS.] and nobility then in company of the said Deputy there; and for the controversy betwixt them and th' Earl of Thomonde they required the benefit of her Majesty's laws, by which they required to be tried, and thereof was denied; and likewise, contrary to the said protection, they were kept from their army, and sent to th' Earl of Desmond's country. They were proclaimed traitors, their lands and possessions taken from them.
"Teige McMorghe O'Breine came unto the said Lord Deputy upon the like protection, and was imprisoned to time for to challenge he was enforced a manor called Droghed Iwreine, a parcel of his inheritance, and the same manor is now in the possession of th' Earl of Ormond.
"Item. The said Teige, upon the protection of Mr. Marshal, came unto Limerick. He brought him to the Constable of Dublin, and there was imprisoned two years and a half, till he brake prison.
"Item. Art Boye Cavanaghe, coming to Captain Hearne, being sent for by the said Captain, and after dinner with the Captain at the Hall within Captain Hear[n]e his house, there was traitorously murdered.
"Item. Conill O'More, chief of that name, the Viscount of Mongarrett and father-in-law to the said O'Nill, did convite him to his house, and persuaded the said O'Nill to send him to Captain Hearne, and without farther trial the said Captain sent two of his servants with the said O'Nill, by whose commandment the same O'Nill ["Onill" in MS. Qy. mistake for Conill?] was hanged and put to execution.
"Item. Donoghe O'Conour coming upon the Earl of Kildare by [Qy. mistake for his?] protection unto the presence of the Lord Deputy, and William Cantwell likewise was sent by the said Deputy and his ring for the said Donoghe to come to his presence; the same Donoghe came with the said Earl [of] Kildare unto the Lord Deputy; one Digbey shot at the said Donoghe with a dagge[r] through the sleeve of his shirt, and escaped that vile enterprise of murder; yet the same Digbey escaped without punishment; and contrary to that protection the said Donoghe was taken prisoner, and so continued to time he delivered the best pledges he had; all which pledges were afterwards put to death at the Dingan.
"Item. Randall Boyes' two sons, good servitors to the Prince there, being sent for by Mr. Brereton to his house; and after supper the gentleman sleeping in the chamber where he was appointed to lie, was murdered by the same Brereton.
"Item. The other brother the same night by the same Brereton in the next town was murdered; and Brereton escaped without punishment.
"Item. To declare to my Lord Deputy how my sons Harry and his godson are misused, and that I may understand how he is.
"Item. To understand of the prey made upon MacMahande.
"Item. To take order for the punishon of the rimour[s] that did misuse me; whereof I wrote to my Lord Deputy."
Signed: O'NELL. [In Irish characters.]
"And all be it I stand most assured of your Honour's lawful and assured friendship, being most assured of your Lordship's good affection, and the most number of that honourable Council, yet my people are timorous and mistrustful of the former proceeding."
"The other instruction (?) I have to move your L. I have sent the same by Mr. Stwkeley and the Justice Dowdall, praying your Honour to give credit to that they shall declare in my behalf."
From Benborbe, 18th February.
Signed: Your Lordship's loving gossip to command, O'NELL. [In Irish characters.]
Copy.

SUBMISSION of the EARL OF DESMOND.  MS 611, p. 166  12 July 1569

Former reference: MS 611, p. 166

1 Page.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 259.


Related information: Another copy in MS 617, p. 86.

Contents:
I, Garret, Earl of Desmond, knowing myself to have offended the Queen's?laws, and to stand in great peril of life and forfeiture of all my lands and goods; and besides, knowing myself to be in danger of forfeiting 20,000l., wherein I stand bound to her Majesty by recognizance: therefore, to obtain her favour, I submit myself to her mercy and clemency, and do offer to her Majesty all my possessions, thereof to take into her hands so much as she thinks convenient, and to dispose of the same for the benefit of the realm of Ireland, at her pleasure; and I grant and promise that within ------ [Blank in MS.] days after her pleasure shall be signified to me, what castles, lands, or liberties she shall think good to take, I will make assurance thereof to her Majesty, her heirs and successors.
At Haward House, before the Privy Council, 12 July 1568, 10 Eliz.
Copy.

PAYMENTS for IRELAND.  MS 611, p. 163  29 Sep 1569

Former reference: MS 611, p. 163

1 Page.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 262.

Contents:
Money paid out of the receipt of the Exchequer for the Queen's affairs in Ireland, from Michaelmas 7 to Michaelmas 10 Eliz.
To Sir William FitzWilliams, Treasurer of Ireland, 59,551l. 13s. 11d.; Sir Morrice FitzGarret, 120l.; William Pierce, 73l. 6s. 8d.; William Dixe, 66l. 13s. 4d.; Earl of Desmond, 359l.; Earl of Ormond, 200l.; Sir Francis Knolles, 3,210l.; Edward Randoll, late the Lieutenant of the Ordnance, 4,231l. 17s.; William Winter and Edward Bashe, 9,520l. 17s. 2d.; Edward Horsey, 5,066l. 13s. 4d.; Sir Henry Sydney, 7,290l.; Thomas Jenyson, the Queen's Auditor, 6,120l.; George Delves, 149l. 14s. 10½d.; Sir Henry Ratclif, 600l.; Sir George Stanley, 244l. 6s. 11½d.; Thomas Myte, surveyor of the Queen's victuals in Ireland, 2,000l.
Sum total, 98,938l. 9s. 11d.
"Ex. per me, Humfridum Selton."
Copy.

SIR EDMUND BUTLER.  MS 611, p. 95  1 Sep 1569

Former reference: MS 611, p. 95

2 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 264.

Contents:
"The words uttered by Sir Edmund Butler upon his first meeting with me, [the Earl of Ormond,] [...] [The words in brackets were inserted by Carew between the lines.] in presence of those whose names are subscribed, as well as we could remember them."
"The 1st of September 1569, my brethren, Sir Edmund, Edward, and Piers, being by me sent for, came to me toward Kilkenny, where the said Sir Edmund prayed me, upon my faith and honour, to tell whether the Queen's Majesty was in health or no, and told me that he heard such reports from her Majesty as he could not be quiet in his mind till he were certain how she did. And when I gave him to understand that her Majesty was (God be thanked!) in very good health, he put off his murrion and thanked God of it, and prayed that she might so continue in as long and happy a reign as ever any King or Queen did. And so prayed his two brethren and all their company.
"After this, he made a grievous complaint unto me of the cruel and ill usages of my Lord Deputy and Sir Peter Carew, who (as he said) were not only contented to spoil him of all his land and living without any order of law, but also did what they could to bereave him of his life, and proclaimed him traitor to the Queen's Majesty, which grieved him most of all, having no cause or good ground so to do, saving only for that he shunned to come in my Lord Deputy's presence, whom he feared upon divers threatening words to take away his life and living without process of law, which was the cause that he did shun him, thinking that he would detain him till he had surrendered his land to Sir Peter Carew. And within three or four days after he had him proclaimed traitor, he being thereby amazed, and having sent his letters to my Lord Deputy to crave his protection to come before him to show his grief, and also to be employed in her Majesty's service in Connaught, or elsewheresoever it would please my Lord Deputy to appoint him; my Lord Deputy stayed his messenger prisoner in the castle of Dublin, and sent him no answer upon his letters, but suddenly sent Sir Peter Carew and Captain Gilbert with 300 horses of the [Queen's Majesty's army [Supplied from the original in the Record Office.]] to seek him, who set upon certain of his galloglasses and slew as many of them as they could, being such as have always served the Queen's Majesty under my leading, thinking to have slain himself if he had been with them.
"These and many other griefs and injuries he complained of, and to take God to witness and prayed that he might be dampned both body and soul if ever he meant to rebel or take part with any in the world against the Queen's Majesty, or if ever he meant to do any harm to my Lord Deputy; and for witness of the same, declared that he took not so much as a horse from his Lord in all his journey, and sent unto his Lord such of his men as chanced to be taken by some of the said Sir Edmund's men, but always sought to be revenged upon Sir Peter Carew, who to this day enjoyeth his living, if he could have gotten him out of my Lord Deputy's company.
"And for such hurts and offences as by occasion of my Lord Deputy and Sir Peter Carew's said dealings, he was driven to do and commit to others of the Queen's Majesty's subjects, he most humbly and lowly submitted himself to the Queen's Majesty's mercy, and promised to me to keep her Majesty's peace from henceforth to all her subjects, till it shall please her Highness to signify her pleasure how she will him demeaned; and whatsoever order it shall please her Majesty to take for him, he promised according to his bounden duty to stand to and accomplish the same. And if she will have him to serve in France or in any other place out of my Lord Deputy's danger, he will with a faithful and most willing heart so do; and in the mean time to serve her Majesty with all the power he hath or may have to the uttermost of his power at his own charges in any place in Ireland, so he be not driven to come in my Lord Deputy's presence or to serve in his company, which he refused to do; and promised hereupon to stay and keep the peace till I do let him to understand of my Lord Deputy's pleasure touching this and certain other requests that he hath to make to his Lord, now at this time of my repair unto him."
Signed: Thomas Ormo[n]de [&] Oss. ["Ormodeosh" in this copy; corrected from the original in the Record Office.]; [Richard Montgaret] [This name is supplied from the original in the Record Office, being illegible in the copy.]; John Fernys; Christopher Ossr; Walter Archer, Sovereign of Kilkenny; William Johnson, Dean of Kilkenny; Oliver Grace; Hare (i.e. Harry) Davells; Robert Harpoll; R. Sheeth; Edmund Butler.
Copy.

SUBMISSION of the BUTLERS.  MS 611, p. 162  28 Feb 1570

Former reference: MS 611, p. 162

1 Page.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 270.

Contents:
Submission of Sir Edmond Butler and Pierce Butler, brethren to the Earl of Ormond and Ossory, made to Sir Henry Sydney, President of the Council in Wales and Lord Deputy General of Ireland, and to the Council in Ireland, the last of February 1569, 12 Eliz.
We Edmond Butler and Pierce Butler acknowledge before you that we have disloyally swerved from our allegiance to her Highness, by raising disorderly her subjects against her, and submit our bodies and goods to her Highness, beseeching you to be mean to the Queen to receive us to mercy and extend upon us her pardon, upon trust of our assured loyalty henceforth.
Examined by E. Molyneux.
Copy.

EARL OF THOMOND.  MS 611, p. 167  23 April 1570

Former reference: MS 611, p. 167

1¼ Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 271.

Contents:
"Offers of agreement granted by the Lord Deputy and Council to be proponed by the Right Hoble the Earl of Ormond, Lord High Treasurer of this realm of Ireland, to the Earl of Thomond, to be accepted or refused by the said Earl of Thomond within five days after they shall be published unto him by the said Earl of Ormond."
(1.) That Thomond shall have licence to repair to the Lord Deputy and Council "to declare his causes of disliking with the Lord President and Council of Connaught, and to propone what he hath for the justifying or excuse of his doings hereon fallen out;" or, if he prefer it, he shall have licence to make his repair to the Queen between this and the 27th of May next.
(2.) That if within five days after the restoring of his castles, he accept either of the offers abovesaid, he shall yield that his castles and lands shall be redelivered as afore, and remain in the Queen's protection till her pleasure be signified in that behalf.
(3.) That thenceforth the profits of his lands shall be sequestrated into the hands of the Earl of Ormond to her Majesty's use, till she have declared her pleasure in the disposition of it.
(4.) That Ormond shall have power and authority in the time of sequestration lawfully to defend all wrongs offered to any of Thomond's tenants.
(5.) That Thomond, before his departure into England, shall deliver to the Lord President a book containing the names of all persons who have committed any offences in partaking with him since his rebellion.
Signed at the beginning: H. Sydney; at the end: Robert Weston, Canc.; T. Armachan.; H. Miden.; N. Bagenall; Jo. Plunkett; H. Dracott; Francis Agarde; John Chaloner.
"A true copy, examined per E. Molyneux."
Copy.

THOMOND.  MS 611, p. 164  1570

Former reference: MS 611, p. 164

2 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 272.

Contents:
"The names of all castles in Thomond in anno 1570."
Copy.

KILKENNY and TIPPERARY.  MS 611, p. 87  1570

Former reference: MS 611, p. 87

8 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 273.

Contents:
1. "The names of all the gentlemen inhabiting the comit' of Kilkenny, with their lands valued by estimation as followeth."
Lands holden by knight service of the manor of the Grannaghby. [In the margin:--"The Barony of Grannaghe."] --Daton and his kinsmen, 100 marks; James Sherlocke's lands, 10l.; the Bishop of Ossory's, 6l.; Piers Welshe, 40 marks; Thomas Grant, 15l.; Edmund Grant, 8l.; William Welshe and his cousin, 10l.; James Grant, 20l.; Patrick Dobin, 12l.; Peter Strong, 51l.; Galle, 30l.; John FitzWilliam FitzAdam, 6l.; Thomas O'Day, 20l.; Mr. James Butler, 20l.; Redmond Roche, 20l.; Walter Forster, 20l.; Edmund Forster, 15l.; Aylward, 13l.; Archdeken, 6l.; Gerald Forster, 10l.; Piers FitzJohn Butler, 20 marks; Edmund Butler, 30l.; James De Freny, 60l.; Oliver De Freny, 5l.; the Baron of Brownesforde, 50l.--Total, 543l. 13s. 4d.
Manor of Knocktofer.--Edmund Welsh and his kinsmen, 151l.; Oliver Fanyng, 8l.; Robert Tywe, 10l.; David Howling, 5l.; James Howling, 7l.; Edward Howling, 4l.; Nicholas White, 40l.; James FitzPiers Butler, 4l.; Purcell of Kilkerely, 6l. 13s. 4d.; Adam Welshe, 10l.; John Howell alias Gilledufhele, 5l.; Wadton, 20l.; Poer of Porer's Wood, 5l.; the Churchtowne of Gerepont and the Oldtowne belonging to divers burgesses, 10l.--Total, 285l. 13s. 4d.
Manor of Calanne. [In the margin:--"The Barony of Kelles."] --William Twetman, 74l.; Richard Baron, 30l.; Thomas Comerford, 40l.; Richard Comerford and William Faninge, 30l.; St. Ledger, 26l. 13s. 4d.; Fowlke Comerford, 40l.; William Croke. 5l.; James Butler, 6l.; David Butler and his kinsmen, 21l.; James Toben, 10l.; John Toben, 20l.; Nicholas Deveroux ["Deverony" in MS.] and William Lincoll, 10l.-- Total, 311l. 13s. 4d.
Manor of Gawran.--Thomas Doben, 40l.; Thomas Denn, 51l.; Patrick Forster, 51l.; Ryan and his kinsmen, 100l.; John Cantwell, 60l.; Edmund Butler of Powleston, 40l.; Donell FitzPiers, 5l.; Patrick FitzGerald, 4l.; Edmund Fitz-Nicholas, 3l.; The Bishop of Ossory, 100l. Gerald Blanchville and his brethren, 100 marks; Robert Sartall, 26l.13s.4d.; John Longe, 5l.; Richard Sartall, 12l.; Robert Toben, 5l.; Geoffrey Purcell, 100 marks; Donell FitzPatrick, 10l.; Robert Purcell, 10l.; James Cowley and his brethren, 13l. 6s. 8d.--Total, 669l. 6s. 8d.
Manor of Kilkenny.--The Viscount Montgarret, 100l.; Gerald Archedeken, 30l.; Richard Archedeken and his kinsmen, 30l.; Oliver Sartall, 80l.; the Bishop's lands, 100 marks; John Smythe, 20l.; Richard Grace and Onselle Grace, 10l.; Piers Sartall, 6l.; John Clynton, 10l.; William Bourdes, 4l.; John Richforde, 20l.; Lawnt, 20l.; Richard Shete, 20l.; David Roth, 10l.; Walter Archer, 6l.; Edmund Shete, 6l.; Piers Baron, 6l.; Piers Ragged, 5l.; Robert Sentleger, 13l.; Oliver Grace and his kinsmen, 120l.; James FitzRichard Butler, 13l. 13s. 4d.--Total, 596l. 6s. 8d.
"The third part thereof is to be set upon Upper Ossory, ["Ossories" in MS.] for that it containeth the third part of the country."
II. Names of the gentlemen inhabiting the county of Tipperary, with the extent of their lands.
Lands holden of the manors of Knockgraffen and Kilshielan.--James Toben and his kinsmen "the Comsie" in the cantred of Clonemell, 150l.; Richard Lont, 5l.; William Wale, 40l.; Barnaby O'Nele, 40l.; John Nele, 8l.; Donell O'Nele, 4l.; Edmund Wale, 8l.; William Meydole, 40l.; Richard Butler and his kinsmen, 67l.; James Butler, 67l.; William FitzRichard, 13l. 6s. 8d.; Edmund Butler, 5l.; Philip Wale, 5l.; David Welsh, 50l.; William Poer, 20l.; Patrick Sherlock, 10l.; Edmund FitzRichard, 5l.; Theobald Haked, 13l. 6s. 8d.; Walter FitzThomas, 10l.; John Corre, 10l.; Geoffrey White, 20l.; John Strich and Henry White, 20l.; John FitzPiers, 6l. 13s. 4d. John Monkclerke, 5l.; Thomas Treverse and his kinsmen, 40l.; Sir Theobald Butler, 300l.; Piers English and his kinsmen, 40l.; Thomas Fitz-Theobald and his kinsmen, 30l.; Robert Ketinge and his kinsmen, 30l.; James Prendergast and his kinsmen, 150l.; Morish English and his kinsmen, 20l.; Edmund English and his kinsmen, 30l.; John Ketinge and his kinsmen, 50l.; Richard Keting and his brethren, 40l.; the Bishop of Waterford, 20l.--Total, 1,422l. 6s. 8d.
Manors of Nenaghe, Rosscre, Templemore, and Thurles.--The White Knight's lands there, 100l.; Walter Bourke and his kinsmen, 100l.; John Bourke and his kinsmen, 40l.; Onaght, by the year, 10l.; O'Dowire and his kinsmen, 200l.; the Ryans, 150l.; McBrien Arre, 150l.; Ormond and all the Kenedies, 300l.; O'Caroll and his kinsmen in Ely, 400l.; O'Meagher and his kinsmen in Ykyrm, 100l.; O'Kahill, 20l.; John O'Forgerte and his kinsmen, 40l.; Walter Bourke and his kinsmen, 40l.; James Ashpole and his kinsmen, 50l.; Thomas Purcell and his kinsmen, 100l.; Richard Reaghe Butler, 20l.; James FitzRichard Butler and his cousin, 30l.; Walter Archer, 40l.; Edmund FitzThomas Heding and his kinsmen, 40l.; Thomas FitzJohn Butler and his cousin, 20l.; Miles Cantwell, 10l.; Piers Cantwell, 30l.; Piers Butler, 50l.; the Archbishop of Casshell, 10l.--Total, 2,000l.
Manor of Kildenale in the Barony of Slievevardaghe.--James Butler, 60l.; John Cantwell, 10l.; Richard Cantwell, 15l.; Richard Cantwell 6l.; Thomas Stoke, 20l.; James Laffan and his cousin, 30l.; William FitzJames, 3l.; Thomas Butler and his kinsmen, 8l.; Richard Marvell, 15l.; William Fanninge, 50l.; William Faninge, 13l. 6s. 8d.; James Moreis, 5l.--Total, 235l. 6s. 8d.
Manor of Knockgraffen.--Baron of Donboyne's lands, 300l.; John Butler, 40l.; Theobald Butler, 30l.; Robert Saint John, 40l.; Richard SaintJohn, 10l.; Richard Wale, 13l. 6s. 8d.; Piers Oge Butler, 10l.; William Bryth, 6l.; John Brithin, 6l. 13s. 4d.; James Brythin, 6l. 13s. 4d.; Edmund Monckclerke, 40l.; Edmund Comen and his kinsmen, 30l.; [So in MS.] John Comen, 5l.; Melaghlin O'Carran, 10l.; the Archbishop of Casshell, 40l.; Richard Salle, 10l.; Patrick Hacket, 10l.; Piers Hacket, 10l.; John Hackett, 8l.; Edmund Hackett, 15l.; Edmund Comen and his kinsmen, 30l.; [So in MS.] Redmond Aylward, 30l.; Richard Hacket, 10l.; Thomas Vyn, 15l.; Robert Sawce, 20l.; Theobald FitzThomas Buttler, 8l.; Thomas FitzTheobald Butler, 10l.; John Bremmingham, 5l.; William Moncell, 8l.; Derby O'Caran, 6l.; O'Keamey, 10l.; John Kearney, 10l.; Theobald Ashpole, 20l.; Andrew Hacket, 10l.; James Fleminge, 10l.-- Total, 842l. 13s. 4d.
Sum total, 6,957l.
Copy.

TIRLOUGH LENAGH O'NEILL.  MS 611, p. 168  20 Jan 1571

Former reference: MS 611, p. 168

2 Pages.
Language:  Latin

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 274.

Contents:
Concord and peace made between the Queen's commissioners Justice Dowdall [James Dowdall, Second Justice of the King's Bench.] and the Dean of Armagh, [Terence Daniel.] by authority of the Lord Deputy, of the one part, and Tirlough (Terentius) O'Neill, chief of his nation and name, of the other part, in the camp of the said Tirlough, at Dromgarrowe, 20 Jan. 1570, 13 Eliz.
(1.) O'Neill will keep the peace generally towards all the English subjects of the Queen. O'Donell, O'Reighlie, Bernard, son of Phelem O'Neill, Magnassa O'Hanlon, the sons of the Baron, [Matthew O'Neill, Baron of Dungannon.] and Arthur McDonell, shall remain upon the peace of the Lord Deputy; and the said Tirlough may not invade them. Should any controversy arise between him and any of them, he will make his complaint before the Lord Deputy, who will send commissioners to determine the matter. If they who are upon the peace of the Lord Deputy violate the peace, a marshal shall immediately, by authority of the Lord Deputy, compel the party to restore the spoils, together with four animals as a penalty for every animal taken away. The said Tirlough shall be bound to do likewise on his part. This peace shall be inviolably observed until the return from the Queen of the messengers whom he will send with certain petitions.
(2.) The said Tirlough desired to have McGwier Mahon and Collo McBrian upon his peace, as urraghs, [Uriachus in MS. Qy. mistake for uriachos?] until the return of his messengers, for that they willingly came to him during the war, as (according to him) they were bound to do by ancient custom; but this was refused by the commissioners. Nevertheless it was promised him that the Lord Deputy should not invade them or any other in the North until the return of the said messengers, unless for debts respecting which there is no dispute, ["Liquida debita jam judicata."] or on account of future offences; and as to the proof of the said debts, it is ordained that they shall be fully proved before the commissioners, who shall limit a certain time within which the party condemned shall pay before any invasion or pledges. Future offences are committed to the determination of the commissioners; and if any offender should not pay according to their decree, it shall be lawful to prosecute him in an hostile manner.
(3.) Whereas many spoils have been committed by the subjects of the said Tirlough upon those who depended upon the peace of the Lord Deputy, and in like manner upon the subjects of the said Tirlough by the sons of the Baron and others depending upon the peace of the Lord Deputy, during the truce made by the said Dean and others in the Lord Deputy's name, full restitution shall be made in all things as was ordered by the commissioners.
(4.) It is ordered that in determining all controversies, two discreet persons of the men of the said Tirlough shall assist the commissioners.
The said Tirlough swears to fulfil the premises by the holy Gospels. Present: Justice Dowdall; the Lord Dean of Armagh; Tirlough, son of Henry Y'Nyle; Tirlough, son of Phelem; Arthur, son of Henry McGwier McMahon; and Collo McBrian, and other gentlemen.
All these gentlemen whose names are subscribed, "unacum sua uxore," have solemnly sworn to observe the said peace.
At the humble petition of Tirlough O'Neill, we the Lord Deputy and Council have set our hands to this concord or peace, and affixed the Privy Seal of this kingdom, 3 March 1570, 13 Elix.
"Ex. L. Bruskett."
Copy.

THE O'FARROLLS.  MS 611, p. 170  11 Feb 1571

Former reference: MS 611, p. 170

5 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 275.

Contents:
Indenture betwixt Sir Henry Sydney, President of the Council of Wales, and Lord Deputy General of Ireland, of the one part, and Faghne O'Ferall, otherwise called O'Farroll Bane, of Tully, in the county of Longford, sometime called the country of the Annele; William Fitz Donell O'Farroll, of the Mote; John O'Farrall, of the Glane, captain of Williams sept; Donell O'Farroll, of the Reen, now McMorghe, in Tlewe; Moylaghlen O'Farroll, of Moylynlegan, called MacHioge, of Maythra; Felyn Boye O'Coyne of the Brewne, called O'Coyne; Donnell O'Ferroll, of Kilgresse, captain of Gillernow's sept in the said county, gentlemen, of the other part.
Faghne O'Ferrall and the rest above named promise and bargain to surrender in the court of Chancery in Ireland, to the use of the Queen, when they shall be required to do so, all their possessions in the said country, sometime called the Annelye, and now the county of Longford. And the Lord Deputy promises that they shall receive the same by letters patents from the Queen, to hold to them and their heirs for ever by knights' service, and that they shall be exonerated from the bonaught accustomed to be paid out of the said country to the Queen's galloglasses, and from all other cesses and impositions. In consideration thereof they grant to the Lord Deputy "and his heirs" to the use of the Queen and her successors a yearly rentcharge of 200 marks Irish, payable at the feasts of Michaelmas and Easter, from Michaelmas next. For lack of money to be paid in the Exchequer, the Treasurer or Receiver General is to receive kine to the value of the rent unpaid, as kine shall be worth and sold in the market[s] of Athboye and Navan. If the rent be behind unpaid in part or in all by the space of six months next after any of the said feasts, it shall be lawful to the Lord Deputy, or to the Treasurer or General Receiver, to enter and distrain in all their lands.
(2.) They promise to answer to all general hostings, roads, journeys, and risings out, as they have been accustomed, and to pay yearly for ever "the ancient rent due to the Queen's Majesty out of the said portion of the said country now being under the rule of the said Faghne O'Ferroll, that is to say 50 kine, or 6s. Irish for every cow."
(3.) "That the captainship of that portion of the said county sometime called the Annelye, which heretofore hath been used by the said O'Ferroll Bane, shall from henceforth be utterly abolished, extinguished, removed, ["renowned" in MS.] and put back within the said county for ever; and that the said Faghne O'Ferroll shall receive and take, by letters patents from the Queen's Majesty, for term of his life, an authority in the said county called Clentane in the said county of Longford, by the names and stiles of Seneschal, and not otherwise, together with all such customs, duties, and charges as been accustomed to be yearly yielded and paid unto the said Faghne O'Ferrall as captain of the said country, and endorsed upon the back of these indentures; and the said O'Ferrall not to be removed from his captainry till such time as he have in patent the senescalship." After his death like letters patents to be made to one of the Ferrolls within the said county, such as the governor for the time being shall choose.
(4.) None shall be chief serjeant or petty serjeant in any barony within the said country, but one of the said country birth.
(5.) The said Seneschal shall apprehend all traitors, felons, and other malefactors, and commit them to the common shire gaol of the said county, and prosecute them according to the laws. For this his travail he shall have the moiety or halfendell of the lands of persons attainted and of the goods and chattels of such felons as shall be executed within his rule; the other moiety to remain to the Queen. The Seneschal shall also have all frays, batteries, and bloodsheds that shall happen within his rule, according as [O'Ferroll and his predecessors] have used to have by the name of O'Ferroll.
(6.) The county of Longford shall from henceforth pay yearly the subsidy of 13s. 4d. sterling upon a ploughland, granted of late by Parliament to the Queen, when it shall be divided into ploughlands. For the first three years next after the said division into ploughlands, wastes shall be allowed as in other places of shire ground. The lands of the Geraldines and Nugents, and others of the English pale, and all abbey lands shall be contributors, and bear to the said Seneschal all such lawful customs and duties as heretofore they used to receive by the names of captains or "stanist." If the same be obstinately refused, the sheriff of the said shire shall distrain.
(7.) None of the gentlemen, freeholders, or others of the said county shall take any goods or chattels one from another on any account, "but only for rent service, rent charge, or damage fesant; and ["in" in MS.] none of them to seek to revenge their private quarrels one upon another for anything but by order of the Queen's laws or arbitrament with consent of the parties, upon pain of double the thing received totiens quotiens to him or to them that shall so offend."
(8.) Neither the Seneschal nor sheriff shall levy or exact upon the said county any money, cattle, or other things for their expenses in coming to the Governor and Council to Dublin or elsewhere, in their own private business, unless they be appointed by the said country for the common profit thereof; and then such expenses as they shall have shall be first condescended by the said county, and cessed equally and indifferently.
(9.) The said county shall be discharged of soldier, horse, horseboy, and all other cesses and exactions, "unless it be when the said soldier, horse, horseboy shall have occasion for service of the Prince to travel through the said country."
Sealed by the parties above named, 11 February 1570, 13 Eliz.
Signed and delivered in the presence of Richard Tailor, Fergus O'Ferrall, Richard Staine, William McDonall.
Copy.

THE O'FERRALLS.  MS 611, p. 175  1571

Former reference: MS 611, p. 175

2 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 276.

Contents:
Indenture betwixt Sir Henry Sydney, on behalf of the Queen, of the one part, and Faghne O'Ferrall, otherwise called O'Ferrall Boye, of the Pallisse, in the county of Longford, sometime called the country of the Anele; Kedaghe O'Ferrall, of Raharewy; Fergus O'Ferroll, of the Bawne; Edmund O'Ferrall, of Criduffe; Irrill O'Ferroll, son to the said O'Ferroll, of the Mornyn; Teige Duffe McConnick O'Ferroll, of the Killyncrubok; O'Ferrall of the Camace; B[r]yan McRurey O'Ferrall, of Drumvinge; Shane McGerrott O'Ferroll, of the Cargyn; Tirrelaghe O'Bardan, of Dromhishen; William O'Bardan, of the same; Rowrey McRosse O'Ferrall, of Kilmacshane; Gerralte McOwen O'Ferrall, of Dwrey; Teige Boy O'Ferrall, of Tirlyken; Irryell McWilliam O'Ferrall, of Balleywhaun; Brian McHebbard O'Ferrall, of Killacommoge; Murghw McDonell O'Ferrall, of Athaydonell; Rosse McDonell O'Ferrall, of Balleywringan; Morghw McTeige O'Ferrall, of Balclare; Catle McHebbard Ferrall, of Dwclyne; Murghco McConyck O'Ferroll, of Corriglagan; Ruran McGerrot O'Ferrall, of Clonfower; Tiege Duff O'Ferroll; of the same; Connoll McShane O'Ferroll, of Drommeded; Gillarnew McFaghne O'Ferroll, of Raclyne; Cowke McHebbard O'Ferroll; Beallalyng Felem McDonell O'Ferroll, of Keraunkeyll; Conor McRossa O'Ferroll, of Cashell; Beage Hebbard McRossa O'Ferroll, of Furkeyll; Teige McMoryarty O'Ferroll, of Cornyll; Jefferye Oge O'Ferroll, of Cerwnagerak; Moryertagh McEdmund O'Ferrall, of Livery; Howe McDonkey O'Ferrall, of the Carygyn; Shane McDonnell O'Ferrall McDonell, of the Currey; Felem O'Cuyn, of the Brewne; Breyne O'Cuyne of the Arcwranake; Jeffrey O'Cuyn, of Leasduffe; William McDonkay O'Ferrall, of Daremore; Donall McCalle O'Ferrall, of Crulaghte in the said county, gentlemen, of the other part.
The said Faghne O'Ferrall and the rest above named covenant to surrender in the court of Chancery in Ireland to the use of the Queen, when they thereunto shall be required, all their possessions in the country sometime called the Anneyley, and now the county of Longford, either in use or possession, with the like covenants and conditions as in the former indenture are mentioned.
Signed by the parties above named.
Copy.

DESMOND'S LANDS.  MS 611, p. 205  1572

Former reference: MS 611, p. 205

12 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 282.

Contents:
"The yearly extents and standing rent[s] of the Earl of Desmond's lands and inheritances, answerable, rising, and growing out of and upon those countries, lands, and places following, &c., anno 1572."
(1.) The cantred of Keyery, with Broun and Contlow's lands, 300 plowlands, 320l. "half face money," and 240 beefs. The Baron of Lixnawe's lands, otherwise Clanmorris, are contributory to the said money and beefs. The Earl's chief rent in the said cantred, 32l. 11s. 11d. The Earl's manors and dwelling places there, (i.e. in the said cantred,) containing 7 castles and towns. The Island, Killorullan, Berrowe, the Dyngle, Castle Maigne, the New Manor, and the Curryne. The towns, hamlets, &c. of Lystroym, Clanelowre, and others. The town of Trayleie. The chief rent of Desmond per annum 32l. O'Sullyvan More is charged with 6l. yearly, and McConnell and McKrehvin with other, 16l.
"The bloodshed of the country of Keyrry is due to the manor of the Island, together with the rent of Kiltarcon, the Rimors' lands for candlelight to the said manor allowed."
"The rents of O'Sullyvan Beare, and Barrod's lands with other parcels in a deed of gift by the Lord McKarthiemore his father that now is, made to James, late Earl of Desmond," as parcel of the dower by him given to the said Earl with his daughter Dame Ellen, Countess of Desmond.
"The Knight of Kerry's refection, or a fine for the same, at the Steward's discretion." The Bishop of Kerry's refection, or a fine. The refection of Ardene Greghe for his office of seneschalship, or a fine for the same. Rent of Bally McAdam.
"The Baron of Lixnaw is half marshal of the Earl's castle and holdeth the same office by inheritance, and doth also appoint his attorneys in the cantreds of Connellaghe and Imokylly, and taketh rewards of them accordingly."
The profits of the liberty court of the said cantred of Kerrye and Clannmorishe, the admiralty and wrecks of the havens and creeks thereunto adjoining, together with 13s. 4d. out of every stranger's ship arriving there.
(2.) Cantred of Ogonyll, 320 plowlands. Yields yearly every May 320 beefs with 213l. 6s. 8d. in money, and at All Saints in money, without beefs, 213l. 6s. 8d. The chief rent of the said country, 40l. 2s. Other rents upon the freeholders, 15l. Lands held by the rimers of the Earl in the mountey[n?] of Slewlocra, named the Brosenaghe, and by the rimers of Templay, Egleantane, and Balleywroho. Rents and duties of Keary Ihereghen.
"The Knight of Valley ought to the Earl divers customs of meat and drink, together with rising of men at the Earl's calling to the number of 60 kearne, certain horsemen, and the finding and sessing of the said Earl's men at the said Knight's charges to be distributed in his country in times accustomed for the purpose."
The Earl's manors, namely, Asketin, New Castle, Shanneth, the Island of Foyne, Carrygrayge, Tearebeard, the Fort of Three Enemies, Clone, Ogallyn and Dromearde.
"When the Earl doth cross the mountain or take his journey betwixt Keyrry and Connelogh the foresaid rimors are wont to bear the charge for a day and night, coming and going."
The rents and duties of O'Connor Keyrrey's country. The manor and castle of Glyeane. The castle and town of Castlelyssin. The manor of Kilbullan. The ward, marriage, and relief of Kenter's town. "The advowson of certain churches in Ogonnyll, I refer to the Earl's evidence that maketh mention thereof." Lands in the occupation of George Roche, citizen of Limerick, in the town of Garre. Chief rent in Kilfynnye. One plowland holden of the Earl's master of the horse and keeper of his stud, now waste. The land of Greyden's town, in the "tenury" of Killmore. Lands called the Mohe. Lands of Grayge, Icknueregh, Balleglan and Ballyninaste. The castle and town of Castle Carrig Ogunill in Pobull Brien. The Earl's portion of the said county [Qy. mistake for cantred ?] containing 23 plowlands, after the rate of 40s. the plowland. The chief rent of the same, per annum, 3l. 11s. 8d.
"Note that if the Earl do want provision of flesh for his kitchen, he is wont to have beefs from the country, paying for each beef 6s. 8d."
The manors of Lough-gerry, Glino-ger, Rathe-more, and Any. The Black Friary within Limerick, the body of the same excepted, is parcel of the Earl's inheritance by grant of King Henry VIII., together with the village of Courtbreake, besides Limerick, with the appurtenances, being now in lease with Richard Streache, mayor. The Bishop of Limerick's refection once a year. The lands of Rowre besides Athedare. The castle and lands of Corbaly.
"It is found by th' office of baron royal's court, which is wont to be kept by the Earl's steward in the said manor of Annye, that all the freeholders within the precinct of the sovereignty, viz., 23 plowlands to those suits of court, ward marriage, and relief always by the year."
"The Earl is wont to have a refection in the hospital besides Anye from time to time." He has divers purchased lands within the said county, with divers usages and customs, such as "amercements for stealths called canes in Irish, for drawing of weapons, penalties upon horsemen and footmen for not rising at his calling to his several journeys, together with sessing of victual and workmen."
"The Earl's accustomed duties in Killmalloge is 4d. for every colpe by the quarter, and a horse load of wood of such as bring sale wood to the town. Also he is wont to have his lodging with the sovereign of the town for the time being, and to be served there with bread, ale, aqua vitæ, candlelight, household stuff, and bedding, upon account of the said colpe money; and likewise if his horses or horse grooms do take any horse meat or man's meat, the same also to be allowed out of the said colpe money for the first night. Item, he is wont to have carriage there at all times in his journey upon the like account."
The chief rent of Youhall, 7l. 6s. 8d. The advowson of the wardenship of the college of Youhall belongs to the Earl's presentation from time to time. He has a portreeve in the said town for collecting the said chief rent, by the election of the mayor there, together with the Council and commons, from year to year, who receives all bloodsheds in the said town to the Earl's use. He has certain tenements and lands without and within the town.
(3.) Cantred of Imokilly, containing 140 plowlands, contributory to the country charges in beefs and money, after the rate of 6s. per plowland, and where no beefs are to be had, in rent 3s. 4d. per annum, and instead of the "bony begges wages" 12s. 8d. per plowland. Also, 140 plowlands of free lands, not being contributory to the country's charges, yielding to the Earl nothing but a kind of cesse named a "sorrihin," and "their portion of the bonny burry now and then when the Earl doth hold the same."
Of the lands aforesaid Dame Katharine FitzJohn, late widow to Thomas, sometime Earl of Desmond, holds for her dower the manor and castle of Inchiq[u]ine, for life.
Marterstown was holden of the said Earl. The Earl was wont to have a refection of the Bishop of Cloyne yearly. The Earl's physician, dwelling at Cloyne, holds a plowland free for his service, and a tenement in Youhall.
(4.) The cantred of Kerry Wherry, containing 100 plowlands, was wont to be set by the Earls of Desmond after the rate of 10s. every plowland per annum, but now at 53s. 4d. by Sir Warram Sentlegere, the Earl's farmer there. The manor of Beawer, otherwise Carig-Ityn, and also Crostean. The manor of Carrygroughan, upon the river of Lix, with a claim to the wood of Carrkypan, in the tenure of James Russell, as constable. The town of Ballyngarry. The custom and cocket of Kinsaile. The chief rent of Baron Coursi's lands besides Kinsaile.
(5.) Cantred of Karbregh.--The manor of Kilbrittaine, McKarthie Rewghe's chief dwelling place, whereof the Earl claims of rent 67 beefs yearly. "McKarthie and his predecesors were wont to answer and rise to the Earl and his predecessors with all the strength and force of his men victualled for three days, receiving then at the said Earl's hand some benevolence, as horse and harness or such like."
A tenement in Waterford. The rent of Mone-ottrey. The town and lands of Bally Vic Maoge, in the tenure of Dame Ellen FitzGarret, widow to the late Viscount Desses.
The towns, lands, and villages of Keppagh, Knockan, Don, Torcke, Bally-ny-Courtie, Kilgarawan, [and] Keppagh-Quoym, with the barony of Aghe-meane and Ballyswyn.
Sir John FitzGerald, the Earl's brother, possesses the manors, towns, and castles following: Kylmannyhin, Lyffynnen, Mogile, Carrigge-ne-Veare, P[h]illippestowne, Agh Crossen, Brohall and Kilcolman. Sir Thomas FitzGerald, another brother, holds the manor of Connehe, the castle of Aghcarrin, Newtown, [and] Lisan, with all the lands of Keneall Callor; also Goghan's great castle.
The manor of Mocolpe was in the Earl's possession at his departure into England. "Thomas FitzGerald of Kilmagho, and his heirs, holdeth the said town with other lands thereunto adjoining." Morrice FitzGerald, brother to the said Thomas, holds the castle and town of the Shyane. He also holds the villages of Broydane, Ballyforgye, and Whitte's town, since the death of his brother James; which parcels were let to the said James's wife by the Earl that now is.
The manor of Srongcally was in the Earl's possession at his going into Ireland. The manor of Kilshillan with the barony of the same.
The chief rent of C[l]omell, the Earl's manor house court there, with certain tenements, and the mill and bakehouse of the same, "which hath for custom and usage time out of mind, that all kind of malt ground to make sale ale must be ground in the said mill, or else forfeited, without the millers dispense therewith, and the like for baking of sale bread out of the said Earl's bakehouse." The fines and "seace" silver of the said town. A court to be kept there ["then" in MS.] by the Earl's portreeve once every fortnight, wherein no plea is holden above 10s. 1½d.; "for every which plea is due to the steward of the court 3d., for every bloodshed 12d., whereof 8d. is due to the steward, and to the portreeve for the time being 4d. Also, if any be convicted by order of the said court and so committed to ward, the same party making escape, he doth forfeit 5l. totiens quotiens."
"There is joined to the said Earl's court of demesne lands one plowland, a fishing weir, the fishing of the pool besides the bridge, two parcels of land in the mountain of Barre, Makinge and Knocknerighe," which is (are ?) in the Earl of Ormond's hands.
The barony of Kylfiekil, in the said county, has been hitherto demised for the finding and receiving of the said Earl and his train at the constable's charges for two days and nights, as often as he goes thither; but if the Earl tarry above the said time he finds flesh and wine for himself and his train, and the constable all other kinds of victuals, viz., bread, ale, aqua vitoe, butter, pork, mutton, hens, chickens, and such like. This manor has been in the Earl of Ormond's hands since the said Countess's death.
The town of Balleyn Courte, beside Hahealagh. The castle and town of Bridgesford alias Behellahyn Drehed, parcel of the said Earl's marriage goods with the Countess his wife that now is, and in the tenure of Muskry-curcke.
Note, that the baronies of Kilfyekyll and Kilshiellan, and the said chief rent of Clomell have been out of the Earl's hands since the death of the late Countess of Desmond, being detained by the Earl of Ormond.
Saint Mary Abbey, beside Dublin, parcel of the Earl's inheritance, worth by the year 18l.
In many places the amounts of the rents are stated.
Copy.

THE CAVENAGHES.  MS 611, p. 177  1572

Former reference: MS 611, p. 177

5 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 289.

Contents:
I. "An abstract of the Cavenaghes and of other lands, as it hath been divided in times past, which was written in anno 1572." [Sir Peter Carew is mentioned.]
II. "To whom and to what manors these Cavenaghes do belong."
III. "What lands and services belongeth to these manors."
IV. "How these manors stand."
At the end are the following paragraphs:--"There be of estimation of the Cavenaghes but three, that is, Brian McCare, of St. Mylyn's, Mortagh Oge of the Garghill, and Care Duff of Clamolyne, and there is none of them able to make eight horsemen of his own buying, and every one of them is enemy unto other; but they have thieves on foot to steal from the Queen's true subjects, and they do all dwell in the counties of Wexford and Carlaugh, and easy to be brought to answer to the law; for I myself have seen and caused the fathers of the disturbers to carry stones and mortar to the building up of the Queen's Majesty's houses in those parts.
"Within one month after that I come home I will send your Honour a plainer book."
Copy.

THE KNIGHT OF THE VALLEY'S LANDS.  MS 611, p. 185  7 March 1573

Former reference: MS 611, p. 185

5 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 296.

Contents:
Inquisition taken 7 March 1572, concerning the Knight of the Valley's lands. ["FitzGerald" in the margin.]
Names of the Jurors: Theobald Burcke, of Karrigkirill; Garret FitzMoris, of Thomastowne; James Lewis, of Crominigh, Thomas McMorris, of Behagh; John McMorris, of Ballymone; Gerott FitzWilliam, of Beolarie; Garett McMorris, of Bornonne; Morris McEdmond, of Ballinoe; Thomas McRichard, of Balliknockbane; John Coomyn, of Limerick, alderman; Stephen Sexten, of the same; Donell O'Brien, of Karrigkonill.
We find that the Knight of the Valley died seized of the Castle of the Vale, with 13 plough lands thereto belonging, four of which pay cess to the Earl of Desmond. Edmund FitzDavid holds of the said Knight 7 ploughlands belonging to the Castle of the Vale, paying nothing for one of them, and out of the other six, three marks per annum, when they are inhabited, otherwise nothing, and paying his portion of cesses as others do. The said Knight died seized of the town and castle of Castelltowne, the town and castle of the Behir, the town and castle of the Capigh, and of the towns of Kilbriden, Arlomane and Cloingcollon, Ballylougirth, Fahighe, Clohiran, Mowyh, Ballygawe, and Drologhan, and certain ploughlands belonging to these places. He made continual claim to the town of Balligiliahan, now in the possession of Edmund McDavid.
Edmund McDavid and Moris Ykhea hold the town of Shanneballymore, with two ploughlands, of the Knight of the Valley, each of them paying yearly 10s., that is to say, 5s. at Christmas and 5s. at Easter; "and when strangers be cessed upon the country, to bear their portion thereof according the rate of their lands." John FitzMorris and Thomas McBarny hold of the late Knight the town of Ballymnonye and one ploughland, each of them paying yearly 10s. Moris Ikhea holds the town of the Digirth and half a ploughland, for the rent of 5s. per annum. Garett McMoris holds Ballinigowle and two ploughlands, for the rent of 20s.; "and when any strangers should come to the Knight's house, to bear part of them, according to the rate of his land, for two days and two nights." Edmund Oge and David McPhelipp hold the New Towne called Ballinoe and one ploughland for the rent of 10s.; Oge paying two parts thereof and McPhelipp three parts. John Oge McShane holds Ballichane and one ploughland for the rent of 10s. Thomas McRikarde holds Ballinknocknane and one ploughland for the rent of 10s.
The town [of] Beolane owes him 10s. per annum and cess after one ploughland. Balinstini owes him cesse after the same rate. The town of Moneregan owes him cess "The said Knight's lands are to be cessed with all manner of cesses as the freeholders' aforesaid lands are to be charged withal, except the lands belonging to Castletowne only, which of old time are free of any such cess." He was seized a little before his death of the fourth part of the town and lands of Williams Towne, which he had in mortgage of John O'Rone, for kine. He died seized of Ballyvadocke and one ploughland, and had a noble out of this town; of the advowson of the parsonage and vicarage of the church of Kilkornall; of a waste mill and waste weir at Castletowne, and of a waste mill and a waste weir at the Castle of the Valley.
Copy or abstract.

EARL OF ESSEX.  MS 611, p. 182  9 July 1573

Former reference: MS 611, p. 182

3 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. I, document 304.

Contents:
"Covenants between her Majesty and the Earl of Essex, 9 July 1573."
Where her Highness, in consideration of service, and surrender of his title to 800 marks of the Earl of Marche's lands, had given to the Earl the moiety of the seigniories of Clanyboy, &c., the Earl covenanted, before Michaelmas then next ensuing, in person to take his journey into the said country with 200 horsemen and 400 footmen at his own charges, and to continue the same for two years from the said feast. If the Earl do not maintain the said number, her Majesty may levy so much of the revenues of the Earl's lands in Ireland as may suffice to supply the deficiency.
After two years the Earl shall continue like number of soldiers at his charges as her Majesty shall keep, so that the same number exceed not 600 soldiers.
As often as any of the said numbers shall by death or departure be decayed, her Majesty shall cause so many able English men to go to and remain in the said territories.
Before Michaelmas the Queen will send 200 horsemen and 400 footmen under the conduct of the said Earl into the said seigniories, at her own charges.
During two years from the said feast there shall be kept in the said seigniories 200 horsemen and 400 footmen of English birth at the Queen's charges.
"Whereas sundry her Majesty's subjects do purpose to adventure in service under conduct of the said Earl for the reducing of the said country to loyal obedience at their proper costs, some with horsemen, some with footmen," her Majesty grants that every such person shall have in fee simple, for every horseman continued for two years, 400 acres English, and for every footman, 200 acres; paying for every acre 2d. English. "If any of the adventurers die before the two years ended, their heirs to have liberty for six months to supply."
"The country to be divided equally by six commissioners, indifferently to be named, three by her Majesty or the Lord Deputy, and three by the Earl; and commissioners from time to time for that purpose to be awarded, and they [to] divide the country, and to give names to towns, &c."
The Queen may convert a fifth part of her portion in desmesne at her pleasure.
"The Earl shall fortify as occasion shall require before division at the equal charges of her Majesty and the Earl." In his portion he shall fortify or build at his pleasure during 20 years, and have timber out of Kilulto woods. The Queen shall fortify and build for the defence of the country as to the Lord Deputy shall seem good.
Liberty to the Earl, his heirs and tenants to transport, &c. any commodities of his country for seven years without custom, and for twelve years for the custom used in England. To carry out of England money, armour, weapon, victuals, &c. "All assurances to be made conditionally that no part of it be assigned or conveyed to any Irish or Scots Irish or mere Scots, and if any such be, the estate to be forfeited to the Queen's Majesty and the Earl, except that her Majesty may dispose 5,000 acres at her goodwill and pleasure, and the Earl 5,000 more."
The Earl shall for seven years continue Captain General there under her Majesty, and after during her pleasure. He is "to discharge her Majesty, &c. of the garrison at Knockefergus and of their entertainment, except the constable now there present, so as the said garrison will serve under him."
The Earl shall cause his part to be inhabited after division with such number of English birth as her Majesty doth her part, so as her Majesty's number pass not 1,000 persons.
"To supply his want," he shall have them and their furniture out of England, "paying them the like wages as her Majesty doth in likewise."
Copy.

PAYMENTS FOR IRELAND.  MS 611, p. 190  29 Sep 1574

Former reference: MS 611, p. 190

2 Pages.

Contents:
The yearly payments made out of the receipt of the Exchequer into Ireland and here for those affairs," from Michaelmas 5 & 6 Philip and Mary to Michaelmas 16 Eliz.
From Mich. 5 & 6 Philip and Mary to Mich. 1 Eliz., 6,306l. 13s. 4d.; 1 & 2 Eliz., 23,694l. 14s. 9½d.; 2 & 3 Eliz., 23,993l. 18s. 4½d.; 3 & 4 Eliz., 20,456l. 11s. 3d.; 4 & 5 Eliz., 6,880l. 16s. 8d.; 5 & 6 Eliz., 21,515l. 8s.; 6 & 7 Eliz., 11,897l. 2s. 3d.; 7 & 8 Eliz., 25,786l. 9s. 8d.; 8 & 9 Eliz., 46,485l. 17s. 2d.; 9 & 10 Eliz., 24,719l. 17s. 3½d.; 10 & 11 Eliz., 18,239l. 7s. 8d.; 11 & 12 Eliz., 15,406l. 10s. 3d.; 12 & 13 Eliz., 27,446l. 6s. 2¼d.; 13 & 14 Eliz., 32,475l.12s. 27/8d.; 14 & 15 Eliz., 25,169l. 2s. 107/8d.; 15 & 16 Eliz., 43,304l. 19s. 6½d.
Total, 370,779l. 7s. 6¾d. The medium by year, 23,173l.
For those sums that are paid thither out of the Court of Wards, to be certified by the auditor of the same, and of the money growing of the suits received by Mr. Gardiner, by Mr. Conyers, one of the auditors of the prests with whom the account remaineth, and for munition and other artillery by the auditors of the prests; add unto the former charge the money which came out of the Court of Wards and Liveries by all the Queen's Majesty's time, 21,145l.; also for the revenue of Ireland, 120,000l.
Sum total, 490,779l. 7s. 6¾d.
Copy.

SIR WILLIAM DRURY, LORD JUSTICE.  MS 611, p. 351  29 May 1578

Former reference: MS 611, p. 351

9 pages. [Dated in the margin, by Carew, "Anno 1579." There is another copy of these instructions in the Record Office, dated 29 May 1578.]

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. II, document 90.

Contents:
Instructions given by the Queen's Majesty, with the advice of her Highness'Council, to Sir Wm. Drury, Knight, [whom] she hath appointed Lord Justice of Ireland, and Wm. Gerrard, Esq. Lord Chancellor of the same land.
They shall assemble the rest of the Council there, and "enter into the estate of the four provinces, Ulster, Connaught, Munster, and Leinster, how and by whom every or any of these estates be perturbed, how and in what sort at this day the loyal and true subjects are defended from the enemies, and at what charge to her Majesty and at what charge to the country. After, to consider whether any part of the garrison now in pay [may] be diminished and the country sufficiently defended. Then, to consider of all our castles and forts, which at this day at our charge are guarded and kept, what maintenance daily belongeth or is otherwise challenged to belong to every or any of them the said castles or forts, either in lands or customs.
Also to confer and consider how the confines of our countries bordering upon the rebels, specially Leixie and Offally, be inhabited by the owners of the same lands, and whether by such persons or in such sort, with such armour and munition, as either by the laws of the land or in respect of their tenures they are bounden; wherein our will and pleasure is, that you effectually put those the laws of that land in execution, by which laws and through the deserts of owners of the lands we may lawfully demise the lands and appoint tenants.
Also to consider how the Irish rebels, next borderers upon the Pale, may best be dealt with to bring them to civil order, especially the Tooles, Byrnes, and Kavernaughts, "who have over long been suffered to live in the like rude and disordered sort as do the most savage of the Irish." Also to call our Clerk of the Check, and "to peruse his check roll of the whole number of the soldiers and others in our pay, who be their captains, where they live and how employed, and whether all those to whom we give pay as soldiers be continually employed in service." You shall cause the said Clerk of the Check to reduce his manner of entering those in pay into his check roll according to the ancient order.
Because we would be truly advertised of the debts we owe and of those due to us, you shall consider of the late notes laid down by our Auditor, and how all those to whom we remained in debt when Sir Henry Sydney last received the government, and who are not yet discharged, had and came by their warrants, whereby you may gather who are meetest speedily to be paid. We hope, with the revenue of the lands and the levying of the said debts, that those to whom we owe anything may be satisfied without suit to be made to us, and that "such as have patents of office there appertaining to our revenue, should have their yearly fees or the arrearages thereof paid by our Treasurer for the Wars, out of our treasure sent out of England; and therefore you shall charge our Treasurer with that default passed, and direct him not commit the like, what commandment soever any our governors there shall give to the contrary.
We perceive how greatly religion and justice "be decayed in most parts, the parish churches fallen down, and there no service said or very seldom." You shall take "such order as all those the several parish churches decayed may be reedified, who in law are chargeable therewith, the parsons, vicars, or their farmers, compelled to keep curates." You shall cause convenient places to be made or repaired wherein aptly to receive the justices in all times of sessions; also sufficient gaols. The said justices shall put in execution the laws against marriage and fostering with the Irish and using Irish laws and customs; and you shall appoint, in the towns where the sessions shall be kept, and in the good towns through which the passage of the justices lies, inns and places of lodging with convenient proportion of hay and corn, which they shall pay for.
You shall peruse the instructions taken in the time of King Henry VIII. (then put in print,) delivered to Sir William Skevington, Deputy there. So many of them as you think meet for this present age shall be put in execution.
We are wearied with the intolerable charges. Extraordinary expenses are the chief consumer of our treasure. As often as any allowance exceeding 10l. shall be demanded, you shall stay the granting or sending of a warrant by your concordatum, until you have called together all those of our Council being within eight miles, so as you ever have the number of four besides yourself to confer and consider of the demand.
Upon consideration of such sums as since the begnning of our reign have been answered to us "for subsidies, proffers of Mayors and Sheriffs, fines for liveries, the twentieth part for spiritual livings of the Crown, office [of] Clerk of the Hanaper, of the first fruits, fines for homage, forfeitures of merchandises, profits for wards, fines for leases, fines for alienations, fines in the Castle Chambers, forfeitures upon bonds and recognizances, [and] the fines of amercements cessed by the Commissioners in Causes Ecclesiastical," we find the same so small that we think we have not been answered of that which we ought to have received. The orders taken in the time of the Earl of Essex, set down in writing and subscribed by Gilbert Gerrard, Attorney General, for the speedy and due payment of our revenue, are to be executed. Before they pass any warrant to demise any part of our lands, or any pardon or protection for any offender, you and the Council shall consider of the same. The profits accruing thereby have rather been employed upon others than turned to our use.
When any spiritual promotions fall void, they shall be bestowed upon apt and fit persons, eschewing corruption.
You, the Lord Justice, and Lord Chancellor, with our Council, shall enter into the consideration of all officers and offices in our Court of Exchequer established to determine causes touching the revenue, and consider what appertains to the duty of those several offices, what fees they have, and whether our said revenue may not be received by fewer officers and at lesser charge.
Be careful to see our people governed by justice, that they may defend themselves from all oppressions, exactions, spending, coynes, liveries, payments of black rent, or any other Irish tribute or payment.
Search and try out what beefs the Irishry yield and pay us, and what they ought to yield.
Whereas upon the change of governors many good servitors in office have usually been displaced, and the friends and followers of the new governor admitted, although unfit, you shall have care that there be just matter inducing before you displace any.
Have special consideration of all such as hold any their lands of us, that we be not defrauded of any service.
At Michaelmas next, and so forth quarterly, send us a true accompt of the receipts and charges of the quarter, and a perfect certificate of your proceedings.
Copy.

THE BURKES  MS 611, p. 228  1580

Former reference: MS 611, p. 228

2 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. II, document 403.

Contents:
Another copy of MS 619, p. 33

The BURKES.  MS 611, p. 192  17 Nov 1582

Former reference: MS 611, p. 192

13 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. II, document 499.

Contents:
Whereas there was "a commission of orders" taken by the Lords Justices [Adam Loftus, Archbishop of Dublin, and Sir Henry Wallop.] and the Privy Council of Ireland, dated 7 September 1582; the tenour whereof ensueth:--
Upon the submission of Ulick Burke and John Burke, sons to Richard late Earl of Clanricard, both of them exhibited petitions to us the Lords Justices and Council, wherein each of them claimed to be Earl in succession from their father; and they confessed a recognizance of 10,000l. each to other to abide our order. We therefore ratify the order ensuing.
It is ordered and decreed that Ulick Burke shall have the title of Earl of Clanricard and Baron of Dunkellyn, and that the whole lands belonging to the said earldom shall be equally divided between them, as if the lands had descended in coparcenary, saving that the first choice of Logh Reoughe and the lordship of Dunkellyn is allotted to the Earl in this division. John Burke shall have the castle and barony of Leitrim in Clanricard free from the impositions of his brother; and we will be humble petitioners to the Queen to create him Baron of Leitrim in tail male. The rest of the lands shall be referred to the division of Sir Nicholas Malby, Governor of Connaught and Thomond, Justice Thomas Dillon, the Archbishop of Tuam, the Bishop of Clonfert, Edmond Lord Bremingham, Thomas Chester, elect of Elphin, Anthony Brabazon, John Norton, John Merbury, Nathaniel Smith, Teige McWilliam O'Kelly, and Hubbert Boy McDavie. Each of the said parties shall take their lands so divided of the Queen to them and the heirs males of their bodies; and for want of such heirs the earldom to be in remainder to John; and the entail to be from John of his barony and lands to the Earl; and her Majesty to be in remainder of both. Whosoever of them shall first revolve from his duty to her Majesty, and shall be publicly proclaimed a traitor, the other continuing in duty shall presently enter upon the lands, titles, livings, and inheritance of the said party so proclaimed. They shall not claim or exact any coyne, livery, or other Irish customs other than are lawful and allowable. Richard Burke, of Derimallaughnye, and the barony of Clare wherein he and his kinsmen dwell, are to be exempt for ever from all rule and authority of either of the said brethren. "If the castle excepted shall be proved to have been justly in the possession of the Earl of Clanricard, deceased, in his own right, that then such castles and lands shall fall in division as the rest of the lands, not excepted, the castles of Owran, Corrofyn, Bellanenyen, Bellashema, Letaffynne."[This "commission of orders" is signed at the beginning by "Ad. Dublin., H. Wallopp;" and at the end by "L. Dillon, N. Malby, Jo. Garvey, Edw. Waterhouse, Geffrey Fenton."]
And whereas also there was another special commission [It is quoted at length.] granted by the said Lords Justices to Sir Nicholas Malby, Thomas Dillon, Justice of Connaught, and the rest of the Commissioners, dated at Dublin 3 October 1582, reciting amongst other things the said order entered in the black Council Book, folio 51, and authorizing the Commissioners to take view of the said lands, make the division, and deliver possession.
We the Commissioners whose names are subscribed, having assembled at Galway, do award and publish that Ulick, Earl of Clanricard, shall have the house of Lough Reaughe, the lordship of Dunkellyn, the castles of Portumna in Sylauchie, Clare, Kilcolgan, and Moyen; also all the seigniories, duties, &c. belonging to the earldom; excepted and always reserved to John Burke, Esquire, brother to the said Earl, and his heirs males, the seigniories, duties, chiefries, rents, &c., within the barony of Leitrim. In consideration that the same shall be for ever secluded from the said earldom by this our order, we award that the Earl shall have and enjoy three quarters of land of Stradballie, and the monastery of Ogormocame, otherwise called Via Nova, in the diocese of Clonfert, with its lands, as by letters patents of 1 July, 35 Henry VIII., granted to William Burke, otherwise McWilliam, more plainly doth appear. As the said Earl shall be secluded from any demands in the town of Leitrim in right of the said monastery, we award that he shall have the castle of Ballinehvoile.
Ulick shall have and enjoy the quarter of land called Collyaghe and a half quarter of land of Dough Castle. The six plowlands and a half, parcel of the possessions of the late Earl lying in Thuoran, co. Limerick, and three quarters of land in Collyn, shall be equally divided between them. The chief rent of 5l. per annum, purchased by the mother of John Burke in Clevile, Caregyen, Librien, and Ballyloyen, issuing and going out of the sept of Tibbott Burke, shall be equally divided. Carnetubery, with the castles, manors, lands, and rights, shall be also divided.
The said Earl shall have all the farms, leases, and assurances which his father had in the monasteries, parsonages, &c. belonging to the houses and churches of Killenemanagh, Aughrim (excepted the castle, town, and fields of Killeglan), St. John's in Tuam, Ballyclare, Rosrelly, [Or "Roswellye."] Lough Reaughe, Kilbought, and Annaghdowne.
Whereas Redmond Burke of Clantusker, Esquire, holds by lease from her Majesty the priory of Clantuskert, we award that during the lease the Earl of Clanricard shall have two quarters of land of the Ballan in Clanricard, parcel of the nunnery of Kilcrenate, with the tithes; and afterwards the four quarters of land in Ballon.
John Burke, Esquire, shall have the castle and barony of Leitrim in Galway, with eight quarters of land; the several scites, circuits, and castles of Cloncastellan, Clandagawne, Ballydowgan, Kilmacare, Ballyturen, Towloban, Lackafyn, Rathgorgan, and Beath; a parcel of land called Tyrone; land in Marye, being of the gift of Teige O'Donell; the feefarms, leases, and assurances which the late Earl, his father, had of the monastery of Clantuskert in Omany, and also the monastery or nunnery of Kilcrenau, parcel of the said feefarms, and exempted from the said Earl (Ulick) in this division, being in Connaught, with the appurtenances, excepted the four quarters of land in the town and fields of Ballan, parcel of the said nunnery," &c.
He shall have, during the term yet unexpired for which Redmond Burke holds the priory of Clantuskert by grant of her Majesty, two quarters of land in the towns and fields of Ballan; and afterwards the same to revert to the Earl. He shall have the castle and all the lands in Killeglan, in Omany, belonging to the priory of Aughrym. The scite, circuit, castle, &c. of Coroffyn shall be equally divided between them by agreement. "As the castle of Oran, with the lands, &c., is challenged by John Burke to appertain solely to himself, and that we have seen a writing made unto his late father to th' use of the said John, which title maketh the division thereof doubtful to us," we have therefore respited the same until such time as it shall be decided by the Lords Justices and Council whether the same castle of Oran, by the words of their order, be dividable.
The said Earl and John are to have peaceable possession delivered to them of all that we have allotted to either of them.
Lastly, we do award, order, and set down that there shall be and remain a mutual amity and society between the said Earl and his brother, and their tenants and followers.
In witness whereof we have set our hands under the signet of the province to this our instrument at Galway, 17 November, 25 Eliz., 1582:--N. Malby, W. Tuamen., Ste. Clonferten, Ed. Athenry, Tho. Dillon, Jo. Norton, Jo. Marbury, Natha. Smithe.
The said Earl of Clanricard and the said John Burke have given their consents to this order.
Signed: U. Clanricard, Jo. de Burgo.
Ex' per me, Rowlandum Argall, clericum Consilii.
Copy.

MINISTERS' ACCOUNTS.  MS 611, p. 221  4 Nov 1583

Former reference: MS 611, p. 221

2 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. II, document 510.

Contents:
Commission from Queen Elizabeth to Adam [Loftus], Archbishop of Dublin, Chancellor of Ireland, and one of the Lords Justices; James Dowdall, Chief Justice of the Chief Bench there; Sir Robert Dillon, Chief Justice of the Common Pleas; Sir Lucas Dillon, Chief Baron of the Exchequer; Nicholas White, Master of the Rolls; Thomas Jenison, auditor; and Lancelot Aleforde, surveyor.
For that the accompt of Sir Henry Wallop, Treasurer at Wars in Ireland, cannot orderly proceed and be taken as is requisite before such time as the accompts of the Vice Treasurer and General Receiver, the Master of our Ordnance, and the Ministers of our Victuals and of our Works there be first taken and determined, we therefore authorize you to hear and determine their accompts, which shall be engrossed in two parts, and by you signed and avouched, the one part to remain in our Court of Exchequer there, and the other part to be delivered to the parties accomptable. We further authorize you to call before you the said Sir Henry Wallop, with all his books, warrants, certificates, and bills, from his first entry into that office, being the 10th of August in our 21st year, until 30th September in our 25th year, and the same to examine; and also thereof to make a view or declaration of his accompt, which is to be perused by such commissioners as we shall appoint here in England.
Manor of St. James, 4 November 1583, 25 Eliz.
Copy. Addressed.

The QUEEN to the ARCHBISHOP of DUBLIN, LORD CHANCELLOR, and others.  MS 611, p. 223  19 Aug 1584

Former reference: MS 611, p. 223

2 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. II, document 526.

Contents:
Whereas by our commission dated at St. James's, 4 November 1583, 25 Eliz., we authorized you and [James Dowdall] the Chief Justice of our Bench, now deceased, to hear and determine the accompts of our Vice Treasurer and General Receiver, the Master of the Ordnance, and the ministers of our victuals and works, no further than Michaelmas last, we now by these our letters prolong our former commission till 30 September next.
Oatlands, 19 August, 26 Eliz.
Addressed to the Lord Chancellor, Chief Justice of the Common Pleas, Chief Baron of the Exchequer, Master of the Rolls, Auditor, and Surveyor.
Copy.

DONNELL GORME MCDONNELL.  MS 611, p. 225  18 Sep 1584

Former reference: MS 611, p. 225

3 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. II, document 531.

Contents:
Articles of agreement between Sir John Perrott, Lord Deputy, and the Council (viz., Thomas Earl of Ormond and Ossory, Lord Treasurer of Ireland; John Norris, Lord President of Munster; Sir Lucas Dillon, Chief Baron of the Exchequer; Sir Edward Waterhouse and Geoffrey Fenton, Principal Secretary), of the one part, and Donnell Gorme McDonell of the Glynnes in Ulster of the other part.
Dated at the camp near Donluce in Ulster, 18 September, 26 Eliz.
Humble suit has been made to us, the Lord Deputy and Council, as well by the Lady Agnes Cambell, wife to Turlogh Lennoghe O'Nele, mother to the above-named Donnell Gorme, as also by the said Donnell himself, that in respect of his humble submission to her Majesty we would grant him her pardon, " and a patent to enable him a free denizen in this her realm," and so much of the Glynns in Ulster as were the lands of Myssett, otherwise Bissett, for such yearly rents and services as we think requisite. Considering the letters from her Majesty of 14 March 1583, declaring her favour towards the said Lady, we grant the aforesaid petitions. The castle of Olderflete shall be at her Majesty's disposition.
The said Donnell or his heirs shall not serve any foreign prince or potentate. He shall keep no Scots but such as be native of Ireland, and shall book all men in his country, and deliver the book to the Knight Marshal (Sir Nicholas Bagnall) or to Sir Henry Bagnall, his son. He shall serve her Majesty with a rising out of 80 footmen at his own charges. He shall not unlawfully intermeddle with any borderers of Ulster. To pay a yearly rent of 60 beeves, to be delivered at the Newry. To serve against Sauerlie Bwoye and any other foreign Scot. Not to convey any part of the Glynnes.
He shall preserve to the Governor of the realm for the time being all the hawks which shall be bred in the Glynnes aforesaid, or in any part thereof, of what nature soever they be, and the same yearly to be sent in safety to the said Governor." He shall not draw to him any of the followers of Clandeboy, the Rowte or the Ardes.
To the one part of these articles indented remaining with the said Donnell the Lord Deputy and Council have set their hands and seals, and to the other part remaining with the Lord Deputy and Council the said Donnell hath likewise put his hand and seal.--Donell Gorme McConell.
Copia vera concordans cum originali. Ex' per Nath. Dillon.
Copy.

O'NEAL and O'DONNELL.  MS 611, p. 144  20 Sep 1584

Former reference: MS 611, p. 144

1¼ Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. II, document 532.

Contents:
Indenture between Tyrloghe Lyneaghe O'Neale and Hugh O'Donnell, before Sir John Perrot, Lord Deputy, and the Privy Council, 20 September, 26 Eliz., 1584.
Tyrloghe O'Neale and Hugh O'Donnell and their followers to keep the Queen's peace and live in mutual amity. To withstand any foreign invasion of French, Spanish, or Scottish, and assist her Majesty's garrisons. Neither of them to harbour each other's malefactors, or to revenge his wrongs by force, but seek for remedy from the Lord Deputy. If any stealth be taken out of either of their countries, the parties damnified shall freely follow the same into each other's country. "And wheresoever the track is left, the party upon whose lands the same is left shall either produce the thieves that they may be punished, or pay the value of the goods and cattle stolen." Murderers and felons flying for refuge into their countries are to be apprehended. Neither of them shall aid any proclaimed traitors or rebels, but endeavour to apprehend them and send them to her Majesty's Marshal.
These indentures were tripartite. Two of them were subscribed by O'Neale and O'Donnell, whereunto they put their seals. The third was signed and sealed by Sir John Perrot, Knight, Lord Deputy; the Earl of Ormond and Ossorie; Sir Lucas Dillon, Knight, Chief Baron of the Exchequer; Sir Edward Waterhouse, Knight; Geoffrey Fenton, her Majesty's Principal Secretary.
Copy.

The LORDS of ULSTER.  MS 611, p. 145  7 Oct 1584

Former reference: MS 611, p. 145

3 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. II, document 533.

Contents:
Articles indented and agreed upon between Sir John Perrot, Knight, Lord Deputy of Ireland, and the Council of the one party, and the Lords of Ulster on the other party.
18 Sept. 1584, 26 Eliz. -- Tyrloughe Lyneaghe O'Neall shall stand to an agreement formerly made between him and Sir Henry Sidney, then Lord Deputy of Ireland, concerning the limits and bounds of his country. O'Neale especially covenanted to withstand the incursion of the Scots, and to maintain 300 English footmen at 20s. each the quarter, either in money or in cattle. To give to every soldier one "medder" of butter for every five days, or to answer ready money for the same, and two "medders" of oaten meal for every five days. To give to every captain of 100 eight allowances, every lieutenant four allowances, and every ensign, serjeant, drummer, and surgeon two allowances. To give to every band of 100 footmen 50 fat beeves yearly. To send to her Majesty yearly one good chief horse and one cast of hawks.
20 Sept. 1584.--O'Donnell covenanted to find and maintain in Tyrconnell 200 footmen, with the same wages and allowances as O'Xeale.
20 Sept. 1584.--Theobald McGuilly, the chief of his name, covenanted to maintain 100 footmen in garrison at Colrane, and 25 horsemen, with the allowances aforementioned. Every horseman for his victual to have the same allowances as the footmen had, and for their horses he was to provide them oats sufficient.
6 October 1584.--Con McNeale Oge covenanted that upon the Upper Clanhughboy he would maintain the number of 80 horsemen. Shane McBrien McPhelim covenanted to maintain in his part of the Lower Clanhuboy 60 footmen. Hugh Oge McHugh McPhelim upon his part of the Lower Clanhuboy covenanted to maintain 60 footmen.
7 October 1584.--Cormucke McNeale McBrien, Captain of Kilultaghe, covenanted to maintain 13 footmen. Ever McRoory McBrien, Captain of Kilwarlin, 10 footmen. Oghye McCartan, chief of his name, 10 footmen. Sir Hugh McGennis, upon his country called Ivaghe, 40 footmen.
All these indentures were signed and sealed as well by these above-named lords and gent' of Ulster, as by Sir John Perrot, Lord Deputy, Thomas Earl of Ormond and Ossory, Sir Lucas Dillon, Geoffrey Fenton, and Sir Henry Bagenall.
Abstracts.

O'CONNOR SLIGO.  MS 611, p. 217  23 Dec 1584

Former reference: MS 611, p. 217

4 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. II, document 566.

Contents:
Indenture, 23 December, 27 Eliz., between Sir John Perrot, Lord Deputy General, and the Council, and Sir Donnell O'Connor, of Sligo, otherwise Sligaghe, in Connaught.
As Sir Donell surrendered to the Queen the captainship and government of the baronies of Carbrie, Tereraghe-Moye, Tererell Laine, Coryn, and Calavin, and all his castles and lands within the county of Sligo; and as her Highness was pleased that, upon survey and inquisition taken of what castles, &c. he had, the same should be granted back again to him with certain reservations, conditions, and covenants: inquisition and survey have been duly made, and a new grant made back to the said Sir Donell and the heirs males of the body of his father of all the premises, excepting only one town and castle called Ballemote, as by letters patents, dated at Westminster, 20 January, 10 Eliz., and by an inquisition taken at Sligo before Thomas Dillon, Chief Justice of Connaught, and other commissioners, whose commission is dated 12 May, 20 Eliz., and by other letters patents under the Great Seal of Ireland, dated the 22nd of this month, may more particularly appear.
Towards her Highness's charge for the defence of the said country, and to the intent that neither his lands nor the lands of his gentlemen freeholders or farmers shall be charged with any cess, outrising, or other ordinary imposition, but as followeth, it is now covenanted by him that he and the heirs of his father, and other the gentlemen freeholders within the said baronies, shall, besides the 100l. Irish rent, yield and pay as rent the payments ensuing; that is to say, every year one fair and good horse, and during the space of three years next ensuing 100 good, fat, and large beeves yearly, and after these three years 130 good, fat, and large beeves yearly, to be delivered at the castle of Athlone; and also shall serve at all general hostings and risings-out with 20 horsemen and 60 footmen, either shot, kerne, or galliglas, for forty days at their own costs and charges. Also to pay the yearly rent of 25l. of lawful money of England. The same rent, beeves, &c. to stand in lieu of all cess.
The said Sir Donell and the heirs of his father shall have the moiety and half deal of all the goods, chattels, lands, tenements, &c. of persons attainted of felony, and the whole goods and chattels of persons outlawed, goods wayved or strayed, and penalties of bloodshed, within the said baronies.
All the freeholders and inheritors in the said baronies shall hold of the said Sir Donell, &c. by knight service.
All these agreements shall be established by Act of Parliament.
Sir Donell shall permit all persons that shall have any grant from her Majesty of any manors, &c. in the said country, being in her Majesty's gift, quietly to hold the same without disturbance.
In the time of any foreign invasion, or upon any great necessity, Sir Donell and the inhabitants of the said baronies shall serve and contribute at the commandment and discretion of the Lord Deputy.
Copia vera, concordans cum originali. Ex' per Nath. Dillon.
Copy.

The QUEEN to the LORD CHANCELLOR and OTHERS.  MS 611, p. 273  13 Dec 1585

Former reference: MS 611, p. 273

2 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. II, document 585.

Contents:
Where by our commission dated 4 November 1583 we authorized you to hear and determine the accompts of the Vice-Treasurer, &c., and to call Sir Henry Wallop before you; and whereas by another later commission, dated 19 August in our 26th year, we enlarged the time of the said accompts; we now prolong our said commissions till 30 September last, in our 27th year.
Manor of Richmond, 13 December 1585, 28 Eliz.
Addressed to the Archbishop of Dublin, Chancellor, the Chief Justices of the Queen's Bench and Common Pleas, Chief Baron of the Exchequer, Master of the Rolls, Auditor, and Surveyor.
Copy.

The QUEEN to the LORD CHANCELLOR and OTHERS.  MS 611, p. 275  1585

Former reference: MS 611, p. 275

3 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. II, document 586.

Contents:
Whereas in our former commissions of 4 Nov., 25 Eliz., 19 August, 26 Eliz... and 13 December, 28 Eliz., the Clerk of our Hanaper, the Clerk of our Twentieth Parts and First Fruits, the Clerk of our Castle Chamber, the Clerk to our High Commissioners in Causes Ecclesiastical, the Clerk of our Fines under our presidents or governors of our provinces, the Clerk or Collectors of Casualties, and such like are not comprised and specified; we now authorize you to call before you all the said accomptants, and to hear and determine their accompts. The Vice-Treasurer requires a double of his accompts, according to the strict words of our commissions; but as they occupy several great volumes, you shall deliver him a brief declaration of the whole.
No date or address.
Headed: The new draught.
Copy.

ULSTER.  MS 611, p. 278  1586

Former reference: MS 611, p. 278

9 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. II, document 623.

Contents:
The Description and present State of Ulster in 1586.
Its boundaries are described. It contains nine counties, that is to say, three of ancient making, and six made, or rather to be made, new: old--Lowth, Downe, Antrim; new--Manachan, Farnamagh, Tirone, Dungale, Colrane, Armagh.
Lowth is exposed to the often incursions of many lewd and disordered people. Names of its corporations, inhabitors, and principal surnames. Manacan contains these countries, Iriell, Dartrey, Lowghtie, and Irow. The chief captain there is Sir Rory McMahon, who has been some time contributory to Tur[lough] O'Neil, and now is left to the government of the Earl of Tyrone. He is able to make 100 horsemen and 400 footmen. Buildings in his country are none, save certain old defaced monasteries.
The county of Farnmanagh contains all Farnmanagh, Tyrmingrah, and Tirmin O'Mingan. Its captain is Sir Conohour McGwyre, under the rule of Tur. O'Neyle, but desirous to depend on the Queen. He is able to make 80 horsemen, 260 shot, and 300 kerne.
In the county of Tyrone the chief captain is Tir. O'Neyle. Of late the half thereof and more by a composition is let to the Earl of Tyrone. Turlough desires from her Majesty to his son the portion of Tyrone wherein he dwelleth. The O'Neales are all horsemen, and the Clandonelles all galloglas. The O'Doonells are much affected to Shan O'Neyle's sons. The whole force of this country is 300 horsemen and 1,500 footmen. Turlough most commonly dwelleth in the castle of Steaban. "The new castle upon the Earl's part is Dungannon, a defaced castle built by Shan O'Neyle upon the Blackwater, called Benburbe.
The county of Dunegall contains all Terconell and O'Dohertie's country. O'Donell is captain and governor of Tirconell, the chief strength of whom standeth most upon the O'Gallochells and McSwynes. He is able to make 200 horsemen and 1,300 footmen. Between him and O'Nell hath been continual wars for the castle of Liffa and the lands thereabouts. O'Doghertie's country is a promontory almost environed with the sea, namely, with Lough Swyly on the south, and Lough Foyle on the north. O'Doghertie is forced to contribute both to O'Neyle and O'Doonelle. "His country, lying upon the sea and open to the isles of Ila and Jura in Scotland, is almost yearly invaded by the Scots, who take the spoil of it at their pleasures, whereby O'Doghertie is forced always to be at their devotions." He is able to make 60 horsemen and 300 footmen. "Buildings in his countries are the Dery [and] Greencastle, which are wardable.
The county of Coleran contains all O'Cahan's country. Its captain is Rory O'Cahan, always left to the government of Turlough only. His nation is able to make 140 horsemen and 400 footmen; yet because he bordereth so near the Scots, he is much affected to them. His castles are Anagh and Lybenadye. Near the salmon fishing are the castle of Collran and Castle Rooe, where Turlogh O'Neale keeps a constable and a ward to preserve (?) his part of the fishing.
The county of Ardmache contains Oriragh, which is O'Hanlon's country, Clanbrasell, Clancan, Clanawll, Mucknee, Tiriacgh, Fues, and O'Nelan, of late made all contributories to the Earl of Tyrone. O'Hanlon's country is able to make 40 horsemen and 200 footmen. Clanbrasell has no horsemen, but 80 kearne. Clancan has no horsemen, but 100 kearne, who live upon stealth and robberies. Clanawlle appertains to the Archbishop of Armagh and his freeholders, containing the bridge and fort of Blackwater; and Tur. Brasolach holds his portion of land from the Earl of Tyrone. The said Tur. with his sons is able to make 30 horsemen and 80 footmen. Muckne and Tireawgh are now possessed by the Earl of Tyrone, who has placed there certain of his own waged followers. Fewes is peopled with certain of the Neyles, accustomed to live much upon spoil of the Pale. They are able to make 30 horsemen and 100 footmen. O'Neylan is claimed by the Earl of Tyrone. "He hath placed there some of the Quins and Flagans who fostered him, and sometimes he dwelleth himself amongst them there in a little island, Loch Coe." The fort at Blackwater should be repaired and better fortified. At Ardmach, a small village, the charge (church ?) and friaries are broken and defaced. [The extent, situation, &c. of these countries are defined.]
The county of Downe contains the lordship of the Newry and the lordship of Mowrne, Evagh, otherwise called Maginis country, Kilulto, Kilwarlin, Kinalewrty, Clanbrasell McGoolechan, Lechahull, Diffringe, Little Ardes, Great Ardes, and South Clandeboy. Newry and Mowrne are the inheritance of Sir Nicholas Bagnoll, "who, at his coming thither, found them altogether waste, and Shane O'Neyle dwelling within a mile to the Newry at a place called Fedom, suffering no subject to travel from Dundalk northward; but since the fortifications and buildings made there by the said Sir Nicholas Bagnall, all the passages are made free, and much of the countries next adjacent reduced to reasonable civility." Evagh is governed by Sir Hugh MacEnys, the civilest of all the Irishry in those parts. He was brought by Sir N. B. from the bonaghe of the O'Neyles to contribute to the Queen. In this place only amongst the Irish of Ulster is the rude custom of tanistship put away. Maginis is able to make 60 horsemen and 80 footmen. Every festival day he wears English garments. The captain of Kilultoe is Cormack McNeyl, who likewise was brought by Sir N. B. from the bondage of the O'Neyles. "This country afore the Barons' wars in England was possessed and inhabited by Englishmen, and there doth yet remain there an old defaced castle, which still beareth the name of one Sir Miles Tracy." The captain of Kilwarlin is a McGenys, called Ever McRorye, and sometimes did contribute and yield to Clandeboy, but now depends only upon the Queen. In Kinalewrty, or McCartan's country, some interest was given to Sir Nicholas Malbey, but never by him quietly enjoyed. Its captain is Acolie McCartan. Clanbrasell McGoolecham is inhabited by the Kelleys, a very savage and barbarous people, well affected to the Scots, whom they often draw into their country for the spoiling of the subjects. They do contribute, but at their own pleasures, to the captain of South Clandeboy. Lecahul is the inheritance of the Earl of Kildare, given to his father and his mother by Queen Mary. "In it is the bishop's see called Downe, fast built, and inhabited by one Sir John Cowrsy, who brought thither with him sundry English gentlemen, and planted them in this country, where some of them yet remain, though somewhat degenerate and in poor estate, yet they hold still their freeholds. Their names are Savadges, Russells, Fitzimons, Awdleys, Jordans, and Bensons." Diffrin, sometime the inheritance of the Mandevills, and now appertaining to one White, who is not of power sufficient to defend and manure the same; therefore it is usurped and inhabited for the most part by a bastard sort of Scots, who yield to the said White some small rent at their pleasure. Little Ardes is the inheritance of the Lord Savage, who has farmed the same to Captain Peerce. Here are certain ancient freeholders of the Savages and Smithes, who are often harrowed and spoiled by them of Clandeboy. Great Ardes was undertaken by Mr. Smith, and is now possessed by Sir Con MacNeyle Oge, who hath planted there Neyle McBrian Ferto; but the ancient dwellers there are the O'Gilmars [or O'Gilivars ?], a rich and strong sept, always followers of the Neyles of Clandeboy. Of South Clandeboy the captain is Sir Con McNeile Oge, "who, in the time that th' Earl of Essex attempted this country, was prisoner in the castle of Dublin, together with his nephew Hugh McPhelim, captain of North Clandeboy, by mean whereof Sir Brian McPhelim, younger brother to the said Hugh, did then possess both the countries.
Antrim contains North Clandeboy, Island Magy, Brian Caragh's country, Glines, and the Rowte. North Clandeboy is given by letters patents to Sir Brian McPhelim's sons, the Queen's pensioners; notwithstanding, by a new division lately made by the now Lord Deputy, the one moiety thereof is allotted to the rule of Hugh McPhelim's sons, whereby great dissension doth depend between them, and great slaughters on both parties are often committed. The principal followers in this country are the McGyes, McO'Nulles, O'Machalons, Durnans, and Turtures. Island McGye is almost all waste, and contains the McGyes, who contribute to the Lord of Clande boy, but of right belong to the Queen's castle of Knockfergus. "Brian Caragh's country was a portion of North Clandeboy, won from it by a bastard kind of Scots of the sept of the Clandonels, who entered the same and do yet hold it." Brian Caragh contributes to O'Neyle, and to them of Clandeboy.
By reason of the fastness and strength of his country it is very hard to harm him, which maketh him so obstinate and careless, as he never yet would appear before my [Lord] Deputy, but yields relief to the Scots. The Glins, so called because it is full of rocky and woody dales, "is backed with a very steep and boggy mountain, and on the other part with the sea, on which side there are very small creeks between rocks and thickets, where the Scottish galley[s] do commonly land." It lies opposite to Cantier in Scotland. Names of its seven baronies. "These were sometimes the inheritance of the Baron Missett, from whom it descended to a daughter who was married to one of the Clandonells in Scotland, by whom the Scots now make their claim to the whole, and did quietly possess the same many years, till now of late, being spoiled of their goods, they were totally banished into Scotland; but again the country, by instructions from her Majesty, is given to be held from her Highness to Agnus McConnill, Lo. of Cantier in Scotland, and to his uncle Sorleboy. The force of this country is uncertain, for they are supplied as need requireth from Scotland with what numbers they list to call, by making of fires upon certain steep rocks hanging over the sea." The ancient followers of the country are the Missetts, the Mc Y Gills, the McAwnles, the McCarm[a]cks, and the Clanalsters. The Rowte "was sometimes inhabited with English, for there remaineth [in] it certain defaced castles and monasteries of their buildings. The now captain that maketh claim thereto is called McGwillyn, but the Scot[s] hath well near expulsed him from the whole, and driven him to a small corner near the Bann, which he defendeth rather by maintenance of Turloch O'Neile than his own forces; and the said Scots did inhabit the rest, which is the best part, till likewise they were by her Majesty's forces banished as aforesaid, but now come back, and possess all in usurped manner as before. The chief ancient followers of this country are the O'Haries and the O'Quins.
It may be easily perceived by this description of Ulster what are the reasons why this province has been more chargeable than any other; as, namely, the want of good towns and fortified places, the sufferance of the O'Neyles to usurp the government of the several captains and freeholders, the confining so near to the isles of Scotland, and the want of religion, justice, and civil instructions.
The following remedies are proposed:--
(1.) Such revenues as this province may be made to yield to be employed upon fortifications in places most needful for certain years.
(2.) "To apportionate both to Tur. Lenoghe and the Earl of Tyrone, being both of one surname, lands on the north side of Black Water to them and their heirs males indifferently, bounded by some well acquainted with those countries, where with they should only deal, and meddle no further, but leave the government of the rest for her Majesty to the Chief Commissioner or other her Highness' officers in that province.
(3.) "The people which most annoy Ulster from Scotland are the Clandonells, who are ever in continual wars with another sept of the people of the Isles, named McAlanes; and if on McAlan her Majesty would bestow some convenient pension, he will (I think) undertake to keep the Clandonells so continually occupied as they shall be able to send none of their people to disturb her Highness' subjects in Ulster.
(4.) These counties to be as well brought to the nature as well as to the names of shires; that is, the shires to be perfectly bounded, and the sheriffs of English education. There should be some preachers and free schools; and for the whole province a council to be established.
Since the writing of the premises, I do perceive, by letters lately received out of Ireland, that the Earl of Tyrone hath taken upon him the rule of Sir Hugh Mc[Genis?] and Sir Con McNeyle Oge, the captain of Kilwarlin and sundry others, who at my coming thence depended only upon the Queen.
Copy.

SIR HUGH O'DONNELL.  MS 611, p. 261  28 July 1587

Former reference: MS 611, p. 261

2 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. II, document 631.

Contents:
Indenture, 10 July, 28 Eliz., between Sir John Perrot, Lord Deputy General, and the Council, and Sir Hugh O'Donell, chief of his name.
Whereas the said Sir Hugh, by his indenture dated at the camp near Dunluce, in Ulster, the 20th of September 1584, 26 Eliz., did covenant to find and maintain in Tyrconell at his own charges 200 footmen; and whereas the said Sir Hugh seemeth to be grieved with the disorder of such soldiers as were laid upon him, and has repaired hither and made humble suit to the Lord Deputy and Council to accept of a yearly composition to be yielded by him and his country of Tireconell, and to forbear the laying of soldiers upon him: the Lord Deputy and Council are contented to accept and receive of him, for the year past, 700 good, fat, and large beeves, in respect that the full number of soldiers were not placed upon his country that year, to be delivered at Sligo; and yearly hereafter the same number to be delivered at Kells in co. Meath. Sir Hugh also covenants to send and deliver to her Majesty's castle of Dublin Rowry O'Donell, son to O'Donell, McSwyne Fanadaghe's eldest son, and McSwine ne Dwaghe's eldest son as pledges; and to satisfy all such ----- and restitutions as the commissioners that are to be sent from the State here shall take and set down between him and Captain William Bowen, and for all other controversies between the said Sir Hugh and one Hugh O'Donell, otherwise McEdegan, and Sir John O'Dougherty, or any others. In consideration of this, the said Sir Hugh and his country shall be yearly discharged of all other rents and charges, his rising-out to general hostings only excepted.
Signed: John Perrot, Ad. Dublin, Cane., N. Bagnall, Henry Wallop, Robert Dillon, R. Gardener, Geoffrey Fenton.
Copia vera, ex' per Nath. Dillon.
Copy.

ESCHEATED LANDS.  MS 611, p. 317  1587

Former reference: MS 611, p. 317

6 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. II, document 646.

Contents:
A Draft of Instructions for Sir Valentine Browne [concerning the escheated lands in Munster, anno 1587]." [These words in brackets are in Carew's hand.]
Upon your arrival in Ireland, acquaint the Lord Deputy with your instructions, and with the memorials set down by the Attorney-General here.
Some controversies have arisen between the lords, freeholders, and others of Munster, and certain of the Undertakers, about the title of such lands as are escheated by the attainder of the late Earl of Desmond. For deciding these her Majesty has purposed to send commissioners into that realm about the end of this next summer, to hear and determine all pretended claims; and for their better instructions she has caused search to be made in the records here, as well in the Tower as elsewhere, upon certain points set down by the Attorney-General, tending to the strengthening of her title. Charge the Lord Deputy to give order to meet persons to make like search in the records at Dublin; and if any such be found, to take order that the said records may be conveyed into Munster for the use of the commissioners.
As the commissioners cannot take their journey until August next, her Majesty sends you thither beforehand to prepare some things that are needful for the expedition of the service. Require the Lord Deputy to grant out a commission to the President and Vice-President of Munster, the Treasurer of the Wars of that nation, yourself, Sir Edward Waterhouse, the Chief Justice of Munster, her Majesty's Solicitor, and James Golde, late Attorney in the said province, authorizing you to call before you such as pretend title to any of the attainted lands, and examine their claims. It is supposed that such proofs as the lords and freeholders will produce "will consist chiefly upon the deposition of witnesses.
The Lord Deputy is to appoint some person to collect the rents due by certain freeholders to the late Earl of Desmond and others. Part of the said rents have been received by some of the Undertakers, who are to accompt for the same. Certain other rents answered to the said Earl upon certain lands called the chargeable lands, and now in arrear, are to be collected.
Determine the controversies between the Undertakers about the bounding of their seignories and other matters.
And whereas there are certain rebels' lands that are not yet found by office to be escheated, for that the said rebels were not attainted by Act of Parliament, you and the rest of the commissioners shall give order that such persons shall be called before you, and examined what pardons they have received from the late Governors in that realm. And in case you shall find that they are only pardoned for their lives, then shall you cause inquiry to be made by office what lands they were possessed of at the time they entered into rebellion, and shall cause the same to be surveyed and distributed among the Undertakers.
Whereas her Majesty, about a year past, gave order to the Lord Deputy and the Council to consider how the Seneschal [of Imokilly] and Patrick Condon may be agreed with, whereby there might not arise any disturbance from them to the Undertakers, her Majesty has never yet received any answer from the Deputy. Require Sir William FitzWilliams, now appointed Deputy, to consider with the Council what portion of land were convenient to be reserved for them, to the end the residue thereof, which now lieth waste, may be distributed among the Undertakers. "The parties themselves remaining now under guard in the Castle of Dublin may be dealt withal, and let understand [that notwithstanding] their great offence committed, her Majesty can be content, in hope that hereafter they will carry themselves dutifully towards her, to bestow some portion of the land that heretofore appertained unto them (whereof the whole was forfeited) upon them, towards their relief and maintenance.
As to the controversies between the ecclesiastical persons and farmers of tithes, which are like to increase to great value by the peopling of the country and manuring of the grounds that heretofore have been waste, you and the rest of the commissioners shall consider of some good course to be taken with the said spiritual persons and farmers, how there may be allotted out of the said increase of tithes some good portion of the same towards the maintenance of learned preachers and ministers. And whereas certain of the Irish countries within that province have heretofore been chargeable with certain galloglasses for her Majesty's service, or else in lieu thereof to pay the sum of 1,000l., whereof she hath of late years received no benefit, you and the rest of the Commissioners shall make inquiry which of the said Irish countries were chargeable with the said galloglasses, and deal with the lords and freeholders for the payment of the said composition money of 1,000l., and of the arrearages. Take order that such as are appointed to survey the said attainted lands may proceed to the finishing thereof, and deliver you perfect books of the survey.
Examine what numbers of persons the said Undertakers have brought over into that realm of English birth, how many of them are freeholders, how many copyholders, how many labourers and artificers, and whether the number of freeholders and copyholders be such as is required by her Majesty's grant, according to the proportion of their seignories; and lastly, whether, contrary to a clause of her Majesty's grants, they have not planted upon their lands some tenants of Irish birth, and how many of the said Irish birth there be by them planted.
Copy.

The SPANISH ARMADA.  MS 611, p. 149  Sep 1588

Former reference: MS 611, p. 149

2 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. II, document 673.

Contents:
Spanish Ships and Men sunk, drowned, and taken prisoners upon the coast of Ireland in September 1588.
At Loghfoile: ships, 1; men, 1,100. Sligo: ships, 3; men, 1,500. In Tiralie: ships, 1; men, 400. Cleere Island: ships, 1; men, 300. At Finglas in O'Mayle's country: ships, 1; men, 400. In O'Flartie's country: ships, 1; men, 200. In Irris: ships, 2; the men saved in other vessels. In Galway haven one ship escaped, and lost prisoners 70. In the river of Shenan, ships 1 burnt; the men saved in other ships." Total of ships, 17; men, 5,394.
Signed: Geoffrey Fenton.
II. "A Note of such Ships of the Spanish Fleet as perished in September 1588 upon the coast of Ireland, as are not in this former certificate.
One ship of 500 tons sunk in the Sound of Blaskie, near Dingle-Coushe; the men saved by Don Joan de Ricaldo, Admiral of the Biskayne fleet. A ship called the Barque of Hambroughe, of 600 tons, sunk by reason of a leak; 200 of her men saved by other ships. A Venetian ship, called La Valencera, wrecked in O'Doghertie's country. One ship wrecked in McSwynye ne Doe's country, near Loghsuylly; her men saved. A great ship wrecked in O'Boyle's country; the men saved. One ship wrecked near Dunluse, wherein about 300 men perished.

POPE SIXTUS V. to DERMOND MCCRAGHE, Bishop of Cork. ["By the Pope's donation" is added in the margin by Carew.]  MS 611, p. 293  8 July 1589

Former reference: MS 611, p. 293

2 Pages.
Language:  Latin

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 21.

Contents:
Brief, empowering him to absolve all ecclesiastical persons in his diocese, who, though formerly heretics and not holding their benefices by lawful title, have unduly received ecclesiastical revenues, and to compound for the restitution of the same to the churches from which they were derived. Also to grant dispensations to persons who have married within the prohibited degrees of consanguinity.
Rome, 8 July 1589, 5 pont.
Copy.

The EARL OF TYRONE and SIR TIRLAGH O'NELE.  MS 611, p. 230  28 June 1593

Former reference: MS 611, p. 230

4 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 135.

Contents:
Articles of agreement indented between Hugh Earl of Tyrone and Sir Tirlagh O'Nele, before Sir William FitzWilliams, Lord Deputy, and the Council, at Dondalke, 28 June 1593.
(1.) Whereas the said Earl has her Majesty's entertainment for 50 horsemen to serve under him (636l. 9s. 4½d. ster. a year), it is concluded that Sir Tirlagh shall receive the said entertainment to his proper use during his life, according to her Majesty's pleasure signified in the patents of the captainry of Tyrone passed to him, finding the said horsemen to serve her Majesty at the said Earl's charge.
(2.) Sir Tirlagh shall have the yearly rents and duties payable by Magwyre, according to her Majesty's grant; and the said Earl shall constrain the said Magwyre and his heirs to pay the same if they refuse to do so.
(3.) The said Earl is to pay to Sir Tirlagh so many cows yearly as shall, after the rate of 20s. ster. the cow, make up, together with the said entertainment and with Magwyre's rent, 2,000l., ster.; provided always, that if the said entertainment do, in the life of the said Sir Tirlagh, surcease by the death of the said Earl or otherwise, that thenceforth the said Earl, his heirs or assigns, shall pay to the said Sir Tirlagh, his servants or assigns, in lieu of it, and to make up the said 2,000l., the sum of 636l. 9s. 4½d. ster., or in default of money a choice cow for every 20s. ster.; such cows as shall be delivered at May yearly to be in calf, and the cows to be delivered at Hallowmas yearly to be sufficient beefs. 5s. extra to be paid for every cow not delivered at the said feasts. The said money or cows to be paid at Strabane or Bynnvorbe.
(4.) Sir Tirlagh shall have for life the towns and lands of Strabane and Large Virnevie, and also the lands adjoining Strabane (lying in length from Bundened in the north-east to Bundowglishe in the south-west, and in breadth from the river of Fynne to the river of Darge), free from all duties and charges by the Earl; "and also the town of Binvorbe or Curren, with the half Ballebetaghe, with their appurtenances next adjoining to such of the said towns as he shall choose; and the said Sir Tirlagh, taking his choice of the said house and land of Binvorbe, or of the said house and land of Curren, then such house of those as he shall make choice of to be required by the Earl for Sir Tirlagh in convenient time.
(5.) Sir Tirlagh shall quietly, without the disturbance of the Earl, receive three score cows yearly of O'Dogherty, and also the one half of the duties due from Logh Foile and the Bande; the other half to be received by the Earl.
(6.) Also, whereas Sir Tirlagh demands of the Earl some increase of pension over and above the said 2,000l., to be paid in manner as laid down, whereto the Earl was unwilling to yield, nevertheless the Earl and Sir Tirlagh have condescended and agreed to perform such order in that behalf as O'Cahan, Cormocke, the Earl's brother. Henry Oge O'Nele. and one of Sir Tirlagh's men, to be by him named, shall lay down. The said [Earl] also promises to stand to the order of the said arbitrators in the controversies betwixt Sir Tirlagh and Art O'Nele, his son, touching certain lands, parcel of Sir Tirlagh's ancient inheritance, now in the occupation of the said Arthur, and shall cause the said Arthur to perform the same.
(7.) The Earl will endeavour to recover such spoils and preys as Hugh Roe O'Donell hath taken from Ferdoroghe O'Nele, Shane McTole, Art Umolaghe, and others; all which preys are included in the number of 2,000 cows, whereof complaint was made by Sir Tirlagh in his articles of complaint preferred at this assembly against the Earl.
(8.) The Earl promises to assist Sir Tirlagh against O'Donell that now is or shall be, and other bad bordering neighbours, having licence of the State to use force. He also promises to restore Shane O'Donell, servant to Sir Tirlagh, to all such spiritual livings as he held by the presentation of the Lord Primate of Ardmaghe.
(9.) Sir Tirlagh shall receive such rents and duties out of the lands of Sleveshees as were due and payable at Easter or May last, and as yet not paid. The Earl shall cause payment to be made to him of all rents due to him by such as dwell in Tyreone, and shall cause Magwyre and O'Cahan to pay Sir Tirlagh the arrear due upon them. He shall permit Sir Tirlagh to receive such arrear as is behind this last year of the Earl's entertainment for the horsemen aforesaid, and pay to Sir Tirlagh such arrearages as are due "upon the lease determined above the said entertainment.
(10.) The Earl and his heirs shall hold the territory and lands of Tyreone against Sir Tirlagh and his heirs, discharged of all such title and demand as Sir Tirlagh claimeth to have in and to the same, or any part thereof, the castles, hereditaments, &c. hereby appointed to Sir Tirlagh excepted only for term of his life; and also excepted all the ancient inheritance of Sir Tirlagh, to him and his heirs, saving that the said ancient inheritance shall contribute pro rata as like lands in the county shall do.
(11.) If any question or doubt do arise upon the construction of these articles, the same shall be expounded and ordered by the Lord Deputy and Lord Chancellor, or such two of the Privy Council within this realm as the said parties shall choose.
Signed; W. FitzWilliam; Ad. Dublin., Canc.; Rob. Gardener; Tho. Midensis; Geff. Fenton; George Bourcher.
Ex', Geff. Fenton.
Copy.

Carew Manuscript  MS 612  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 612

The Examination of Digorye Castle, alias Tompkins, of Youghall, sworn and deposed thereunto before Sir Richard Morison, Knight, Vice-President of the province of Munster.  MS 612, p. 143  -- December 1610

Former reference: MS 612, p. 143

3 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. V, document 43.

Contents:
Signed: Digorey Castell.
Copy. Endorsed.

"Part of the Instructions for Sir William Russell, Knight, being appointed to be Deputy in Ireland, for government of the same realm. Dated the 25th of May 1594, at our manor of Greenwich."  MS 612, p. 25a  1594

Former reference: MS 612, p. 25a

1 Page.


Related information: MS 617, p. 223 Copy of MS 612, p. 25a

Contents:
Extracts from MS 632, p. 112a

By the LORD DEPUTY and COUNCIL.  MS 612, p. 4  13 Aug 1594

Former reference: MS 612, p. 4

2 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 140.

Contents:
At Dublin, 13 August 1594.
Whereas, for relieving of her Majesty's castle of Inniskillen, commission was directed by Sir W. FitzWilliams, late Lord Deputy, and his Council, to Sir Henry Duke and Sir Edward Harbert, who, with 600 footmen and 46 horsemen, going to attempt the same the 7th (?) of this month, being four days before the delivery of the sword to me the now Lord Deputy, "whereby the traitors met withal, and not only by them defeated of their purpose, but likewise received great loss of soldiers, and all the victuals prepared to victual that fort;" we do conclude and resolve that the Lord Deputy and others of this Council shall repair thitherward to relieve the said distressed ward. Though the forces to attend him be but mean, he has not disfurnished any other places of their necessary forces; having given commission to the Earl of Ormond for defence of the borders against Feagh McHughe and Walter Reoghe, with directions to the sheriffs of the several counties of Kilkenny, Wexford, Catherloghe, Kildare, Dublin, and the Queen's County, to be at his commandment with their several forces and holdings for the defence of the said borders. It is agreed that whatsoever be concluded or executed by the Lord Deputy and Council in this journey, or by those other of the Council in the English Pale remaining, shall be as vayliable, perfect, and permanent as if the whole body of the Council had been present. "Direction shall be sent to the Lords of Gormostone and Slanye, L. of Trymlestone and Killene, the sheriff and chief gentlemen of the county of Meath, for a present holding to be kept by the forces of the country upon the borders of the county of Meath, towards the north parts." The like direction to be sent to the Lord of Louth and the sheriff and gentlemen of co. Louth.
Signed at the beginning: W. Russell; at the end: Ad. Dublin., Cane.; Thomas Ormonde; Tho. Midensis; H. Bagnall; Ro. Gardner; Ro. Napper; Antho. St. Leger; Ro. Dillon; Richard Bingham; G. Bowrchier; Tho. Norris; Geff. Fenton.
Copy.

The EARL OF TYRONE'S SUBMISSION.  MS 612, p. 10  17 Aug 1594

Former reference: MS 612, p. 10

3 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 141.

Contents:
"Delivered to my Lord Deputy, Sir William Russell, and to the rest of the Council, at his coming in, the 15th of August 1594," at Dublin.
I, Hugh Earl of Tyrone, acknowledge that my late absenting of myself from the State, though occasioned through the hard measure of the late Lord Deputy, has been disagreeable to my obedience, and that other unhappy accidents in the North, though not done on my behalf of any intent against her Majesty (so laid to my charge by my enemies there), have induced her Majesty to be offended with me. But when the wrongs and injuries done me by Sir William FitzWilliams, the late Lord Deputy, and the Marshal (Bagnall), practising my life by going about to entrap and ensnare me, shall be discovered, I trust I shall recover the good opinion of my Prince. Her Majesty's displeasure has been my greatest grief, for she it was who advanced me to high title and great livings; and I know that her Majesty, who by grace has advanced me, by force may pluck me down. How can it be, then, that I should be so void of reason as to work my own ruin? I confess I am not clear of offence, but I have done what I have done to save my life; nevertheless I am sorry for my fault. And whereas I durst not trust my life in the hands of Sir William FitzWilliams, understanding of the arrival here of your L., the now Lord Deputy, I have made my repair to you, assuring myself to have my causes considered of with indifferency. I crave some fit time to be appointed for hearing my wrongs, which I would have proved before FitzWilliams himself if he had stayed but one day longer. I here offer my service, either in relieving the distressed ward at Iniskyllin, expulsing the Scots, or doing anything else.
Signed: Hugh Tyrone.
"The 17th of August 1594, the Earl of Tyrone presented this submission as is here written, upon his knees, the Lord Deputy and Council then sitting in Council."
Copy.

FORCES of the EARL OF TYRONE.  MS 612, p. 10  11 Nov 1594

Former reference: MS 612, p. 10

1 Page.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 147.

Contents:
"An Advertisement of th' Earl of Tyrone's Forces, received the 11th of November 1594.
"Foot.--Th' Earl hath cessed to attend himself 800 shot, whereof be present on foot but 400, led by those whose names ensue: Con McTyrlagh O'Neale, 100; Donagh O'Hagan, 100; Tyrlagh Boy O'Hagan, 100; Neale O'Hagan, 50; Patrick Pevy, 50; Cormock th' Earl's brother, 200; Henry Oge, 100; Con the Earl's son, 100; Bryan McArt, 300; Sir Art O'Neale, 40. These be their chiefest force of footmen, trained after th' English manner, having many pickes among them, so as all these are not shot. In their charge they cesse above 2,000, which dead pays these chieftains turn to their own commodity. I omit to speak of the rascals and kerne, whereof there are very many.
"Horses.--Th' Earl himself, 100 [and] 40; Cormock, 80; H. Oge, 80; Sir Art and Slight Arte, 80; Art McBaron, 20; Turlagh McHenry, 40; O'Hagan, 100.
"I omit to speak of O'Donnell, the McMahonds, and them of Clandeboy--their forces are so well known. The above number is very little defective. They appoint leaders to 40, to 20, and to 10 of their foot, for the fitness of the service of the passes; for in plains they mean not to fight."
Copy.

REPORT by LIEUTENANT TUCHER.  MS 612, p. 21  1 June 1595

Former reference: MS 612, p. 21

2 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 154.

Contents:
On Sunday, 24 May 1595, we marched from the Newrie, 1,500 foot and 250 horse, to the eight-mile church. The enemy appeared upon a hill with 1,500 horse. Our General (Sir Henry Bagenall) commanded all the horse to be drawn up towards them. The enemy retired, thinking to draw us up "into their straights of foot, which lay some mile distant;" but the General drew back. Next morning, after eight miles' march, the Earl of Tyrone brought all his forces to a straight which we were to pass, and turned off seven or eight companies of foot to skirmish with us. They annoyed us much, the passage being between a bog and a wood. After we had passed the straight the enemy's powder was spent, but their forces increased. We found that Magwire and McMahon had besieged Monohon, but they rose so soon as we came. We encamped on a hill close to the Abbey. Our loss was 12 slain and 30 hurt; the enemy's, 100 slain and many hurt. The same evening the enemy drew up his forces, increased to above 8,000 foot and 1,000 horse, within three quarters of a mile, and yet did nothing.
Having put victual [into Monaghan], and changed the ward, the next day we dislodged and marched back. The enemy stopped all the straights and passages. It was long before we could wind ourselves through one of them, "being driven to exceeding many stands." We lost 12 horse, amongst whom was Sir Edward Harbert's brother. "Having recovered the champion, they somewhat withdrew the heat of their skirmish, their munition being very near spent, having consumed almost 14 barrels of powder, as we were informed, for we had ever good intelligence from amongst themselves." They sent for a supply to the Earl's house at Dongannon. Next morning we marched away in some quiet. Thinking we would go to Dondalke the Earl stopped all the passages, but we marched to the Newrie, where we found all our losses to have been about 31 or 32 slain and 120 hurt, but none hurt of account except Sir Henry Duke, Captain Cunye, five lieutenants, an ensign, and a sergeant. Of the enemy we hear 300 or 400 were slain and very many hurt. The enemy have broken up the causeway between the Newrie and Dondalk, and "plashed and made up the same." They lie there expecting our army's coming that way. But having spent all our powder, 10 barrels, our General drew to a council, and determined to send me in a small boat by sea to declare what was done and crave a supply of munition, "which had, they are ready and desirous to come away, if they be commanded: but I think it impossible for them to do it were they as many more as they are, for now the enemy is fourteen or fifteen thousand strong in that place."
Signed: Tucher; Perkings.
Headed in Carew's hand: "A report of the service done by Sir Henry Bagenall in the relieving of Monaghan."
Copy.

[no title]  MS 612, p. 24  Undated

Former reference: MS 612, p. 24


Related information: A copy of MS 617, p. 220, undated. [This copy is inserted in Sir William Russell's Diary (MS 612) between the 28th and 29th of June 1595. This is probably Carew's authority for the date assigned by him to the copy in MS 617. Many of the documents in MS 617 have evidently been copied from those in MS 612.]

RESERVATIONS to the CROWN.  MS 612, p. 53a  June 1595

Former reference: MS 612, p. 53a

2 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 156.


Related information: MS 617, p. 237 Copy of MS 612, p. 53a.

Contents:
"Certain Reservations to her Majesty's use upon receipt of surrenders, and upon other compositions and agreements between the Lord Deputy and Council on the one part, and certain lords and gentlemen on the other part, made from the 5th of June 1584, until this present month of June 1595, and to continue as followeth. Besides a tenure by knight service thereupon reserved to her Majesty."
This document shows the rents, beoves, hawks, and chief horses payable to the Crown by the following persons, and the numbers of horsemen and footmen which they were bound to find at risings-out:--O'Conner Sligoe, Sir Turlaugh O'Neele, Donnell Grone McConnell of the Glinne, Sir Hugh O'Donnell, Theobald McO'Ville, ["Staunton" is added by Carew.] Cone McNeale, Shan McBryan McPhelim, Hugh Oge McBryan Hugh Oge McHugh McPhelim O'Neale, Cormock McNeale McBrian, Aghovell McCarten, Sir Hugh McGennis, O'Conner Dunne, Sir John O'Reley, Edmond O'Reyley, Philip O'Reyley, Hugh O'Reyley, C[ahir] O'Reyley, Mulmory O'Reyley, O'Madden, Ever McRorie, Brian Duffe, Cowconnogh McGwere, Sir Brian O'Rorke, Richard McMorrice, and McMahoune.
Summa totalis: Rent per annum, 545l. 19s. ster.: chief horses, 4; hawks, 11, besides the Glinnes; beoves, 663; horsemen per annum, 25; footmen, 1,133; allowances for officers, 100; horsemen for risings-out, 211; footmen for risings-out, 455.
Copy.

EXPEDITION into the NORTH.  MS 612, p. 40  24 July 1595

Former reference: MS 612, p. 40

1 Page.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 159.

Contents:
"24 Julij, 1595.--This day, the service of the North being in question, the Lord Deputy before all the Council, then sitting at the Council Board, required the Lord President [Sir John Norris, President of Munster.] to take the general charge of that service upon him; unto whom he would give and yield all the assistance he could from time to time.
"Then present of the Council: the L. Chancellor, the L. President, the L. of Meathe. Sir H. Wallop, Sir Ro. Gardner, Sir Ro. Dillon, Sir Anth. St. Leger, Sir Geo. Bourchier, Mr. Brabson, Sir Ra. Lane.
"This is a true copy of the entry made in the Council Book, examined by me, Pa. Foxe."
Copy.

To SIR JOHN NORRIS, President of Munster.  MS 612, p. 49  1595

Former reference: MS 612, p. 49

3 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 160.


Related information: MS 617, p. 233 Another copy.

Contents:
Commission to be General of her Majesty's forces in Ulster, for suppressing such of the Queen's subjects in that province and its borders as have traitorously entered into arms, and are now in open rebellion, daily burning, murdering, and spoiling. He is to have the leading and governance of all the martial forces within the realm of Ireland, and of all others that shall hereafter be sent hither or erected here. To form the ablest people in Ulster into bands, and to arm them out of the store of munition lately brought into this land. To proceed to the finishing of the fortifications within the said province. The Deputy and Council shall effectually perform all promises made by him touching pardon or protection to be granted to any rebels. To take man's meat and horsemeat within any part of the realm, as well within liberties as without, in reasonable sort without oppression, paying ready money or giving bills. In the absence of the Deputy, to perform all other actions expedient for this service.
Signed at the beginning: W. Russell; at the end: Ad. Dublin., Canc., Ro. Gardner, Ro. Dillon, Antho. St. Leger, Ro. Napper, G. Bowrchier, Edward Brabson, Tho. Norris, Nich. Walche.
Dated "1595."
Copy.

The QUEEN to the LORD DEPUTY and COUNCIL.  MS 612, p. 37  20 Aug 1595

Former reference: MS 612, p. 37

2 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 161.


Related information: Mr Martin's Calendar, vol. ii., pp. 405-407.
MS 617, p. 228 Another copy.

Contents:
Whereas there is an indictment presented in co. Tipperary for a slaughter of some of the Cantwells by Sir Charles O'Caroll, and an appeal brought for the same fact before the Justices of our Bench there, the said Sir Charles has made complaint that not only the loss of his life is intended by means of that indictment laid in Tipperary, where he is mortally hated in regard of divers spoils between his country of Elye and the County Palatine, but also that, by his answering of the appeal, he shall be forced to confess his country to be in co. Tipperary, and thereby prejudice his inheritance, for which he has duly paid us these many years 100l. a year. Finding that he has put in bonds to answer the appeal to a great value, and asks no favour, if by any indirect jury he may be found to have either been present, or to have done anything but in defence of his own country, we require some commissioners to be appointed to inquire of the fact before any further proceeding. As for the appeal, the trial is to be suspended until the difference of the title betwixt the Earl of Ormond and the said Sir Charles O'Caroll be determined, whether the country of Eley be in co. Tipperary or not. When a commission was granted to inquire of that matter, this gentleman answered the bill brought against him, and the Earl did not reply. If he shall now be justly condemned upon the appeal, we will not pardon him for any respect; and so we wish you to inform the Earl of Ormond.
Given under our Signet at our Palace of Westminster, 20 August, 27 (sic) Eliz. 1595. [Enrolled on the Patent Roll of Ireland for 36-38 Eliz.]
Copy.

By the LORD DEPUTY and COUNCIL.  MS 612, p. 39  20 Aug 1595

Former reference: MS 612, p. 39

2 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 162.

Contents:
Proclamation for restraining the transporting of gunpowder into this land, and forbidding the sale thereof to any but to her Majesty's good subjects, viz., as Noblemen, Sheriffs, and Justices of the Peace. It is to be kept in the common halls or town houses of cities or towns, and from thence to be issued to the owners' benefit.
Dublin, 20 August 1595.
Signed: W. Russell, Ad. Dublin., Canc., H. Wallop, Ro. Gardner, Antho. St. Leger, G. Bowrchier, Geff. Fenton.
Copy.

By the LORD DEPUTY and COUNCIL.  MS 612, p. 40  1595

Former reference: MS 612, p. 40

1 Page.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 163.

Contents:
Proclamation for restraining the carriage of corn, beef, and other victuals out of Ireland.
Copy.

The LORD DEPUTY and COUNCIL to SIR RALPH LANE.  MS 612, p. 50  6 Sep 1595

Former reference: MS 612, p. 50

1 Page.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 164.

Contents:
Where lately we wrote to the Lord President to cashier such companies as were not three score strong, these are to require you to take view of such companies, and to cashier them accordingly.
Castle of Dublin, 6 September 1595.
Signed: W. Russell, Ad. Dublin., Canc., H. Wallop, Ro. Napper, G. Bowrchier, Geff. Fenton.
"P.S.--Our meaning is, that such as are wanting should be chequed, and the rest cashiered should supply th' other bands."
Copy.

"The SHERIFF of WESTMEATH'S CERTIFICATE."  MS 612, p. 40a  6 Sep 1595

Former reference: MS 612, p. 40a

1 Page.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 165.

Contents:
Whereas it pleased your Lordship (the Deputy?) to direct your letters to me for a proportion of garrons, pioneers, and beoves to be delivered to Sir John Norris at his being in Ulster, we sent the same, but when they came thither the collectors could get no tickets for them. Besides, whereas our pioneers should have been kept but 30 days, they stayed 9 weeks, and could get no entertainment. Therefore the country will not be so willing hereafter.
Mollingar, 6 September 1595.
Signed: James FittzGerrald.
Copy.

The EARL OF TYRONE and O'DONNELL to the KING OF SPAIN.  MS 612, p. 46  27 Sep 1595

Former reference: MS 612, p. 46

1 Page.
Language:  Latin

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 167.


Related information: MS 617, p. 232 Another copy.

Contents:
Our only hope of re-establishing the Catholic religion rests on your assistance. Now or never our Church must be succoured. By the timidity or negligence of the messengers our former letters have not reached you. We therefore again beseech you to send us 2,000 or 3,000 soldiers, with money and arms, before the feast of St. Philip and St. James. With such aid we hope to restore the faith of the Church, and to secure you a kingdom.
5. Cal. Octobris 1595.
Signed: O'Neill, Hugh O'Donnell.
"Intercepted, and received the 29th Sept. 1595, from the hands of Piers O'Cullen."
Copy.

The EARL OF TYRONE to DON CAROLO.  MS 612, p. 45  27 Sep 1595

Former reference: MS 612, p. 45

1 Page.
Language:  Latin

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 168.


Related information: MS 617, p. 230 Another copy.

Contents:
I have been informed by the bearer of this that you have written to me, but your letter has not yet reached my hands. I was confident that I should not in vain appeal to you for aid. The faith might be re-established in Ireland within one year, if the King of Spain would send only 3,000 soldiers. All the heretics would disappear, and no other sovereign would be recognized than the King Catholic. Both I and O'Donnell have besought him to succour the Church. Pray second our petition. If we obtain positive assurance of succour from the King, we will make no peace with the heretics. We have written frequently, but are afraid none of our letters have reached the King, as he has returned us no answer. The bearer, a man of pious zeal, has undertaken this perilous mission.
5. Cal. Octobris.
Signed: Amicus tuus ignotus--O'Neyll.
Countersigned: Franciscus Montfortius.
"Intercepted, and received the 29th Sept. from the hands of Piers O'Cullen."
Copy.

The EARL OF TYRONE, O'DONNELL, and MONTFORT to DON JOHN DELAGUILA.  MS 612, p. 45a  27 Sep 1595

Former reference: MS 612, p. 45a

1 Page.
Language:  Latin

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 169.


Related information: MS 617, p. 231 Another copy.

Contents:
As we have heard of your fame, and of your goodwill towards us and our country, we pray you to assist the bearer, who is sent by us to the King Catholic to obtain his aid in our warfare for the Catholic faith. By acceding to our request, he will re-establish our religion and acquire a kingdom.
5. Cal. Octobris 1595.
Signed: Amici tui--O'Neill, Hugh O'Donnell.
Countersigned: Franciscus Momfortius.
"Intercepted, and received the 29 Sept. 1595, from the hands of Piers O'Cullan."
Copy.

The QUEEN to SIR WILLIAM RUSSELL, Lord Deputy.  MS 612, p. 34  28 Sep 1595

Former reference: MS 612, p. 34

4 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 170.


Related information: MS 617, p. 224 Other copies of the same.

Contents:
By our letters of the 12th inst. we authorized you to follow the articles signed by our Council, wherein we directed you within what limits we would accept the submission of the traitor Tyrone. We are persuaded that you have proceeded with him in that form. Out of commiseration for those poor people, whose ruin must follow by the prosecution of the heads of this rebellion, we give you liberty to assure him of further grace and favour, if he be not contented with the pardon of his life only. Our meaning is contained in these articles enclosed. They are to be carried secretly, and you are to draw them as low as possible you may. [Sir] John Norris is to be informed of these articles.
Under our Signet at Nonesuche, 28 September 1595, 37 Eliz.
II. "Articles concerning the submission of the Earl of Tyrone and other rebels in Ireland, 28 Sept. 1595."
When Tyrone seeks his pardon, he may petition for his living and estate. Though we could like best to have it simply referred to us, you may agree to his desires, rather than to break and leave him to utter despair.
Let him know that, besides his life, he has forfeited his whole estate, so as whatsoever he may have hereafter is to come to him anew from us. He must leave all combinations with all disobedient subjects and all strangers. If he consent to this, you may tell him you will procure that he shall be restored to his former estate of the barony of Dungannon, as granted to his father Matthew, when Con O'Neale, his grandfather, was made Earl by King Henry VIII.; the Earldom to remain in our disposition until he deserve to be restored to the same. It is to be considered what lands might be restored to him: none to be near the bridge or the fort at the Blackwater, nor to Armaghe, or Monaghan, or the Newrie.
Further, there is to be considered to how many things he did submit in England in April 1590, upon being charged with putting to death one of the sons of Shane O'Neale. All the captainries of the Irish on the east side of Lough Eawgh to be exempted from his rule. He is to put to liberty Shane O'Neale's son, and to suffer Turlaugh Lennagh to enjoy his castle of Straban.
These conditions seem more tolerable than to continue an uncertain war. For the observation of them, he shall deliver his eldest lawful son as a pledge, to be brought up at school in England, and three or four others, "whereof, if it may be, one of his brothers and one of his base sons, and one of the O'Hagans, and one of the O'Gwyns to be of that number;" to remain in the English Pale.
O'Donnell, McGwire, O'Rowrke, or any of the McMahons, are not to have pardon at the solicitation of the Earl, but on their own several submissions; and by a letter of the Earl's dated the 27th of August it appears that he yields to this. As for O'Donnell and McGwire, some portions of their countries are to be assigned to such others of their sept as have not rebelled, and that are competitors to their captainries, whereby to diminish their greatness. Those who are pardoned are not to have combination with any stranger or with any captain of the Irishry, nor suffer any Scots or other strangers to reside in their country. And if the Earl of Tyrone refuse these conditions, it shall be secretly procured that O'Donnell be received to grace and severed from the Earl, and thereby Connaught reduced to the former obedience; and the commodity of landing any Spaniards upon the coast of Tyreconnell may be also avoided.
Copies.

GEORGE HARVY to [LORD DEPUTY RUSSELL].  MS 612, p. 41  10 Oct 1595

Former reference: MS 612, p. 41

1 Page.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 171.

Contents:
Whereas your Lp. and the Council directed a commission to me to levy within co. Meath 450 beoves, 80 garrons, and 100 pioneers, I did use my best endeavour to send them forward to Dundalk, there to be delivered to such as my Lord General (Norris) should appoint. Your four letters have caused me no little grief, that after 42 years' service I should be charged with negligence. I called all the collectors to Tryme and examined them. They answered that they had every one delivered according to their warrants; which I could not reprove, as no receipts had been given.
Skrene, 10 October 1595.
Copy.

SUBMISSION of HUGH O'DONNELL, now chief of his Name.  MS 612, p. 46a  18 Oct 1595

Former reference: MS 612, p. 46a

1 Page.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 172.

Contents:
I confess to have offended your Majesty contrary to your peace and laws, which I cannot justify, though proceeding not of any malice against your Majesty, but chiefly from the bad usage of me by Sir John Perrott, in the unlawful apprehension of me, with many other abuses. As this has been my first offence, extend upon me and mine your gracious pardon. Protesting hereafter faithfully to serve you, I do renounce to join with any foreign prince or potentate.
Signed: Hugh O'Donnell.
Dated at the beginning, 18 October 1595.
Copy.

SUBMISSION of HUGH EARL OF TYRONE.  MS 612, p. 47  18 Oct 1595

Former reference: MS 612, p. 47

2 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 173.

Contents:
Calling to mind the great benefits and the place of honour I have received from your Majesty, I confess forgetting my duty and obedience contrary to your peace and laws, which I cannot justify, yet I protest the same proceeded not of malice or ambition, but from being unjustly and wickedly charged by my enemies, who sought to deprive me of my life. These ungodly practices being known to my kinsmen, allies, and followers, they in revenge entered into some traitorous actions without my privity or consent. As this has been my first offence, and I have before served your Highness with loss of my blood, extend upon me and my followers your gracious pardon.
I did not take the name of O'Neale upon me in respect of any greater dignity than I have, but mistrusting some other might take that name on him, and so thereby breed great trouble to my tenants and followers. I am now desirous to renounce it. My enemies have published abroad that I practised with foreign princes to draw strangers into this kingdom; but I did not go about any such matter before the 20th of August last, other than the retaining of some Scots for my own defence. Before that date I never practised with, or received letter or message from the King of Spain or other potentate, for the disturbance of the quiet of your Majesty's realm, neither will henceforward.
Signed: Hugh Tyrone.
Dated at the beginning, 18 October 1595.
Copy.

The EARL OF TYRONE.  MS 612, p. 47a  27 Oct 1595

Former reference: MS 612, p. 47a

2 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 174.

Contents:
"Articles agreed unto in the Cessation of Arms taken the 27th of October 1595."
(1.) That no act of hostility or stealth be committed upon her Majesty's subjects.
(2.) That all her Majesty's garrisons shall freely pass with victuals, munition, and other provisions.
(3.) That any soldier shall fetch in grass, timber, stone, &c., for the fortifying or repairing of the said garrisons.
(4.) That the Earl shall not make any journeys into Clandeboy or other countries bordering upon Tirone, to use force upon any that submit to her Majesty.
(5.) That the creaughts of the Earl's adherents shall not graze upon the ground of any persons under her Majesty's obedience.
(6.) That if any of the contrary part shall offer themselves to her Majesty's obedience, it shall be lawful to receive them.
(7.) For the performance of all things in these articles the Earl shall deliver such pledges as by Captain St. Leger shall be demanded; which pledges, in case his pardon be not granted, shall be re-delivered.
(8.) As the Earl's followers will reap great benefit from this cessation, in that their cattle shall freely feed in the plains, he is therefore to furnish 1,000 beoves for the garrisons.
[Note in the margin: "This article only for the beoves denied by the Earl, and all the rest agreed unto."]
(9.) This truce to continue till 1 January, and for one month longer if the Lord Deputy desire it.
Signed: Hugh Tyrone.
Names of the pledges: Brian O'Hagan, McFerdarragh O'Hagan, Donough Rerogh O'Hagan, McMelaghlin McBrian Boy O'Hagan.
Copy.

"The SHERIFF of DUBLIN'S CERTIFICATE."  MS 612, p. 41  8 Nov 1595

Former reference: MS 612, p. 41

1 Page.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 175.

Contents:
I have received directions from the Lord Deputy to send 300 beoves to the North for her Majesty's forces there, the most part whereof have been sent. Some turned back, as none had been appointed to receive them; and no bill was given by the General (Norris) or Provost-Marshal for those delivered. Owing to this, the poor country will not furnish any more beoves. As for carriages, the General and captains have been very sufficiently served out of this county of Dublin.
8 November 1595.
Signed: Natha. Smithe, sheriff.
Copy.

"CERTAIN CONSIDERATIONS set down for the SERVICE."  MS 612, p. 48a  1595

Former reference: MS 612, p. 48a

1 Page.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 176.

Contents:
A fit man to be sent to the Earl of Tyrone, to let him know the doings of his son Con, those of O'Donell in Connaught, and those of the McMahones in the Breyneie, contrary to the cessation; and to sound him touching his coming to the State for his pardon.
A garrison must be sent at once into the Breyneie.
If the Earl will not come in, sundry persons, both in the English Pale and other parts, are to be arrested, "as men doubtful to give aid to the Earl, specially if he take upon him the cause of religion."
The O'Mores in Leax to be stayed. Feogh McHugh to be watched during his protection. Rice O'Toole to be espied, "and what resort is to her from all parts." Dongannon to be strengthened with ordnance, and co. Wexford to be ready to defend it.
The Vice-President of Munster to see beacons along the sea-coasts kept; and that province is to be mustered and put in arms.
Copy.

The ARMY.  MS 612, p. 51  1595

Former reference: MS 612, p. 51

5 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 177.

Contents:
Certificate of the horsemen, footmen, and kearne in her Majesty's pay in Ireland, 1595.
Under the chief officers, 230 horse, 90 foot. Companies of horsemen, 427; supplied out of England in August 1595, 100 horse; one company erected in April 1596. "Old companies [of foot] with new erections," 1,450. Bryttaine companies, 1,500 foot. Companies of foot sent out of England, 1,000. Kearne, 158.
Total, 657 horse, 4,040 foot. In all, 4,855.
Signed by Sir Ralph Lane, muster-master.
The names of the officers and captains are mentioned. At the end there are lists of the companies received from England in August 1595, and in October and November 1596.
Copy.

The ARMY.  MS 612, p. 56a  1595

Former reference: MS 612, p. 56a

1 Page.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 178.

Contents:
"A Note of all the Footmen in Ireland and of their several places of Garrison."
Carrickfergus: Sir Henry Wallop, 100; Captain Merriman, 60; Captain Bethell, 50. Ardmaugh: Sir Thomas Knowles, 60; Captain Wilmote, 60; Captain Barker, 60; Captain Kingsmell, 60. Newry: The Marshal, 100; Captain Audley, 60; Captain Mansfild, 60; Captain Collier, 60; Captain Treuer, 60. Carlingford: Captain Ashendon, 60; Captain Cuny, 60. Dondalke: Captain Lister, 60; Captain Stonton, 60; Sir H. Duke, 60. Atherdy: Captain Rice ap Hughe, 60. Kells: Captain Goodwine, 60; Lord Montjoye, 60. Navan: Sergeant Major, 60. Trime: Captain Percie, 60. Drogheda: Sir H. Norris, 120; Captain Ma. Wingfield, 60; Captain Brett, 60. Talbottoune: Captain Garrett, 60. In Leix: Captain St. Leger, 100; Captain Lee, 50. Waterford: Lord General (Sir John Norris), 120; Sir Richard Wingfield, 60; Captain Izod, 60. Youghall: Sir John Dowdall, 100. Limricke: Sir Thomas Norris, 100. Thomond: The Lord of Thomond, 120. Athenry: Captain Willis, 60; Captain Hu. Mostion, 60. Offally: Sir George Bourchier, 100. Athlone: Captain Parker, 60; Captain Parsons, 60. Westmeath, and there adjoining, whereof three are appointed for the Earl of Clanricard: Captain Baptist, 60; Captain Pettit, 60; Captain Tutcher, 60; Captain Streete, 60; Captain W. Mostion, 60; Captain Higham, 60. Abbieboyle: Sir Richard Bingham, 100. Corroghboye: Captain Conwey, 60.
The whole number of captains of foot, 47.
Dated "1595," in the margin.
Copy.

The EARL OF TYRONE and O'DONNELL.  MS 612, p. 50a  8 Jan 1596

Former reference: MS 612, p. 50a

1 Page.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 182.


Related information: MS 617, p. 236 Another copy.

Contents:
"Instructions delivered to Sir Henry Wallop and Sir Robert Gardner by the Lord Deputy and Council how to treat with the Earl of Tyrone, O'Donnell, and others."
Where you are appointed Commissioners this day, to treat and parley with the Earl of Tyrone, O'Donnell, and others, notwithstanding the generality of your commission, you are to persuade them to accomplish her Majesty's instructions, and the articles he (the Earl) agreed to in England, and to renounce "all superiority and aid of foreign powers, especially from the King of Spain." The cessation of arms may be continued to the last of February.
Dated 8 January 1595.
Signed: W. Russell, Ad. Dublin., Cane., John Norris, Ro. Napper, G. Bowrchier, Geff. Fenton, H. Wallop, Ro. Gardner.
Copy.

WARRANT by the LORD GENERAL, SIR JOHN NORRIS, to the SHERIFF of CO. DUBLIN.  MS 612, p. 55a  14 Jan 1596

Former reference: MS 612, p. 55a

1 Page.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 186.

Contents:
Whereas I directed my warrant to you for the placing of certain horses there, and to furnish the boys and grooms with their diets and lodgings, it appears by your certificate that some persons have refused to receive the said horses. Cause such persons to be apprehended, and to appear before the Lord Deputy and Council.
Dublin, 14 January 1595.
Copy.

PHILIP II., KING OF SPAIN, to the EARL OF TYRONE.  MS 612, p. 65  22 Jan 1596

Former reference: MS 612, p. 65

1 Page.
Language:  Latin

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 203.


Related information: Another copy in MS 617, p. 242

Contents:
I have been informed you are defending the Catholic cause against the English. That this is acceptable to God is proved by the signal victories which you have gained. I hope you will continue to prosper; and you need not doubt but I will render you any assistance you may require. Give credence to Fussius, the bearer, and acquaint him with your affairs and your wishes.
Madrid, 22 January 1596. ["Stilo noro" is added in Carew's handwriting.]
Headed: "A letter sent to the Earl of Tyrone from the King of Spain, delivered by Alonso Cobos; which letter the Earl sent to the Lord Deputy and Council, taking Captain William Warren's promise, and his servant's oath who brought it, that no copy should be taken of it."
Copy.

The EARL OF TYRONE and O'DONNELL.  MS 612, p. 57  26 Jan 1596

Former reference: MS 612, p. 57

2 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 213.


Related information: MS 617, p. 240 A copy of MS 612, p. 57.
MS 617, p. 271 A copy of MS 612, p. 57.
MS 627, p. 229 A copy of MS 612, p. 57.

Contents:
Articles between Sir Henry Wallopp, Treasurer at Wars, and Sir Robert Gardner, Chief Justice, her Majesty's Commissioners, and Hugh Earl of Tyrone and Hugh O'Donnell, touching the cessation of arms concluded upon between them the 26th of January 1595.
Similar to the articles dated 27 October 1595. The following are added:--
That they or any of them shall not draw or receive into their countries or adherence the persons or goods of any of her Majesty's subjects. [Note in the margin: "To this article we do not yield, unless like measure be showed us, that none in our adherence be drawn or received from us into her Majesty's obedience.--Hugh Tyrone, Hugh O'Donnell."] That the Earl's pledges shall be continued. That O'Donnell deliver such pledges as the Lord Deputy shall allow of. [In the margin: "O'Donnell saith he hath here no pledge to deliver, and his country is so far off as the time will be expired before he can send any."] The cessation to be continued till the 1st of April; and further till the 1st of May, unless warning be given to the contrary.
Signed: Hugh Tyrone, Hugh O'Donnell.
Copy.

WARRANT by the LORD GENERAL, SIR JOHN NORRIS, to the SHERIFF of CO. DUBLIN.  MS 612, p. 56  30 Jan 1596

Former reference: MS 612, p. 56

1 Page.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 232.

Contents:
As divers persons have made forcible resistance against the under-sheriff in the placing of horses, and not only refused the receiving of them but turned them loose abroad, besides the evil entreaty of the grooms and boys, I have thought good to send 50 soldiers with their leader, to assist him in executing his commission, and to be placed by you where you think fittest.
Dublin, 30 January 1595. Signed: Jo. Norris.
Copy.

The QUEEN to SIR WILLIAM RUSSELL, Lord Deputy, and the COUNCIL.  MS 612, p. 67  9 March 1596

Former reference: MS 612, p. 67

2 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 233


Related information: MS 617, p. 243 Another copy.

Contents:
In your letters of the 9th of last month there is nothing to our contentation. You signify that, upon the return of the Commissioners sent to treat with Tyrone and O'Donnell, you do find "the traitorous intent of the traitors to continue in their rebellion and in their barbarous demands, though, as yourselves confess, they did in the beginning stand simply upon our mercy without condition, and made offers to give largely for the redemption of their faults; which if you had at the beginning accepted, and not passed over the time so many months in fond device by learned counsel to form their pardons, this that hath followed so contrary to their submission had not now happened."
You have sent Sir Robert Gardner, one of the Commissioners, to inform us particularly of all the proceedings with the said rebels, "yet you have at length in writing described the particular disorders almost in every part of the realm, an advertisement very uncomfortable from you, who hath had the authority otherwise to govern the realm, than, for lack of regard in times convenient, now to present unto us so broken an estate of so great a part of our realm, as to have all Ulster wholly, saving two or three places, and all Connaught, saving as few places, wholly possessed with rebels, and likewise some of the counties next our English Pale in like danger." You propose remedies which rest altogether upon great preparations of forces and treasure, without offering any reformation of the government there.
To obviate "the inconveniences likely to appear by the simple and gross treaty of the Commissioners with the rebels,' we have caused answers to be made to the presumptuous demands of the rebels, such as shall be fit for rebels to receive; "and otherwise also we have yielded to such answers as are meet for offenders to receive, acknowledging their offences and suing for pardon." Instructions, signed by our Council, are now sent thither, to be used by such commissioners as now you shall authorize to meet with the said rebels for a full answering of their demands. John Norris is to be commissioned with our secretary Fenton, to meet with the said rebels before the cessation [terminate], and "to proceed with them to some final end, either according to their submissions to yield them pardons, with such conditions as are contained in the said instructions, or if they shall refuse the reasonable offers therein contained, or seek former delays, to leave any further treaty with them."
As we conceive that the misgovernment there of late years has given cause and scope to these rebels to revolt thus generally in divers parts, "we have caused a collection to be made in writing of certain manifest errors and defaults there committed of late years in that government, whereof some are past all remedy, and some by better regard had may be in time coming amended."
Under the Signet, Richmond, 9 March 1595, 38 Eliz.
Copy.

TYRONE and O'DONELL.  MS 612, 68  11 March 1596

Former reference: MS 612, 68

7 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 234.

Contents:
Instructions for such of her Majesty's Council in Ireland as shall be deputed by the Lord Deputy and Council there to meet with the two rebels Tyrone and O'Donell.
At Richmond, the 11th of March 1595.
Her Majesty has been largely informed by Chief Justice Sir Robert Gardner of the submissions, complaints, petitions, and answers of the rebels to the Commissioners' demands, "whereof for some part she findeth so great cause of mislike as she hath been offended with her Commissioners that would receive or give ear to any such presumptuous and disloyal petitions and answers." These articles following are now to be proposed to the rebellious Earl, to O'Donell, McGwire, McMahon, and Brian McShane.
I. ANSWERS to the rebellious EARL OF TYRONE.
Whereas he requires free liberty of conscience for all the inhabitants of Tyrone, this request was disloyal, and thereof at the time of his submission no word had been made. "He may be sharply told that this hath been a later disloyal compact made betwixt him and other the rebels without any reasonable ground or cause to move them thereunto, especially considering there hath been no proceeding against any of them to move so unreasonable and disloyal a request as to have liberty to break laws, which her Majesty will never grant to any subject of any degree."
Whereas it is required to have no garrison, sheriff, or other officer placed in Tyrone for a time, if he and the inhabitants will hereafter live peaceably, then the placing of a garrison may be forborne until her Majesty finds it profitable and necessary to have a sheriff or some like officer.
As the Earl agrees that Armagh and Tyrone may be made one county, one sheriff shall therefore be appointed for both counties, "who shall be chosen to be one of the country, if any such may be found sufficient for such an office."
The Earl and O'Donell have, by their letter at their departure, written to the Commissioners that, unless Feogh McHugh, McWilliam, Ran McWilliam, O'Rrork, O'Conner Dun, and others in Connaught in action, the O'Reilies, and those of the Breny, may receive pardon upon their submission, they cannot perform their articles and offers saving only for cessation. Her Majesty will not be prescribed proudly where to bestow her mercy, which she will never grant but upon their own penitent petition, not allowing that one rebel to obtain pardon for another. The Earl and O'Donell have greatly increased in disloyalty, and drawn to them as many subjects as they could induce to become disloyal. At the beginning of their rebellion, and at the first making of their submissions, a great number of those who are now offenders in Connaught were quiet subjects; and so were also, until a late time, O'Reily and others in the Breiny. Feogh McHugh has obediently submitted, and craved pardon, which her Majesty will sooner grant to him for his own sake than for any intercession of the Earl or O'Donell.
"Where he agreeth that he will suffer the Bishop and Dean of Armagh to enjoy their livings and jurisdictions, as the rest of his neighbours in Ulster will do, she thinketh this both undutifully and uncertainly answered; for whatsoever his neighbours will do or not do, there is no reason for him to deny the said Bishop and church of Armagh that which belongeth to them of right, and whereof the Queen's Majesty only is the founder and patron, as belonging unseparably to her Crown."
He says he cannot deliver Shane O'Neale's sons for many respects. Had he expressed those respects she might have allowed or disallowed of his answer; but no good subject should keep another as a prisoner.
The rest of his answers are not disallowed.
II. The QUEEN'S ANSWERS to O'DONELL'S PETITIONS.
As his demand for liberty of conscience has been made by compact between the Earl and him and others of the rebels, her Majesty makes the same answer to him as is made to the Earl.
His request that the castle and lands in Sligo may remain in his hands, and be given by him to Donnogh McCale Og O'Conner, under such services as O'Conner's ancestors have yielded to O'Donell's ancestors, is strange. It was taken out of the Queen's possession by treason and shameful murder, and he alleges a title thereto by a tenure whereof neither O'Conner himself nor any man else has ever heard any report; "neither is [it] yet known whether this Hugh O'Donnell have any right to be O'Donnell by his father's sufferance during his life, the interest to be O'Donnell after his father's life being due to another." But her Majesty will be pleased that O'Connor may receive the possession of the house and lands, and, if there be any good proof made of O'Donnell's claim to be lawful, O'Connor shall yield to O'Donnell such services as are due.
Whereas he requires that no garrison or officer be placed in Tireconnell or in Sligo for a time, but commissioners to be appointed for all controversies there, she consents so far as regards Tireconnell; but with regard to Sligo, she will, as she finds cause for the profit of the country, appoint or not appoint officers.
Answers upon the Articles of the Commissioners.--"Where he will yield to her Majesty whatsoever hath been reserved out of Tireconnell before his father's time, there is no just cause why he should not yield the like as his father hath done," who was always a good subject. But if the duties reserved by his father's grant were extorted above reason, they shall be qualified. The rest of his answers to the Commissioners' articles are allowable. If he will promise dutifully to perform them, her Majesty will grant him pardon upon her own mere grace, without respect of any mediator.
III. ANSWERS to MCGWIRE'S PETITIONS.
The request for liberty of conscience savours of a compact with others. Her Majesty never means to grant that liberty to any subject, though heretofore she has acted mercifully.
Whereas he requires to have no garrison nor officers placed in his country, but to be governed as McMahon's country shall be, she will take care for the good government of both their countries.
Whereas he protests that his disloyalty was occasioned by his hard usage, she never heard that he has been misused. If complaint had been made to her, she would have seen speedy redress. But as he acknowledges his fault, she will grant him his pardon, and cause his complaints to be examined.
"Where he maketh request to have restitution of the lands both spiritual and temporal in his country upon a rent, her Majesty thinketh it strange that either he or any other of the offenders at this time should have a conceipt to demand spiritual lands, wherein never any of his ancestors had interest. And yet nevertheless the state of the spiritual lands shall be considered, and such of them as shall be thought meet to be granted to the inhabitants of the country, being obedient subjects, they shall have the preferment thereof."
IV. ANSWERS to BRIAN MCMAHON'S PETITIONS.
"Where he protesteth that, by sundry hard usages, and by the unjust execution of Hugh Roe McMahon, and the distribution of the substance of the country by Sir William FitzWilliams, Sir Henry Bagnall, and eight or nine more Englishmen, all strangers to the country, to the disherison of the people of the country, he and the rest of the McMahones have been occasioned to enter into this disloyalty, and yet now do acknowledge their transgressions," for which he seeks "pardon for himself, and the lands of his country spiritual and temporal, for the which he offereth the yearly rent of 100l.;" her Majesty having never heard of any such misusage, is moved the rather to grant him mercy.
As to the spiritual lands, it is strange that he or any other of the offenders should require restitution of any other lands than of lands temporal. "Yet such of the English as have grants of such spiritual lands as are called Termond lands shall be treated withal to surrender their patents, whereupon the inhabitants of every barony may have the same Termond lands distributed amongst them, upon reservations of the former rents." Otherwise he shall have restitution of all such lands as of right belong to him, at the usual rents. But whereas he offers 100l. a year, she understands not for how much land, "for, upon the division of the whole lands in Monahan about five years past, there was allotted unto him and five others of his name lands rented at 500l. and more, besides a yearly rent unto the chief lord upon the freeholders' lands, the sum of 446l.; so as, out of one of the baronies granted to him by the name of Brian McHugh Oge McMahon, he had granted unto him and his heirs males of his body lands to the yearly value of 108l., to be paid to her Majesty; besides that he had of the freeholders of that barony, being 88 in number, the yearly rent of 105l." Her Majesty wishes that the parties to whom the said baronies were allotted may still enjoy the same.
V. ANSWER to BRIAN MCSHANE'S DEMANDS.
His request for liberty of conscience is devised by compact with others. If he lives as a good subject, his country shall not be troubled with a garrison or officers until it shall be found profitable.
"And whereas in the answer to the Earl and others his adherents a strict course is prescribed, yet rather than the purpose of pacification should fail upon some of their private demands, not being dishonorable nor much disprofitable unto her Majesty, it shall be lawful to such as shall be employed in this service to yield thereunto," Rather than the treaty should break off, you shall give them their pardon, though they refuse to come in personally to the State after its receipt; providing for their continuance as loyal subjects, and for the dispersion of their forces.
Signed: Jo. Puckeringe, W. Burghley, Essex. H. Coblam. T. Buckehurst, Ro. Cecyll, J. Fortescue.
Copy.

CASTLE of CLOGHAN O'MADDEN.  MS 612, p. 62  12 March 1596

Former reference: MS 612, p. 62

1 Page.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 235.

Contents:
"The names of such chief men as were killed in the castle of Cloghan O'Madden at the winning thereof," 12th of March 1595. [See Russell's Diary under that date.]
Eleven names are given. Two gentlemen of O'Rorcke's country (names not known) were also killed.
II. "The names of the chief men killed in the conflict the day before the winning of the castle."
The names of eight are given.
"The rest were shot, bowmen and kearne. The whole number killed and drowned (besides those in the castle) were seven score and upwards, besides some hurt, which escaped, being unarmed, and fled away in great amazement."
Copy.

HENRY HOVENDEN to the EARL OF TYRONE.  MS 612, p. 65a  20 March 1596

Former reference: MS 612, p. 65a

1 Page.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 236.

Contents:
"Upon receipt of a letter from O'Donnell importing somewhat touching the cause of this business unto your Lp., I conferred with him. He told me that the case wherein you and O'Donnell are is sufficiently known beyond seas, though not by any means which yourselves sent. He told me also that through cross fortune he was constrained to shift away his letters, reserving only a bare copy of them in a broken paper. Whereupon I said unto him, that albeit his speeches might carry a great possibility of truth in that behalf, yet it behoved him, coming to men of such calling as your Honour and O'Donnell are of, to be of such calling himself and place of credit as might bring with it cause of believing his errand; and therefore I demanded what he was, in which demand he hath satisfied me, and so he will your Lp. He passeth in his journey for a man of Galway, and so I pray you let him be accompted there; otherwise, in his return to the place from whence he came, it may be he will be intercepted, as the rest were that your Lp. despatched from thence. After you have seen what is required of you and O'Donnell, you may determine what course to handle. If England fear no foreign invasion it is the likelier to go hard with you; and also if your stay depend on the assistance of those that you cannot convoy a letter unto, the same yieldeth no show of present help unto you. And if you agree to the articles which Henry Warren moved to you, whereof I have sent you a copy, I do not see how such a peace can stand with your good. Neither is the lingering and delay of the State intended any way to serve your turn. Therefore I wish your Lp. to procure a thorough peace, or else to labour that help betimes, which at length you must be driven to if the wars endure. If it please your Lp., O'Donnell would meet you at Strabane, to perfect what you will touching this cause. If old O'Caban's son do solicit your Lp. for the fine which Tierlogh O'Quine's sons have, you may not assent to him, for that your fines here are my gain so long as I am toiled with supplying your Lp's. room."
20 March 1596. ["Stilo novo," according to Carew.]
Copy.

EXTORTIONS of the SOLDIERS.  MS 612, p. 63  18 April 1596

Former reference: MS 612, p. 63

2 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 239.

Contents:
Orders to be observed in the English Pale against the abuses and extortions of the soldiers, made by Sir William Russell, Lord Deputy, and the Council at the Castle of Dublin, 18 April 1596. [Note: "To these orders Sir John Norryes hath refused to put his hand."]
All soldiers shall, in their travel through the country, march above 10 miles by the day, and not lie above one night in one place, each taking of his host meat and drink, without exacting money or committing any other extortion, upon pain of death, but paying ready money or giving his captain's or officer's ticket after the rate of 5d. ster. per diem.
No two soldiers shall have above one boy attending upon them, and a band of 100 foot shall have but six women for laundresses, such as shall be married wives to some of the said soldiers; the said women and boys to be in no way chargeable to the country or towns. Any women or boys found above the said number to be committed to gaol by the sheriff, justice, or high constable, till order be taken to execute them by course of martial law. The captains, officers, and soldiers shall assist in apprehending them, on pain of being discharged and punished.
No band of foot or horse shall, upon pain of death, charge the country with more than the just number allowed by her Majesty in pay and entered in the cheque rolls; and no soldier or officer shall exact or take money by the name and under colour of dead pays, or shall take any more meat than his supper and breakfast, and that without exacting any kind of meat called "Capury encreasone" or "Capure ne hairke." Any persons doing the contrary to be committed to gaol and executed by martial law.
Every two soldiers shall have a boy allowed them, to be found by the country, and pay after the rate of 5d. ster. "le piece" for their diet per diem.
"The soldiers shall not at their will (as heretofore theyhave done) be their own carvers in killing of the subjects' lambs, hens, geese, and such like, or in demanding of wine and aqua vitae to their meat, but shall take such competent meat and drink as the country is able to afford, without beating or abusing the poor people, or committing of other disorders in taking money or distresses for the same."
Neither the soldiers nor their captains shall take up the subjects' garrons for their carriage, or for the carriage of their wives and laundresses, without special warrant from us, and in such cases to pay for hire of the garrons according to her Majesty's usual rates, upon the pain and peril aforesaid.
Soldiers shall not range up and down the country or depart from their garrisons without special licence, which obtained, they are to pay for anything they take in the country to the owners' contentment.
Pain of imprisonment to such as shall not make complaint of any extortion.
The soldiers in marching through the country shall be placed by the mayor, sheriff, portreeve, sovereign, bailiff, collector, high constable, or the gentleman adjoining, according to the ability of the poor people; and the captains and soldiers are not to please themselves as heretofore, whereby many poor people were utterly undone and driven to forsake their dwellings.
Pain of death for ravishing any woman against her will, and for taking any moveable goods.
Signed: Ad. Dublin., Canc., Tho. Midensis, Henry Waloppe, Robert Gardner, Anthony St. Leger, George Bourchier, Robert Dillon, Geoffrey Fenton.
Copy.

PROCLAMATION by the LORD DEPUTY and COUNCIL.  MS 612, p.62a  20 April 1596

Former reference: MS 612, p.62a

1 Page.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 240.

Contents:
That upon sundry complaints to us exhibited, as likewise to the Justices of Assize in their circuits, by the inhabitants of the English Pale and the countries adjoining, greatly impoverished through the extortions of the soldiers, we have agreed upon certain orders for the reformation of the said abuses; commanding all captains, lieutenants, ensigns, sergeants, and soldiers to observe the same.
Given at Dublin, 20 April 1596.
Copy.

The QUEEN to LORD DEPUTY RUSSELL and the COUNCIL.  MS 612, p. 74  25 May 1596

Former reference: MS 612, p. 74

5 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 241.


Related information: MS 617, p. 253 Another copy.

Contents:
We command you (without faction or partiality amongst you) to unite yourselves in council, and to provide for the cure of the present diseases. Notwithstanding our infinite charges for the prosecution of those rebels, no sound remedies have followed, but still we see new erections of companies, new devices of charges, loose musters, and slack and cross counsels.
In Ulster we do see, since the journey and discreet dealings of our President of Munster and our Secretary, [Sir John Norris and Geoffrey Fenton.] a general submission of the rebels. Complete that work for our honour, "with such conditions as we may find to be derived only from public respect and not for particular end." Considering the monstrous accusations brought against our ministers that have lived amongst these people, we cannot turn our face from their complaints. We have determined on a course of pacification, and shall hold it a weakness in you (the Deputy) if you require to be daily directed in all particulars, especially as your advices are bare and barren.
To begin with Connaught, it troubles us to find such slackness in the trial of the enormities complained of in Bingham's government, for the people must needs think our heart alienated from doing them justice; and you have not given us thorough information. Select fit commissioners to be sent to Connaught, and let it be known to them that only their fleeing from justice to disorder, and not coming in to make complaint to our ministers, was the cause of this protraction. If Bingham appear guilty, he shall be removed, but we must not condemn a governor unheard and without good proof.
"For the particulars suggested in settling hard rates at the composition, we doubt not but, if it shall well be ordered, the people will continue the composition, for we never heard that they repined thereat, but that besides their rents for the composition they were burdened with cesses both for victuals and soldiers, contrary to the true meaning of the composition."
Though the composition of Connaught has been greater than that of Munster or any other province, yet no direct profit has been given to us, for the governor erected so many bands of horse and foot that the whole revenue of the composition is expanded.
Diminish our intolerable charges by relating some of our forces, especially the newly-erected companies. When Gardner was with us, he had conference with our Council of many things respecting Connaught. Our President of Munster and our Secretary "have gotten by their dealings with Tyrone and O'Donnell further light what would be the state of their demands; so as we will have these two employed as fit instruments in the same."
We have seen shrewd informations, taken before you our Deputy, of underhand plottings by the ministers of Bingham to disturb this intended course. To assure the people that we will do them right, he is to carry at Dublin or remain at Athlone, from whence he may be called to Galleway before such of you as shall be in commission. The commissioners now appointed are to get information of his practices. We hear also that many officers and captains under Bingham do pick quarrels to disturb this beginning. They are not to be left unpunished.
Use with Norris and Fenton the service of Dillon our Chief Justice, of our Justice, in Connaught, and our Attorney, to hear and examine all these things. The Earls of Clanrycard and Thomonde, who have served us faithfully in this broken time, are to be present, not as commissioners, but as witnesses, to the people's comfort that they shall have equal measure in the examination.
Tyrone and O'Donnell, with the rest, may receive their pardon according to that which Norris and Fenton have accorded to them, and are to be enjoined to come in to our State there after their pardon.
"For the coming of the Spaniards we know not what to say, because your bruits are so uncertain; only this, we expect to hear the particularities as well by your own intelligences as from Tyrone and O'Donnell, who dutifully advertised our President of Munster of their arrival, and their refusal to accept them. We do also wish you our Deputy, to whom the message was sent, to confer with Norris and Fenton about the fine offered, wherein we know no cause why, by such an evasion, he should save that ransom, being much too little a redemption for his grievous disloyalties. Others likewise have agreed to yield fines, which we would have you consider how to draw from them towards the expiation of their offences."
As to O'Donnell's request for lessening the composition which his father was rated at, he may be relieved in that rate and the rent reduced. Such matters we leave to your discretions. Seldom or never you direct commissioners, but waste time in sending hither to and fro needlessly.
"And for you our Treasurer, of all other, we see nothing but great sums expended, and no good nor timely certificates how they are issued, but in generalities, with accompts of idle and particular charges, wherein we find large allowances made to yourselves by yourselves in all things. And for the musters (of which let Ralph Lane be sharply warned) either we have none, or such as we assure you it is ridiculous to the world to hear what an army we pay, and yet what an army we have."
Under our signet at our manor of Greenwich, 25 May 1596, 38 Eliz.
Copy.

EXPEDITION to CADIZ.  MS 612, p. 89  22 June 1596

Former reference: MS 612, p. 89

4 pages + 5 pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 242.

Contents:
On the 3rd of June 1596 the Earl of Essex and the Admiral sailed with 144 vessels from Plymouth. Lord Thomas Howard, the Admiral, was in The Flaner de la Merr, Sir Walter Raleigh in The Warspright, Sir Robert Southwell in The Lyon, and Sir George Carewe in The Mary Rose, &c.
On the 19th they fell in with a bark of Waterford, and learned there were about 60 great ships in Cales (Cadiz), many of which were laden with merchandise for the Indies. They arrived before Cales on Sunday [the 20th], and made an attack on the Spanish fleet. Fifty-seven great ships were taken or burned, and the port of Pontale was captured. An attack was then made on the town by the Earl of Essex, the General, assisted by the Lord Marshal, the Earl of Sussex, and Sir George Carewe. The castle surrendered on the 22nd.
Copy.
II. "The names of those knighted on Monday the 22nd of June 1596, the day Cales was taken."
Copy.

HENRY HOVENDEN to the EARL OF TYRONE.  MS 612, p. 76a  27 June 1596

Former reference: MS 612, p. 76a

1 Page.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 243.

Contents:
"All the delays that could possibly be used for prolonging the causes here have not been omitted, and your own advice to O'Donnell to have the variance between the Commissioners and him to be made known to your Lp., and also to take hold of Captain Warren's dealing touching the retaining of your Lp.'s pledges at Dublin, hath been likewise treated of by O'Donnell; but all will not serve, for the Lord General pretendeth to war because O'Donnell will not put in his pledge, which you know he will not do. And as yet no harm is done of any side to testify a new war, though my chiefest opinion is, it will not be so immediately. And the Commissioners find no reason to refer these causes to your hearing, in that you have signified your mind unto them in writing in this behalf, together with the copies of such letters as you wrote to O'Donnell, McWilliam, and the rest, wherein in my opinion you used more haste than was convenient. I can say no more to your Lp. by way of advice but what I have already written to you, to be provided for the wars. You shall know more as the causes here fall out"
27 June 1596
Copy.

TYRONE'S REBELLION.  MS 612, p. 80  6 July 1596

Former reference: MS 612, p. 80

1 Page.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 244.


Related information: MS 617, p. 258 Another copy.

Contents:
"The translation of a letter in Irish, signed by the Earl of Tyrone, O'Donnell, Brian O'Rourk, and McWilliam, sent by the Clanshies into Munster to stir up rebellion there."
"This writing doth manifest, in the behalf of O'Neile, O'Donnell, and McWilliam, that they have given oath and vow that whosoever of the Irishry, especially of the gentlemen of Munster, or whosoever else, as if we did particularly name them, from the highest to the lowest, shall assist Christ's Catholic religion, and join in confederacy and make war with us, let them, as our true messengers and agents, give firm credit to the Clanshyes, and to this our warrant that we send with them, that we will remain and be unto them a back or stay, warrant or surety, for their so aiding of God's just cause; and, by our said oath and vow, never to conclude peace or war with the English for ourselves or any of us during our life, but that the like shall be concluded for you that shall so join in confederacy with us; and, if you should be driven to extremity, to relieve and enable you as ourselves in the cause thus intended. And again, give credit to these our trusty messengers that we send you.
"At Strabane, the 6th of July 1596."
Signed: H. O'Neile, H. O'Donnell, B. O'Rourke, Theobald Bourke.
Copy.

SIR ROBERT CECYLL to the LORD DEPUTY (RUSSELL).  MS 612, p. 81  10 July 1596

Former reference: MS 612, p. 81

4 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 245.

Contents:
By divers packets you have represented the confused state of that kingdom, and that her Majesty should provide for the worst. "When it shall appear that this merciful course of hers taketh no place," she will use other means. Connaught should be well compounded, and so Ulster thereby more assured. It is better to temporize than to be driven to the charge of new armies, the victualling of which is very difficult. Otherwise it were a paradox to believe that the army (being 6,000 or 7,000) should not have suppressed the rebellion. Her Majesty attends the issue of this great army in Spain.
As for the cessation of arms, and treaties of peace, which you note to be prejudicial, her Majesty adopted that course upon your own advertisements, that you could not suppress the rebels. You and the Council represented that Ireland might be settled by pacification. "I think it had been a counsel well followed." You wrote that plain necessity, after your forces were harassed in a journey into Ulster, moved you to agree to a cessation. Had you written in mislike of the cessation, and undertaken the ending of the war, with any reasonable propositions, I assure you "that both her Majesty and her Council were most greedy of that honorable course by force to have reduced them;" but she notes that you are only advertisers, and not advisers. She requires you to restrain this coming over of Irish servitors and suitors, whereby her person and her Council are pestered, as they might be despatched by yourself in that kingdom.
"There is another matter wherein her Majesty is contented your Lp. use your own wisdom; not as seeming to have any authority from her. One Captain Thomas Ley doth pretend he could do much to cure these needless jealousies in the Earl of Tyrone, which keep him from repairing to the State, and that he would sue for leave to come into England; a thing which the Queen hath no reason to refuse, although it is not fit that she should desire it."
All this is in answer to your last packet of 29 June, with divers others. I have noted by a postscript in a letter of yours to your noble sister, that you retain an opinion of my constant poor goodwill towards you. "I shall never be found so gross or injurious as in any kind to raise the reputation of any other, whom you think I do also affect, to the least prejudice of your Lp.'s reputation, or darkening of that superiority which her Majesty hath given you without exception over any subject or servant of hers in that kingdom." I refer you to my Lord my father's writing concerning matters of money. We are so far from advising any diminution of forces, "as order is taken to send over that remain of horse of the Clergie unsent over."
From the Court, 10 July 1596.
Received the 24th, by Marviliack.
Copy.

The PRIVY COUNCIL in ENGLAND to the LORD DEPUTY and COUNCIL of IRELAND.  MS 612, p. 83  8 Aug 1596

Former reference: MS 612, p. 83

2 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 247.


Related information: MS 617, p. 259 Another copy.

Contents:
You have received her Majesty's pleasure in what sort you should proceed with Feagh McHugh, referring the conditions to such memorials as should be brought over by Sir Henry Harrington; but as he is not going over with sufficient expedition, we send you a memorial of some things honorable for the Queen and not over-hard for him (Feagh).
(1.) He is to be received to mercy together with his wife, sons, and followers, and restored to his house and livings by letters patent, yielding some service. (2.) He must promise to banish all strangers. (3.) Any persons appertaining to him on committing stealths or outrages shall be by him sent to abide the trial of law. (4.) He shall answer at assizes and sessions. (5.) He is to deliver a sufficient pledge, to be exchanged every three months.
If he insist on his demand to be restored to Balinocore, and will not be reduced without that, let him have it, and hold it of the Queen, who is at great charges to keep it.
From the Court at Greenwich, 8 August 1596.
Signed: Jo. Cant., Tho. Egerton, W. Burghley, W. Cobham, T. Buckehurst, Ro. Cecyll, J. Fortescue.
II. Postscript of a letter from the Council, dated 16 July.--Here is a solicitor of Feagh McHugh's, who desires to be received into her Majesty's mercy. She is resolved to give him his pardon. Upon Sir Henry Harrington's coming to you give him pardon for his life and lands, as is used in such cases, without further troubling her Majesty.
Copy.

FEAGH MCHUGH to the EARL OF TYRONE.  MS 612, p. 84  17 Aug 1596

Former reference: MS 612, p. 84

1 Page.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 248.

Contents:
I have received your letters, and do now crave your advice. I am still bearing myself as I have done with such as take my part in Leinster, but I am bidden oftentimes by these Englishmen to do for myself, and not to trust to you. If it be your will that we shall trouble them well, cause O'Donell to send me out of Connaught a company of good shot for the guard of my body. I shall observe and fulfil whatsoever you require me.
From the Ranelagh, 17 August 1596.
Intercepted by Captain Lea.
Copy.

LORD DEPUTY RUSSELL to the EARL OF ORMOND.  MS 612, p. 85  3 Sep 1596

Former reference: MS 612, p. 85

1 Page.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 249.

Contents:
Yesterday I received your two letters, the one to the whole [Council] table, and the other to myself. As you have been informed, Peirse Butler has been sent for, and so has his brother James, both sons to Sir Edmond, but yet neither of them comes; James pretending that he has been long sick and Peirse fearing arrest, as he owes money to some about Dublin. Both have bound themselves by oath with the O'Moores to enter into action. As they are of your name and near kindred, endeavour to bring them in to the State. "I have written letters both to the Lord of Mountgarret and Sir Peirse his father-in-law and Sir Edmond Butler, his father, without delay or excuse to apprehend him and deliver him at Kilkenny to your Lordship."
Killmainham, 3 September 1596.
Postscript.--"Write a sharp letter to my Lord Mountgarrett, that presently he send Peirse Butler to you. And for that the matter may be kept the more secret, I have thought good to send my letters both to my Lord and Sir Edmond Butler to your Lp., desiring you to be very earnest with them both for to have Peirse and James delivered unto your Lp.'s hands; for this will be made a great matter in England by some that doth not love you."
Copy.

LORD DEPUTY RUSSELL to LORD MOUNTGARRETT.  MS 612, p. 85a  3 Sep 1596

Former reference: MS 612, p. 85a

1 Page.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 250.

Contents:
"Where commandment both from ourself and the rest of the Council hath been of late given to Peirse Butler, your son-in-law, for his present repair hither to confer with us about special services for her Majesty, and yet that he hath refused, or at least neglected to come to us;" these are now straightly to charge and command your Lordship, "to whom he hath often access, and therefore you [can] conveniently do it," forthwith to apprehend him and deliver him to his uncle, the Earl of Ormond.
Kilmaneham, 3 September 1596.
Copy.

LORD DEPUTY RUSSELL to SIR EDMOND BUTLER.  MS 612, p. 86  3 Sep 1596

Former reference: MS 612, p. 86

1 Page.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 251.

Contents:
"Where by our letters from the Council table your son, Peirse Butler, hath received a commandment to come unto us, and yet he hath either obstinately refused or at least neglected to do so, these are therefore to will and command you to apprehend him and deliver him to his uncle, the Earl of Ormond."
Kilmaneham, 3 September 1596.
Copy.

SIR JOHN NORRIS, LORD PRESIDENT [of MUNSTER], to the LORD DEPUTY.  MS 612, p. 86a  15 Sep 1596

Former reference: MS 612, p. 86a

2 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 252.

Contents:
By our joint letter and by the report of Captain Warren you will understand our proceedings, and into what terms we have drawn these rebels. "As this matter hath happened touching Ballenacor, whereby it is like that some stirs will follow in these parts," such companies as you bad determined to send hither should be now stayed, and likewise the risings-out that are appointed. I have sent you with all expedition Sir John Dowdall's and Captain Marshall's companies, because your pleasure is to have the said fort built up again. If you require any more companies from hence, I will send you such as shall be fittest for that service.
Athlone, 15 September 1596.
Postscript.--I have received yours of the 12th. I cannot give any advice for the prosecution Feagh McHughe, as I know not upon what occasion he is grown to that extremity; but the people of his country will not be hasty to enter again into rebellion for anything that may be done to him, though many of their loose men may repair to him. I will hasten down towards you Captain Hugh Mostian's company and Captain Garret's, having already despatched Captain Higham; and if I can get such kerne as we have here to go thither, I will send them. I would have sent some others of the companies here, but that they would have left the greater part of their numbers behind sick and weak, and that I think those light men are fittest for that service. The horsemen are all of them returned to their accustomed garrisons, except my own company, which is in Mollengar, and Captain Russell's at Athenrye. As for the general hosting you may dispose of it as you see fit, for here we shall have no need of it; only I wish there should be a reservation of some garrones to serve monthly for her Majesty's carriage, if need should require. The biscuit and beef provided for this place may be employed where you think fit, and we will provide the companies here with such as we can procure out of Munster.
Copy.

PETITION of SIR WILLIAM RUSSELL, LORD DEPUTY, to the PRIVY COUNCIL.  MS 612, p. 87a  [? Oct] 1596

Former reference: MS 612, p. 87a

2 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 253.

Contents:
"That whereas, from time to time, for the space of a year and more, he hath by his letters made known unto your Lord ships the dangerous state of this distressed kingdom, committed to his charge and government, as well through the great force, strength, and means of the rebels themselves, as through their continual practice to draw in foreign assistance, if the same were not prevented by a timely and round prosecution; and yet, to his great grief and discomfort, could not in his devices be credited, but others suffered and authorized to proceed in a course of pacification which, in the opinion of the said Deputy and the most part of the Council, his assistants, did tend directly to her Majesty's disadvantage, and the gaining of time to the said rebels, the better to bring to pass their purposes. Forasmuch, therefore, as it hath appeared by the report of divers come lately out of Spain, that a fleet of Spanish ships, set out to sea to have come thither, by this time had arrived here if they had not been dispersed and wrecked by tempest about Cape Finister, as also that the remain of the said fleet and army, to the number of 2,000, are said to have direction to come on, and thought now to be at sea again; when the Earl of Tyrone, with all his forces, save such as are left about Armagh to block up the fort there, are drawn up to the borders of the Pale, where he daily preyeth and spoileth, with purpose, as may be thought, to take all advantages by joining with the said Spaniards, or otherwise: it is most humbly desired by the said Deputy, in discharge of his duty, for the good of her Majesty's service and the safety of her realm of Ireland, that your Lordships would be pleased to be a means unto her Majesty to revoke him, and place some other better countenanced and graced in Court, to the end. more credit being given to his advices, he may be better supplied of means than he findeth himself to be to withstand so imminent dangers."
Copy.

The LORD DEPUTY and COUNCIL to the EARL OF TYRONE.  MS 612, p. 100  30 Nov 1596

Former reference: MS 612, p. 100

2 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 254.

Contents:
By advertisements sent to us from Mr. Stafford, and by a letter of your own of the 12th inst. to Mr. Marshal (Bagnall), we understand "that there is a restraint made of the relieving of Armaghe, as also that some of that garrison going for wood have been slain by your people." This dealing "being in no sort agreeable with the acceptation of your pardon and duty to her Majesty," we charge you to permit that garrison to be victualled and to fetch wood, according to your promise and such covenants as you have agreed upon with the Lord President (Norris) and Sir Geoffrey Fenton. We intend to send victuals thither by Mr. Stafford. If you fail herein we will take order for the execution of your pledges, and proceed against yourself by way of proclamation.
In your letter to Mr. Marshal, you allege that "promise is broken with you by the Lord General," because Feagh McHughe is prosecuted according his deserts. The Lord President and Sir Geoffrey Fenton have assured us that Feagh McHughe was never once named in their treaty with you; "which being true, as we have cause to believe it, remembering your own articles agreed upon, viz., that you should stand upon your own pardon without meddling with any other but of Tyrone; and in regard the said Feagh had surprised her Majesty's fort before anything was attempted against him, your Lordship hath no cause to be grieved."
Castle of Dublin, 30 November 1596.
Signed: W. Russell; Ad. Dublin., Cane.; Tho. Midensis; H. Wallop; Ro. Gardner; Anthony St. Leger; Ro. Dillon; George Bowrchier.
Copy.

The EARL OF TYRONE to FEAGH MCHUGH.  MS 612, p. 101a  2 Dec 1596

Former reference: MS 612, p. 101a

1 Page.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 255.

Contents:
"I have formerly sent unto you touching all the proceedings betwixt us and the Lord Norris in Connaught, and that we did conclude a peace there for you as well as for ourselves, and did withal signify unto you that her Majesty is now merciful unto you in giving you pardon as well as the rest that entered into the war in these parts, and how upon that condition we had delivered in our pledges; but the Lord Deputy permitted not our men to pass therewith unto you. We are now to let you understand that the condition whereupon the best of the Irish have given their promise and oath, one to another, is not to make peace until every one in particular that entered into the war may have the like peace and their right and other meet things, or else whose should not accept or take the same, presuming of his own pride or presumption, that then he should spend himself in his own quarrel. Therefore I wish you to make peace as becometh you, and to take your pardon, and to cause the Butlers also to do the like, and all other persons that have joined themselves with you in war. And herewith we have sent you our man; and, if you be licensed, send your man unto us about these causes, if you may get peace.
"From Loghnaseak, 2 December 1596.--Hugh Tirone."
Headed: "Translated out of Irish."
Copy.

The EARL OF TYRONE to the LORD DEPUTY and COUNCIL.  MS 612, p. 101  4 Dec 1596

Former reference: MS 612, p. 101

1 Page.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 256.

Contents:
"I received your Honours' letters, and as concerning the restraint for victualling the garrison of Ardmagh, I confess it to be true; and the occasion thereof is, that promise was not kept with us, and that I accomplished whatsoever I promised since I received her Majesty's gracious pardon. And albeit Feagh McHughe was not upon my peace, yet, notwithstanding, he was promised his pardon as well as the rest, and yet alway pursued by the Lord Deputy. And as for the pledges, they should have been released half a year ago, and notwithstanding kept in, contrary to our agreement; the which, as now we perceive it, was to no other purpose but only for their execution, in which your Honours may use your discretion. And as for my part, I did what I could in Connaught to bring all things to a good end. And now, lately, your Honours shall understand how Oyn McCollo was shamefully murdered by some of the garrison of Kells; and these and many other injuries caused us to stand in doubt until better order be taken, for I expected the Lord President's meeting these four months for the ending of ail matters between us; and I doubt not, if he were in health, but that all things should be ended; and when it shall please your Honours to take order in the matter here. I am ready to attend."
Loghnaseak. 4 December 1596.
"Your Honours' very loving friend,--Hugh Tirone."
Copy.

The LORD DEPUTY and COUNCIL to the LORD PRESIDENT (SIR JOHN NORRIS).  MS 612, p. 99  9 Dec 1596

Former reference: MS 612, p. 99

3 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 257.

Contents:
Your letter of 5 December was received yesterday, with the copy of another from the Earl of Tyrone to yourself. "Where you make mention of another letter received from Rice Ap Hugh, wherein he thinketh that Ardmaghe is lost, and that it is long since that you wrote unto the Marshal (Bagnall) and to us about it, grounding thereupon an opinion, as it seemeth, that if we had written but one good letter to the Earl it would have saved it, we know not what your Lordship may mean by this clause." At no time since the Earl took his pardon we have written to him in any unpleasing manner, but have laboured to hold him in good terms. "But now that he hath given so many apparent proofs of his bad meaning to this State, and namely the public restraint he made of all victuals to be carried to Ardmagh; his quarrelling with the convoy, and cutting some of the soldiers that went with the victuals; his late attempt made to surprise the place, wherein were slain 35 of the garrison, himself countenancing the matter in person; the violent incursions into the Pale lately made by his kinsmen and followers with open force as far as the river of Boyne, and on this side his son-in-law, Henry Oge McShane, being there in person, and commanding the rest in his name; and, lastly, his late treacherous attempt to surprise her Majesty's castle of Carlingford, where, missing of his principal purpose, there was carried away as prisoners, in lamentable manner, two gentlewomen, daughters of Captain Henshaw, the one married and the other a maid, he being, by appointment, to follow with his forces of purpose to surprise the castle;" these were sufficient reasons not to write to him in so mild manner as you advise. Nevertheless, as you are better acquainted with his humours, we leave you to deal with him for the relief of Ardmagh, either by persuasion or by force. You shall not want all the help of horse and foot that is in the kingdom. The place is victualled yet for 30 days.
Dublin, 9 December 1596.
Signed: W. Russell; Ad. Dublin., Canc.; Tho. Midensis; Henry Wallop; Ro. Gardner; Anthony St. Leger; Ro. Dyllon; George Bowrchier; Geoffrey Fenton; Ralph Lane.
Copy.

LORD DEPUTY RUSSELL to the PROVOST MARSHAL.  MS 612, p. 84a  22 Dec 1596

Former reference: MS 612, p. 84a

1 Page.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 258.

Contents:
Warrant to execute Hoye and two other soldiers of Captain Hugh Mostian's, who have not only committed great extortion in co. Dublin, "but also sore wounded one of her Majesty's subjects, who is like to miscarry through the same."
Dublin, 22 December 1596.
Copy.

VICTUALLING of the ARMY.  MS 612, p. 86  29 Dec 1596

Former reference: MS 612, p. 86

1 Page.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 259.

Contents:
"A particular note (set down by the Lord Deputy and Council) of such proportion of victuals as is delivered to a soldier for the victualling of himself by the day, as such time as he is victualled out of her Majesty's store."
"The said soldier is victualled for seven days in the week, being four flesh days and three fish days, and hath given him, viz.,--"
Flesh day.--Loaf bread, 1½ lb. Beer, one pottle. Beef, salt, 2 lb.; or, instead thereof, beef, fresh, 2½ lb.; the beef being without legs and necks.
Fish day.--Loaf bread, 1½ lb. Beer, one pottle. Butter, ½ lb.; or, instead thereof, cheese, 1 lb.; or, instead thereof, herrings, 8 per diem.
Mem.--That the horseman, in regard of his boy, is allowed half as much more as the footman.
This is the ordinary allowance that her Majesty makes to the soldiers, and they are not to exceed this rate.
Signed: Geff. Fenton; Rob. Newcomen.
Copy.

JOURNAL of SIR WILLIAM RUSSELL, Lord Deputy.  MS 612  27 May 1597

Former reference: MS 612

117 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. III, document 270.

Contents:
(From 24 June 1594 to 27 May 1597.)
June 24th, 1594.--My Lady [Russell] took her journey from Chiswick to St. Alban's.
25th.--My Lord went with the Queen from Tiballs, the Lord Treasurer's house, to Mr. Wrothe's, at Enfeilde, where her Majesty dined. In the afternoon my Lord took leave and went to Donstable.
26th.--My Lord went to Stonystratford, and met my Lady, with the Earl of Bedford. [The names of the lords and gentlemen who met or entertained Lord Deputy Russell in his journey are specified.]
27th.--Went to Coventry, to the sign of the Pannier.
28th.--To Lichefeilde.
29th.--To Stone.
30th, Sunday.--To Nantwich. "My Lord's chaplain preached in the forenoon."
July 1st, 1594.--To Westchester.
2nd.--Visited by several gentlemen, who sent him venison.
5th.--My Lord and Lady dined at the Mayor of Chester's.
8th.--Dined at Serjeant Warborton's, vice-chamberlain of Chester. Visited the Bishop, Dr. Chaterton, who lay sick.
9th.--A packet despatched to my Lord Treasurer [Burleigh].
11th.--From Westchester to Hillbrye. Waited for a wind until Sunday 14th. Then put to sea, and went down the river to Gayton.
15th.--"We went to hunt at the Earl of Derby's, at Nestow Lodge."
17th.--"My Lord wrote to Mr. Maynarde about explanation of that point in the Queen's letter concerning his entertainment;" and to Lady Warwick and Mr. Oldiswoorth about the same.
18th.--My Lord and Lady went aboard the Queen's ship.
19th.--The wind continuing contrary, they landed again on the Welsh side.
20th.--To Glothaithe.
21st.--At Mr. Mostian's.
22nd.--Letters to the Lord Treasurer, Lord Essex, and Lady Warwick, enclosed to Smithe.
23rd.--Over Abraconwaye passage and Penmen Mawre to Bea Morris (Sir Richard Burklye's).
24th.--To Hollyheade. Waited for a wind until the 31st, when we took shipping in the morning, and arrived that night at the Head of Hothe. My Lord lay that night at my Lord of Hothe's.
August 1st, 1594.--To Dublin. Were met by the Council, captains, mayor, and other gentlemen, to the number of 500 horse. "My Lord lighted at one Mr. Bise's, a new house near the Castle."
2nd.--My Lord met the Council, and desired before receiving the sword to learn the state of the country. Appointed officers of his household.
3rd.--"My Lord's concordatum about land carriage was signed and allowed."
4th.--His arrival notified to the Council [in England].
5th.--Warrant for the repair of the Castle against my Lord's entrance.
6th.--Sir Richard Bingham went to the relief of Eliskellin (Enniskillen) Castle.
7th.--My Lord dined at Kilmainham; my Lady went to the Castle [of Dublin] to prepare it.
8th.--My Lord of Ormonde came to visit my Lord.
9th.--The Bishop of Fernes, the Earl of Thomond, and others came to visit my Lord.
10th.--Sir Thomas Norries came to visit my Lord. Sir Richard Bingham returned upon news that our people had received an overthrow at Eliskellin, under Sir Edward Harbert and Sir Henry Duke, and lost men, horses, and an ensign. My Lord first dieted in the Castle.
Sunday, 11th.--My Lord received the sword with great solemnity. Sir William FitzWilliams dined with my Lord; Sir Stephen Thornar knighted.
12th.--The Council engaged in preparing warrants and orders for general hostings.
13th.--News that 2,500 Scots had landed and preyed Kerifergus (Carrickfergus).
14th.--"News came of the Earl's (of Tyrone) coming to do his duty to my Lord, a thing unexpected of all men generally." Sir William FitzWilliams took his leave.
15th.--The Earl of Tyrone came in to my Lord and the Council, and delivered his submission in writing.
16th.--"My Lord took a view of all the men that were to go out of Dublin to attend Sir Richard Bingham, and he refused them, and gave Captain Streete licence to find voluntary men for that service."
17th.--"My Lord's company of gentlemen, being holberders, musketeers, and callivers, set forward towards Eliskellin Castle, under Collier."
18th, Sunday.--My Lord went to the church for the first time as Deputy; Dr. Hanmer ["Hammon" in the margin in Carew's hand.] preached.
19th.--My Lord prepared my ["F. Michell" in the margin.] despatch for England to the Court, with letters to her Majesty and the Council. My Lord began his journey to Elliskellin. The wind proved contrary, and I could not go till the next day. My Lord lodged at Trim, at Mr. Ashe's, his own man's house. He was accompanied by Sir Robert Gardiner, Sir George Bowrcher, Sir Richard Bingham, Sir Thomas Norreis, Sir Geoffrey Fenton, and others.
20th.--My Lord went to Mullingar (Mr. Hope's).
21st.--To Athlone Castle (Sir Richard Bingham's).
22nd.--Stayed there for the munition.
23rd.--To Roscommon (Mr. Malbie's).
24th.--To the abbey of Boyle (Sir George Bingham's).
25th.--Stayed at Boyle for the companies appointed to meet there.
26th.--Over the Curlewes to Dromdona, with the companies.
27th.--To the hill of Killargan, alias Mallaghenenuragh.
28th.--To Ballaghnemerlaghe; passed the bogs with very great danger.
29th.--To Glacknemaucha. "My Lord went in person to see the cashes made towards the pass near the river Ellis; but it could not that night be performed sufficiently."
30th.--It was resolved that some companies should beat the pass, and work a passage over the river, "grown great by fall of much rain." About 400 or 500 men were passed over the ford by 2 o'clock, with whom my Lord marched towards the Castle, and entered it without any let. Letters came from the constable that the enemies were fled. The Earl of Tyrone sent letters to my Lord.
31st.--The rest of the army reached the Castle. Some men and garrons were lost at the river.
September 1st, 1594, Sunday.--After the sermon by Mr. Richardson, my Lord's chaplain, Sir William Clerke and Sir Robert Needham were knighted. Sir Richard Bingham was sent on before to pass the river Erne.
2nd.--My Lord with the rest of the army passed the Erne in a great boat; some essaying to ride over were drowned, among them Mr. Cicil, a pensioner. Encamped at Aghnerina.
3rd.--Ballaghleina, between two great and foul passes, where the enemy had encamped before.
4th.--To Agrioghe in Dortrye, where Sir John Orreille and the rest of that name met my Lord.
5th.--To the Cavan. "The bands were mustered, and order taken for their discharge, or repair to places of garrison."
6th.--To Logchrine (Mr. Plunkett's).
7th.--To Abrechan (my Lord of Meath's), and stayed there all Sunday the 8th.
9th.--"They returned all to Dublin Castle."
10th to 14th.--My Lord reposed himself.
15th.--Letters to England; but the wind contrary:
16th.--"I (Michell ?) landed with my letters from her Majesty, from the Lords of the Council, and my Lord's private friends, and news of 8,000l. treasure."
17th.--The Earl of Kildare and the Baron of Dunkellin returned from the Court and visited my Lord.
18th to 23rd.--"0."
24th.--"My Lord passed Rocester's ward."
25th.--"My Lord sent away letters by Sir Edward Yorke, who went post to the Court. And divers of my Lord's people were then put to their pension to live at 8d. and 12d. the day, or else to return home with letters to their friends." Letters sent by Mr. Collier. The packet of the 14th sent to Westchester. Sir Robert Needham departed into England.
26th.--"Sir Edward Moore went away, about dealing with the Earl of Tyrone, to Mellifante."
27th.--"My Lord went to take the air." Sir William Weston, Chief Justice, died, and was buried on the 28th.
29th.--"The old mayor [of Dublin] feasted my Lord and Lady at his house."
30th.--"The old mayor came and yielded up the sword to my Lord. The Recorder made a speech of the charters of the city. My Lord made choice of Garret to be mayor, and delivered him the sword and the staff, and made a speech."
October 1st, 1594.--Letters from Sir Edward Moore about a month's truce with the Earl of Tyrone; and a ship brought the Earl's steward.
2nd.--Moore's letters answered.
3rd.--7,000l. brought by one Crosse from the Lord Treasurer.
4th and 5th.--A ship came upon the Bar; suspected to be a pirate, or to have prohibited goods. My Lord sent to make search and confiscate.
6th.--Mr. Francis [Russell], my Lord's son, sick.
7th.--Two prisoners that made resistance in the ship committed by my Lord.
8th.--Packet from Sir Robert Cicill.
9th.--"Sir Robert Gardiner was stayed by my Lord of his journey into England."
12th and 13th.--Moore returned from the truce with Tyrone. "Sir William Clerke returned from the journey of bringing the Lady Wallop home to Eneskorfen."
16th.--My Lord sent a packet to the Court by my man. Letters from Knockfergus of spoils done thereabout.
21st.--"My Lord granted a commission to search in Wexford, Rosse, and Waterford for prohibited wares to pass for France; Mr. Brisket was a commissioner." He signed Hartpole's fiant for Carlowe Castle. Wrote to the Lord Treasurer and Sir Henry Wallop by Crosse.
22nd.--Letters from Sir E. Moore about "more time of truce" with Tyrone.
23rd.--"News came of the death of Dowde, and wardship of his son; slain by Crofton."
24th.--"Letters were made ready for England, to be sent by Crosse, Sir H. Wallop's man, to Smith, concerning serving (?) the fishing with cash (?)."
25th.--Commission to search at Galway for prohibited commodities. Letter to Sir R. Bingham.
26th.--"Letters from the Lord Admiral about one Trevor to make trial of beef and bacon" for the shipping. My Lord granted him a letter to Sir Thomas Norreis.
27th, Sunday.--The Bishop of Limerick preached. "Thorneboroughe, Crofte, and Higham were in the field."
28th.--My Lord granted the Bishop of Limerick leave to go to England. Letters to Cragfergus, by Mr. Egerton, constable there. "News came that Jones was killed at Chester by Goldwell (Colonel ?) Rogers."
29th October to November 3rd, 1594.--"Little done, save some letters written to Feagh McHughe for some truce, upon his desire of going or sending into England."
4th and 5th.--"The judges sat about the choosing of sheriffs for the whole realm."
6th.--The first day of full term. "The Lords came to visit my Lord; and all the judges strangers." Warrants of full pay to the Clerk of the Cheque.
12th.--Warrants for Brian FitzWilliam's patent of 10s. the day, and for 10 horsemen for Sir William Clerke, my Lord's uncle.
13th.--"My Lord sent the warrant to the Queen's Council after the Serjeant had signed it, but the Solicitor would not, and Mr. Attorney did, but scraped out his name, and it passed with one counsellor's hand."
14th.--Letter to England about the former matter.
15th.--My Lord sat the first time in the Star Chamber.
16th.--Patent for Sir W. Clerke's pension. "One was executed for treason."
17th, Sunday, the Queen's [accession] day.--"My Lord was wonderfully attended on with five bishops, the councillors and divers earls and lords. This day my Lord pricked the sheriffs privately by himself, a roll being delivered and their warrants."
18th.--"There were divers made shows, and my Lord Kildare on the one side and Warham St. Leger on the other side ran at ring, and Mr. Malby and Mr. Norton; and after went to tourney in armour."
19th.--Letters from England, by a messenger of the [Queen's] Chamber.
20th.--Other letters from England.
21st.--"A great consultation by my Lord with all the lordborderers, to stand upon their defence with their own powers."
27th.--Mitton concluded with my Lord about the "great grant."
28th.--The term ended.
December 17th, 1594.--Packet [for England] by Tashe, who had long waited for a wind. The two Duttons, Wentworth, and Manchester departed. Caverlie and Beeston mustered the 200 men brought by them out of Lancashire and Cheshire. Sir William Clarke and Mr. Brisket went to Enyscorthy to the Lady Wallopp's, for Christmas. [After this date the journal is written by a different hand.]
January 16th, 1594[-5].--"My Lord took a hunting journey to Ballenecar, and drove Feogh McHugh out of his house into the Glinnes, and placed a garrison there of Captain Street's company."
17th.--"Feogh McHugh, Risse his wife, Walter Reogh, and all their sons and followers were proclaimed traitors." My Lord came to Newcastle (Sir H. Harrington's).
18th.--My Lord returned to Dublin.
19th, Sunday.--Captain Street sent in five of the traitors' heads.
21st.--Captain Chichester sent to Ballenecor with powder and shot.
22nd.--"More provision sent by water to Arcklo for the garrison at Ballenecor."
24th.--"Captain Chichester returned, and brought in Feogh's brother, who came in voluntarily and submitted himself. Mr. Michell [Qu. the writer of the first portion of this journal.] sent into England with a packet of letters. The mayor and sheriffs of Dublin rescued a ward of the Queen's, whom my Lord had sent the Queen's sergeant for. The ward was one widow Doughill's son. This night, in the watch within the city, a spy was taken which came from Feogh McHugh, who was committed to the Castle."
25th.--"The spy which was committed was examined. The mayor sent in the ward, and came and submitted himself to my Lord on his knee, craving pardon for that he had done. My Lord appointed him to be at the Council Chamber in the afternoon. My Lord and the Council met this afternoon in Council."
26th.--Felimy Toole's son taken by the sheriff of co. Dublin, and committed to the Castle. The Earl of Ormond visited my Lord. Feogh's porter taken.
27th.--"Hugh Duffe came in, certifying my Lord he had taken certain of the traitors' heads." My Lord and the Council sat.
28th.--Lords Ormond and Delvin dined with my Lord.
29th.--My Lord and the Council sat; and on the 30th.
30th.--This night Garrald FitzGarrald (W. Reogh's brother), with 80 followers, burned Crumlin. "My Lord went out into St. Thomas' Street, and caused the gates to be opened, and sent horsemen thither."
31st.--"My Lord and the Council sat in the Exchequer Star Chamber in the forenoon, and in the Council in the afternoon."
"MY LORD'S JOURNEY to BALLENECOR, being accompanied with Sir George Bourchier, Sir Geoffrey Fenton, Sir Harry Harrington, lieutenant, Sir Ralph Lane, Sir William Clarke, knights, with many other gentlemen: beginning the 1st of February 1594[-5]. Captain Chichester, sergeant-major; Mr. Bowen, marshal. Corporals of the field:--Captain Prise, Captain Kellie, Mr. North, Mr. Beeston."
February 1st.--To Newcastle (Sir H. Harrington's).
2nd, Sunday.--Divers of Feogh McHugh's followers received in upon protection.
3rd.--Encamped at Killnomanagh.
4th.--Encamped near Ballenecor. A messenger from Feogh McHugh and Walter Reagh desiring to parley with Sir Harry Harrington.
5th.--My Lord began the fortification [of Ballenecor]. Captains Streete and Wyllis sent forth on service. Licence to Harrington to parley with Feogh and Walter. He met them, accompanied by horse and foot, between two great hills two miles from the camp. They desired mercy and pardon.
6th.--"The camp continued fortifying at Ballenecor" till the 22nd.
7th.--Streete and Wyllis's companies returned, bringing in a girl who had warned six kerne to escape by her cries. "The foragers took a prisoner in a house, wherein they found a bag of bullets newly molten for the enemy." He was executed.
8th.--My Lord marched five miles into the Glinnes with Streete and Wyllis's companies. Letters from England.
9th, Sunday.--The camp continued near Ballenecor. Mr. Wheeler preached in the forenoon. Letter from the Earl of Ormond. Streete and Wyllis's companies sent forth. My Lord was certified that James FitzGarrald, Walter Reogh's brother, was taken prisoner by Dermond McMorris [Kavanagh].
10th.--The Earl of Ormond came to the camp.
11th.--100 churls came out of the O'Birnes' country, to work at the fort.
12th.--Street and Wyllis's companies brought in a follower of W. Reagh. Letters from England. Victuals sent for to Dublin.
13th.--My Lord went to see a pass cut near the camp. The prisoner executed. The foragers brought in the head of a follower of Feogh McHugh. Certain soldiers, having strayed from their companies, were benighted, and took a house and barn to defend themselves. Before Captain Chichester, sergeant-major, could relieve them, the enemy had fired the house and killed three of our soldiers and two boys. The sergeant-major met some of Ormond's company, and not knowing one another they skirmished; but little harm was done.
14th.--Victuals came from Dublin.
15th.--Sir William Clarke with horsemen rode to Arcklo, and brought James FitzGarrald to the camp as prisoner.
16th, Sunday.--Mr. Wheeler preached. Proclamation to bring in all the goods and chattels of the traitors, "whomsoever had received the same."
17th.--"My Lord rode up to Dromkitt, the pass being cut as his Lordship passed, the strength of the place being reported to be such as one man might resist ten; but my Lord found it otherwise."
18th.--My Lord rode to Killcomen to see the pass cut there. Ormond met him.
20th.--Letters from Ormond.
21st.--News from Streete and Wyllis that they had driven Walter Reagh from his house at Ballenehorne, and that Garrald McMorris, Reagh's brother, Daniel Reerton, one of their chief shot, and another were slain, their heads being brought in. Some of Ormond's company assisted them. The Earl of Ormond dined with my Lord; "after which they rode to Ballenecor to view the fort."
23rd, Sunday.--Mr. Wheeler preached. The camp rose and marched towards Dublin, as far as the New Town. Letters from the North, from Captain Greemes, certifying the overthrow of the enemy there. "Morris, Hugh Duff's son, brought in on (one?) Redman Ogg his head, and a prisoner whose name was Daniell Birne, a kinsman of Feogh's."
24th.--The camp broke up. My Lord returned to Dublin. The Lord Chancellor (Archbishop Loftus) with the rest of the Council met my Lord; likewise the Earl of Kildare, the Lord of Howth, and others; in all, 200 horse.
25th-27th.--My Lord and the Council sat; and almost daily till 10 April.
27th.--Mr. Ashe sent into England with letters. "A prisoner condemned in the Castle broke his fetters, and by the help of other prisoners got over the wall at the grate, and escaped."
28th.--News that about the Navan the enemy was 700 strong. "This night two drunkards, falling out within the suburbs of Dublin, raised the cry, which put many presently in readiness with armour and weapon." News that Arcklo was burned.
March 1st, 1594[-5].--Mr. Chester came to Dublin.
2nd.--The Primate [John Garvey, Archbishop of Armagh.] died this day.
5th.--"The Primate was buried, at whose funeral my Lord and the Council was present, Mr. Richardson preaching the funeral sermon at Christ Church." Walter Reagh's father committed, upon suspicion of relieving his son.
7th.--Letters from England.
9th.--Sir Richard Bingham came to Dublin.
10th.--Mr. Chester took leave for England.
11th.--Sir R. Bingham departed.
13th.--Letters to England by Mr. Linche.
15th.--Letters and 8,000l. received from England. Sir Ed. Yorke arrived. Mr. Phifould's servants brought in the head of Edmond Leonard, a follower of Feogh, and took a prisoner. Mr. Ashe arrived with letters from England.
18th.--Sir Harry Norris certifies the arrival of British soldiers at Waterford.
19th.--The Lords of Slany and Delvin came to visit my Lord.
24th.--Letters out of England from Mr. Michell.
25th.--The heads of Shaan McDermond Ogge, Dermond Dore, and John Kellie, followers of Feogh, were brought in.
29th.--Plot of prisoners in the Castle dungeon to escape by undermining the wall.
April 1st, 1595.--Captain Russell mustered his 50 horsemen on the Green.
2nd.--Sir Harry Norris came to Dublin.
5th.--Two heads of Feogh's followers brought in. "The Britten soldiers came into Dublin." My Lord and Sir H. Harrington laid a plot for the taking of Walter Reogh.
7th.--The Britten soldiers were mustered at the Green. James FitzGarrald and another executed. Mr. Mountague brought word of the taking of Walter Reogh in a cave by Sir H. Harrington.
8th.--Walter Reogh brought into the Castle.
9th.--W. Reogh examined before the Lord Deputy and Council, and sentenced to be hanged in chains. Letters to England by Mr. Bostock and Mr. Talbott.
10th.--W. Reogh hanged in chains.
"MY LORD'S JOURNEY into COSHAN and SHEELELA, being accompanied with the Lord of Howth, Sir George Bourchier, Sir Geoffrey Fenton, Sir Edward Yorke, Sir William Clarke, knights, and with divers other captains and gentlemen: beginning the 11th of April 1595. Sir Harry Harrington, lieutenant-general; Captain Chichester, sergeant-major; Mr. Bowen, marshal. Captain Prise, Captain Kellie, Mr. North, [and] Mr. Higham, corporals of the field."
April 11th. 1595.--From Dublin to Castle Dermon (Mr. Noble's).
12th.--Stayed for the companies. Garrald McShaan Begg's head sent in by Doulin McBrian.
13th.--To Kilknock. Letters from the Lord Chancellor and Council at Dublin.
14th.--Two prisoners, Edmond McMorris, gent., and Turlagh O'Nolane, kerne, brought in by Captain Willis, and executed.
15th.--Sir Harry Norris visited my Lord at Kilknock. Lieut. Greemes brought in one Hall, a seminary priest, taken at the Lady Colie's house. He was examined before my Lord and the Council, and committed close prisoner to Dublin Castle.
16th.--To Newston, at Mr. Peirse Butler's castle. Letters from the Lord Chancellor and Council.
17th.--Word brought by Captain Mince that the enemy had left the woods.
18th.--To Monies. Word brought that Captain Street's lieutenant was slain in rescuing cows at Ballenecor from the enemy; at which time Garrald Reogh, one of the enemy's chief shot, was slain. An unsuccessful assault was made by Feogh's sons and followers on the fort there.
19th.--Letters from Captain Willis "that he had the day before the enemy in chase from Ballenecor through the Glinnes, but night falling could not overtake them, yet forced them by their speed to leave their mantles, swords, and targets in the way behind."
20th, Easter Sunday.--The camp still at Money. "Mr. Wheeler preached; after which my Lord knighted Sir Edward Munings."
21st.--"My Lord rode abroad hunting stud." Heads of Morrough O'Birne Mulchonery and Torne Roe, two kernes, brought in. Mr. Mountague, Lieutenant Greemes, and Donnio Spannio "sent abroad upon service several ways." Morrough McEdmond examined, and committed to the Marshal.
22nd.--My Lord rode to Mr. Masterson's castle at Fernes, where he passed the night.
23rd.--My Lord returned to the camp at Moneys. Mr. James FitzGarrald sent in three traitors' heads, whose names were Mortough O'Eowter, Morrow Boy O'Birne, and Edmond McGarrett.
24th.--Mr. St. Lawrance and Hugh Duffe sent on service with the Lord of Howth's company. Mr. Mountague and Lieutenant Greemes returned to the camp.
25th.--"My Lord rode to view Ballenchorne, Walter Reogh's late habitation." Mr. James Butler brought in the heads of Turlaugh McCahire, O'Toole Sollis, Richard Balligh, Shaan McCasheene Farrill, Towhill McKeagho, Roorie McKeagho, and Edmond Reogh. Three of Feogh's shot came in and craved pardon. Victuals from Dublin.
26th.--My Lord rode to Eniscorffie, to Sir Harry Wallop's.
27th.--Mr. Masterson brought in two prisoners and a woman.
28th.--My Lord returned to the camp at Money. Letters from Sir H. Harrington, that Rise Feogh's wife and a sister of hers were taken prisoners. Two traitors' heads brought in.
29th.--Sir H. Harrington brought in Rise Feogh's wife and her sister, who were examined before the Council. The two men whom Mr. Masterson brought in were executed.
30th.--Sir Geoffrey Fenton, being unwell, took his journey towards Dublin. Captain Mince brought in the head of Feogh's piper. Captain Willis brought in two traitors' heads.
May 1st, 1595.--Captain Streete brought in the head of Patrick McShaan Bribb.
2nd.--My Lord surveyed the country.
3rd.--Captain Streete sent upon service.
4th, Sunday.--Mr. Wheeler preached. Mr. St. Lawrence and Hugh Duffe returned, bringing in two prisoners.
5th.--My Lord went a hunting.
6th.--Letters from England. Fire in the camp; 10 houses burned. News of Sir John Norris's landing at Waterford.
7th.--Captain Street returned, bringing in three prisoners.
8th.--The prisoners examined before my Lord and the Council.
9th.--The camp marched from Money to Rossebaune.
10th.--My Lord went a fishing. Letters received from England, and from the Lord Chancellor and Council at Dublin.
11th.--Mr. Wheeler preached. "This night, after the watch set, by the noise of a great tree which fell, the cry was raised throughout the camp, and every one ready expecting th' alarum."
12th.--Letters from the Council in England by Mr. Cuffe.
13th.--"The camp (at Rossebaune) broke up, and the companies appointed to places of garrison." My Lord rode to Baltinglas, where he lay at the abbey (Sir Harry Harrington's). Sir H. Harrington took two of the Toolis, brothers, who were examined before the Council, and condemned by martial law. Mr. Masterson brought in Donnio Reogh prisoner.
14th.--My Lord went to St. Olstan's (Mr. Allen's). The two Toolis were executed at Baltinglas.
15th.--My Lord returned to Dublin. The Lord Chancellor and Council, with many knights and gentlemen, met him in the way. He sat in Council immediately; and did so almost daily till the end of June.
18th.--My Lord was certified by Captain Merrimans that the Earl of Tyrone's forces were spoiling the Queen's subjects in co. Longford. Order taken for the relieving of Monohon.
20th.--Despatches to England.
21st.--"Sir Edward Yorke and Sir Wm. Clarke took their journey towards the Newrie, to Sir Henry Bagnall, who was sent Lieutenant-General over 1,500 soldiers for the relieving of Monohon." Captain Trever landed at Dublin with his company.
22nd.--Letters from Sir John Norris.
23rd.--My Lord and the Council sat in the Star Chamber. Mr. Phillipes, the Lord of Buckhurst's secretary, sent into England with letters. "Donnio Reogh was arraigned for receiving Redman McFeogh, who was a proclaimed traitor, and suffered him to depart without apprehending; for which he was tried by a jury and found guilty of treason, and condemned to be hanged, drawn, and quartered." Captain Belinge brought in Donnio McDallio prisoner, who was a reliever of Feogh McHugh and his sons.
24th.--Three prisoners condemned for felony were executed.
26th.--Rise Toole, Feogh McHugh's wife, arraigned, and by a jury found guilty of treason.
27th.--Feogh's wife sentenced to be burned. A Britten soldier for murder condemned to be hanged, drawn, and quartered.
28th.--Donnio Reogh and Donnio Dallio hanged, drawn, and quartered for treason. One executed with them for helping a prisoner to escape from the Castle. This day my Lady "found" to Sir Henry Harrington's son, who was named Russell Harrington.
30th.--Sir Edward Moore certified receipt of intelligence that the Marshal had relieved Monohon, and was returned to the Newrie, between which and Dundalk Tyrone lay with his forces to stop our army's passage. Captain Streete certified that some of his company had met with Feogh McHugh, and one of our soldiers wounded Feogh with a "skayne" in flying, and brought away his sword, target, and head-piece. Two of Feogh's company, named Thomas McHugh McOwen and Dermond McHugh McOwen, were slain, and their heads brought in. Sir John Norries came to Dublin, and visited my Lord.
June 1st, 1595, Sunday.--Lieut. Tucher came to Dublin, with the report of the relieving of Monohon, from Sir Henry Bagnall and the rest of the commanders. [This "report" is copied into the journal. It is calendered on MS 612, pp. 109-110.]
2nd.--"Sir John Norris, Sir Henry and Sir Thomas, with other captains and gentlemen, dined with my Lord, where they were honorably feasted."
3rd.--Mr. John Clarke arrived with letters from the Marshal at the Newrie.
4th.--One of the O'Reilies sent in the heads of McMahon's brother and two others. Mr. Michell arrived with letters from England.
5th.--Letters sent into England by Captain Dearing.
6th.--"My Lord sat in the Council of wars. Letters from Sir Richard Bingham certifying "the betraying and murdering of Captain George Bingham at Sligo Castle by one of the Bourks (Ulick Bowrke), his ensign, who took the castle the same time for the enemy, and slew all the English of the ward."
7th.--Sir Edward Yorke, Sir William Clarke, and the rest returned to Dublin from the Newrie, "and disposed of the companies to their places of garrison."
9th.--Mr. Baptist sent into England with letters.
13th.--Sir John Norris dined with my Lord, and departed for the Newrie. The Lord of Delvine sent in, out of the Breny, six traitors' heads.
15th.--The Earl of Thomond came to Dublin, and visited my Lord.
18th.--My Lord began his journey into the North, accompanied by Sir John Norris, Lord President of Munster, Sir George Bourcher, Sir H. Bagnall, Sir Geoffrey Fenton, Mr. William Brabson (councillors), Sir H. Norris, Sir Ralph Lane, Sir Edward Yorke, Sir John Dowdall, Sir Robert Salisburie, Sir William Clarke, and other gentlemen. "From Dublin to Mellivant, 23 miles, at Sir Edward More's."
19th.--To Dondalke. The Lord President met my Lord, and brought him into the town.
20th.--Stayed at Dondalke for the companies of the risings-out. Sir H. Bagnall certified that the pass between the Newrie and Dondalke was clear, the enemy lying about the Blackwater.
21st.--Letters from Sir Richard Bingham.
22nd, Sunday.--After the sermon my Lord and the Council sat, and then rode to Sir John Bedlowe's, at Castleton, where they dined.
23rd.--"Tyrone, O'Donell, O'Rorcke, McGwire, McMahon, with the rest were proclaimed traitors at Dondalke by the Queen's Sergeant-at-Arms, the Provost Marshal, her Majesty's Pursuivant, and the bailiffs of Dondalke, with other officers; delivered by one ---- both in English and Irish."
24th.--To Roskragh. Hugh O'Moloy carried the Queen's standard before my Lord.
25th.--The camp moved to Carrickbaume, but my Lord, the Lord President, and the Council lay at the Newrie. Letters to them from Tyrone brought by a priest whom Sir H. Bagnall employed; "but he being already proclaimed, my Lord and the Council utterly refused to receive them." O'Hanlon carried the Queen's standard before my Lord.
26th.--My Lord and the Council rode to the camp, to see the risings-out mustered. Tyrone and the rest were again proclaimed traitors at the Newrie.
28th.--The camp marched towards Armagh, and encamped near the Ten Mile Church. Captain Merriman despatched with letters to Sir Turlaugh O'Neall. The enemy first showed themselves, to the number of 60 horse. Letters from Sir H. Duke by a messenger who had been taken by the enemy, and committed to the custody of a gallowglas, who falling asleep, the messenger escaped, bringing away the head of the gallowglas with him. Letters sent to England.
29th.--The camp marched a mile beyond Armagh, where the enemy again showed themselves. The Council sat at Armagh, and concluded to fortify it, and leave a garrison there.
30th.--The camp marched some miles, for better provision of horse meat. My Lord appointed the pioneers to begin the fortification at Armagh. "Between 12 and 1 of the clock this night, the enemy came near the skirts of our camp, and gave us a volley of shot, by which means th'alarum had like to have been taken, but my Lord being abroad at that instant stayed the same. About an hour after they came again to another side of our camp, and gave us another volley." No harm done.
July 1st, 1595.--Intelligence by a spy that O'Donell, McSwyne, and others with their forces had joined Tirone.
2nd.--The pioneers continued fortifying Armagh. Sir Edward Yorke was sent in pursuit of some of the enemy's horse, but they escaped. Patrick Poyney, one of their chief shot, slain, and his head brought in.
3rd.--The camp marched towards the Newrie, nine miles, leaving a garrison at Armagh.
4th.--A supply of victuals for relieving Monohon sent for to the Newrie, and brought to the camp. 400 of the enemy's horse showed themselves on a hill near us, but fled on our horse drawing towards them. My Lord and the Council sat. Letters sent to England by Captain Trever's brother.
5th.--The camp marched eight miles, and encamped near Armagh. The enemy in sight, but attempted nothing. The Council sat.
7th.--Marched towards Monohon, six miles. The enemy showed themselves.
8th.--Marched to----, six miles. My Lord, the Lord President, and the Council then rode to Monohon and victualled it.
9th.--Marched to Knockfarren alias Raynie Hill, towards the Newrie.
10th.--Fords impassable.
11th.--Camp marched to Balleglasse, near the Newrie.
12th.--Scouts reported that the enemy were passing towards the pass of the Moyrie. My Lord and the Lord President commanded all the horse to be in readiness, and appointed as many shot on horseback as horses could be provided for. We had the enemy in chase some five miles, "very ill way and full of bogs," but at a main bog 500 of their shot made a stand whilst their horse escaped. O'Hanlon, my Lord's chiefest guide and standard-bearer, was hurt. We killed four of the enemy's men, one of whom was foster brother to Cormocke McBaron, Tyrone's brother, named Donneell; and another was a Scot, brought to the camp and beheaded. They left behind many "horses, swords, horsemen's staves, and mantles, with divers other baggages, provision of butter, cheese, and other things." My Lord and the Council sat.
13th.--My Lord and the Council rode to the Newrie, to Sir H. Bagnall's, where they took order for appointing the companies to places of garrison.
14th.--The camp marched eight miles, and encamped near Dondalke, by the church on the hill. We passed through the pass of the Moyrie without hindrance, the enemy having been lately dispersed. My Lord ordered the pioneers to cut the said pass.
15th.--Letters received from England by Mr. Baptist.
16th.--The camp broke up. My Lord rode to Tredaugh. The Council sat.
17th.--My Lord and the Council dined with the Mayor of Tredaugh.
18th.--Returned to Dublin. Turlaugh McFeogh executed under the Castle wall.
22nd.--"James Rea went into England, and carried a packet of letters to Chester, at which time Mr. Percie went over to procure his company."
August 3rd, 1595. [From this date to 21 October the journal is resumed by F. Michell.] --"Mr. Peirce went with divers letters into England from my Lord and Lady. Martin went with hawks,--a cast to Sir Robert Cicill, a cast to the Countess of Warwick, a cast to the Lord Thomas Hayarde, one goshawk to Fulke Grivill, a cast of marlians (merlins) to the young Lord Essex, and a cast of marlians to the young Mr. Morrison, and a goshawk to the Countess of Essex; in all 12."
4th.--"News came of the landing of the Scots at Copland Island, and of their overthrow by the Queen's shipping, The Moon, The Popingye, and one that Captain Riggs had charge of."
5th.--Marviliacke went with despatches to England.
6th.--"Divers passengers landed at night, the wind having been contrary seven weeks before."
7th.--Two packets from the Lord Treasurer. "Divers came with letters, as suitors for captains' places of the men that then were to come over."
9th.--"Some landed of the men, and Captain Tutcher came with them."
10th.--"Some others landed of the horse companies."
11th.--Sir J. Norreis took his journey for the North. Divers of the companies mustered upon the Green.
12th.--Captains Piercey, Chichester, and Noell had companies delivered them. The Council sat almost daily till 8 Sept.
14th.--Sir Richard Bingham came to the town for forces.
16th.--Captain Piggott had a company delivered him. Sir Henry Norreis went to England. A packet for England sent to the post of Chester. Letters came out of the North from the Scots. Captains Tutcher and Pigott went to Connaught with their companies.
17th, Sunday.--"The Council met about serious occasions of Connaught matters."
18th.--"The Council discharged Captain Harecourte, his company being but 16 English left, the rest being ran away." Sir Henry Duke, Mr. Martin, Mr. Malby, and Tibbot Dillon "had 50 horse put in pay the piece."
19th.--Mr. Manneringe went with a packet into England. News came that all the cows of the Newry were preyed.
20th.--My Lady [Russell] extremely sick.
21st and 22nd.--Letters from Sir John Norreis.
23rd.--Francis Shane's matter debated in Council; "and he had leave to go into England, to complain of the ill-dealing of Fox, Crowe, Capstock, and Boyle in taking his land."
24th, Sunday.--Sir Edward Brabzone and Sir William Walgrave, son to Sir William Walgrave, knighted in Christ's Church. Doctor Hanmer preached a very bitter sermon.
25th.--The Council sat.
26th to 29th.--"Nothing done, but receiving of letters out of England, and 1,000 foot, 100 horse--Captain Deringe, Captain Mountague."
30th.--General muster upon the Green. Sir William Walgrave went to England.
September 1st, 1595.--News of Mr. Warren's capture by the enemy.
2nd.--Sir Robert Napper returned from the circuit.
3rd.--Captain Parsons and Captain Minshewe's companies went to Connaught.
6th--Letters received from England.
9th.--My Lord took his journey towards Kells, "a place thought most fit to answer the service either in the North or in Connaught." In his company went the Earl of Thomonde, Sir George Bourcher, and Sir Jeffrey Fenton. He lay that night at Lessmullin (Mr. Cusack's). Thither came Captain Francis Stafforde with letters from the camp from Sir John Norreis, describing a skirmish with the Earl's forces, in which Sir John was hurt, and Sir Thomas Norreis and divers horses lost; "but the Earl driven to retreat, by reason of a stand made at a ford by our forces." Captain Harvy, High Sheriff of Westmeath, met my Lord. My Lord sent Eustace, a man of his own, to collect beefs and garrons for Sir John Norreis.
10th.--My Lord went towards Kells. The Earl of Kildare and Mr. Plunket, with horsemen and foot companies, met my Lord. The Bishop of Meath met us at his house called Arbrachen. My Lord was attended by Captain Montague and Captain Dearing's horse, and by Captain Stanton, Captain Parker, and the Earl of Thomond's foot companies.
11th.--The day being so wet my Lord could not take the musters. He lodged in Kells, at a poor thatched house of one Betaghe, and dined with the Earl of Kildare. "The Earl of Thomond's man, and some other letters brought over from Westchester by James Rea, and were sent to my Lord."
12th.--"My Lord sent letters to Sir John Norreis, &c., and a packet to Dublin, to the Council there."
13th.--"The Earl of Thomond's 50 were mustered, and entered into the country pay."
14th, Sunday.--Mr. Graves preached in the church of Kells. Sir Rafe Lane directed letters about the cheques of the companies. "Sir Henry Bagenoll and Sir Henry Duke certified of the death of old O'Neile, and that Tyrone had created himself O'Neile."
15th.--Sir George Bourcher and Mr. Newtervile mustered the horsemen.
16th.--My Lord went to Nobber, passing Karne hills. He sent two companies and a company of horse into the Fewes' country, "the draft for a prey being laid by an Irishman of the Geraldines." Lord Slane mustered 50 horse.
17th.--The forces sent forward the day before met us at the hill called ----, but without the prey, "in respect that the cry was up, and warning was given before." My Lord returned to Kells. Marviliacke returned with a packet out of England.
19th.--The Earl of Ormonde came to Kells, but left his company at Arbrachen. William Warren delivered out of prison, and came to Kells from the Earl of Tyrone.
20th.--Sir Jeffrey Fenton went from Kells "about the defence of Munster from invasion of Spaniards."
21st.--Captains Dearing and Montague, with 50 horse each, Lord Dunsany with 12 horse, and Captains Stanton, Parker, Garret, and Brett, with their foot companies, were sent to Dondalke to the relief of Sir John Norris.
22nd.--My Lord marched to Ardye with the Earl of Ormonde. The rebels had preyed the country thereabout.
23rd.--The Baron of Slane, Lord Louth, and others came thither. The camp marched to Tredaghe, where my Lord lodged at the Primate's house. "My Lord left with my Lord of Ormonde my Lord of Thomond's 100 and his Lordship's own 100 horse."
26th.--My Lord dined at Mellifount, at Sir Edward Moore's, and there he hunted a tame stag.
27th.--The Lord of Slane sent in the heads of two rebels. Joan O'Neile, with 12 others, her servants and tenants, were protected at my Lord of Louth's suit. Philip O'Reylly's wife, Maguire's sister, brought by my Lord of Slane to my Lord. The Earl of Ormonde visited my Lord.
28th.--My Lord dined with the Mayor of Tredaghe. A seminary priest, named Piers Cullen, was apprehended. My Lord had a sermon preached by the Primate. Mr. Mannering came with letters from England.
29th.--My Lord went to Dublin. He was met by Lord Gormaston, Mr. FitzWilliams of Meriom, Sir H. Wallope, Sir Robert Napper, and Sir Anthony St. Leger. New Mayor of Dublin sworn.
October 2nd, 1595.--"Sir Henry Harrington complained of Captain Lea, about the murdering of one of the Tooles, protected by the Council." My Lord dined at the new Mayor's. Richardson the chaplain was buried, and Mr. Graves, another of his Lordship's chaplains, had the "chantership" given him.
3rd.--Letters from Sir John Norreis of his departure for the relief of Monaghan. Captain Smith came to Tredagh extremely sick, and Sir Edward Yorke came to Dublin sick.
4th.--"The Council sat. Mannering passing the office of searchership,"&c.
5th.--"Mr. Henry Browne, my Lord's servant, went with the packet for England; and Dudley Norton and Spackman and others that passage. Letters came from Sir John Norres of his return from Monaghan, and sent therewith certain offers of the Earl's."
6th.--"Letters came from Sir Jeffrey Fenton, that all was well in Munster concerning matter of invasion by Spaniards. The Council sat. Order went for the discharge of all the officers of the field both to Sir John Norreis and Sir Rafe Lane."
7th.--Letters from the General and Captain Russell.
8th.--Letters sent to England by the post of Chester. "Letters written to Captain Lea, upon Sir Henry Harington's complaint, that he should bring the body of Dermot O'Toole, and not make his own house a prison."
9th.--"The men of Tredagh complained of laying garrison with them."
10th.--News of the killing of Captains Foule and Mince, and one Mr. Terote (or Tewte ?), and of much other loss in Connaught done by the Bourks.
11th.--The Earl of Ormonde, Sir John Norreis, Lord Thomonde, &c. came home to Dublin. A prisoner, Dermot O'Toole, sent in by Captain Lea, with many soldiers. "Captain Moyle was with the Queen's ship discharged." Letters written to Egerton "to set the pledges of Scots at liberty, for that they had kept their word to go out of Ireland without doing hurt."
12th.--"Sir J. Norreis and the Earl of Ormonde came to dinner to my Lord. They sat in Council after dinner."
13th.--The Earl of Ormonde departed. Samuel Norton came home with letters from England. Munition landed. A horseman of Captain Mountague's executed for running away.
15th.--News that Rory Oge had burned in the county of Leax. Garrisons planted.
16th.--The matter betwixt Sir Henry Harrington and Thomas Lea, "about killing of O'Toole being protected," was debated in Council.
17th.--"News came of some of the Baron of Delvin's men that were gone, and some stir in Meath. The Council sat, and sundry of the gentlemen of Meath were assembled."
18th.--The Council sat about the quarrel between the Earl of Thomonde and Darcye, who were both bound. The term adjourned to Crastina Animarum. Packet to England. Henry Willins and Mr. Thorpe went that passage.
19th, Sunday.--"They went to the church before and after dinner."
20th.--"Some letters came that Sir Fra. Drake had taken Cales" (Cadiz).
21st.--The Council sat "about despatch of suitors."
24th.--Sir Geoffrey Fenton returned from Munster. Mr. Pratt came with letters from Connaught.
26th.--Mr. William and Francis Clarke set to sea for England.
28th.--The Earl of Kildare came to Dublin.
29th.--Captains St. Leger and Warren returned from parleying with the Earl of Tyrone.
30th.--Mr. Henry Browne returned from England with letters.
November 2nd, 1595, Sunday.--The Bishop of Limerick preached.
7th.--Sir H. Harrington brought Feogh McHugh in upon my Lord's protection.
8th.--Feogh McHugh submitted himself upon his knees before the Council, and craved pardon.
9th.--My Lord knighted Captain Richard Winckfield in Christ Church after the sermon.
10th.--My Lord began his journey towards Galway, being accompanied by the Lord Chancellor, Sir Geoffrey Fenton, the Earl of Kildare, Sir Dudley Loftus, Sir W. Clarke, and others. He went as far as Mr. Ashe's house at Trim.
11th.--To Mollingar (Mrs. Hope's).
12th.--The Sheriff of Meath presented his letter [See 8 Nov. 1595. MS 612, p. 41.] with Sir John Tirrell and many others of that county.
13th.--To Ballemore (Lady Straunge's).
14th.--To Athlone Castle (Sir Richard Bingham's).
15th.--To Balleneslow (Mr. Brabson's), where Mr. Malbie and Tibbott Dillon came to my Lord.
16th.--To Lough Reogh (the Earl of Clanricard's).
17th.--To Galway, where my Lord lay at Mr. Dominick Lynche's. "As soon as my Lord entered the city, four great pieces of ordnance were discharged on the outer wall, without the gate of the town. The mayor and aldermen were ready in their scarlet gowns to receive and welcome my Lord, and there delivered the keys of the town gates to his Lordship, with an oration written in Latin; which done, the townsmen, to the number of 200, with their ensign and in arms, stood on both sides the street guarding my Lord to his lodging, where being alighted, they discharged a volley of shot." There were assembled at Galway the Earls of Kildare, Thomond, and Clanricarde, Lords Brimegeam, Roche, and Dunkellie, and divers knights and gentlemen.
18th and 19th.--My Lord sat in Council.
20th.--Sir Charles O'Carrell came to Galway "with report of divers of his men slain by the Butlers."
21st.--Letters from England.
22nd.--Letters from Mr. Malbie about his coming in with the O'Conners. The mayor and aldermen came and invited my Lord to dinner the following day. Mr. Leman, of co. Mayo, brought in his complaints against Sir Richard Bingham, his brothers, and followers.
23rd, Sunday.--The Bishop of Kilmaccowe preached before my Lord and the Council, both in English and Irish. My Lord and the Council dined at the mayor's, after which Mr. Graves preached. Mr. Brabson and Tibbott Dillon returned from parleying with the Bourckes.
24th.--His Lordship walked out of the town to see the abbey.
25th.--Intelligence that O'Donell was come into Connaught, and had dissuaded the Bourkes from coming in as they had promised; whereupon Mr. Brabson was once more sent to them. Doctor Neland's son committed, being lately come out of Spain.
26th.--Captain Conwaie's company came to Galway.
27th.--Morrough McMurie ["O'Flahargtie" in the margin.] came in and submitted himself before the Council, and put in a pledge.
29th.--The mayor came before the Council, "and craved my Lord's furtherance for establishing a preacher for the town," which was assented to.
30th.--Mr. Graves preached. The Council sat. Mr. Malbie brought in O'Conner Roe and Dermot O'Conner O'Hanley, with their complaints.
December 1st, 1595.--"This night the noblemen and captains presented my Lord with a mask."
2nd.--Captain Higham was committed. The Earl of Thomond took his leave, and rode into Munster.
3rd.--Letters from England, brought from Dublin by Thadie Noland.
4th.--Thady Noland, the pursuivant, sent to Dublin with letters for England.
5th.--Letters from Mr. Brabson, from Mayo. My Lord departed from Galway to Athenree, where he lay at the abbey (Mr. Broune, the dean's).
6th.--Mr. Grafton brought in complaints against Sir Richard Bingham's followers.
7th.--To Lough Reogh (the Earl of Clanricarde's). Mr. Brabson returned from the Rowrckes, who would not come in, but sent a submission, and their complaints against Sir Richard Bingham and his followers.
8th.--To Balleneslowe (Mr. Brabson's).
9th.--To Athlone Castle. "Sat in Council, and dealt with Sir Richard Bingham touching the manifold complaints against him."
10th.--To Ballymote (Lady Straunge's).
11th.--To Mollingar. My Lord of Delvine, Mr. Newgent, and others met my Lord.
12th.--To Cloinne (the Lord of Delvine's). Letters for England sent to Dublin by Mr. Manneringe.
13th.--To Arbracken (the Bishop of Meath's). Conner O'Birne submitted before the Council.
14th.--To Riverston (Sir Robert Dillon's).
15th.--To Dublin.
16th.--My Lord sent for Sir Robert Gardner and Sir Harry Wallop to confer of such business as had passed in his absence.
17th, et seq.--The Council sat.
19th.--Sir John Norris came to Dublin.
27th.--Mr. John Hoye, the gentleman usher, sent into England with a packet.
28th, Sunday.--The Bishop of Lawghlen and Mr. Fenn preached.
29th.--"The Mayor and the citizens of Dublin came and made their excuse to my Lord, showing their disability, being not able to lend money to the State at that time."
30th.--Rise Ap Hugh came to Dublin, and certified the death of the Countess of Tyrone.
31st.--The Mayor and townsmen of Tredaugh presented their complaint of the soldiers' abuses.
January 1st, 1595[-6].--"Letters received from the Earl of Clanricarde and from Mr. Anthony Brabson, certifying the outrage of the enemy in Connaught, notwithstanding the peace, and how some of the Kellies were gone out lately, and burned and preyed certain towns of Mr. Francis Shanne's. ["O'Ferrall" in the margin.] This night certain lords and gentlemen presented my Lord with a mask."
2nd.--"This day the lords and gentlemen who were of the maske, being before invited, dined with my Lord, where they were honorably feasted."
3rd.--Letters sent into England by post.
4th, Sunday.--My Lord knighted Captain Henry Warren in Christ Church after the sermon.
8th.--Letters from Sir Richard Bingham and Tibbott Dillon, certifying the outrages of the enemy in Connaught.
9th.--It was determined in Council to send Sir H. Wallopp and Sir Robert Gardner to draw the Earl of Tirone to a peace at Dondalke, according to her Majesty's directions. Six rebels' heads were brought in, including some of the O'Reylies', who were overtaken with a prey, which was rescued by Mr. Plunckett, Mr. Taffe, and others.
10th.--The Lord of Slany sent for by the Council, "and direction given for the bringing in of Philip O'Reylie for the safeguard of himself and certain merchants who were bound for his coming in." Warrant and direction given to Wallopp and Gardener.
11th.--Dr. Hanmer and Mr. Fenn preached.
12th.--Letters to England. Captain Higham, come from Sir Richard Binghame, reported the state of Connaught to the Council. The companies of Captains Chichester, Percie, Parsons, Garrett, and Babtist, and Sir George Bourcher, were sent thither, making in all 19 companies at that time in Connaught. Wallop and Gardner departed for Dondalke.
13th.--Letters from Sir Richard Bingham.
14th.--Commission to Sir Richard Bingham for placing soldiers in Connaught. News from Spain that the river of Seville, overflowing, drowned 4,000 people, and did much harm.
19th.--Letters from Sir H. Wallopp and Sir R. Gardner, certifying the death of Sir Hugh McGennis, and that Tyrone was staying within three miles of Dundalk for O'Donnell.
21st, et seq.--The Council sat.
25th, Sunday.--Mr. Daniell and Mr. Fenn preached.
26th.--My Lord was advertised by the townsmen of Kells that the rebels had taken all their cattle and hogs, which were rescued by Captain Fleminge and his horsemen, who slew about 30 of the rebels, 13 heads being brought in.
27th.--Mr. Hoy, the gentleman usher, arrived with letters and 12,000l. from England. He brought news of the death of the Earl of Huntingdon, Sir Roger Williams, and Sir Thomas Morgan.
February 2nd, 1595[-6].--Sir H. Wallop and Sir R. Gardner returned to Dublin from parleying with Tyrone.
5th.--The Earl of Ormond came to town. Phergus O'Farrel sent in the heads of Farrell O'Banne's son and another rebel.
7th.--Letters from the Lord of Delvin, "certifying of the assault and burning of a castle, where some of the enemy were burned and the rest killed." Sir Thomas Norris came to town, and did his duty to my Lord. [The] Sergeant-Major returned from Connaught with letters from Sir R. Bing[ham]. Letters sent to England by Mr. Oldsworth.
8th, Sunday.--Letters from the Earl of Clanricard. Sir Henry Ducke died this day. The Bishop of Meath and Mr. Fenn preached.
9th.--"My Lord sat in the council of wars."
10th.--The Council sat "about hearing a controversy between the Earl of Ormond and Sir Charles O'Carrell."
11th.--Surley Boy came in, and did his duty to my Lord.
12th.--Surley Boy invited to supper.
16th.--[The] Sergeant-Major ["Chichester" in the margin.] sent with certain companies to relieve the Cavan.
18th.--Letters sent into England by Mr. Fowlkes. Sir Robert Gardner sent to England.
19th.--Captain Bartlett married to the Lord Chancellor's daughter.
22nd, Sunday.--The Bishop of Downe and Mr. Fenn preached. "My Lord and the Council sent Surley Boy a black velvet mantle laid with gold lace."
24th.--Letters received from Tyrone by Th. Noland.
25th.--"Mr. Manneringe died, and his office of searchership my Lord bestowed of his servants, William Miller and Richard Griffen. Sergeant-Major returned from the Cavan."
26th.--20,000l. arrived from England, by Dudley Norton. Mr. Manneringe buried.
March 2nd, 1595[6].--"My Lord sat in the council of war."
3rd.--Sergeant-Major (Chichester) with other captains went to relieve the abbey of Boyle.
4th.--Mrs. Huggans died.
6th.--Upon intelligence that 300 or 400 Scots and Irish were come over the Shannon into McGoghlin's country to burn and spoil, my Lord began his journey [thither], accompanied by Sir George Bowrcher, the Lord of Inssiequeene, Sir William Clarke, Sir Edward Herbert, Sir Harry Warren, and others. He rode to Tryme (Mr. Ashe's). Letters left at Dublin to be carried into England by Marviliack, "the next wind."
7th.--To Mollingar (Mrs. Hope's).
8th.--My Lord and Sir G. Bowrcher heard bills of complaint, and ordered that the country should be paid for things taken up for her Majesty's service.
9th.--His Lordship sent his carriages to Phillipstown, where preparation was made for his coming; but suddenly he took another way towards O'Moloie's country, and rode to Durrough (Sir Edward Herbert's).
10th.--To Rathmacgelduld (Tege O'Moloye's). The chief of the O'Moloies with other gentlemen and some kearne met my Lord, and declared that the Scots, at that instant, were burning the country within view. His Lordship sent 100 shot with certain kearne, under the guiding of O'Moloye, over the bogs towards them. Assisted by McGoghlin, they came near to the Scots that night, and at break of day fell upon them, and killed 140 of them, others being drowned in returning over the Shannon.
11th.--My Lord rode to Cloghon, O'Madden's castle, in Losmage, and encamped before it. O'Madden, being gone out in action of rebellion, had left there a ward of his principal men, who, on my Lord's approach, set three of their houses adjoining the castle on fire, and made shot at us. Being summoned to yield, their answer to Captain Thomas Lea was "that if all that came in his Lordship's company were Deputies they would not yield," expecting some aid. That night my Lord appointed Captain Izod to keep watch, lest the enemy should escape by a bog adjoining the castle. About midnight my Lord visited his watch, and understanding that some women were in the castle, sent "and advised them to put forth their women, for that he intended the next morning to assault the castle with fire and sword," but they refused.
12th.--The thatched roof of the castle was fired by a soldier who cast up a firebrand, "and whilst our shot played at their spike holes, a fire was made to the grate and door, which smothered many of them." The soldiers made a breach in the wall and took many alive, most of whom were cast over the walls and so executed. 46 persons were burned and killed. Two women and a boy were saved by my Lord's appointment.
13th.--My Lord rode to an island a mile distant, "where it was supposed some of the cotts should be found which the Scots got over the Shannon with." Mr. Brabson came from Althone, with a boat manned, to seek out the cotts on the river.
14th.--My Lord having appointed 50 of Sir George Bowrcher's soldiers with McGoghlin and his kearne for the defence of the country, rode to Corcurr, "where his Lordship rested in straw that night at one Tege McFirre's house." Letters from Sir R. Bingham.
15th.--My Lord rode to the fort at Phillipstown.
16th.--Sir W. Clarke despatched to England with letters. Mr. Foulkes brought letters from England. Mr. Malbie came from Sir Richard Bingham.
17th.--Order for the repairing of Phillipstown.
18th.--My Lord rode to Croghon (Sir Thomas Moore's).
19th.--My Lord returned to Phillipstown, and hunted the hare as he came. By the way the Baron of Upper Osserie and his son met him.
20th.--My Lord rode to the fort at Mary Borrough, and dined by the way at Mr. Dempsi's, where letters were received from England by post.
22nd.--To Stradbery (Mr. Gosbie's). "My Lord found to Mr. Gosbie's son's child, Sir Harry Warren being my Lord's deputy for the same."
23rd.--To Mounstereven (Captain Warram St. Leger's).
24th.--To Dublin. My Lord dined by the way at the Nasse, between which and Dublin he was met by the Lord Chancellor, Lord President, and the rest of the Council, with the citizens of Dublin.
25th, et seq.--The Council sat.
28th, Sunday.--Mr. Fenn and Mr. Pilsworth preached.
29th.--Mr. Garrett Moore came out of the North, and spake with my Lord.
April 1st, 1596.--My Lady rode to Kilmanum to prepare the house against my Lord's coming.
2nd.--Letters to be sent to the post of Chester for the Court by Mr. Beeston. Captains Dearing and Russell appointed to go to Chester, receive 300 horsemen there, and see them shipped and brought over. Certain corporals sent to conduct over the 1,500 foot.
3rd.--My Lord removed to Kilmanum.
4th, Sunday.--Mr. Traverse and Mr. Fenn preached.
5th.--Sir Robert Gardner returned from England. "A Spaniard which was sent into Spain for Englishmen to redeem the Spaniards here, returned and brought nine Englishmen out of the galleys; and for them nine Spaniards were delivered."
6th to 8th.--Part of the soldiers landed.
8th.--The Lord Chancellor and Sir H. Wallopp dined with my Lord.
9th, Good Friday.--The Lord President and Sir Geoffrey Fenton departed for Dondalke, to treat with Tyrone, O'Donnell, and the other principal traitors.
10th.--The soldiers who lately arrived were mustered.
11th, Easter Day.--The Bishop of Downe and Mr. Fenn preached. After the Bishop's sermon in the morning, my Lord knighted Sir John North in Christ Church.
12th.--Sir Robert Napper and Sir Anthony St. Leger dined with my Lord. The Lords of Gormonston and Lowth brought the ward of Mr. FitzWilliams before the Council.
17th.--Sir Robert Needham and Captain Russell landed with part of the companies of horse and foot.
18th.--Mr. Dean Wheeler and Mr. Fenn [preached]. Letters from the Lord President and Sir Geoffrey Fenton.
20th.--My Lord viewed the horsemen on the Green. Letters from the President and Fenton by Brimegam.
21st.--The Council sat. Letters to the President and Fenton.
22nd.--Sir H. Wallop and Sir R. Gardner dined with my Lord. Sir Edward Yorke arrived from England with letters. More horsemen landed.
26th.--Sir Henry Norris and Sir Robert Needham's companies of horses were erected.
27th.--The Lord President and Sir Geoffrey Fenton returned to Dublin from the treaty with the Earl of Tyrone.
29th.--Sir H. Wallop and Sir G. Fenton came to my Lord.
May 1st, 1596.--The Council sat (as usual). Sir W. Clarke arrived from England with letters. News came that the Spaniards had won Callis (Calais).
3rd.--News from England of the deaths of Sir Francis Drake, Sir John Hawekings, and Sir Nicholas Clyfford.
4th.--The Lord of Delvin came to town and dined with my Lord.
6th.--Letters to England by Mr. Beeston.
8th.--Sir R. Bingham came to town. Letters from Captain Stafford, from the Newrie, certifying that Spaniards had landed in the North with munition.
12th.--News of the death of Sir John Puckering, Lord Keeper. The Earl of Tyrone's pardon signed, and sent by Lieutenant Banckes to be delivered to Sir Edward Moore.
16th.--Sir Harry Norries landed.
17th.--Mr. Beeston set to sea with letters, and Sir John North also went to England.
20th.--News that Mr. Gosbie, his eldest son, and five of his men were slain in defending his town against 60 of the O'Moores. Mr. Gosbie killed Gorg O'Moore, one of the chiefest of them. Sir Robert Napper, Sir Anthony St. Leger, and Sir Geoffrey Fenton, with their ladies, dined with my Lord at Kilmanum.
21st.--Sir H. Wallop and Sir H. Norries came to dinner.
23rd, Sunday. Mr. Dean Wheeler and Mr. Fenn preached (as usual). Letters from the Earl of Clanrichard and the Mayor of Galway, "confirming the Spaniards' landing in the North, being 3 pinnaces, and in each 60 musketeers."
24th.--One of Captain Audlei's soldiers executed for running away.
26th.--"My Lord and Lady rode abroad a hunting the wolf."
27th.--Letters to England by post. The Earl of Kildare went to England.
29th.--"Certain soldiers who ran away from their captains were by my Lord's appointment put to cast the dice for their lives, and one of them, who cast least, was executed."
31st.--Sir R. Napper and Sir J. Fenton came to dine with my Lord. "Captain Warran returned from the Earl of Tyrone; at which time the Earl sent one of his followers, Shane McDonnell, with a letter to my Lord and the Council, which was sent him from the King of Spain, and charged the said Shane upon his oath, and Captain Warren upon his promise, that the said letter should be returned without any copy taken of the same. [See 22 January 1596, MS 612, p. 65.] The said letter was brought out of Spain, and delivered to the Earl by one Don Olonso Cobos."
June 2nd, 1596.--Letters to England carried to Chester by Captain Roberts. The Lord President and Sir G. Fenton departed for Connaught.
6th, Sunday.--My Lord and the Council received the Communion. Letters from the Mayor of Galway, "who sent an Italian to my Lord, who came into Ireland with the Spaniards and escaped from them." After his examination my Lord sent him into England to my Lord Treasurer.
7th.--Browne, the Lord President's man (with letters), Captain Streete, and Captain Higham landed from England.
8th.--Sir R. Bingham and Sir R. Napper came to my Lord.
10th.--The Lord Chancellor and Sir Harry Wallopp dined with my Lord, after which they sat in Council. Letters to England by Mr. Altone Clarke.
12th.--Letters from the Lord President and Sir G. Fenton.
13th.--The Bishop of Downe and Mr. Fenn preached. Letters to the President and Fenton. "Morrough McTege Oge secretly, with a barrel of powder, lead, and match, upon one of his L[ordship's] horses, [went]towards Ballenecor to Captain Tucher; which munition was delivered there the day following."
15th.--The Bishop of Meath came to my Lord.
16th--The Lord of Delvin came.
20th.--The Lord of Delvine sent in one of the O'Farrels, a notable rebel, who was taken and wounded by the Newgents. He died of his wounds.
22nd.--Letters and 12,000l. from England.
23rd.--Letters to England. My Lord and Lady rode to Rafarnam "to see the house." Letters from the Lord of Delvin and the rest of the Commissioners brought by Captain Streete. Baron Elliot came to tell my Lord "how Sir Edward Moore, being one of the Commissioners, had been to bring the Earl of Tyrone his pardon; who, before his coming, had taken a journey into the uttermost part of his country."
26th.--Captain Warren affirmed before the Council "that he had not given his oath to the Earl of Tyrone for returning the King of Spain's letter."
28th.--Letters from the Lord President and Fenton.
July 1st, 1596.--Letters from the Lord President and Fenton, "declaring that they of Connaught had deferred their meeting for a month." Mr. Henry Broune despatched into England with letters. Sir Robert Napper and his Lady went to England.
2nd.--Letters from the Mayor of Galway.
4th, Sunday.--Letters from the Lord President and Fenton. My Lord and the Council received the Communion.
5th.--Sir H. Wallop and Sir R. Gardner dined with my Lord.
6th.--The Sergeant-Major returned out of Connaught.
7th.--Wallop, Gardner, and Sir Robert Dillon came to my Lord. Order for sending 2,000l. to the Lord President (Norris) in Connaught, to pay the companies there.
8th.--Eight ships seen at anchor beyond the head of Hawth. Mr. Hoye and Gryffen, being sent to know what they were, brought word they were Scots.
9th.--Letters from the Lord President. Sir Geoffrey Fenton returned from Connaught. Letters to England (frequently).
13th.--Wallop and Gardner came to my Lord.
15th.--News that the Garradines had burnt a town of Captain Lea's.
16th.--Letters to England. Order for the making up of certain Irish companies into hundreds.
18th.--News of the capture, sack, and burning of Cales Cadiz) by the Earl of Essex. The Lord of Delvin came to my Lord.
19th.--Divers Irish Lords appeared before the Council about the general hosting. News that Tyrone had received his pardon.
20th.--Lords Delvin and Gormonston came.
22nd.--"Letters received from the Commissioners, confirming that the Earl had received his pardon (after much debating) with humility and reverence, protesting all faithfulness and duty to do her Majesty service; but he refused to take his oath to forsake all foreign aid."
24th.--Marviliack returned with letters from Sir Robert Cecill, who was chosen her Majesty's principal secretary. Mr. Wiseman and O'Connor Sligo also came over.
26th.--Sir H. Norries returned from Connaught.
August 2nd, 1596.--Sir G. Fenton departed for Connaught.
5th.--Letters from the Mayor of Waterford.
6th.--"The news of the Earl of Essex confirmed from Waterford and Milford."
8th.--Sir Henry Norris set to sea for England; and my Lord sent Morgan over with hawks and horses.
9th.--The Sergeant-Major (Chichester) went into Connaught.
10th.--My Lord rode with Sir R. Gardner, Sir R. Bingham, and Sir G. Bowrcher to the Lord Chancellor's at Rafarnam, where they sat in Council.
11th.--Letters from the Lord President and Sir G. Fenton in Connaught, giving hope of peace, and certifying "that the army goeth not forward on the 6th of August as was appointed by them."
12th.--Letters from Lieut. Greame, who certified that Feagh McHugh had received letters from the Earl of Tyrone, "and that himself feared to be burnt every night."
13th.--Sir H. Wallop and Sir R. Gardner came to Killmaneham, and dined with my Lord.
14th.--Letters from the Lord President and Sir G. Fenton "doubting of the peace." Letters to England by post. Letters from Captain Tucher "that James Butler had taken five of the Captain's his men and hanged them."
16th.--Letters to England by Mr. Wiseman.
18th.--Captain Thornton returned from sea. Sir Charles O'Carrell sent in his brother and two others according to my Lord's appointment, and desired that the Earl of Ormond might send in James Butler and the rest, "which were principal men [who] had done him wrong."
19th.--Letters from the Lord President and Fenton.
21st.--Letters from Sir E. Moore. Captain Lea returned from the Earl of Tyrone.
23rd.--Letters from Sir Thomas Norries.
25th.--My Lord of Delvin came to dinner.
26th.--"Mr. Strawbridge and my fellow Gryffen took a seminary priest in Dublin," who was committed to the Castle.
27th.--Letters from Justice Walshe, "that a female child was brought before him dead with two heads upon one body, which he sent to Waterford."
28th.--Letters to England by Marviliack. News of the deaths of Lord Hunsdon and Sir Francis Knowles, and of the return of the Earl of Essex with our navy. [Here follows a "report of the voyage." See MS 612, p. 89.]
September 2nd, 1596.--"My Lord and Lady with the Lady Bowrcher rode a hawking."
3rd.--Sir Robert Dillon came to my Lord.
5th, Sunday.--My Lord and the Council received the Communion at Christ Church. Mr. Howson and Mr. Fenn preached. The Sergeant-Major returned from Connaught with letters from the Lord President.
6th.--The Lord of Delvin sent in three of the O'Farrels' heads.
7th.--"My Lord and Lady walked abroad to see fish taken."
8th.--Sir Anthony St. Leger came to my Lord.
9th.--Lieut. Beeston was sent by my Lord with Sir Robert Needham's horsemen to convey munition to Ballenecor. They were attacked at the pass near Radrome by some of Feagh McHugh's followers, one man being slain and two or three hurt, but the munition was saved and brought back. Captain Tucher having sent some of his men to meet the munition, Feagh in their absence assaulted the fort, won it by the treachery of a sergeant, took Captain Tucher prisoner, and razed the fort to the ground. My Lord sent the Sergeant-Major (Chichester) and Captain Lea with 200 foot and 40 horse to Ballenecor, but at Newcastle hearing that the fort was lost, they returned.
10th.--Letters from the Earl of Ormond.
12th.--"This night, being windy and dark, between 11 and 12 of the clock, certain cows of Kilmanum town, breaking out of a banne, and running away, one of the town raised the cry, whereat my Lord and the household rose, and put ourselves in arms, supposing some treachery."
14th.--Letters from Ormond and Captain Mountague.
15th.--Letters from England by one of Sir Henry Norries's men and by Mr. Garrett, of Dublin.
16th.--Mr. Henry Browne returned from England.
18.--My Lord began his journey to Rathdrome, and rode to Old Courte, where he encamped, being accompanied by Sir Edward Yorke, Sir William Clarke, the Sergeant-Major (Chichester), Captains Peirsey, Marya Winckfield, Russell, and others.
19th, Sunday.--Marched to Newraff.
20th.--To Rathdrome. Here two or three in fetching wood were cut off by the rebels, one of them being Cassie, my Lord's messenger, "who was found sore mangled."
21st.--"My Lord continued at Rathdrome, and began to fortify the church, intending to leave a garrison there. In the afternoon his Lordship rode towards the woods, and appointed certain houses adjoining thereunto to be pulled down for timber to fortify with; but the rebels lying close in the wood gave us a volley of shot; whereupon my Lord sent the Sergeant-Major and Captain Street to entertain skirmish with them, which they did for the space of half an hour." Captain Mountague and Garrett Fleminge parleyed with Feagh McHugh.
22nd.--Captain Tucher's sergeant was executed near the camp for treachery and cowardice in yielding up the fort of Ballenecor. Two soldiers executed at Dublin for the same.
23rd.--Letters brought from Dublin by Philip Hore, "about the dividing of the treasure of 15,000l., whereof 8,000l. was borrowed here and repaid by my Lord Treasurer's direction out of England.
24th.--"About one of the clock this morning my Lord appointed Captain Lea with his companies of foot and kearne to rise, and to lodge as near the enemy (beyond them) as he could. Then my Lord rose by break of day with 200 foot and 50 horse, and marched towards Ballenecor with drums beating and ancients spread; and drawing near the ford, the rebels raised the cry, and made show on the hill by Ballenecor about 100 strong, besides 60 and upwards of their best shot, [and] drew down to the ford to meet us there at the bridge. Notwithstanding they lay at rest there for us, and played upon us, yet our soldiers behaved themselves so well as that we drove them from their stand, and recovered over the ford with small loss and some hurt. Then Captain Lea came to my Lord, who could not recover beyond them without descrying; whereupon my Lord sent him and Captain Streete another way into the Glynnes to meet with them; and coming to a town of Feaghe's, named Farrenerren, they burned it, and in returning from thence the rebels skirmished with them about an hour, whilst my Lord with his horse stood upon the mountain. After which, in coming to the camp the same way, my Lord appointed certain houses adjoining to the wood to be set on fire." Sir John Dowdall's and Captain Higham's companies came to the camp.
25th.--Sir Richard Bingham departed for England without my Lord's leave.
26th.--Letters from Mr. H. Browne (at Dublin), who was going with letters to England.
28th.--My Lord rode to the woods, to fetch timber for fortification. Mr. Mastersonne and Mr. Dudley Norton came to the camp.
29th.--Captain Lea was sent out with companies upon service.
30th.--Captain Mountague returned with two prisoners, and Captain Lea with a prey of 80 cows taken from the rebels.
October 1st, 1596.--The Earl of Thomond came to the camp. The two prisoners were executed, "and a horseboy of my Lord's for stealing a soldier's sword."
2nd.--The Earl of Thomond returned to Dublin. Letters to England and to the Lord President.
3rd.--The Earl of Ormond came to the camp with 100 horse, and after conference with my Lord returned to the rest of his company, 200 foot, and encamped two miles distant. About midnight my Lord sent out the Sergeant-Major and Captain Lea with our foot companies two several ways into the Glynnes, and by daybreak of the 4th "rose with 50 horse, and rode through part of the Glynnes up to the mountains, some six miles, where we met with the Sergeant-Major and his company, who had been discovered by the rebels; and, drawing together further on the mountain side, we descried about 100 of the enemy in two companies, which showed themselves on the Glynne side. And my Lord, knowing there would be no service performed without great disadvantage, commanded the Sergeant-Major to draw back; and in returning towards the camp we espied Captain Lea on the mountain by Ballenecor, standing with a prey of 300 cows and upwards, which he had taken from other of the rebels, and stayed there till my Lord drew down to the ford to assist him." We brought the prey safe to the camp.
6th.--The Sergeant-Major, with some companies of foot, sent out upon service.
7th.--The Sergeant-Major returned with 80 cows and a prisoner, a follower of Feagh's, named Hugh Boye, with his daughter. On receipt of letters from England, my Lord "sent post to the Lord President into Connaught."
8th.--My Lord departed for Dublin, leaving the camp at Rathdrome under the command of the Sergeant-Major (Chichester), who went on with the fortification.
11th to 15th.--My Lord and the Council sat.
16th.--My Lord returned to the camp from Dublin.
17th.--Sir George Bowrchier came to the camp.
18th.--Sir John North and Sir John Bowles, with their foot companies, each 100 strong, came to the camp.
19th.--My Lord sent the Sergeant-Major into the O'Birnes' country for beeves, who returned with 100 cows. A muster taken before my Lord. The Sheriff of Kildare sent in a prisoner, who was with Feagh at the taking of Ballenecor. He was executed near the camp. The Lord of Dunkellie and Mr. Newgent came to the camp.
20th.--Lieut. Flower and John Mastersone sent with some companies on service.
21st.--Captain Lea sent with some companies on service.
23rd.--Captain Lea, in returning to the camp with a prey of 80 cows, was fought with by the rebels at the ford at Ballenecor. My Lord, being abroad and hearing the skirmish, went in person to relieve him, and brought the prey to the camp. We had 9 or 10 slain and 20 hurt.
24th, Sunday.--Mr. Dean Wheeler preached. Letters from England by Marviliacke brought to the camp by Thomas Belfield.
25th.--The Sergeant-Major and Captain Lea sent abroad upon service Sir George Bowrchier rode to Dublin with Mr. Cooke.
27th.--Captain Flemming came to the camp.
28th.--Letters from Lieut. Flower and Captain Greemes, that they had taken 80 cows from the Butlers, and the castle of Newston, where they left a ward.
29th.--"My Lord received a packet of letters by Mr. Mastersonne, which came from the rector of the Irish seminary of Salamanca, brought to Waterford by one Father Archer, who went here in the name of Bowman; which letters were received by one Devorexe, of Waterford, whom my Lord committed." Captain Flemming's horsemen cut off one rebel's head, and took another prisoner. Lieut. Flower returned.
30th.--This night the Sergeant-Major and Captain Lea were sent abroad, and on Sunday, the 31st, by break of day my Lord went with his company of horse, and met them returning with 300 cows and 60 garrons, "and had the killing of 8 of the rebels, the chiefest of whom was Cahire Glasse O'Toole."
November 1st, 1596.--"This night, at the setting of the watch, six soldiers of Sir John Bowles and Sir Thomas North's companies, which had run away from their colours, were put to cast the dice for their lives, and one of Sir Thomas North's company, who cast least, was executed." Captain Mountague and Lieut. Flower sent abroad on service.
2nd.--Sir Henry Bagnall came to the camp. Phelim McFeagh's foster-brother brought in as a prisoner.
3rd.--Sir H. Bagnall returned to Dublin. Letters from the Council at Dublin by the pursuivant Farrell.
4th.--Mr. Cooke sent to Dublin. Phelim McFeagh's foster brother executed.
5th.--"My Lord rode abroad unto the Glynn side, where he lighted upon some of the enemy unaware, but being near their fastness, no service could be done upon them. About midnight three or four shott of the enemy discharged into our camp, whereat the alarm had like to have been taken."
6th.--Sir Edward Bowes came to the camp with his company, 100 strong. Victuals brought from Dublin by Thomas Belfied. Lieuts. Flower and Vaughan sent to Tullie and Newston with companies.
9th.--Sir William Clarke went to Dublin.
10th.--Captain Lea, in returning to the camp over the ford at Ballenecor with 40 cows, was skirmished with by the rebels, and forced to stay till my Lord relieved him.
12th.--"Lieut. Flower returned from Tully, where Lieut. Vaughan and six of his soldiers were treacherously by the enemy slain, and two of his brothers sore hurt."
13th.--Lieut. North and his company were put into the fort [at Rathdrome] till Captain Lea returned from the Glynnes, when he and Lieut. Flower were appointed to keep the same. Sir Urian Leigh arrived with his company, bringing one of Feagh's followers prisoner from Dublin.
14th, Sunday.--The camp moved from Rathdrome to Boylie Boye, the entry into the main Glynnes. Captain Trevers' company were sent back to the Newrie.
15th.--The Sergeant-Major (Chichester) and Captain Lea entered the Glynnes before day. "And by daylight his Lordship drew to the north side of Glan-Malorrighe with his company of horse and some shot, which he thrust into the Glynnes, and drew all along even home to the camp, the enemy making no fight upon any part of our forces to hurt." Captain Lea, passing through the Glynnes on the further side, had taken 200 cows, which he brought to the camp by the bridge of Ballenecor.
16th.--In consequence of heavy rains the camp was raised, and we marched over the bridge at Ballenecor with all the carriages, and through two bad passes to Rastbane, near Glan-Lurkin. My Lord appointed Feagh McHugh's pledges, one of them being his base son, to be executed, with one other of his followers.
17th.--Marched to Hacketts-town.
18th.--Mr. Harepoole came to my Lord.
19th--"The camp removed to Tullie. The Earl of Ormond was in fight the same day with the Butlers that were out, and burnt about the Briskloe in our sight. This night the Sergeant-Major and Captain Lea were sent out with companies to do some service upon the Butlers, and, lighting upon the Earl's camp, returned from him in the morning. In the meantime Mr. Harpoole had taken a prey from the Butlers."
20th.--The Earl of Ormond came to my Lord, and returned to his camp about the Briskloe. Letters from the Council at Dublin by Morgan Birne.
21st.--News that Captains St. Leger's and Marshall's companies had done some service upon the rebels in Leixe.
22nd.--Letters to England by Mr. Sparke. My Lord rode to Newston and relieved the ward there. The Earl of Thomond, Donogh Spannio, and other Cavanaghs came to my Lord.
23rd.--The following companies sent to their places of garrison: Sir John Bowles's to Cariekfergus, Sir Edward Bowes's to the Nasse, and Sir Urian Leigh's to Droheda. The Earl of Thomond went with his company to garrison at Kilkenney.
24th.--Captain St. Leger came to my Lord and returned.
25th.--Letters from the Lord Chancellor and Council by Thady Farrall, the pursuivant.
26th.--Letters brought by Mastersonne from the suffiran of Rosse, that 17 ships, containing 5,000 Spaniards, coming to Ireland, were all cast away by tempestuous weather. This was confirmed by the Mayor of Waterford's letters.
27th.--My Lord removed to Boulton, leaving the Sergeant-Major in command of several companies at Tullie.
28th.--To the Nasse (Mr. Coolie's).
29th.--The Earl of Kildare came to my Lord, who then rode to Dublin. The Council and citizens met my Lord by the way.
30th, et seq.--The Council sat.
December 1st, 1596.--Justice Dillon committed to the Castle.
4th.--"This day Chambers died, and his office of the keeping of Kilmanum my Lord bestowed of Mr. John Hoye, who was married this day to Mrs. Grace Cade, my Lady's woman.
5th, Sunday.--Mr. Dean Wheeler and Mr. Fenn preached. My Lord and the Council received the Communion.
6th.--Captain Follyott committed to the Castle upon a complaint made by one of the Lord Chancellor's tenants.
7th.--Divers of the Irish lords met before the Council.
8th.--Letters from the Earl of Tyrone brought by Thadie Farrall.
10th.--Samuel Norton (with letters) and Sir Robert Gardner went to England.
12th.--Mr. Fenn and Mr. Graves preached.
13th.--The Mayor of Dublin mustered the citizens.
14th.--Letters from Captain Mountague that Captain Thomas Lea, in coming from Wicklowe with victuals to the fort at Rathdrome, was set upon at a ford a mile from the fort by Feagh McHugh, but, with the help of some horsemen of the O'Birnes' country, killed 30 of the rebels, among whom were Morris Duffe, Feagh's nephew and secretary, and Edmond McShane, his uncle.
15th.--Captain Lea sent in 17 traitors' heads.
16th.--Letters from the Baron of Delvin.
17th.--Letters from the Earl of Tyrone by Captain William Warren. Letters from the Lord President (Norris), the Lord of Louth, and Sir H. Bagnall.
18th.--The Lord President came to Dublin from Connaught.
20th.--Crosse, Mr. Treasurer's man, arrived with 20,000l. from England.
23rd, Thursday.--Mr. Fenn preached.
24th.--Letters from the Sergeant-Major. "A soldier, counterfeiting a warrant of Captain Hugh Moystion's and naming himself to be one Hoy, for extortion and wounding a tenant of Mr. Finglasse's," was executed by martial law.
25th, "Christide."--Dean Wheeler preached.
26th, Sunday.--Mr. Hughson and Mr. Fenn preached. Letters from Sir H. Bagnall, that the Earl of Tyrone was encamped with 5,000 men within a mile of the Newrie.
28th.--"A dyffident was signed for the captains."
29th.--Lord Delvin came to Dublin.
31st.--"Captain Warram St. Leger certified my Lord that his company and Captain Marshal's met with one Captain Tyrrell, who was out in action in Leaxie, where they had the killing of eight of the rebels, besides the taking of their munition."
January 2nd, 1596[-7].--Letters from Captain Maria Winckfield, that Turlagh McHenry, captain of the Fewes, had taken Captains Baker and Gwest prisoners.
4th.--Sir Connia[r]s Clyfford, Sir Thomas Jerman, Sir Stephen Thornexe, and Sir Christopher St. Lawrance landed at Dublin.
6th.--Sir Conni[r]s Clyfford "received his oath" before the Council, and was appointed governor of Connaught.
7th.--Letters from the Lord of Louth and Captain Warren brought by Farrell.
9th, Sunday.--Dr. Hammer and Mr. Fenn preached.
11th.--The Sergeant-Major (Chichester) came to Dublin from Tully.
13th.--"A packet of letters sent into England by post, and brought back again by turning of the wind."
14th.--The Lord President departed to victual Ardmagh, accompanied by Sir George Bourchier and Sir Geoffrey Fenton.
16th, Sunday.--The Lord Chancellor (Archbishop Loftus) and Mr. Fenn preached. Letters received from Galway.
17th.--Seven Englishmen, sent from Spain to redeem so many Spanish prisoners, arrived at Cork. Their names were Wright, Hughes, Gage, Rogers, Byrche, Kellie, and Dixon. They had money given them, and were sent to England.
18th.--Letters from Connaught, that upon O'Donnell's coming into that province most of the people revolted again.
20th.--Letters from the Earl of Clanricard, that O'Donnell was come into the country of Clanricard, with 3,000 foot and 200 horse, burning and spoiling.
21st.--Mr. Henry Browne arrived with letters [from England]. The Lord Borrowgh coming to be Deputy.
23rd.--Letters from Sir G. Fenton, "that the Earl of Tyrone had suffered Ardmagh to be victualled with three of our companies, for the performance of which the said Earl had delivered in pledges." Mr. Thomas Horewell sent to England with letters.
24th.--Letters from Galway. Mr. Molinex, Chancellor of the Exchequer, died, and my Lord bestowed that office on Mr. Richard Cooke, his secretary.
25th.--Captains Russell and Mountague returned from the Lord President.
26th.--The Lord President and Sir G. Fenton returned from Dundalke. "Captain Henry Streete sent in 35 heads of the rebels of the Breney, besides 10 more of the rebels' heads which were stolen away; all which he had the cutting off in the town of Kells, where he lay in garrison, they attempting the town in the night."
The Council sat almost daily.
February 3rd, 1596[-7].--Lord Mountgarrett brought before the Council.
4th.--Sir Edward Stanley and Lady Clyfford landed from England at "the Ring's end."
8th.--Sir Conniars Clyfford departed for Connaught. Letters to England by Bignell, the Treasurer's man.
13th, Sunday.--Sir Conniars Clyfford's chaplain and Mr. Fenn preached.
19th.--Letters to England by John Fowlkes. My Lord began his journey towards Catherlough, and rode to the Nasse.
20th.--To Catherlough, where my Lord lay, at the Castle, Mr. Harpoole's.
21st.--A seminary priest named Lee, who this day said mass at Lawghlin bridge, was taken by a soldier, examined, and committed to the custody of the Provost.
22nd.--The Sergeant-Major and Captain St. Leger came to my Lord. Captain Lee also came, and certified that he had taken 200 cows and 50 garrones from Feagh McHugh.
23rd.--The Earls of Ormond and Thomond, the Lord of Doneboyne, and others dined with my Lord. Letters from England.
24th.--Letters despatched to Limerick, Ross, Cork, Waterford, and all other ports for restraining shipping from going to any part of Spain.
25th.--Sir G. Fenton sent news of the overthrow of 2,300 Spaniards in Brabant by the States.
27th.--Edmond Keting committed.
28th.--My Lord removed to Tullagh. Letters from England brought by Moore the pursuivant from Dublin.
March 1st, 1596[-7].--Captain Russell, Mr. Cob, and Mr. Cooke came from Dublin. Letters to the Lord President, the Lord Chancellor, and the Council at Dublin.
2nd.--To Haggardstown. Captain Richard Greemes took a spy.
3rd.--Over the mountains to Farrenerren. The Sergeant-Major with 200 soldiers had a light skirmish with the enemy, and took from them 50 cows, and brought in the head of one of their best shot.
4th.--"My Lord marched from Farrenerren to Ballenecor, and passed over the bridge; and from thence proceeded forwards over the mountain into the deepest bottom of the Glynne with carriages, where his Lordship dined; after which he knighted the Sergeant-Major, Sir John Chichester, being the place where Sir Peter Carew was slain in the Lord Graie's time. Then his Lordship returned another way through the Glynes, up a mighty rock and bad pass, which, God be thanked, with much ado we safely passed, without any annoyance from the enemy, to our camp at Farrenerren."
5th.--My Lord marched to Catherlough. Letters from the Council at Dublin by Stanley, pursuivant. Letters from Captain Henry Street.
6th.--Letters to the Council at Dublin, desiring to know what time was appointed for the Commissioners' meeting with the Earl of Tyrone at Dundalke, and promising if requisite to be at Dublin before their going, for furnishing the army to attend them. The sub-sheriff of the county of Catherlough was committed for abuse in gathering up corn in the country. Captains Montague and Richard Greemes brought in the heads of Dermond McOwen and Caire Glasse O'Birne, of Feagh's sept, and took a prey of 60 cows.
8th.--My Lord rode to Lawghlin, Captain Warham St. Leger's, where he was honourably entertained.
9th.--The Earl of Ormond came to Lawghlin. My Lord passed his word under his hand to the Earl of Ormond and Captain St. Leger, that if Garrett McMortaugh would cut off 20 of the kearnes, being rebels, he should have his pardon. My Lord returned to Catherlough.
10th.--Mr. Harpoole's men brought in from the Brisklow the heads of Geff. Tobie and Patrick Duffe, followers of the Butlers out in action, and a prisoner named Nicholas Tobie, foster-brother to Peirse Butler; "who, being examined, would not confess anything against the Butlers, or where they usually abode."
11th.--Patrick Moore, a prisoner, executed by martial law.
12th.--My Lord rose by 3 o'clock in the morning, and rode towards the Brisklowe, where he had appointed three foot companies to meet him, and beat through some of the rebels' fastnesses, but none could be found, as they had gone beyond the mountains. Some of our soldiers lighted on 16 rebels, one of whom, named Caroe McDonnell Cavanagh, uncle to Feagh's sons, was taken prisoner.
13th.--Letters from the Council at Dublin that six lasts of gunpowder, containing 140 barrels, lying at the Crane in Dublin, had by some negligence exploded, blowing up many houses adjoining, and killing many people. Mr. Harpole received a letter from Peirse Butler, asking for my Lord's protection.
14th.--My Lord rode to the Nasse.
15th.--To Dublin. The Chancellor and Council, with Mr. William Lane, Mr. Brounkett, and others, met his Lordship. The Council sat.
16th.--Captain Lea sent in two traitors' heads. Phelim O'Toole brought in one head, and took Turlagh O'Birne, one of Feagh's followers, prisoner.
17th, Thursday.--My Lord sent for Mr. William Lane and Mr. Brounkett, to speak with them. Mr. Fenn preached in the chapel. Captain Persie came to my Lord.
22nd.--The Earl of Kildare came to my Lord. Brian Reagh's brother's head brought in by the Earl of Kildare's lieutenant. A prisoner named Morris McHugh Cavanagh brought in by Captain Kellie. Letters from Molmorie O'Reylie, promising to perform some service in the Breney.
25th, Good Friday, 1597.--Letters to England by Lieutenant Fysher. The Lord President went to Dondalke to parley with the Earl of Tyrone. Captain Richard Greames brought in three traitors' heads and four prisoners, one of them son to Hugh Cancoe.
27th, Easter Day.--After the sermon in St. Patrick's my Lord knighted Mr. William Lane.
30th.--Captain Lea sent in the heads of James Butler, nephew to the Earl of Ormond, and two others. Letters from Sir Conniers Clyfford out of Connaught.
April 1st, 1597.--Letters to the Governor of Connaught.
3rd, Sunday.--The Bishop of Lawghlin and Mr. Fenn preached.
4th.--Captain Thomas Maria Wingfield came from Dondalk. Captain R. Greemes sent in one John Eustace, sometime his lieutenant, who had conspired to betray him and his castle to the rebels, as a prisoner, and also two traitors' heads, one of them being Hugh Duffe's brother.
5th.--Peirse FitzJames, sheriff of Catherlough, sent in 13 of the traitors' heads.
7th.--Marviliack went to England with letters. Sir G. Fenton and Sir G. Bowrchier rode to Dundalk to the Lord President.
8th.--Captain Trever landed from England with letters from the Countess of Warwick and others.
11th.--Sir William Lane went to England.
13th.--Two ships of Dublin arrived from Spain, bringing my Lord intelligence from thence.
14th.--Letters from the Earl of Ormond, that one Tirlagh Oge McHenry, with eight more rebels, was killed by his men two days before.
15th.--My Lord sat in the Star Chamber hearing a cause between Mr. Edgerton and Captain Mansfield. Mr. Edgerton was fined 100 marks for a riot, and committed to prison. John Ball, sergeant-at-arms, provost-marshal of Connaught, and marshal of the Four Courts, died. My Lord bestowed the first office on John Hoye, his gentleman usher, the second on Captain Lea, and the third on Mr. Gwilliams, his treasurer.
16th.--Letters to Captain M. Wingfield, at Dondalke.
20th.--Mr. Richard Mastersonn brought in the heads of 12 of Feagh McHughe's followers, having also committed seven prisoners to the castle of Wexford. My Lord sent Mr. Richard Cooke, his secretary, with letters to England. My Lord sat in the Star Chamber about ordering a cause between the Bishop of Lawghlin and Mr. Sheffeld.
21st.--Sir G. Fenton and Sir G. Bowrchier returned to Dublin. Letters from the Earl of Ormond, "that his men had taken six prisoners that were traitors in Munster with Morogh McShehy."
22nd.--A packet of letters sent to England by post, and carried to Chester by the Bishop of Lawghlin.
24th, Sunday.--The Lord Primate and Mr. Fenn preached.
30th.--Letters received from my Lord Borrough by Dakings, his servant, who was sent over before to make provision. One of Hugh Cancoe's sons and two other rebels executed by martial law.
May 1st, 1597, Sunday.--Letters from the Earl of Essex and the Countess of Warwick brought by Lieut. Fisher. Sir Peirse FitzJames's son sent in another of Hugh Cancoe's sons. Mr. Huson and Mr. Fenn preached. Captain Goodwyn died.
3rd.--Captain Thornton sent to sea with the Queen's pinnace for the Lord Burgh.
5th.--Letters from the Lord President (Sir John Norris), "that the Earl of Tyrone had deferred his meeting with him till the last of May, till which time a peace was prolonged, at the expiration of which the Earl promised to meet the Lord President in Dundalk, and deliver in his son as a pledge." The Earl of Ormond sent in 24 traitors' heads.
6th.--"My Lord sat in the Castle Chamber, where Captain Norries's cause was heard, who was adjudged (for speaking most heinous speeches against her Majesty's person) to be brought to the pillory with a paper on his head declaring his offence, and there to lose both his ears, to pay 500l. Irish for a fine, and to endure perpetual imprisonment." Widow Hope was fined 200l. Irish, and imprisoned, for the escape of the Newgents from Mollingar gaol.
7th.--Sir Thomas Jerman went with letters to the Council in England. My Lord took his last journey towards the Glynnes, in prosecution of Feagh McHughe, and rode to Rathdrome, where the foot companies met him.
8th, Sunday.--Early in the morning our foot entered the Glynnes, and fell into that quarter where Feagh McHugh lay; "and coming several ways on him, it pleased God to deliver him into our hands, being so hardly followed as that he was run out of breath, and forced to take a cave, where one Milborne, sergeant to Captain Lea, first lighted on him, and the fury of our soldiers was so great as he could not be brought away alive; thereupon the said sergeant cut off Feagh's head with his own sword and presented his head to my Lord, which with his carcass was brought to Dublin, to the great comfort and joy of all that province." Many of his followers were slain, and 200 cows were taken, with much pillage, which was divided among the soldiers. My Lord returned to Rathdrome, and there before the fort knighted Sir Calistinas Brooke, Sir Thomas Maria Wingfeild, and Sir Richard Trever.
9th.--My Lord rode to Dublin. All the way the people of the country met him with great joy and gladness, and, as their manner is, bestowed many blessings on him for performing so good a deed, and delivering them from their long oppressions." The Council, divers noblemen, and the citizens of Dublin, with many others, met his Lordship, and he was welcomed with universal joy.
10th, et seq.--The Council sat. Several of the foot companies landed.
15th.--"The Lord Burgh landed at ----, and came to Dublin, where he was invited to supper at the mayor's, after which his Lordship went to his lodging to St. Mary Abbey, at Sir George Bowrcher's house." 24,000l. and divers foot companies landed. Marviliacke brought private letters from England.
16th.--Dermond McNorris sent in five heads of Feagh's followers. "My Lord removed this night from the Castle to lie at Mr. Usher's house at the bridge foot, whereby the Castle might be made ready for the Lord Burgh against he should receive the sword." The Lord Burgh came to visit my Lord.
17th.--My Lord and the Council sat, "where the Lord Burgh came, and delivered her Majesty's instructions." After supper my Lord went to the Lord Burgh's lodging, where they conferred together.
18th to 21st.--My Lord and the Council sat.
19th.--Sir John Chichester sent in the heads of one Conner O'Kennedie and seven others of Feagh McHugh's followers. Mr. Cooke, "our" secretary, landed with letters from England. Letters from the Earl of Ormond that he had lately cut off 12 of the rebels by martial law, and kept four others prisoners. The Lord President (Norris) came to Dublin.
21st.--"My Lord and the Council sat in the afternoon, after which my Lord went to St. Mary Abbey to the Lord Burgh." The Earl of Ormond took his nephew Peirse Butler, executed him, and sent his head to Dublin.
22nd, Sunday.--The Lord Chancellor (Archbishop Loftus) and Mr. Fenn preached. After the sermon my Lord delivered up the sword to the Lord Burgh in St. Patrick's Church, and dined with him at St. Mary Abbey, "where the feast was kept." After dinner they sat in Council there about the "establishment."
23rd.--The Lord Deputy and Council met at St. Mary Abbey and sent for my Lord, who, after some consultations, departed.
24th.--My Lord went to the Lord Deputy and Council at St. Mary Abbey. Divers lords, knights, and gentlemen came to take their leave of my Lord.
26th.--My Lord departed from Dublin, being accompanied to the waterside by the Lord Chancellor and the rest of the Council, the mayor, sheriffs, and citizens of Dublin, and divers captains. "This evening we hoist sail, and the day following, being Friday, 27th, his Lordship landed at Ormshead, where his Lordship lay at Mr. Rowland Moystion's--in Wales."

WAR between ENGLAND and SPAIN.  MS 612, p. 114  Aug 1599

Former reference: MS 612, p. 114

3 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73, vol. III, document 311.

Contents:
"A Project by Sir William Russell for the impeaching of the Spaniards' landing, expected in August 1599."
My opinion is that the enemy places his principal hope of success in the suddenness of coming upon us. Let us make use of the sea, and, with such ships as are in readiness, "wait and attend upon them to take such advantages" as occasion may offer, and to prevent their landing [in England], considering "the danger of discovering humours of ill-affected and discontented persons."
"I wish that the companies of trained men throughout all the counties should forthwith march towards the sea coast, and that to every company of foot there should be some 40 horse[s] appointed to be attending upon them, to mount so many upon any sudden as may be called upon by the commander; and commissions sent away with all expedition to every shire to make provision of such horses and geldings with such furniture as cometh next to hand; to th' end that by that means there might be, over and besides the main force for stand, a camp volant,"ready to make head in any place where the enemy might attempt to land.
Although I will not say that I would repulse them from landing if their force be great, yet I will promise with small venture of men to make their landing hard and dear. In the execution of this service I do offer myself in all duty, "leaving to your grave wisdoms [the Privy Council] the consideration of the same."
Copy.

SIR WILLIAM RUSSELL.  MS 612, p. 116  10 Aug 1599

Former reference: MS 612, p. 116

2 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73, vol. III, document 312.

Contents:
Appointment (by the Queen) as General and Chief Commander in the Southern and Western Counties [of England], except within the charges of Sir Ferdinand Gorges at Plymouth, and Sir Nicholas Parker at Falmouth.
Nonesuche, 10 August 1599.
Copy.

SIR WILLIAM RUSSELL.  MS 612, p. 117  13 Aug 1599

Former reference: MS 612, p. 117

1 Page.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73, vol. III, document 313.

Contents:
Southampton, 13 August 1599, 41 Eliz.
"Sir William Russell, Lord General of her Majesty's army and forces of the sea coasts westward, was, the day and year above written, chosen and admitted to be one of the guild and burgesses of the town and county of Southampton, frank and free.
"Orat. admiss.; Jo. Friar, clericus."
Copy.

Carew Manuscript  MS 613  [n.d.]

Former reference: MS 613

Wardship of David Barry, son to David Oge Barry and grandchild to David, Lord Barry, granted to John Chichester.  MS 613, p. 77  14 April 1611

Former reference: MS 613, p. 77

4 Pages.
Language:  Latin

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. V, document 48.


Related information: 8 Jas. 1st.

Contents:
Examined by James Newman, clerk in the office of the Master of the Rolls.

A WARRANT from the KING to the LORD DEPUTY CHICHESTER for the taking of surrenders of lands in in the province of Connaght and the county of Clare, and also to pardon Intrusions, &c.  MS 613, p. 75  21 July 1615

Former reference: MS 613, p. 75

3 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. V, document 158.

Contents:
As we are informed that, by several indentures of composition, made between our late sister and the inhabitants of our county of Clare, otherwise Thomond, that there was granted unto her and her successors a certain yearly sum of money out of every quarter of land (freedoms only excepted) in regard whereof it was intended that the several inhabitants should have letters patent to confirm their estates to them and their heirs, with reservation of tenures by knight service as of our several manors in that province and county: And as the inhabitants have and do duly observe their conditions in making payments yearly of the several sums reserved, but by reason of the wars, &c. in that kingdom, they have not had the means hitherto (as they alledge) to pass their said lands as was intended unto them, but have now been suitors to us to grant that grace: We hold ourselves bound in honour to perform what our sister did intend; and in respect of the great yearly revenue which we receive out of that province and county, by virtue of that composition, we have been pleased for the settling of their several estates to condescend to their request.
These are therefore to require and authorize you to issue forth one or more commissions into that province and county, to inquire what quantities of lands every of our said subjects is seized or possessed of within the same and upon the return of the said commissions to accept a surrender or surrenders to us, &c. of so much as the several persons shall offer to surrender, and thereupon to cause letters patent under the great seal of that our realm to be passed, of the lands so mentioned to be surrendered, unto every our subjects respectively, &c. who shall be found to be so seized by the said inquisitions, or to such other persons, &c. as they shall appoint; saving and reserving to us, &c. our said composition, and such other rents and duties as are now answered unto us for the said lands; the same to be holden of us by knight's service as of our castle of Athlone in that province; in which grants our express will is, that there shall be no mention made of any surrenders; as we are given to understand by them that they have heretofore been often troubled in our Court of Exchequer there for their several intrusions, fines for alienations without license, mesne profits, reliefs, sums of money for respite of homage, concealed wardships, and the like.
We, in commiseration of their former troubles, are further pleased that in their several letters patent there shall be contained several pardons and grants of the same, or that you shall give them such other effectual discharges as shall free them and heirs from further trouble in any of our courts; provided that their before the said grants or pardons are past, you take care that they, and every of them that are to derive any benefit thereby, do first make some moderate and reasonable composition for the same, with such patentees, or their assigns, to whom for the good of our service any grant hath been made of the same, by you or other commissioners there, under our great seal of that kingdom, in which compositions we will that a fourth part of the benefit should be reserved for us. Given under our signet at Westminster, 21st July, 13th year of our reign.
Our farther pleasure is for the ease of the people of that province and county that in all patents to be made from us you permit as many of the freeholders to pass their lands together in one grant, as you in your discretion shall think fit.
Addressed to the Lord Chichester and Deputy of our realm of Ireland.
Copy.

A WARRANT from the LORDS JUSTICES to the JUDGES, to certify their opinions of the Earl of Ormond's title to the liberty of the county of Tipperary. [Heading in Carew's hand.]  MS 613, p. 47  1616

Former reference: MS 613, p. 47

3 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. V, document 170.

Contents:
Thomas Dublin. Canc., John Denham.
Opinions of the judges, 25th April 1616.
The Earl has no title or right to any county palatine there. But as the Earl of Ormond is not at present in this kingdom, that we might review his title, you may understand that his Majesty did direct letters 12 January, 1614, to the late Lo. Deputy, to signify the present state of the freedom of Tipperary, and how justice was administered there. Upon those letters, by a reference from the late Lo. Deputy, the Earl of O., with his counsel, had a public hearing before us, at which time the Earl did show a patent bearing date 46 Edw. III., for his pretended liberties, the copy whereof we have not nor can find upon record, but we have seen a copy of a patent, 3 and 4 of Philip and Mary, in which the patent of 46 Edw. III., and the words of grant thereof are recited in hoec verba, viz.:--Regalitatm. feod. militum. et alias libertates, et res quæ habuit tam in maneriis de Clonmell, Kilfekill et Kilshielan, cum pertin. in Com. Tippar. quam in aliis, clocis dicti Comitat. de Tippar., quatuor placitus; viz. incendio, raptu, forstallo et thesauro invento. Ac etiam proficno de Crciis in Eod em Com ilatu cum omnibus ad ea spectand. quæ erga se et hered suos retinere voluit dunclaxat excepto.
And at the same hearing the Earl, by direction from us, did show unto the King's Serjeant and Attorney General several rolls and writings of his own to prove his pretended usage, by which he pretends to appoint officers, judges, and sheriffs, as in a county palatine, and to condemn and pardon felons, and to determine all other real and personal actions within the said liberty; the copy of which patents, and the abstract of the rolls produced by him, and the former certificate of the judges, we present to you. But, upon consideration of the premises, they seem to us to be very weak, and of small validity to support so great a pretence. For, in that certificate of the King's Serjeant and Attorney, there is no roll from 11 Hen. VI. till 7 Hen. VIII., nor any roll since, and very few before 11 Hen. VI., to warrant his pretended usage of a liberty excepting only some few rolls from a county court and turne kept in that court till the time of Richard III; and for the words of the patent, they have no colour to warrant a county palatine. And, touching the present state of that liberty which we are required to certify, it is thus: his Majesty's judges do sit there twice every year and discharge the service, as in other counties within their circuit, without any interruption but verbal claims. And his Majesty's justices of peace do keep their quarter sessions there as other justices of peace do in the rest of the counties within this kingdom. And in the interval of the coming of his Majesty's justices into that county, the Earl and his officers do, at their pleasure, keep their session, gaol delivery, and peace, and do exercise jurisdiction in criminal and all civil causes within the said county, which proves an extraordinary burthen of the subjects thereof.
Signed: Dom. Sarsfelde, Fr. Aungier, Willm. Methwold, Christoph. Sibthorp, Blennerhayssett, Geo. Lowther.
Copy.

SIR RANDALL MCDONNELL'S First Brief  MS 613, p. 1  1617

Former reference: MS 613, p. 1

6 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. V, document 188.

Contents:
Proofs that the island of Rathlyn is parcel of the dominion of Ireland.
From the situation, because it lies within a league of the firm land of Ireland, seven leagues and more from the firm land of Scotland, and not so near to any of the isles that are of the Scottish dominion. And the law saith that mare or particula maris est de territorio illius regni cui magis appropinqt; and, again, maris partes ejus provinci aeeonseantur que proxima est. From the nature of the soil, which neither breeds nor nourishes any living thing venomous, but is as clear of them as Ireland, where the isles of the Scottish or English dominions in the same sea breed and nourish them, which was thought to be a proof that the Isle of Man was British, as appears by Giraldus, in Topograp. Hibernia distinct, in 2, chapter 15.
It appears by records, that at the beginning of the conquest of Ireland and since the English possessed it, as a part of that realm, granted it and had service done for it, it was inquired of according to the English law, became forfeited to the Crown, temporal jurisdiction was exercised in it, and spiritual, as within the Bishoprick of Connor. Also that in those times the isles were not of the Scottish dominions, but in the dominion of the Norwegians or Kings of the isles that were feodary to them.
In 14° John the Bishop of Norwich, who was then the King of England's Justice in Ireland, did certify the King, that he had assigned for Allan Gallway, Insula de Rathlin and other lands, except certain Knights fees adjoining to the castle of Kilsanton, excepto ommi jure ecclesiastico, et omnibus illis que ad viros religiosos et ecclesiasticos pertinent.
For assurance of this assignment, the King by his charter granted unto this Allan Gallway this island, by the name of the island of Rathrim, in pratis et pasturis et in aquis dulcibus et salsis, inportubus et ripis, &c., and English liberties &c, infangethfet and utfangetheft. Wherein it is to be noted that this Allan Gallway was Constable of Scotland, and served King John with the license of the King of Scotland in the service in Ireland, as appears in Buchanan, liber 8, who cannot be pretended to be ignorant of the extent of the Scottish dominions, or willing to withdraw anything from it.
Teste apud, Westmr., 10 April, 4 Hen. 3.
The King sent his writ to Allan Gallwaye, and did thereby signify that the King and a great part of his Council should be at Yorke, where Alexander King of Scotland would also be present, about the affairs of the kingdom, and commanded Allan Gallway to be there, to do his homage and fealty for those lands amongst others.
Teste apud, York, 16 Jan., 4 Hen. 3.
The King by his writ directed to the Justice of Ireland recites that Allan Gallway had done his fealty and did command to give him seizin of the land that King John had granted him, viz.: Inter alia Insulam de Rathrim in which the King's command is executed by his ministers of the realm of Ireland.
That in this time it was not of the Scottish dominion, appears in Chron. Manniae, and Matthew Paris, fol. 745, and also by the charter dated 19 H. III, whereby the King calls Olanus, Rex Manniae et Insularum.
In the 6th Edw. I., the King sends his writ to the Justice of Ireland to be certified of the extent, that is, the particulars and value of the lands that were one John Bissett's, who died seized of divers lands in Ireland as the writ recites, and commands that inquisition should be made thereof, by the oath of men of the parts of Ulster. And it is presented by the oath of twelve men, that John Bissett the day of his death held the island of Rachry, then of the value of 4l. 8s. 5d., and that the same was holden of the Earl of Ulster, who at the time might create a tenure of himself. And that John Bissett endowed his mother-in-law of two parts thereof, which proves likewise that his father was seized of it. This inquisition was taken by virtue of the King's writ and taken by oath of men of that province of Ulster, and was taken in Cull, which is within the county of Antrim.
In 12 Edw. II., the King granted unto John Athy those lands and tenements which were Hugh Bissett's in Insula in Rughrie in Hibernia, by express words, which were forfeited to the King by adherence of Hugh Bissett to the King's enemies. So for the space of 200 years and more this island was possessed as a part of Ireland and all temporal jurisdiction was used therein; and it cannot be said that in this time the same was taken from the Scottish, for they then did not at that time possess the isles.
From 12 Ed. II., until the year 1500, there has been nothing shown on the one side or the other; but in that year there is shown on the other part that James IV. granted the island (which is mentioned to come to the King by the forfeiture Johannes de Insula) unto Adam Reed. That in the year 1537 he died and seisin was commanded to be delivered to Barnard Reade, his son and heir; the like is done in 1571 to Adam the son of Barnard, and after his decease the right thereof came to his four daughters and co-heirs, whereof one part came to Henry Steward of Barkesmyne, who, in 1585, contracted for this island, and undertook for himself and the other co-heirs to affirm it to Agnus McConell. After, in 6° James, those co-heirs did make resignation to the King, who granted it to the complainant.
Then it is to be noted, 1, that there is no proof that Johanes de Insula ever had this island, or that Reed took any profit of corn, cattle, or other things there; 2, those three instruments of delivery of seisin were, one a precedent to the other, one following the other in the same words; and the contract of sale was for less than three score pounds English, of the whole island, which is not much more than a year's value; and the latter assurances were made by those that had only a pretence of right, which is unlawful in the law of England, and by the law De his qui potentioribus. But for further answer, if those lands were of the dominion of the Crown of England, in the hundred years after the conquest of Ireland, it must be gained from it by sale, which is not pretended, or taken from it by strong hand. If it were so, it must be either by the subjects of Scotland, without being sent by the King, or by his warrant; by the former they could not gain any dominion by their entry into the island, but they do instantly become of the allegiance of him in whose hands or whom the isle was at their entry. If it had been gotten by the force of the King, yet if the English did again recover it, the same becomes of the same dominion it formerly was.
For further proof it is plain that in the time of Reed, Alexander Cara possessed this island, and the Glynnes and the great part of the firm land in Ireland, and after him, Alexander Oge possessed it with the Glynnes, and after him Cole McDonell possessed it, and after Surley Boy possessed it, and in 1585, when Henry Steward of Barskemyn contracted with Agnus McConell, neither the said Barskemyn nor Agnus had possession or profit, unless it were while the said Agnus detained Surley Boy as prisoner.
The title that McConell made to it and the Glynnes was as heirs unto Bissett, and Sir Randall McDonell paid a rent for his island unto Q. Elizabeth, and so did his father and brother before him.
The late Queen did inflict punishment upon the inhabitants as being robbers to the Crown; for in 18th Eliz. she sent an army thither, under the conduct of Sir John Norris, who slew and overthrew most of the said inhabitants, and maintained a garrison of soldiers in the castle of that island; and her forces did divers times burn, prey, and kill the said inhabitants as rebels against her Crown, which she would not have done, if this island had been piece of Scotland, there being then a strong league of amity between his Majesty and the said Queen. And doubtless his Majesty (if it had been reputed part of Scotland,) would have taken exceptions at the placing of the garrison there, the killing of his subjects, and required restitation thereof.--Cosmographers number this island among the islands belonging to Ireland.
The territories of the Glynnes, of which the said island is part, being parcel of the province of Ulster, was by Act of Parliament, anno 11 Eliz., vested in the Crown of England, in which it is called the Baron Missett's land. The said Queen did amongst other lands pass the moiety of the said island unto Walter, Earl of Essex, &c., and it was after resumed unto her Majesty's hands for not performing certain conditions mentioned in the patent.
By an inquisition taken anno 1 Ja., before the Lord Chichester, now Ld. Treasurer of Ireland, and others, by virtue of a commission to them directed, it was found that Q. Eliz., by virtue of the said Act, anno 11, was seized of this island, and thereof died seized; and that his Majesty was seized in his demesne as of fee of the said island, in the right of the Crown of England; and that Surley McDonnell, and his two sons, Sir James and Sir Randall, did successively take the profits thereof, as being half a tough of the Glynnes, in the county of Antrim, for the space of 20 years, next before the taking of the said inquisition; and, further, that the tithes of the said island did belong unto the Abbey of Bangor, in the Upper Clandeboye, in the county of Downe.
4 James.
The said island was not since the 15th of Elizabeth disposed of by letters patent until his Majesty, after the said inquisition taken, passed the same unto Sir Randall McDonnell and his heirs, with remainders to divers of his kindred.
By another inquisition taken in the co. Antrim, before Commissioners appointed, it was found that Wm. O'Dorman, late Abbot of the Abbey of Bangor, was at the time of the suppression of the said abbey seized of the tithes of the island of Raghlin, which abbey was dissevered 33 Henry VIII.; and those tithes have been since granted unto Sir James Hamilton and his heirs, under the Great Seal of Ireland, and are accordingly enjoyed by him. Sir Randall McDonell and his elder brother Sir James being sundry times in Scotland, before his Majesty's reign of England, and himself divers time since, did never hear of any challenge or pretence of right made by any unto the said island, saving that at his Majesty's last being in Scotland, the complainant did then make his pretended title to the said island known unto him.
Copy.

A COLLECTION of such Reasons and Arguments together with sundry records proving that the island of Raghlin, Rathrim, or Raghery, in Ireland, now in the possession of Sir Randall McDonell, is parcel of Ireland, and no parcel of Scotland, as is supposed.  MS 613, p. 5  1617

Former reference: MS 613, p. 5

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. V, document 189.

Contents:
Sir. Randall McDonnel's Second Brief.
(1.) The first reason as in brief 1.
(2.) As in 1st brief.
(3.) The 3rd reason is drawn from the jurisdiction, both spiritual and temporal used and exacted within this island of Rathlin. First, for the spiritual jurisdiction, it has always been within the diocese of Connor, a bishopric of Ireland, and subject to the visitation of the bishop thereof, for which the said bishop doth receive yearly a proxie of 20 shillings out of that island; whereas all the other islands which lie on the north-west coast of Scotland, are under the jurisdiction of the Bishop of the Isles, but in this island of Rathlin, the Bishop of the Isles had never any jurisdiction. For the temporal jurisdiction, this island is parcel of co. Antrim in Ulster, and the sheriff of that county has ever executed the King's writs there, and the inhabitants of that island have ever appeared and served at the assizes and general sessions holden at Knockfergus for that county, and upon their default have been fined. Neither did any of the inhabitants there to excuse their appearance, or to save their fines, ever allege that the island was part of Scotland, and no part of Ireland, which they would have done if they had conceived that it had been part of Scotland. And on the other side, this island was never reputed or claimed to be part of any sheriffdom, bailiwick, or stewardship in the kingdom of Scotland; neither did the temporal officers of Scotland use any jurisdiction there.
(4.) The fourth reason is drawn from the long continuance of possession in the Crown of England, or in such held, or claimed this island from or under the Crown of England.
(5.) Same as in 1st brief.
(6.) The sixth as before.
Hereafter ensue sundry copies of records remaining in his Majesty's Tower of London and elsewhere, which manifestly prove the said island to be part of the kingdom of Ireland.
14 John, King.
The Bishop of Norwich did signify unto King John that Allan Gallwaye had sent his uncle and other persons unto him, being then in Ireland, to receive the lands his Majesty had conferred upon him, and that he being then at Knockfergus, accompanied with divers knights and other persons of quality, did assign unto the said Allan Gallwaye divers lands with the isle of Rathlin, excepting all ecclesiastical rights, and such things as did appertain to the spiritual jurisdiction.
17 John, King.
King John did give, grant, and confirm the said lands, together with the island of Rathlin, in Ireland, unto Allan FitzRolland and his heirs.
Teste at Westmon: 4 H. 3, 18th April.
King Henry III. did signify by his letter unto Allan Gallwaye, that one Hamo de Gallway did earnestly solicit him in his behalf to re-deliver unto him his lands, affirming that the said Allan, was ready to do homage for the said lands which his father, King John, had given unto him. And thereupon K. Henry advertised the said Allan that he and a great part of his Council were to be in York, and his well beloved Alexander, King of Scotland, with a great part of his Council, to confer of certain affairs concerning both their kingdoms, and therefore commanded the said Allan that he should come thither to do his homage and fealty.
Teste at York, 4 H. 3, June 16.
Allan de Gallwaye did fealty unto K. Henry 3, for the said lands together with the island of Rathlin, and thereupon the King commanded his Justices of Ireland without delay to put him in full possession thereof.
6 Ed. 1.
By virtue of a writ directed by King Edward I. to Robert Ufford, his Justice of Ireland, it was found, by an inquisition taken at Cull, in the province of Ulster, that John Bissett died seized of the island of Raghery, and did hold the same of Richard Burgo, son and heir of Walter Burgo. This inquisition being taken at Cull, in the county of Antrim, and found by a jury of that county, doth sufficiently prove the said island to be part of that county, and also the temporal jurisdiction there.

CRAWFORD'S PRETENDED TITLE to the Island of the Raghlins, 1617. His First Brief. [In Carew's hand.]  MS 613, p. 9  1617

Former reference: MS 613, p. 9

2 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. V, document 190.

Contents:
The island of Rauchlins, one of the Hebrides or Ebudes Insules, land in Mari Doeucalidonio, hath been by the space of two or three hundred years possessed by the Clan Donald and Uthile, Scots subjects, and now is acclaimed by George Crawford, of Lesnories, by virtue of these rights following, viz.:
By the attainder of John Earl of Rose the island fell unto the Crown.
John Lord of the Isles, being in possession of the said island, and for his misdemeanor forfeited by K. James the Fourth, the said island by a lanes mane became a parcel of the Crown of Scotland through forfaltor.
In anno 1500 King James the 4 passed the island to Adam Reade and his heirs.
Adam Reade died seized of it in anno 1537.
Bernard Reade's son died seized of it in anno 157 Adam Reade, his son, died seized of it, about 1575.
He left 4 daughters in minority.
And as it did lamrie accrest to the Crown so was it lamrie disponit by King James the 3rd for good service to Adam Reade of Stourguerit, as is clear by our first seazinge in 1500. To this Adam his son Barnard is retourit heir and seazit in the said island, by virtue of a precept directed furthe of the Chancellary, as is clear by our seasauge in anno 1537. To Barnard's son Adam is retourit heir and seized by a precept forth of the Chancellary, as may appear by our seizing in anno 1571. And the said island having Iyen in nonentrie four year before Barnard's son was seizit, the sheriff of Terbett has made compt in check of the nonentrie and release of anno 1571, as by an extract of books of responde of that date.
Henry Steward, in the right of his wife, the eldest daughter, claimed the island, anno 1585, in which Agnus McConnell took the same by a deed from the said Henry, and afterwards restored the said island to the above-named Henry.
He was hindered of the possession by a grant made to the Earl of Argile, for the clearing whereof he compounded with the Earl, and also with his wife's sisters, in anno 1606. And in the same year he took the island again by a new grant from the King, since which time he sold his title unto George Craford, of Lesnoris.
That Adam Reade continues in possession of this island till his death, anno 1575 or thereby, and to him in the right of the said island his four daughters succeeded, their being no heirs males, left until about the 1580 year. And at that time Harry Steward of Barskymen having married the oldest, did acclaim the said island in the title of his wife from Agnus McConnell, violent possessor of the same, who fearing his Majesty's miscontentment for his violence and oppression, and being conscious to Barskymen's right, transacted with Barskymen for his right, as is clear by a mutual contract betwixt them, in anno 1585. By virtue of this right Agnus McConnell brinkes that island by the space of divers years and he being dispossessed of did repone the said Barskymen in these his own place again, who ceased not to do all that he possibly could for keeping his right and possession of the said island, but was impeded partly by the violence of Sir Randall, who had intruded himself there, and partly by a gift of the nonentrie of that island, granted in favour of the Earl of Ergile, and so to enteer his wife over to her father, and to transact with the rest of the sisters, and purchase their investements in anno 1606; and by their resignation he himself is infest by a new gift in anno 1606, as may appear by the daughters four seasing and charter under the Great Seal. And the said Harry having thus the full right of that island established in his person did deal with sundry of his friends to obtain his Majesty's favour for being re-possessed therein; and at last dispoint his title thereof to his nephew George Crainford, of Lisnories [who] now humbly petitions to his Majesty for the possession of the said island, as he has the best right and title to the same; which right and title competent to the lands of Barskymen was also established in their persons and in the person of Agnus McConnell having right from them by a possession and receiving of duties from the tenants of that island, as shall be sufficiently proven.
Copy.

CRAWFORD'S SECOND BRIEF.  MS 613, p. 11  1617

Former reference: MS 613, p. 11

8 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. V, document 191.

Contents:
That Raughlin is a part of the dominion of Ireland was thus proved by George Craford, plaintiff against Sir Randall McDonnell.
(1.) Because it lies nearer to Ireland than to Scotland and hath no venomous beast in it.
(2.) That which did at any time belong to Ireland must still be reputed to remain with it, except it appear that by conquest, marriage, or other treaty it was taken from it. But so it is, that in the days of K. John, Henry III., Edw. I., and Edw. II. Raghlin was of Ireland, which is thus proven: King John, by his charter, did grant the same to Allan of Galloway, who did homage for it to Henry III. By inquisition taken by virtue of writ of Edw. I. it appeareth that John Bissett and his father died west and seized of that island by the oath of men in Ulster and in Ireland. And, lastly, Edw. II. granted it to John Athy as forfeited to his Crown by Bissett's adherence to the King's enemies.
(3.) The Glennes in Ireland were, the 11 Elizabeth, vested in the Crown of England by Act of Parliament. This isle is part of the Glennes. To this reason are considered the speeches of Sir John Bingley, Sir Fulk Conway, and the letters from Ireland bear that Sir Randall McDonnell and Surley Boy have paid rent for the Glennes.
(4.) Elizabeth, anno 15, passed a part of this island to the Earl of Essex.
(5.) It appears by missives and memorials produced that in her time, peace being between the Crowns of England and Scotland, the English did follow the Scots into this island, took the castle, killed the Scots who were in it, put garrison in the castle, as a place fit to repress the Scots, till they should know his Majesty's further pleasure. Nor does it ever appear that the King of Scotland shewed himself there with discontented.
(6.) Since his Majesty's coming to the Crown of England, it appears by inquisition that the said island belongs to the Crown of England, the tithes thereof to Bangor in Ireland; and his Majesty has disposed the same to Sir Runall McDonnell by letters patent under the Great Seal of England.
That Raughlin is a part of the dominion of Scotland is thus proven:--
(1.) All cosmographers account the Hebrides or Æmonas insulas to belong to Scotland; like as all of them consider Raughlin to be one of same.
(2.) That which did at any time within these six score years belong to the Crown of Scotland must still be reputed to remain with it, except it appear that by conquest, marriage, or other treaty it has been taken from it. Now Raughlin, anno 1500 and before, did belong to the Crown of Scotland, for James IV., finding that by the forltonie of John of the Isles, this island was come to his Crown, disponit, the same by charter under the Great Seal of Scotland to Adam Read, 1500, who, by a precept direct out of the Chancery, was seized eadem, [Sic. In eadem.] whose son Bearnard Read, anno 1551, by virtue of a writ direct to the sheriffdome of Tarbett, was served and retornit heir to his father in the said island as a 20l. land of old extent, lying within the said sheriffdome of Tarbett. By which it was since found by the oaths of men of that shire, that the said Adam Reade died west and seisit in the said island. Like as thereafter, anno 1571, the said Barnard being dead, by the oaths of men as before, that the said Barnard died west and seized in the said island, and that the same is 20l. land of old extent lying within the aforesaid sheriffdome of Tarbett. According to this verdict returned in the Chancery of Scotland, Adam as leeint heir to his father, Bernard by a precept out of the said Chancery was seized in the said island, and by reason the said land of Raughlin had been in nonentures for some years after the decease of the said Barnard, the sheriff of Tarbett made count, reckoning, and payment of the said rents of the same lands into his Majesty's Exchequer of Scotland.
This last Adam Read dying last "west and seized" in the said island about the year 1594, left four daughters minors, and the lands lay in non-entry, possessed violently by the Clan Donald till anno 1585. Angus McDonnell, did agree for it with Harry Stewart of Barskimmen, husband to the eldest sister, who afterwards being reponit by the said Angus, then dispossessed of the said island and taken by his son. And the said Harry being unable by a gift of non-entry of the said island, granted to the Earl of Argile by the possession of Sir Ronnald McDonnalle, and by the weakness of his own estate, to acquire the possession of the said island, after he had dealt with sundry of his friends for the re-possession thereof, has at last disponit his title and right thereof to his nephew George Crawford of Lochnores. Now it appears in A.D. 1500, and before the said island did belong to the Crown of Scotland; for ridiculous it had been for James IV. to have disponit that island to Read by forfaltoure of John of the Isle, if the said John had neither right nor possession of the same, nor can any show, if proof be made out of record or history, that any other but the said John and his predecessors for the space of about 200 years, pretending the said gift of James IV., did possess the said island, or that the said John or any of his predecessors did acknowledge the Crown of England for this isle or any other lands, nor yet ever before his Majesty's coming to the Crown of England, since the days of Edw. II. this island was granted by the kings or queens of England to any, except one alleged grant made to the Earl of Essex, anno 15 Elizabeth: which being transitory, whereupon no title is founded nor possession followed, ought no more to be repeated than the grant of the Mers and Louthiane made to sundry of the English at their setting out against Scotland. Nor can it appear that before his Majesty's coming to the Crown of England that any man ever paid rent or duty for this island to the Crown of England. For whereas they would have this island comprehended under the Glennes lying in the continent of Ireland, as it is against sense to make an island four or five miles from any land to be a part of the Glennes in the main which designeth no shire, county, or place of one jurisdiction, but hills with valleys between them bounded with woods; so doth it appear likewise in the grant made of old by the kings of England, that Raughlin has been ever granted as a several territory by itself, and not comprehended under the Glennes. If then, before the days of James IV., it was possessed by the Clan Donald, and, for anything we can see to the contrary, for the space of 200 years before, and that since it has been disponit from age to age by the kings of Scotland to this Read and his successors, remaining in the actual and real possession of the said island; and that it is offered to be proven if needs be, by living witnesses that the tenants of the said island brought the rents of the same to the house of Barskimen, and that Angus McDonnell, after he had agreed with Harry Stewart for the same island, did, by virtue of the said right, possess the same actually and really, and that the sundry Reads have not been dispossest but by violence of the said Clan Donald, who were possessors of the said island, when they had no foot in Ireland, how can Sir Donald now, or his brother, or his father, temp. Elizabeth, meet the possession of the Crown of Scotland during the time of peace between the two Crowns? For as after where peace is made, that remains with the conqueror by title of conquest, which is not agreed to be restored by the treaty of peace between the two Crowns; so can I not see how during the time of peace the subject of either of the Crowns can alter marches, or extent of jurisdiction; or if the subject do, how this alteration of the subject can acquire any good title to either of the Crowns of the new extending of their possession.
To the first objection; in some other of our north isles there is no venomous beast; as infinite instances may prove, that isles may belong to others than these, who are the next neighbours. It is not the quality of the soil nor living that makes right or title. But all were first as yet derelicta primo occupantis, and ever since his, who by conquest or treaty purchased the same. To the second, there needs no other record to prove the conquest of Rathlin by the Crown of Scotland but the possession thereof in the days of James IV., which possession is presumed to have continued 200 years before, since nothing is shown to the contrary neither out of record nor history. What comes by marriage or other treaty may be upon record. But retention of that is conquest. And truly it were a great piece of work to find out how every piece of ground has assessed or fallen away from the one of these kingdoms by conquests or treaties of peace.
The third reason is answered before, for it is denied that the Glennes comprehend Raughlin; nor could Sir John Bingley nor Sir Fulk Connowley say that ever any duty was paid for Rathlin under that name, only they would infer that rent was paid for Rathlin, because rent was paid for the Glennes.
To the fourth objection; that grant made to the Earl of Essex as is said before, it was never effectual, as they confess, nor ever any possession followed thereupon, but, as they themselves confess, it was restrainted, and therefore ought not to be received nor respected. That in his Majesty's minority, things being but ill settled in the islands of Scotland, his Majesty did not quarrel that the English governors in Ireland did pursue the Scots invading Ireland, even into the Isle of Rathlin, and there did put them to the sword, and did leave some soldiers in the fort of the island till he should receive her Majesty's further pleasure. It may be an argument of the little care there was in the regents to protect those who deserved protection, and their unwillingness to offend the Queen, to whom they were all that time many ways tied.
Whatsoever inquisitions concerning that isle have been purchased since his Majesty's coming to the Crown of England, either by Sir Rannald for the Scots or Sir James Hamilton for the tithes thereof, ought in all reason to be little respected, the purchasers being such as could have no title if these lands were not found to be of Ireland, and the juries of Irishmen, who can never be fit men to adjudge any island betwixt Scotland and Ireland, questionable; and the too great curiosity expressed in the said inquisitions bearing things having no affinity with any record, do show more diligence than sincerity, like as the said Harry Steward of Barskimen for making his right manifest to all parties, since his Majesty's coming to the Crown of England, used precepts of warning against the tenants and possessors of the said island, whereupon he has intended summons of removing before the Lords of Council and Session of Scotland, so that none can pretend ignorance of his right.
Copy.

"A BRIEF NOTE concerning the Island of Rathlin in Ulster, extracted of Scotichronicon." [Headed by Carew.]  MS 613, p. 17  1617

Former reference: MS 613, p. 17

1 Page.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. V, document 192.

Contents:
It is certain by the chronicles of Man, Melrose, Scotichronicon, &c., that in the year 1265 and 49 Henry III., Magnus King of Norway passed away his right of the Isle of Man and the south isles of Scotland, as also the north isles, to Alexander III. King of Scotland. But at that very time it is as certain by authentic records that the Bissetts or Missetts were seized of the Isle of Rathlin as a parcel of the kingdom of Ireland, and so continued above 40 years; so that by no means it can be supposed that the Isle of Rathlin was then passed away to the King of Scotland, but remained as formerly a parcel of the kingdom of Ireland near or adjacent thereunto. Whereas it is alleged that the Rathlins belong to the jurisdiction of the sheriffdom of Tarbar, it is to be understood that the south isles of Scotland were assigned to that jurisdiction; but not before the year 1503. For at that time James IV. enacted in his 6th Parliament, cap. 59, for that there is a great abusion in the north and south isles, for lack of justices and sheriffs, and therefore the people are almost gone wild; it is therefore ordained that there should be a sheriff made for the south isles, and to have his place in the Tarbar of Loch Kinkeran; so that this new institution of the sheriffdom of Tarbar cannot prejudice the right of the Crown of England to the Rathlins, which, since the conquest of Ulster, was annexed to the county of Antrim both for temporal and spiritual jurisdiction.
Copy.

At the STAR CHAMBER on Wednesday 6th of May 1618.  MS 613, p. 80  6 May 1618

Former reference: MS 613, p. 80

4 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. V, document 195.

Contents:
Present: Lo. Archbishop of Canterbury, Lo. Chancellor, Lo. Treasurer, Lo. Pr. Seal, Lo. Chamberlain, E. of Arundell, Lo. Visc. Wallingford, Lo. Bishop of Ely, Lo. Zouche, Mr. Sec Lake, Mr. Chancellor of the Exchequer, the Master of the Rolls.
Whereas by virtue of his Majesty's letters bearing date 3 April, to the Lo. Deputy of Ireland, for passing a grant under the Great Seal of that realm to the Lady Helen, Countess of Ormond, daughter to David Lord Barry, Viscount Buttevant, and to any other person or persons in trust, whom she and Lord Barry her father should jointly nominate, of the wardship and custody of the body and lands of the now Lord Barry, then an infant and grandchild to the Lo. Barry aforesaid, then as yet living, and of the benefit of his marriage if the same were then in his Majesty's disposition, or as soon as the same should happen to be in his gift by the death of the infant's father, David Barry, deceased, or his grandfather the Lo. Barry, then living, together with the wardship of all other lands which had or might descend to him the said infant by any other means during his minority, to hold and enjoy the same unto the said Countess and her assigns, or to such person or persons of trust as she and the Lo. Barry, her father, should name, and their assigns, to the use both of the infant the now Lord Barry for his better education and preferment, and likewise to the use and preferment in marriage of such of the Lo. Barry's daughters as should be unmmaried at the time of his death, to be disposed of as the said Lo. Barry and the Countess in their discretion or the survivor of them shall think meet:--Letters patent were accordingly passed under the Great Seal of that realm of the wardship to Edmond FitzJohn Barry of Ballyspillan, and Gregory Lombarte of Buttevant in the county of Cork, their heirs, &c., being persons nominated in trust by the said Lo. Barry, the grandfather, and the Countess of Ormond, his daughter, to hold the wardship to the use of David now Lo. Barry, cousin and heir apparent of the said Lo. Barry, Viscount Buttevant, the grandfather, as he and his daughter the Lady Helen, now Countess Dowager of Ormond and Ossery or the longest liver of them should appoint. And as the Countess surviving her father has at sundry times showed to this Board that according to the power given her by the letters patent, and for the good of her nephew, and for other purposes expressed in the letters patent, and for that she also is informed that Edmond FitzJohn Barry has not faithfully discharged the trust reposed in him, nor is a person responsible for so great an estate, she has therefore desired the said Lombart and Barry to release and give up their interest as she should appoint; but Barry refused, and was therefore at the instance of Sir Thomas Somerset, Kt., and the Countess now his wife, warned several times to make his appearance here before their Lordships to yield a reason for his refusal and to abide an order for the trial of the points in question; whereupon Barry at length appeared; it pleased the Board to refer the examination of the business to the Lord Viscount Wallingford, with the assistance of the Attorney General and Sir James Lee, Kt., Attorney of the Court of Wards. They having called the parties before them, the Viscount Wallingford did this day report to the board the state of the cause, concluding that Barry acknowledging the trust reposed in him was contented to yield up the same to the Countess of Ormond, or as she should appoint to the uses mentioned in the grant; and in regard of his submission their Lordships were pleased to pardon and remit all former contempts to this Board, and do hold it just and meet that Barry shall, upon notice thereof, presently surrender and resign all his interest and right in the wardship to the Countess, as Gregory Lombart the other patentee has already done. And for that Barry in his answers in the Court of Wards and Liveries in Ireland, unto a bill exhibited by the Countess and Sir Thomas Somerset, has cast some aspersions upon the Countess touching her honour, their Lordships think fit and do order in regard he now disclaim and utterly disavow the same, that he shall forthwith under his hand subscribe his disavowal thereof with a like submission unto the Countess answerable thereunto, and shall also before the last of June next in the Court of Wards in Ireland, where the scandalous answers remain on record, make the like submission and disclaimer under his hand.
Copy.
Knowles.

SIR OLIVER ST. JOHN, Lord Deputy of Ireland, to SIR G. CAREW, concerning the Island of Rathlin in Ulster. [Headed by Carew.]  MS 613, p. 15  30 May 1618

Former reference: MS 613, p. 15

2 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. V, document 196.

Contents:
Acknowleges his Majesty's acceptance of a present of marble and his noticing several courtesies done to Sir Randall McDonell and Conor Brady.
Of Sir Walter Rawleigh's return to this coast, I suppose you hear already. He came upon the harbour of Kinsale the 24th of March, and found three of his disbanded ships in the same harbour with Sir John Fernes, Pennington and Kinge in them. Upon the first news I sent to my Lord of Thomond to inform himself of all things before going away, and, if he could, to send those captains, mutineers, or carry them with him and secure their ships, for they may do mischief upon these coasts. I hear Sir Walter Rawleigh will draw to the harbour of Yoghall. I am extremely sorry for his ill success, by the failing and mutinying of those that ought rather to have died with him than left him, and I wish them no favour at all. Concerning the island of Rathlyn, what the records here could discover Sir Randall carried with him. The bishop's records are utterly lost by the mutiny of former times. I found his registrar here who has executed the office under the four last bishops. He affirms that the people of the island of Rathlyn always with readiness appeared upon summons in the bishops court of Connor, underwent their censures, paid their portion according to the statute towards the maintenance of the schoolmaster, and neither the people nor anyone else ever heard so much as of a claim made by the Bishop of the Isles. The Justices of Assize and of the peace always call them to their assemblies without gainsaying, and they have ever felt the hand of justice both by the civil magistrate and martial, and it is close joined to the land of Ireland; and therefore our possession is ancient, continual, and without interruption, unless other proof be made to the contrary, which I can hardly believe can be. Besides, there is one Donell O'Murey yet living that was Bishop of Connor in time of Popery, and he affirms that in those times he ever recovered 12s. yearly for procuration due unto him out of the island of Rathlyn.
Copy.

A LETTER to the LO. DEPUTY and COMMISSIONERS for the Wards in Ireland.  MS 613, p. 82  20 July 1618

Former reference: MS 613, p. 82

1 Page.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. V, document 197.

Contents:
Whereas by former letters from this board, order was given that there should be no further proceedings had in Ireland touching the wardship of the Lo. Barry until the cause were duly examined here, and for that purpose Edmond Barry, against whom Sir Thomas Somerset and the Countess of Ormond, his wife, complained, as you may remember, for detaining the wardship contrary to a trust reposed in him, was sent for over, and here willingly surrendered his pretended interest to the Countess of Ormond. Now as the right of the wardship doth unquestionably belong to Sir Thomas Somerset and the Countess his wife, we have thought good to require you and the King's Commissioners for the Wards as it appertains, respectively to take order, that they may be presently settled and continued in the possession thereof according to the right which is both agreeable (as we concive) to justice and equity.
Whitehall. 20th July 1618.
Signed by Lo. Archb. of Canterbury, Lo. Chancellor, E. of Suffolke, Lo. Pr. Seal, Lo. Chamberlain, Earl of Arundell, Lo. Bp. of Ely, Lo. Zouche, Lo. Hay, Mr. Treasurer, Mr. Vice-Chamberlain, Mr. Secretary Naunton, Mr. of the Rolls.
Copy.

A PROJECT sent by Sir Oliver St. John, Kt., Deputy of Ireland, concerning the plantation of the county of Longford to the Lords of the Council in England.-- [Headed by Carew.]  MS 613, p. 83  August 1618

Former reference: MS 613, p. 83

6 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. V, document 198.

Contents:
The time of the year wearing away in the employment of the measures in the county of Longforde, I thought it agreeable to make known what I conceive will be the issue of the work of that plantation.
The work being great and requiring careful deliberation, my opinion is, that the best course is to settle Longforde this year, and, if time will permit, O'Carroll's country, and leave the country of Leitrim, McCoghlan's, and O'Mulloye's countries for the work of next year. Concerning the county of Longforde, whereof having carefully looked into the former proceedings and surveys of that county, I find that the whole county consists of six baronies esteemed at 50,000 acres.
I find that the lands of the bishop and clergy, the old glebes of churches, the abbey lands, and some patentees who have obtained grants in fee farm will not come within the compass of the escheated lands, but must be set apart from all distributions.
I find also two rents payable by that county, the one of 200l. to the heirs of St. Nicholas Malbye, being the ancient composition of that county, the other of 120 beeves being an ancient rent payable to the castle of Granarde. Those two rents are needful to be compounded for, and a compensation of land taken out of the whole county, otherwise the undertakers will be subject to the exactions and distresses of other men, which would be very inconvenient. It will be needful also that there be taken out some quantity of land, to be bestowed by his Majesty for the bettering of the livings of the poor incumbents of the parish churches, according to that which was allowed in the plantation of Wexford. And in like sort a portion of land must be bestowed upon a corporate town, and for the erecting and maintenance of a free school. All which must be deducted before I can give a guess what will remain for distribution. For albeit the King's officers are of opinion, that some of the grants of the patentees are questionable, yet I suppose his Majesty's purpose, for the most part of them, is not to have them questioned, but either to let them enjoy their lands, or to give them other lands in lieu thereof. The general content of the whole county, and the deductions formerly mentioned being thus compared, I am of opinion as well as upon consideration of the former survey taken in the late Lord Deputy's government, and by the former judgment of the success of this began measurement, that out of the remain there may be set by for the placing of undertakers 12,000 ac., being as I guess a fourth part and somewhat more.
In the distribution, I suggest that it will be needful that a moiety of all those lands which are to be disposed of to undertakers, should be bestowed here upon such servitors remaining in this kingdom as have well served in the wars, and have had no land at all given unto them; and those to be chosen and nominated by the Lord Deputy; not in great quantities, as was done in Ulster, and in the late plantation of Wexford, but in smaller proportions, as in 200, 300, 400 ac., and so increasing according to their several abilities and deserts; none to exceed 1,000 acres. By this manner of plantation the buildings will be more, the bodies of men in greater quantities, and consequently they and their posterity, by their continual residence, will be a surer countenance to the plantation, and a stronger instrument for the settling of peace and civility in those parts, and become more profitable for the commonwealth, and yet his Majesty's rents continue the same. Whereas if those lands could be distributed into greater proportions, as 1, 2, or 3,000 ac., the buildings would go on more slowly, the country would be left more weak by reason of the large wastes, the freeholders more scarce, and the Irish less kept in awe by them.
And, for the residue to be bestowed upon the British undertakers, I humbly propound that their portions may be smaller, the undertakers more in number than they were in Ulster and Wexford, for now Irish land is more valuable, and the county of Longforde, joining upon the English pale, more easy and commodious to be planted. And experience has taught us that [in] Ulster the undertakers' buildings have not been so readily performed as was expected, nor the British brought over in sufficient numbers to inhabit those great scopes; neither has that number of freeholders been placed in those lands as was covenanted by the undertakers; and such as have been made freeholders are held up at so high rents that they are not left able to do the service of freeholders. This making of lesser undertakers to hold of the Crown was the ancient manner of planting Irish countries, as may appear by the multitudes of castles in the English pale, and the counties of Tipperrarie, Limericke, Kilkennye, and all the countries where the old English do yet keep their footing; and that course was held in the later plantation of Leix and Ophalye, where many English undertakers had freeholds, granted unto them from the Crown, of small quantities of land. And their posterity continue freeholders still, and are very useful, as well in time of war as in time of peace; and it is very probable that in this very county of Longforde, the granting of too great proportions to the English, at their first planting there, was the principal cause it was so soon overrun again by the Irish.
I propound, as a matter of especial consideration in this work, that the undertakers be placed in the most uninhabited parts of the county; as towards the countries of Leyterim, Cavan, and Roscomman; and so leave the natives to inhabit in that part that lies near to the English pale, where their ancient borders still remain; and the rather for that the natives now inhabiting that part are reasonably reclaimed by civil education, and many of them have built good stone houses where they dwell.
And, for the full settling of those lands, I propound that he granted estates in fee farm as well to natives as undertakers; receiving from the native for every acre of 21 foot to the pole, 2d. st., and from the undertaker 1½d. st., in respect of the charge of his building. And where the towns or cartrons do consist for the most part of bog, barren mountain, and unprofitable wood, the surveyors shall have power, in the making up of their particulars, to lay those bogs, &c. as an addition to the towns, &c, and set a rent upon the same by the acre, at one rate to the natives, and at a lesser rate to the undertakers, according to the goodness and quantity thereof.
I propose that every proportion under 1,000 acres be held of the castle of Dublin, in free and common soccage, and every proportion of 1,000 acres or above to hold of the King in capite. For, in the old plantation of the English pale, all the undertakers and their heirs hold their proportions, be they greater or smaller, in capite.
Also, that every undertaker and native of 1,000 ac. and above be bound, within three years, to build a castle 30 foot in length, 20 in breadth, and 25 in height; the castle to be built of stone and lime, or brick and lime, and compassed in with a bawn, of 200 foot in compass, of stone and lime, or brick and lime. And every undertaker of 600 ac. and so to 1,000 ac., shall be bound to build a strong house of stone and lime, or brick and lime, within a bawn of 200 foot compass; and every undertaker of quantity under 600 ac., to build a good house of stone and lime, or brick with lime; the natives of these two last-named proportions to be left to themselves.
That every proportion of 1,000 ac. and above may have a manor and a court baron, and power to create tenures and a leet; and every proportion of 600 ac., and so to 1,000, to have a manor with a court baron, and power to create tenures The proportions under 600 ac. to have neither.
That among all the undertakers and natives there may be grants made of six market towns in the most convenient places, and no more, and fairs in as moderate a number as may stand with respect and conveniency, and rents to be reserved upon both.
That no native shall have granted unto him less than 100 ac., except very few, and upon good considerations; and none at all under 60 ac.
That every undertaker and native that is bound to build may have liberty to take a proportionable quantity of timber and other materials for his buildings, in any place within the plantation, by warrant from the Deputy, with a limitation of the time of that liberty.
That every ancient pretended possessor who shall be now made a freeholder, shall depart with at the least a fourth part of the land, he formerly possessed, for the accommodation of the plantation, besides a ratable proportion towards the compounding of the two rents before mentioned of Sir Nicholas Malbye and Sir Francis Shane. That every undertaker and native shall content himself to enjoy his proportion, according to the number of acres laid down by the now admeasurement, without any questioning of old. That every undertaker and native shall be bound that his under-tenants shall build together in town reeves, with a nomine poenæ for those that shall suffer their tenants to build dispersedly.
That the natives may be tied with a proviso of forfeiture not to sell their lands in fee simple or fee tail, or lease them above 40 years, or three lives, to any of the Irish, lest the old Lords should grow great again, and likewise not to enter in action of rebellion.
That the state may have power to place such of the inferior natives of the country as shall not have lands allotted unto them, upon the lands of any undertakers or natives who are to have leases for terms of 21 years, or three lives, at such reasonable rents as shall be set down by the Lord Deputy and Council, whereby such as cannot be made freeholders may be provided where to remain.
That every undertaker and native be bound to sow yearly a quantity of hemp, according to his Majesty's direction in that behalf, and that proportionably according to the quantity of such man's proportion.
That the Lord Deputy may be warranted to grant a quantity of land to each parish church, for the bettering of the livings of the poor incumbents, as was done in Wexford.
That a corporate town may be established in some convenient place within the plantation, and 100 ac. be allotted to the burgesses that shall undertake it, with a warrant to make a grant of a corporation with such name and such immunities and privileges as were granted to the new corporation in the escheated lands of Ulster, and that some land may be allotted for the maintenance of a free school.
That the natives be tied by a proviso of forfeiture neither to take upon them the name of O'Farrall, nor set up or maintain that name by giving of rent, cutting, or service, nor divide their lands by gavelkind. That the whole charge of admeasuring the county, and other necessary expenses for the finishing and settling of those lands, may be borne by the undertakers and natives by equal contributions.
Copy.

The AWARD which his Majesty made between the Earl of Ormond and the Lady Dingwell, by Indenture Tripartite of Award. [In Carew's hand.]  MS 613, p. 31  3 October 1618

Former reference: MS 613, p. 31

26 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. V, document 199.

Contents:
Whereas divers controversies have been moved between Sir Walter Butler, Kt., Earl of Ormond and Ossory on the one part, and Sir Richard Preston, Kt., Lord Dingwall, and the Lady Elizabeth his wife, sole daughter and heir of Thomas late Earl of Ormond, touching the title and use of the manors, &c. which were of the late Earl Thomas in Ireland, whereunto the said Lord Dingwell in right of the said lady, and the said lady in her own right, pretends title by inheritance from the said Earl Thomas, and the now Earl pretends title to the same, as heir male by entails formerly made thereof; and concerning other lands which were Theobald Butler's, late Lord Viscount Butler of Tulleophelin, late husband of the said Lady Elizabeth, in use or possession; and concerning other lands enjoyed by Lo. Dingwell in right of his lady, and by her in her own right, by estate derived from the late Earl; and concerning other lands which the now Earl has in possession by pretence of conveyances from the late Earl Thomas; and concerning certain debts of the said Lord Viscount which the now Earl has undertaken or stands engaged to pay by reason of certain articles of agreement made between the late Earl, the now Earl, and the Lady Elizabeth in her widowhood; and concerning the evidences, charters, and writings that concern the said manors, lands, &c., or the use of them or any of them. We, of our disposition to plant and settle peace and amity between the parties, the one being heir general and the other heir male of an ancient and noble family in Ireland, have at their suit, notwithstanding our other weighty affairs, been contented to take this burthen upon us, to mediate a quiet arbitration of the controversies. We, therefore, out of our desire to have a firm peace fixed between parties so near in blood, and to prevent the wasting and decaying of the large possessions of the late Earl, which would ensue by multiplicity of suits, and considering it to be an act of piety to appease these controversies, have manifested our intention to proceed by all the ways and degrees we could, to have the true merits of the cause on both parts, as well for matter of fact as for matter of law to be discerned; to which end we commanded our learned counsel, by exact examination of all deeds, wills, and other evidences concerning the estate and possessions of the late Earl on both sides to be produced, to instruct themselves and inform us truly how, upon what considerations, and when the same or any of them were made and perfected, that thereby we might know whether the same depended upon clear or doubtful points in law. They having waited upon us, and let us to wit, by writing under their hands, that there were difficulties in law arising upon the conveyances of the late Earl, which being by him multiplied in his later time, some of the assurances were divers and various in themselves, and thereby left an uncertainty of his intent how much of his inheritance and of what estate he meant to the said Lady Elizabeth or to the said Walter now Earl:--We, therefore, for better preparing our judgment in matter of law, have taken the advice of three of our principal judges, whom we commanded to hear both parties and their counsel at as great length as if the same had been publicly and judicially heard at the bar. And having found by their report the main questions so disputable, as some of them held that Lady Dingwall's right to five of the manors contained within the fines and recoveries levied and suffered in the late Earl's time, viz., the manors of Carick, Thurles, Kelkenny, Callin, and Grenaughe to be clear in law, and others of them doubted of the clearness of that question in their private judgment; but yet they all agreed in one, that the question was so perplexed in law, that none of them could tell what the event of the same would have been if it had been proposed to all the judges of England;--therefore they have all in one voice declared to us, that it was proper for us to give a decree therein by way of equity as if we were sitting in our person in our Court of Chancery.
First, having perused letters from divers of the Lords of the Council by the command of our late sister Q. Eliz., dated 1602, to the late Earl Thomas, signifying that she in respect of her favour then lately done to the Earl and his house, and out of the care she had to see the Lady Elizabeth his daughter competently by him provided for, lest otherwise she might be driven into some indigent fortune, expected that he should then present assure to her after his decease so much of his fee simple lands as should amount to 800l, per ann. in good rents; and thereupon in performance of the same in part before the marriage of the Lady Elizabeth with the late Viscount Butler her first husband did in his lifetime convey and settle upon her a good part of that value amounting to 400l, per ann. or thereabout, whereof the Lo. Dingwall and the Lady Elizabeth have been in quiet possession both before and since the death of the Earl;--We holding it to concern us much in honour to see the Earl's intention for the advancement of the Lady Elizabeth fully performed, and the estate of inheritance intended to her by her father to be made up full to the value of 800l. per ann., think fit it should be done by the now Earl of Ormond, and that he settle to the Lady Elizabeth and the heirs of her body the castles, manors, &c. she already has assured her by her father, and supply and make up to her and her heirs an estate in other lands which; together with that already in her possession, may amount to 800l, per ann. as it was at the time of the letter written to the Earl.
We do therefore order, decree, and award that the Lady Elizabeth and the heirs of her body and her feoffees in trust for her or to her use shall and may from henceforth lawfully and quietly enjoy against the now Earl and his heirs and every other person in trust for him or to his use the manors, &c. hereafter expressed, now in the possession of Lord and Lady Dingwall. (Here follows a list of the said manors.) And, further, for the making up of the value of 800l. so intended by the late Earl, we do hereby award and decree that the now Earl and his heirs, &c. shall within that space by good and sufficient conveyance at the like costs settle, assure, and appoint to the Lady Elizabeth, &c. the said several manors before mentioned, together with all deeds, &c. concerning the lands to her awarded. And as the now Earl, by articles of agreement dated 4 Jan. 1613, and by an obligation under his hand and seal of the sum of 6,000l, dated 18 Jan. following, stands bound to the Lady Elizabeth for payment of all such debts as should appear by good proof or specialty to be due to the late Viscount Butler, her husband, at the time of his death, we, holding it fit to require of the now Earl the payment of the same debts, do therefore order and award that the now Earl, &c. shall, within the space of three years next ensuing, pay all such debts of the late Viscount, and within the space of six months next ensuing satisfy all the sureties of the late Viscount such principal and interest as they have paid, and indemnify such sureties against the same.
And because it may happen that divers of the charters, deeds, &c., which are the strength of the title of the lands in them contained, may concern as well the lands hereby awarded to the said Earl as the lands awarded to the Lady Dingwall, we do therefore decree and award both parties shall, within two years, produce and deliver into our Court of Chancery of Ireland all such as do promiscuously concern the lands hereby severally awarded, which so delivered we hereby order and decree shall there remain for ever for the common and indifferent security of both parties to make use of, which we will shall be done upon motion to be made to our said court, and upon caution to be first given respectively for the safe re-delivering of the same into that court again, nevertheless giving them and their heirs as aforesaid free liberty, power, and authority. And because we have given two years for the perfecting of the several assurances, unless the same be hastened by the several requests of the parties, we do hereby award and decree that the parties respectively shall and may forthwith enter into all and every the lands severally to them awarded, and take possession and claim and challenge the trust or use thereof, and then quietly to hold and enjoy together with the rents and profits thereof as is hereby intended and declared without interruption each of other. And for further settling the premises, we do hereby declare our intent and pleasure to be that at our next Parliament to be holden in Ireland, all and the said manors and lands, &c. be enacted and established by our Parliament to be and remain for ever as the same are herein by our award appointed. And we hereby declare that we shall give our royal assent to such Act if any such shall be offered for our assent. And we further order and award that the said Earl Walter and the Lady Elizabeth and their heirs respectively shall do their best endeavours to have this our award established, ratified, and confirmed at the next Parliament at the equal and indifferent charges of both parties, and that this our award and decree shall be entered and set down within our realm of Ireland as an Act of State before our Deputy and Council there, thereby requiring as well them as all our judges, justices, officers, &c. there for the time being that they be aiding and assisting to see this award and decree in all points to be executed and fulfilled according to our intention herein expressed. In witness whereof we have caused our letters to be made patents. Witness ourself at Westminster. Oct. 3, 1618.
Signed: Younge and Pye, ex per H. Yelverton.
Copy.

The LORDS COMMISSIONERS' REPORT TO HIS MAJESTY, concerning the plantation of Longford and O'Carroll's country, upon the escheated lands in those counties.  MS 613, p. 89b  1618

Former reference: MS 613, p. 89b

6 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. V, document 203.

Contents:
We to whom the business of Longford and O'Carroll's country was referred, with the advice and approbation of the rest of your Privy Council, offer these propositions following, to be observed in the plantation there to be made.
(1.) According to the survey now taken, the escheated lands of all sorts in Longford amount together to 130,356 acres, and in O'Carroll's country to 54,199; total 184,555.
(2.) Out of which, allowance being made of the glebes, abbey lands, lands formerly granted to patentees, which are not to be meddled with, unprofitable mountain, wood, and bog as they are found by the survey, there will remain of good land and profitable wood to be disposed: in Longford, 66,190 ac.; in O'Carroll's country, 36,872; total 103,062.
Then follow a number of suggestions, of which the following are the most important:--
(5.) It is best for the King's service that the undertakers, according to their several qualities, should have proportions of profitable land, some of 1,000 acres, others of 600, 500, 400, 300, and 200 a piece, besides bog, barren mountain, and unprofitable woods, of which there is likewise division to be made amongst them, by which course the buildings will be more, the bodies of men in greater numbers, and consequently the plantations will be stronger and better settled. The same order to be held in planting of the natives, but with this caution, that none of the better sort shall have more than a fourth part taken from them.
(8.) Every ancient pretended possessor who shall be now made a freeholder shall part with at least a fourth part of the lands he formerly possessed, besides a ratable proportion towards the compounding for the two yearly rents, now taken upon the country; that is of 200l. composition to Malbie's heirs, 120 beeves to the manor of Graynard.
(9.) Many of the principal natives are civil men, have built good houses and bawns, and some of them strong castles, and to these it may well stand with the King's goodness (if it may with the conveniency of the plantation) to regrant them their houses and castles again, with lands about them, upon the same conditions that the other natives have theirs. Your Deputy and Commissioners to be required to have a special care to give contentment to the best gentlemen and chiefs of several septs, by making good provision for them, that the clamours of the multitude may be restrained.
(10.) The places where the undertakers should be planted may be left to the discretion of the Deputy and Commissioners, though we are of opinion that it would sooner civilize the people and keep them from their private meetings, to have the undertakers mixed among them than to be designed to any place by themselves.
(11.) We desire that your Majesty should rather gain a good people and make a strong country than a rackrent, and therefore we do not advise a greater rent should be taken for this land than 2½d. an acre of the undertakers and natives one with another, all alike, for the good land in respect of the charge of the building and planting, and for the bog, barren mountain, and unprofitable wood (of which every native and undertaker is to have an addition to their other proportions). The Lord Deputy and Commissioners to be appointed are to set rents upon the same by the acre, both to the natives and undertakers, according to the goodness and quality thereof.
(12.) Every undertaker and native of 1,000 acres is to hold of you in capite, others of the lesser proportions to hold of your castle in Dublin in free and common soccage.
(13.) That every undertaker and native of 1,000 ac. shall be bound within three years to build a castle 30 foot in length, 20 in breadth, and 25 in height, to be built of stone or brick with lime, and compassed in with a bawn of 300 foot in compass of stone or brick with lime; and every undertaker of 600 and so to 1,000 ac. to be bound to build a strong house of stone or brick with lime within a bawn of 200 feet in compass; and every undertaker of a quantity under 600 ac. to build a good house of stone or brick with lime. The natives of these two last named proportions to be left to themselves.
(14.) That every proportion of 1,000 ac. shall have a manor with a court baron, with power to create tenures, and a leet, and every proportion of 600 and so to 1,000 ac. shall have a manor with a court baron, with power to create tenures. The proportions under 600 ac. to have neither.
(15.) That among all the undertakers and natives there may be grants made of 6 market towns, in the most convenient places, and no more, and fairs in so moderate a number, and rents to be reserved upon both.
(16.) That no native shall have granted unto him less than 100 ac. except very few upon good consideration, and none at all under 60; and all of them to hold immediately from your Majesty to lessen the dependency upon their lords.
(17.) That every undertaker and native that is bound to build may have liberty to take a proportionable quantity of timber and other materials for his building in any place within the plantation, by warrant of the Lord Deputy and Commissioners, within a limitation of the time of that liberty.
(20.) That the natives may be left at liberty to alien to British without licence, but be tied by a proviso of forfeiture in their patents not to sell their lands in fee simple or fee tail, or lease them above 40 years or 3 lives, to any of the Irish, lest the old landlords should grow great again; and the like, if they shall at any time enter into action of rebellion. And that care be likewise had that they make certain estates to their under-tenants, and not to leave them at will to shift every year.
(21.) That every undertaker and native be bound to sow yearly a quantity of hemp.
(22.) That the Lord Deputy and Commissioners may be warranted to grant a quantity of land to each parish church for the bettering of the livings of the poor incumbents as was done in Wexford, which is to be deducted out of the whole before your Majesty's fourth part be taken.
(23.) That a corporate town may be established in some convenient place within the plantation, and 100 ac. to be allotted to the burgesses that shall undertake it, with warrant to make a grant of a corporation with such name and such immunities and privileges as were granted to the new corporation in the escheated lands of Ulster, and that some lands may be allotted for the maintenance of a free school, which are likewise to be deducted as aforesaid.
(24.) That the natives be tied by a proviso of forfeiture neither to take upon them the name of O'Farroll, nor to yield to, set up, or maintain that name, by giving of rent, cutting, or service, nor divide their lands by gavelkind.
(25.) That the whole charge of admeasuring the county and other necessary expenses for the finishing of those lands, may be borne by the undertakers and natives by equal contribution; but the charge to be viewed by the Deputy and Commissioners, and no more raised than has been duly disbursed.
(26.) No man to be admitted an undertaker but such as will readily take the oath of supremacy, and, as far as may be, the natives to be drawn to this course.
(27.) That every undertaker and native be bound before he has his patent to perform all the conditions of the plantation within 3 years. The bonds to be duly taken and kept in Ireland.
(28.) None of them to have power to alien their lands to one another without licence of the state, for so all may in time be drawn into the hands of some few of the undertakers, and the plantation come to nothing; nor to alien at all to the mere Irish, but upon forfeiture of the lands to the Crown.
(29.) None to be admitted to any lands but such as will in person dwell upon them, build, and plant.
(30.) No man to be admitted as undertaker in this plantation that has any lands in any other plantation.
Signed: G. Cant., G. Carew, T. Arundell, Robert Naunton.
Copy.

The LORDS COMMISSIONERS REPORT TO HIS MAJESTY, concerning the plantation of Longford and O'Carroll's country, upon the escheated lands in these counties.  MS 613, p. 92  1618

Former reference: MS 613, p. 92

1 Page.

Contents:
Continuation of MS 613, p. 89b.
The fourth part being 25,765 ac. may be disposed of to 56 undertakers in such several proportions as follows; viz.--4, of 1,000 ac. a piece=4,000; 8, of 600=4,800; 10, of 500=5,000; 10, of 400=4,000; 12, of 300=3,600; 12, of 200=2,400. These several proportions are of good and profitable lands, and amount to 23,800 acres. There will then remain to satisfy the claim made by the Bishop of Ossory, and to augment the glebes to the Church, if your Majesty please, 1,965 acres. And if the Bishop and the rest can be otherwise provided for, then this 1,965 may be disposed of to undertakers, or so much of it as your Deputy and Commissioners shall think fit.
(Signed): G. Cant., T. Arrundell, G. Carew, Robert Naunton.

COUNTY LONGFORD.--A brief Certificate of the number of acres of land, and nature, in co. Longford and territories of Elly O'Carroll, as the same are found by late measure made by Sir Tho. Rotheram, W. Parsons, his Majesty's Surveyor General, and Nich. Pynnar.  MS 613, p. 87  30 Nov 1618

Former reference: MS 613, p. 87

4 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. V, document 204.

Contents:
Barony of Granard.--Arable and pasture, 14,036 acres; profitable wood, 2,294; bog, 4,905; unprofitable wood and bog, 2,323; mountain, unprofitable, 360; formerly granted by patents, 4,939; abbey held by patent, 7,229; glebe of new endowment, none; total, 36,086.
Barony of Ardagh.--Arable and pasture, 10,930; profitable woods, 1,395; bog, 5,109; unprofitable woods and bog, 486; mountain, unprofitable, none; formerly granted by patent, 1,055; abbey, as before, 280; glebe, 40; total, 19,295.
Barony of Shrowle.--Arable and pasture, 6,894 acres; profitable woods, 226; bog, 1,324; unprofitable woods and bog, 113; mountain, unprofitable, none; formerly granted by patents, 1,297; abbey, as before, 1,729; glebe, 37; total, 11,620.
Barony of Rathelyne.--Arable and pasture, 8,676; profitable woods, 1,648; bog, 2,126; unprofitable wood and bog, 804; mountain, unprofitable, none; formerly granted by patents, 465; abbey, as before, 2,464; glebe, 34; total, 16,217.
Barony of Moydowe.--Arable and pasture, 7,245; profitable woods, 1,030; bog, 2,009; unprofitable wood and bog, 1,740; mountain, unprofitable, 164; formerly granted by patents, 1,075; abbey, as before, 60; glebe, 66; total, 13,389.
Barony of Longford.--Arable and pasture, 10,022; profitable wood, 1,794; bog, 10,370; unprofitable wood and bog, 6,993; mountain, unprofitable, 1,186; formerly granted by patents, 2,282; abbey, as before, 84; glebe, 18; total, 32,749.
Total.--Arable land and pasture, 57,803; profitable wood, 8,387; bog, 25,843; unprofitable wood and bog, 12,459; mountain, unprofitable, 1,710; formerly granted by patents, 12,113; abbey, 11,846; glebe, 195; total, 130,356.
Com Regis (Kings County), territory of Elly O'Carroll.--Arable and pasture, 32,090; profitable wood, 4,782; bog, 5,642; unprofitable wood and bog, 4,627; mountain, unprofitable, 3,431; formerly granted by patents, 3,360; abbey, 136; glebe, 131; total, 54,199. It is to be observed in this certificate of the quantities above written that only the two kinds, viz., arable pasture and profitable wood, are to pass as valuable; all the rest are of very little value.
Copy.

The LORD DEPUTY'S second advice concerning the plantation of Longford and O'Carroll country.  MS 613, p. 89  1618

Former reference: MS 613, p. 89

2 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. V, document 205.

Contents:
If his Majesty resolve to make estates in fee farm, according to the cost of plantation in other places used, I pray their Lordships to peruse the former project I sent the last summer, and consider the advice therein set down for the grounds of distribution. That it may please his Majesty and their Lordships, upon notice of the exact quantities subject to division now sent, that his Majesty would declare how much land he would have divided amongst undertakers, servitors, and natives; to how many persons he will grant the same, and of what quantities they shall consist. But if his Majesty shall resolve to grant all the escheated lands in lease, as well to natives as to British and servitors, in that case I pray their Lordships to take into consideration these things following:--
1. That his Majesty may out of a general quantity set apart such portions as shall be thought fit to give satisfaction, for the rent of 200l. a year paid to Mr. Malbye; and the six score rent beeves paid to the manor of Granard; to the end that his Majesty's fee farmers and lessees may be freed from the distresses and extortions of other men.
2. That proportion being set apart how much of the residue shall be leased to natives, and how much to British undertakers and servitors.
3. Of the portion to be appointed to natives, whether it will not be fit to grant every principal native his dwellinghouse and a reasonable demesne thereunto in fee farm, and the residue in lease, without which all buildings now being an omission will decay and none will be added; and the same course to be held for British undertakers and servitors.
4. What quantities his Majesty will be pleased to lease to the several persons, as well natives as British, &c., and therein consideration to be had of the former advices, for it will be ill to lease much to any.
5. To appoint where the plantation of the British shall be in each county, either towards the English pale or towards the Irish, and whether his Majesty will not think fit to continue some of the principal men in the castles which themselves have built.
It is to be observed in the certificate of the quantities of land now sent over, that only the two qualities, viz., arable and pasture and profitable woods, are to pass as valuable lands; all the rest are of little value and to pass at smaller rates. What shall be imposed upon the patentees of fee farms, or leases towards the defraying of the admeasurement and other charges necessarily to be disbursed about the work of plantation, and whether the whole charges be laid upon them by small contribution for the saving of his Majesty's charge. What rent shall be ratably laid upon each acres, as well good as bad, and how much upon fee farmers that are to build, and how much upon farmers for years. For what terms the leases shall continue. That a caveat be given, that none of the lands forleased shall be passed upon any books in fee farm or fee simple, else the course of the plantation may be overthrown. What directions their Lordships will give for the measuring of the county of Leytrim, McCoghlan, and O'Mulloyes countries, and the residue of those escheated lands, and when their Lordships shall be pleased it shall begin ?
Copy.

A BOOK of the PLANTATION of ULSTER.  MS 613, p. 93  28 March 1619

Former reference: MS 613, p. 93

105 Pages.

Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. V, document 211.

Contents:
Ulster.--A brief view and survey made in several places, in the counties within named, between 1 Dec. 1618 and 28 March 1619, by me Nichollas Pynnar, &c., by virtue of a commission under the Great Seal of Ireland, dated 28 Nov. 1618. Herein are set forth the names of the British undertakers, servitors, and principal natives, with their proportions, and the undertakers of towns in the several counties of Armagh, Tyrone, Donegall, Cavan, and Fermanagh; how they have performed their buildings and plantations; and other matters, answerable to articles in the said commission annexed, together with the works performed by the city of London and city and co. of Londonderry.
Co. Cavan.--Precincts of Clanchie, alloted to Scottish undertakers. The Lord Aubignie, first patentee, 1, 3,000; Sir Ja. Hamilton holds these lands by the names called Keneth, 2,000 ac.; and Cashell, otherwise Castle Aubignie, 1,000 ac. Upon this proportion is built a strong castle of lime and stone, called Castle Aubigny, with the King's arms cut in freestone over the gate. This is 5 stories high, with 4 round towers for flankers; the body 50 foot long, and 28 broad, the roof set up and ready to be slated. Adjoining one end of the castle is a bawn of lime and stone 80 ft. square with 2 flankers, 15 ft. high, very strongly built and surely wrought. In this castle he himself, his lady, and family dwells. It stands upon a meeting of five beaten ways which keep all that part of the country. Planted and estated upon this land of British birth and descent are: Freeholders, 8; viz., one having 480 acres, 2 of 144 apiece, 2 of 192 jointly; 1 of 108, 2 of 120 apiece, 1 of 96, and 1 of 48. Leaseholders for years 5, viz.: 1 of 102, 2 of 96 apiece, 1 of 168, 1 of 100 ac. Cottagers 25, viz.: each man a tenement, a small quantity of land and commons for certain number of cattle. In toto, 41 families, which consist of 80 men armed. 36 of the heads of these have taken the oath of supremacy. Good tillage, and husbandry in English manner.
(2.) John Hamilton, 1,000 acres, called Killochan. Has built a bawn of lime and stone 80 ft. sq. and 13 ft. high, with 2 round towers for flankers, being 12 ft. the piece in diameter; also begun a stone house, now one story high, and intended to be 4, being 48 ft. long and 24 ft. broad; besides 2 towers, which are vaulted, flank the house; another bawn, near adjoining former, built of stone and clay, 100 ft. sq. and 12 ft high. Here are begun 2 houses of clay and stone, one to be 80 ft. long, the other 60, and each to be 20 ft. in breadth. Also a village of 8 houses joining the bawn, being inhabited by British tenants, a watermill, and 5 houses adjoining it. Estated upon this, of British birth and descent are 2 freeholders of 120 acres apiece. Lessees for years, 6: of 148 apiece. Cottagers 7. Each of these have a house and garden plot and commons for 4 cows. In toto, 15 families, 40 men armed. These 15 principal tenants have taken the oath of supremacy. Good tillage, after the manner of England.
(3.) Wm. Hamilton, 1,000, called Dromyck. Has built a bawn, 80 ft. square, of lime and stone, with 2 round towers for flankers, 2 stories high, vaulted; wall itself 13 foot high within the bawn, a house of lime and stone 36 foot long and 20 ft. broad, and near, a village of 5 houses, all British families. Estated upon this, of British birth and descent: 2 freeholders, of 120 ac. apiece. 2 lessees for 3 lives, 1 of 42 ac., 1 of 54. 4 lessees for years: 1 of 128 ac., 1 of 84, 1 of 48, 1 of 36. Cottagers that hold for years 6: 1 of 30, 1 of 20, 1 of 15, 1 of 12,1 of 11,1 of 10 ac. In toto, 14 families, 30 able men to serve the King. 12 of the heads of these families have taken the oath of supremacy. Tillage, &c., after the English manner.
(4.) Wm. Bealy, 1,000 ac., called Tonregue. Has built a bawn of lime and stone 90 ft. square, with two flankers, and in one of the flankers a castle, which is already above the first story and the length 30 ft., the breadth 22, vaulted; another house at one corner, 20 ft. square, vaulted, both one story high. In this himself, with wife and family, now dwell. Estated upon this, of British birth and descent are 2 freeholders, 1 of 144 ac., 1 of 48. Leaseholders for years 4: 2 of 96 apiece, 2 of 48 apiece. Cottagers for years 4: 2 of 20 ac. jointly, 1 of 5 ac., 1 of 4. In toto, 10 families, 28 men armed. These ten have taken the oath of supremacy. Good tillage, after the English manner.
The precinct of Castlerahin allotted to servitors and natives, Sir Wm. Taffe was first patentee.
(5.) Sir Tho. Ashe, Kt., 1,000 ac., called Mullagh. Upon this is an old castle, newly mended, but all the land is now inhabited with Irish. Sir Edm. Phettiplace first patentee.
(6.) Sir Tho. Ashe holds 1,000 ac., called Carvyn. Upon this is a good bawn of lime and stone, 70 ft. square, with two flankers, and 12 ft. high, all the land inhabited with Irish. Lieut. East, the first patentee.
(7.) Sir Tho. Ashe, Kt., 500 ac., called Miermode. Upon this is a bawn of sods, all the land inhabited with Irish. Capt. Ridgwaie first patentee.
(8.) Capt. Culme, 1,000 ac., called Logh-Rammarals, manor of Chichester. Upon this is a bawn of lime and stone, 180 ft. square, with two flankers, and 14 ft. high; a house in it of lime and stone, which is in building now about the second story. The roof ready to be set on. Has 4 English families, and this bawn stands upon a passage, which is able to do good service. Capt. Culme is to build a town called Virginia, for which he is allowed 250 ac. Upon this he has built about 8 timber houses, and put into them English tenants, of which town there is a minister who keeps school and is a very good preacher.
(9.) Sir John Elliott, Kt., 400 ac., called Muckon. Upon this is a bawn of lime and stone, 60 ft. square, and a small house, all the land being inhabited with Irish.
(10.) Shane McPhillipp O'Ralie, 900 ac. Upon this is a small bawn of sods and an Irish house, wherein he dwells.
The precinct of Tullagh-garvy allotted to servitors.
(11.) Capt. Hugh Culme and Arch. Moore, 1,500 ac., called Tullavyn. Upon this is a bawn and towers thoroughly finished, roof of the house framed and ready to be set up. It stands in a place of great strength. The said Archibald, with his wife and family, dwell in it. 4 English families about him, the rest of the land is inhabited with Irish.
(12.) Sir Thomas and John Ashe, 750, called Drumesheele. Upon this is a bawn of clay and stone, another of sods, 120 ft, square, all inhabited with Irish.
(13.) Mullmorie McPhillip O'Reyley, 1,000 ac., called Ittery-outra. Upon this is a very strog bawn of sods, with 4 flankers and a deep moat, a good Irish house within it, in which himself and family dwell. He has made no estates.
(14.) Capt. Reyley, 1,000 ac., called Liscannor. Upon this is a bawn of sods and a house in it, in which he dwells; he has made no estates, but from year to year, and all his tenants plough by the tail.
(15.) Mulmorie Oge O'Reley, 3,000 ac. Upon this is a bawn of sods, and in it an old castle, now built up, wherein he and his family dwell. Has made no estates to his tenants, and all plough by the tail.
(16.) Capt. Rich. Terrill and his brother William, 2,000 ac., called Iterrery. Upon this is a strong bawn of lime and stone, 80 ft. square, 12 ft. high, with 4 flankers. Has made no estates.
(17.) Mawric [Maurice] McTelligh, 3,000 ac., called Liscurcron. A bawn of sods, and in it a good Irish house, in which he and his family dwell.
The precinct of Toghtee.
Freeholders, 7, viz.
Lessees for years 7.
Cottagers in fee.
(18.) The precinct of Toghtee, English undertakers. John Tayler, 1,500 ac., called Aghteduff. Upon this is a castle, and bawn thoroughly finished, wherein he and his family dwell. Estated upon this, of British birth and descent: 1 of 288 ac., 1 of 264, 1 of 96, 2 of 48 apiece, 2 of 24 apiece. 1 of 192 ac., 2 of 48 apiece, 2 of 24 apiece, 2 of 48 ac. apiece. 3 of 60 ac. apiece, 3 of 31 apiece, 2 of 30 apiece, 1 of 4, 1 of 2.
In toto, 24 families, besides divers undertenants, 54 men armed. All these have taken the oath of supremacy, and dwell most of them in a village of 14 houses, in which there is a water mill, but no great store of tillage.
(19.) Tho. Waldron, son and heir to Sir Rich. Waldron, Kt., deceased, 2,000 ac., called Dromhill and Dromollan. Upon this is a bawn of sods 200 ft. square with 4 flankers, but much is fallen down. The castle or stone houses is finished, and he with his mother, the Lady Waldron, and family, dwell in it. Has built a town of 31 houses, all inhabited with English, a windmill, a thoroughfare and common passing into the country. A little tillage. Estated upon this, of British families of birth and descent; are
Freeholders, 5, viz.
2 of 96 ac. apiece, 1 of 192, 2 of 48 ac. apiece;
Lessees for years 17.
3 of 96 apiece, 2 of 48 ac. apiece, 1 of 72, 9 of 24 apiece, 2 of 33 apiece.
Cottagers, 31.
All these have a house and two ac., and commons for 12 cattle apiece. In toto, 57 families; 80 men very well armed.
(20.) John Fisher, 2,000 ac., called Dromany. Upon this is a bawn and castle long since finished, very strong, and he himself, with his wife and family, dwell therein. Has also built 2 villages of 10 houses each of lime and stone, and two good innholders, for they stand upon a roadway. Estated upon this, of British families, are as follows;
Freeholders, 4.
2 of 192 ac. apiece, 1 of 144, of 130.
Leases for 3 lives, 4.
2 of 150 apiece, 1 of 120, 1 of 144.
Lessees for years 14.
4 of 92 apiece, 4 of 48 apiece, 2 of 24 apiece, 1 of 30, 2 of 40 apiece, 1 of 20.
Cottages, 14.
Each of these have a house and garden plot and commons for four head of cattle.
This is now in the hands of McAdwick.
In toto, 22 families, besides cottagers; 60 men well armed.
(21.) Sir Hugh Warrall, Kt., 1,500 ac., called Monaghan. Upon this there is no bawn, but he is building a house of lime and stone, which is but two stories high, so it has been these two years. And now he has made it away to Mr. Adwick who is in possession. Estated upon this, of British families are:
Freeholders, 3.
2 of 96 acres apiece, 1 of 48.
Lessees, 5.
2 of 48 apiece, 1 of 72, 2 of 24 apiece.
Cottagers I saw not any, nor any counterpane to make it appear, but they said they have eight, whose names they gave me. These eight families with the eight cottages, are able to make 26 men, but for arms I saw not any, neither is there any place to keep them.
(22.) Sir Steph. Butler, Kt., 2,000 ac., called Clones. Castle and bawn finished, of great strength. Has built 2 corn mills and 1 fulling mill. He is also able to arm 200 men with very good arms, which are within, besides others which are dispersed to his tenants for their safeguard. Estated upon this, of British familes, there are:
Freeholders, 15.
1 of 144 ac., 2 of 96, 6 of 48 apiece, 6 of 24 apiece.
Lessees for 3 lives.
1 of 264, 1 of 144, 9 of 48 ac. apiece.
Lessees for years 15.
1 of 144, 5 of 48 apice, 6 of 24 apiece, 3 of 12 apiece.
In toto, 40 families, besides undertenants, able to make 135 men armed.
(23.) Sir Step. Butler and the undertakers of the precinct are to plant a town at Bolturbutt, and for that is allowed 384 ac., and to build a church. In this town there are 35 houses built of cagework, all inhabited with British tenants, and most are tradesmen, each having a house and garden plot with four ac. of land, and commons for certain number of cows and garrons.
Reginald Horne was first patentee.
(24.) Sir Geo. Mannering, Kt., 2,000 ac., called Lisreaghe, Upon this is a bawn of lime and stone 44 ft. long, 12 high. with two flankers, a brick house the same length, 20 ft. high, all of good work and strong, also a village of seven houses, all inhabited with English families. Estated with British families as follows;
Freeholders, 3.
Lessees for years 21.
1 of 144 ac., 2 of 192 apiece, 4 of 48 apiece, 1 of 51½, 8 of 24 apiece, 4 of 48. Jointly, 3 of 20 apiece, 1 of 30. In toto, 24 families, besides undertenants, able to make 48 men, as they say, but I did not see them.
William Snow was first patentee.
(25.) Pet. Ameas, 1,500 ac., called Tonagh. Upon this is a good bawn of lime and stone 75 ft. square, 12 high, with two flankers, a stone house within it 60 ft. long and three stories high, strongly built, and a village not far from it of seven houses. Estated upon this, of British families, there are;
Freeholders, 4.
3 of 480 ac. jointly, 1 of 48.
Lessees for years 7.
3 of 96 apiece, 7 of 96, 1 of 68, 2 of 96 ac. apiece. Total, 11 families, besides divers undertenants, able to make 30 men.
Precinct of Clonemahowne allotted to servitors and natives.
Capt. Lyons and Joseph Fennes were first patentees.
(26.) The Lord Lambert, 2,000 ac., called the Carigg-Upon this is a large strong bawn and a stone house finished long since, inhabited by an English gentleman, resident with family.
(27.) The Lord Lambert, 1,000 ac., called Tullacullen. A bawn of lime and stone 200 ft. square, 14 high, and a deep moat and two flankers. A small house in which dwells an English gentleman and other English families, who hold land for 21 years.
Lieutenant Atkinson and Lieutenant Russell were first patentees.
(28.) Arch. Moore, 1,000 ac. A strong bawn with two flankers, in which is an Irish house and one dwelling in it.
(29.) Capt. Flemming, 500 ac. A small bawn with two flankers. An Irish house and one dwelling in it. A house of lime and stone very strong.
Natives.
(30.) Mullmorie McHugh O'Reley, 2,000 ac., called Commett. A strong house of lime and stone 40 ft. long, 20 broad, three stories high, a bawn. No estates.
(31.) Phillip McTyrlagh, 300 ac., called Wateragh. A bawn and an Irish house, in which he is now dwelling.
Precinct of Tullaghconchoe, allotted to Scottish undertakers.
Sir Alexr. Hamilton the first patentee.
(32.) Jane Hamilton, late wife to Claud Hamilton, dec., 2,000 ac., called Garotobber and Clonkine. A strong castle, bawn of lime and stone, finished, she and her family live therein. Planted and estated upon this, of British: 1 of 288 ac., 1 of 144, 1 of 96, 3 of 48 apiece. Lessees for years, 2 of 144 apiece, 3 of 96, 14 of 48 apiece, 4 of 96. Jointly, 2 of 24 apiece. In toto, 31 families, with divers undertenants, 52 men, 14 of the heads of these have taken the oath of supremacy.
Sir Claud Hamilton was the first patentee.
(33.) The said Jane, 1,000 ac., called Clonney. No castle built, but a town of 22 houses. The inhabitants, have no estates as yet. Her son being under age, ten of the principal have taken the oath of supremacy. Each of these have a house and garden with four ac., and commons for cows.
Alexander and John Aghmootie were the first patentees.
(34.) Sir Ja. Craigg, Kt., 2,000 ac., called Dromheda & Killagh. A strong bawn of lime and stone 75 ft. square, 16 high, with four round towers. A strong castle, length of bawn 20 broad within, five stories high. Another house is building in the bawn, now built to the top of the wall, and to be a platform for two small pieces. British tenants, planted and estated who are resident:
Freeholders, 5.
1 of 96 ac., 3 of 48 apiece, 1 of 24.
Lessees, 7.
1 of 168, 2 of 48 apiece, 3 of 24 apiece.
Cottages, 21.
Each have a house with commons. In toto, 32 families, resident, 100 men armed.
John Brown was the first patentee.
(35.) Arch. Atcheson, 1,000 ac., called Corrodownan. Bawn of stone and clay 100 ft. sq., with four flankers 9 ft. high, standing on a mountain. Planted with English and Scottish, but they have not taken out their leases which I saw drawn and signed. Of the tenants there are;
Freeholders, 2.
1 of 144 ac., 1 of 120.
Lessees for years 19.
4 of 50 apiece, 2 of 48, jointly; 5 of 30 apiece, 3 of 36 apiece, 2 of 48, jointly; 3 of 48 apiece.
In toto, 21 families, 28 men. Eight have taken the oath of supremacy. The rest refused till they have their leases.
Precinct of Tullagtha, servitors and natives.
(36.) Capt. Culme and Walt. Talboott, 1,500 ac., called Balleconnell. Have built a strong bawn 100 ft. sq., 12 ft. high, with two flankers, and within a strong castle of lime and stone, three stories high. Stands in a convenient place for the strength and service of the country.
(37.) Sir Rich. and Sir Geo. Grimes, 2,000 ac. Have built a bawn of stone and lime 60 ft. sq. and 10 ft. high, with a little house in it.
(38.) Wm. Parsons, 1,000 ac., called Larga. It is between divers men, for it was granted for concealments, and they were not bound to build at all.
(39.) A native's 1,000 ac., called Magauran. A strong and good house of lime and stone with a ditch.
County Fermanagh precinct of Knocknyny, allotted to Scottish undertakers.
The Lord Burleigh was the first patentee.
(40.) Sir Ja. Belford, Kt., 1,000 ac., Carowshee, otherwise Belfed, and 2,000 ac., called Legan, but the one is in a remote place.
Building began at Castle Sheagh, foundation laid of a bawn of lime and stone, 70 ft. sq. of which two sides are 15 ft. high, also a castle, same length, one half two stories high, and is to be 3½, numbers of men at work, and are bound to finish it speedily. All materials in place, both strong and bountiful, a plot laid out for a church which must be 75 ft. long, and 24 broad, now in hand and to be finished this summer. A school 64 ft. long and 20 broad, and two stories high, of good stone, &c., roof ready framed and shall presently be got up. Near to the castle is a house in which Sir James and family now dwell adjoining a town of 48 houses of timber work and mud walls, inhabited with British, and is the only thoroughfare into the country. I find planted on these two proportions, 82 armed men, which I saw, but not any one of these have any stalls [...] estates as yet, as they told me, or leastways they did not show me any.
The Lo. Kinkell was the first patentee.
(41.) Mr. Adwick, 1,000 ac., called Aghalane. A bawn of clay and stone, rough cast over with lime, 50 ft. sq. and 12 high, 2 flankers, a poor thatched house within. Planted upon this, of British, 10; but I saw no estates more than by promise, which are here named, &c.:
Freeholders, 6.
Leesees, 4.
1 of 180 ac., 1 of 60, 4 of 120, jointly; 2 of 60 apiece, 1 of 30, 1 of 40, 10 families, the rest are Irish.
James Fraile was the first patentee.
(42.) Mr. Adwick, 1,000 ac., called Dristernam. A bawn began of lime and stone, 60 ft. sq. with 2 flankers, but it is not as yet above 5 ft. from the ground. No English tenants, but all inhabited with Irish.
The Lord Mountwhany was the first patentee.
(43.) Sir Steph. Butler, 1,500 ac., called Kilspena. A bawn of lime and stone, 60 ft. sq., 12 ft. high with 2 flankers. Within a house of lime and stone. Planted and estated, of British: 1 of 180, 3 of 120 apiece, 1 of 140, 1 of 90, 6 of 60 apiece. In toto, 12 families of 15 men who dwell dispersedly; not one freeholder but many Irish.
Lessees for years
Sir John Whisher was first patentee.
Lessees for years 17.
Cottagers in fee, 45.
(44.) Sir Steph. Butler, Kt., 1,500, called Leytrim. A bawn of lime and stone, 70 ft. sq. and 12 high with 2 flankers 3 stories high, a good stone house in building, now 1 story high. Planted and estated, of British: 3 having 240 ac., apiece, 3 of 120 apiece, 1 of 90, 6 of 60 apiece, 3 of 30 apiece, 1 of 10. Each has a house and 10 ac., and dwell most of them in a town adjoining to the bawn, 8 of these have taken the oath of supremacy, making 66 men with arms.
George Smelhome was the first patentee.
Lessees for years 3.
(45.) Sir Stephen Butler, Kt., 1,000 ac., called Derryanie. A small bawn of clay and stone, 60 ft. sq., with 2 flankers, a little house in it. Planted and estated upon this, of British; 1 of 500, 1 of 250, 1 of 60. In toto, 3 families, besides under-tenants, making 15 men, many Irish on this.
Precinct of Clancally, English.
(46.) John Ledborrow, 1,000 ac., called Latgar. A poor bawn of sods, of a round form, much of it fallen down, nobody dwelling in it, and a pound for cattle. Planted and estated upon this, of British: 1 of 420, 1 of 240, 1 of 240, 3 of 60 apiece. Freeholders, 6. 12 others whose estates I saw not, for many of these dwell in other countries. Of these 18 families, 1 took the oath of supremacy. Able to make 24 men.
(47.) Th. Flowerdew, 1,000 ac., called Lisrisk. A large round bawn of lime and stone, a little house of stone within, a small village adjoining of 6 houses inhabited with English, of cagework. Planted and estated, of British: 1 of 180 ac., 1 of 60, 1 of 90, 3 of 60 apiece, 2 of 60, jointly; 2 of 40 jointly, 5 of 30 apiece, 10 of 20. In toto, 16 families, now resident; 9 have taken the oath of supremacy, and make, with under-tenants, 40 men.
Freeholders, 2.
Lessees for years 14.
Robert Boges was the first patentee.
(48.) Edw. Hatton, 1,000 ac., called Clamcarn. Upon this is an excellent strong house and bawn, well seated for the King's service and strength of the country. Watermill for corn, and within half a mile, 4 good timber houses, and 6 more building. The town stands in a common road into the country. Is a minister and a good teacher of the word of God. Planted and estated upon this, of British: 1 of 120, 1 of 130, 1 of 240, 4 of 60. Each have a house and garden plot and 4 ac., 2 have taken oath of supremacy; 20 men in all, well armed.
Freeholders, 2.
Lessees, 5.
Cottagers, 8.
Thomas Plomstead was first patentee.
(49.) Sir Hugh Wirrall, Kt., 1,000 ac., called Ardmagh. Upon this is a bawn of lime and stone, 66 ft. sq., with 2 flankers and a little stone house within standing waste, no freeholder nor leaseholder, and but 3 poor men who have no estates, for all the land at this time is inhabited with Irish.
Peter Calvert was the first patentee.
(50.) Geo. Ridgway, 1,000 ac., called Gutgoonan. Upon this is a bawn of lime and stone in building, 60 ft. sq., and not above 8 ft. high, tenants dwell dispersedly. Planted and estated on this, of British: 1 of 100 ac., 1 of 480, 3 of 240, jointly; 1 of 160, 1 of 120, 1 of 60. In toto, 8 families, 12 men armed, and many Irish.
Freeholder, 1.
Lessees for years 7.
Precinct of Clinawly, servitors and natives.
(51.) Sir John Davis, Kt., 1,500 ac., called Lisgowelly. Upon this abbey land is built, a sure stone house but no bawn, and on this proportion not anything built.
(52.) Mrs. Harrison late wife to Capt. Harrison, dec., 500 ac., called Gurtin. Has built nothing at all.
(53.) Pierce Mostion, 300 ac., called Moycrane. Nothing built, he himself dwells in Connaught.
Precinct of Lurgie and Coolemckernan, English undertakers.
Thomas Burton was first patentee.
(54.) Sir Gerard Lowther, Kt., 2 small proportions, Drumynshin and Necarne. Upon Drumynshin is a good bawn of clay and stone, 60 ft. sq., 2 flankers, but no house. Planted and estated, of British birth and descent: 1 having 120 ac,. 1 of 200, 3 of 40 apiece, 1 of 60. Three of these have taken the oath of supremacy.
Freeholders, 5.
Leaseholder, 1.
Harrington Sutton first patentee.
(55.) Sir Gerard Lowther, Kt., 1,000. Has built upon Necarne, a strong bawn of lime and stone and a house in it, and near a village of 10 houses and a market house & a watermill. Planted and estated, of British &c.:
1 having 120 acres, 1 of 90, 1 of 73, 2 of 40, jointly, 1 of 60, 6 of 20 a piece, 1 of 18, 1 of 4.
Freeholders, 2.
Lessees for years 12.
In both proportions 16 British families, besides under-tenants, making 28 men with arms. 9 have taken the oath of supremacy.
(56.) John Archdale, 1,000 ac., called Tullana. A bawn of lime and stone, 3 flankers 15 ft. high, a good lodging, slated, with a house 80 ft. long and 3 stories high, with a battlement. Himself, wife, & family resident. A watermill, and in two several places of his land 2 villages of 8 houses a piece. Planted, &c., of British, &c.:
Freeholders, 6.
1 of 200, 1 of 120, 2 of 40 a piece, 2 of 30 a piece.
Lessees for years 10.
4 of 240 jointly, 2 of 30 a piece, 1 of 60, 1 of 20, 1 of 40, 1 of 15. Cottagers, 4. Each a house and 1 ac. of land. Abel to make 42 men, and 11 of these have taken the oath of supremacy.
(57.) Thos. Flowerdewe, 1,000 ac., called Reseguire. Nothing at all built. 2 gentlemen placed, as he thought, upon his land, but it proves to be glebe, and this is the reason he has not any English. The rest inhabited with Irish, a great number.
Hen. Humings first patentee.
(58.) Edw. Sabthorp and Hen. Flowre, 100 ac., called Dowrosse. A bawn of lime and stone 60 ft. sq., with 2 flankers. No house in it, but stands waste. Now a pound for cattle. Near is built a village of 14 houses, inhabited by English, but I saw not their estates, for the undertakers were forth of the country. All that I could see was 1 of 60 ac.
(59.) Tho. Blennerhassett, 1,000 ac., called Edernaghe. A bawn of lime and stone, height 75 ft., breadth 47, and 12 high. 4 flankers within. A house of the length thereof and 20 ft. broad, 2½ stories high. Wife and family dwell therein. Begun a church, also a village of 6 houses of cagework, inhabited with English. Planted, &c., of British: 4 freeholders,: 1 of 80 ac., 1 of 46, 1 of 22, 1 of 26. Lessees for years, 3: 1 of 60, 1 of 26, 1 of 8. In toto, 7 families, with undertenants, making 26 men, but I saw them not, for undertakers and many tenants were absent.
John Thurslon's first patentee.
(60.) Sir Edw. Blennerhassett, and Tho. Blennerhassett, 1,000 ac., called Talmackein. Nothing built, and all the land inhabited with Irish.
(61.) Fran. Blennerhassett, son to Sir Edw., 1,500 ac., called Bannaghmore. Here is a strong bawn of lime and stone 80 ft. long and 60 broad, a stone house 3 stories high, all finished. Himself and family dwell in it. A village near the bawn of 9 houses of good cagework. Planted and estated, of British: 1 of 120 ac. and a tenement, 1 of 120, 1 of 60, 1 of 50.
Freeholders, 4.
Saw no freeholders. Undertakers' in England, when I came suddenly upon them. By a jury I found the land to have 22 British, with undertenants, able to make 40 men, and store of arms, and I saw not one Irish family upon the land.
The precinct of Goole and Tyrcanada, servitors and natives.
(62.) Sir Wm. Cole, Kt., 1,000 ac., called Cornegrade. A bawn of lime and stone 68 ft. long, 56 broad, and 12 high, with two flankers. Planted and estated on this land.
Lessees for 3 lives, 7.
3 of 60 ac. each, 4 of 30 each, all have taken oath of supremacy and are able to make 18 men armed; there is also a good watermill.
(63.) Sir Hen. Folliot, Kt., 1,500 ac., called Newpurton. A strong bawn of lime and stone 150 ft. long, 120 wide, and 12 high, with 3 flankers within. A strong house of lime and stone 3 stories high. Himself, with lady and family, dwell in it. Near by is a town of 11 houses inhabited with Scottish and English. A watermill for corn.
(64.) Capt. Paul Gore, 1,000 ac., called Carick. A strong bawn of lime and stone 60 ft. sq. with 3 flankers, with a house in it inhabited by an English gentleman. On this land are 8 English families.
(65.) Capt. Rog. Atkinson, 1,000 ac., called Coole. A strong bawn of lime and stone 60 ft. sq. with 3 flankers, a strong stone house in which his wife and family dwell. 2 freeholders and 8 leaseholders, all resident, 2 watermills, a corn, and a tacking mill.
(66.) Con. McShane O'Neale, 1,500 ac., called Clabby. A little bawn of sods, and a house within of lime and stone very strongly built. 3 leaseholders, 60 ac. each for 21 years. Tenants plough after the Irish manner.
(67.) Bryan Maguire, 2,000 ac., called Tempodessell, and and 500 which were his late brother's. A large bawn of sods and a good house of lime and stone. 5 leaseholders, 60 ac. each for 21 years. Tenants plough after the Irish manner.
The precinct of Magheriboy, Scottish undertakers.
Ferremy Lynsey was the 1st patentee.
(68.) Sir Wm. Cole, 1,000 ac., called Dromskeaghe. A bawn of lime and stone 60 ft. sq., 13 high, with 4 flankers. A stone house or castle, 3 stories, strongly wrought. An excellent windmill. Planted, &c, upon this, of British, &c.:
Freeholders, 2.
2 of 120 ac. apiece;
Lessees for years, 10.
1 of 120, 2 of 90 jointly, 7 of 60 apiece, 1 being a tenant at will. 13 families have taken the oath of supremacy and have 11 tenants under them, making 34 men armed.
Sir Robert Hamilton was 1st patentee.
(69.) Malcolme Hamilton, 1,500 ac., called Dermiefogher. A strong castle of lime and stone 54 ft. long and 20 broad. No bawn to it, nor defence for succouring his tenants. Planted, &c., of British birth and descent, &c.:
Freeholders, 3.
1 of 384 ac., 1 of 120, 1 of 60.
Lessees, 11, viz.:--
3 of 180 jointly, 3 of 120 apiece, 2 of 40 apiece, 2 of 80, 1 of 20. Of 14 tenants 6 have taken the oath of supremacy, and these have divers undertenants, able to make 77 men with reasonable arms. Good store of tillage, and no Irish.
James Gill was the 1st patentee.
(70.) John Archdale, 1,000 ac., called Drumragh. Upon this is a bawn of lime and stone 60 ft. sq., 12 high, with 2 flankers; a house is now in building, and is about the first story. Planted, &c., of British, &c.:
Freeholders, 6, viz.:--
1 of 240, 1 of 120, 1 of 100, 2 of 40 apiece, 1 of 4, and a tenant.
Lessees for years, 5, viz.:--
1 having 120 ac., 1 of 140, 1 of 80, 1 of 20, 1 of 40. Cottagers, 4; each has a tenement and 4 ac. with common for cows. In toto, 14 resident, who have taken the oath of supremacy, and make 26 men armed.
Alexander Humes was 1st patentee.
(71.) Geo. Humes, 1,000 ac., called Dromcose. A bawn of 80 ft. sq. of lime and stone 12 high. No house in it. But few appeared before me, for the undertaker was out of the country, but the land is well planted with British and good store of tillage. No Irish that I could learn of, but I saw
Lessees for life, 3, viz.:--
1 having 300 ac., 2 of 60 jointly, who have taken the oath of supremacy. Rest of tenants have no estates, but promises.
William Fuller was 1st patentee.
(72.) Sir John Humes, 1,500 ac., called Moyglasse. Planted, &c., with a number of British. No estates, but promises.
Freeholders, 3, viz.:--
3 are nominated for freeholders, but are not resident, viz.:--
Lessees, 12, viz.:--
2 of 120 ac. apiece, 1 of 90, 9 of 60 apiece. These 15 have undertenants able to make 30 men. Good tillage and no Irish.
(73.) John Dunbarr, 1,000 ac., called Drumcro. A bawn of lime and stone 80 ft. long, 45 broad, and 14 high, 2 watermills. Himself, with wife and family, on the land. Planted with British, &c.:
Freeholders, 2.
2 of 120 a piece.
Lessees for years, 7, viz.:--
1 of 180, 3 of 120, 3 of 60 apiece. Nine families have undertenants, but all save one are estated only by promise, making 60 able men. 8 ploughs going. No Irish.
(74.) Sir John Humes, 2,000 ac., called Carrynroe. A bawn of lime and stone 1,000 ft. sq., 14 high, 4 flankers for defence. A fair strong castle 50 ft. long and 21 broad. A village near, in which dwell 24 families. Planted, &c., with British natives:
Freeholders, 4, viz.:--
2 of 120 ac. apiece, 2 of 200 apiece.
Lessees for years, 9, viz.:--
1 of 240, 1 of 120, 6 of 60 apiece, 1 of 40.
Cottagers, 11, viz.:--
1 of 30, 2 of 6 apiece, 1 of 5, 2 of 4 apiece, 1 of 3, 4 of 2 apiece.
In toto, 24 families resident, and most have taken oath of supremacy, making 30 able men with arms.
COUNTY DONAGALL.
Precinct of Boilagh Bainagh, Scottish undertakers.
(75.) John Murrey. Has all Boilagh and Bainagh, being 10,000 ac., and has planted as follows, viz.:--
The Lo. Bombe was first patentee.
(76.) Capt. Tho. Dutton, 2,000 ac., called the Rosses. But newly come into it, and has not his assurance from Mr. Murrey. A bawn and a small castle, built long since, of lime and stone, himself with wife and family dwell in it; has 6 English families, but they do but little as yet, till they have estates.
Sir Patrick McKill was first patentee.
(77.) John Murrey, 1,000 ac., called Cargie. A bawn of clay and stone, 60 ft. sq. and 12 high, and built upon a rock. Divers planted, but no freeholders, and they upon the land have no estates but "mynnytts," in number 23 families, and make 40 men of British birth, but dwell dispersedly.
Patrick Vans was first patentee.
(78.) John Murrey, 1,000 ac., called Boilaghoutra. This is let to William Hamilton and others. A bawn of lime and stone, 70 ft. sq., 12 high, with 2 flankers, in it a castle, very strong, no freeholders. There are 28 families of British, as I am informed, able to make 50 men with arms, these hold their land by promise. I saw but very few, for they dwell far asunder, and had no time to come to me.
(79.) John Murrey, 1,500 ac., called Dunconnally. Ja. Toodye and others have taken this for certain years. A bawn of lime and a castle, now inhabited. Planted with British, &c.:
Lessees, 11, viz.:--
1 having 200 ac., 2 of 100 jointly, 5 of 200 jointly, 3 of 120 apiece. 30 families, able to make 40 men with arms. I saw but 10 that had estates.
Alexander Dunbar first patentee.
(80.) John Murrey, 1,000 ac., called Kilkeran. Let to Rowland Congell and others for 15 years. A bawn and castle of lime and stone, inhabited by a Scottish gentleman. Not one freeholder, and but two leaseholders, one a lease for 15 years, the other for 5, and under them 10 British. Here are many Irish.
The Lo. Broughton first patentee:
(81.) John Murrey, 1,000 ac., called Ballagheigtra. Nothing built, and land inhabited with Irish.
(82.) Alex. Cunningham, 1,000 ac., called Moynagan, for the said John Murrey. A good strong bawn of lime and stone, 2 flankers, very few British tenants, but many Irish upon the land.
(83.) Ja. McCulloghe, 1,000 ac., called Mullaghvegh. Neither bawn nor castle, and very few British. Mostly inhabited with Irish.
Precinct of Dortloughe, Scottish undertakers.
(84.) John Cunningham, 1,000 ac., called Donboye. A bawn of lime and stone, 70 ft. sq., 14 high, 2 flankers, 3 stories high, good lodgings, a good house in bawn, in which he himself with his wife dwell. Near he has built a town of 26 houses and good watermill, all inhabited with British. Planted, of British:
Freeholders, 2, viz.:--
1 having 120 acres, 1 of 100.
Lessees for years, 12.
2 of 130 ac. apiece, 4 of 90 apiece, 1 of 48 apiece, 2 of 50 apiece, 3 of 100 apiece.
Of these 14 families most have taken the oath of supremacy, making with undertenants, 50 men armed. Great store of tillage, and no Irish on the ground.
(84.) Ja. Cunningham, 1,000 ac., called Moyegh. A bawn of lime and stone, 60 ft. sq., 2 flankers, walls 14 ft. high, within a good stone house, 3 stories high, himself and family dwell therein. Planted, of British:
Freeholders, 2.
1 of 200 ac., 1 of 66.
Lessees for years, 6.
2 of 100 apiece, 2 of 200 apiece, 2 of 240 jointly. Cottagers 15. Each has a house and garden plot and 6 ac., with common for cows. In toto, 23 families, with undertenants, make 42 men armed. Good store of tillage, and I saw not one Irish family on the land.
(85.) Sir Ja. Cunningham, 2,000 ac., called Darastrosse and Porthloghe. Upon the bawn there is no more built than there was 3 years past, a little bawn of lime and stone, and small house in it, in which the lady and her daughters dwell. Near is a village of 12 houses, British, 40 able men. Good store of tillage and no Irish.
Sir James Cunningham must answer for this.
(86.) Cuthbert Cunnington, 1,000 ac., called Dromagh, otherwise Coole McTreene. Nothing built by him, but peopled sufficiently with tenants, who build after their manner. The said Sir James must build and answer for both propositions. I have put them both together, for otherwise they cannot be distinguished. Planted upon both, of British:
Freeholders, 6, viz.:--
3 having 200 ac. apiece, 1 of 140, 1 of 120, 1 of 100.
Lessees for years, 9, viz.:--
2 of 200 ac. apiece, 2 of 200 jointly, 3 of 100 apiece, 2 of 360 jointly.
Each has a tenement with a backside, with some common for cattle. In toto, 30 families, with undertenants, making 80 men. 5 have taken the oath of supremacy.
(87.) William Stewart, Ld. of Dunduffe, 1,000 acres, called Coole Laghie. A bawn of clay and stone, 70 ft. sq., 2 flankers, 3 stories high, with necessary lodgings, not yet finished. A good house in it, in which he himself with his wife dwells. Planted with British:
Freeholders, 2, viz.:--
1 having 200 ac., 1 of 60.
Lessees for years, 8.
2 of 200 apiece, 2 of 100, 3 of 200 jointly, 1 of 66 ac. 16 families, with undertenants, making 40 men with arms. Most have taken the oath.
(88.) Alex. McAwley, otherwise Stewart, 1,000 ac., called Ballyneagh. A bawn of lime and stone, 70 ft. sq., 4 flankers, and a stone house in it. Planted upon this, with British:
Freeholders, 2, viz.:--
1 of 200, 1 of 60.
Lessees for years, 9, viz.:--
3 of 200 ac. apiece, 2 of 180, 1 of 120, 2 of 60 apiece, 1 of 40. In toto, 11 families, with undertenants, making 30 men armed, who have taken the oath. Good store of tillage, and not one Irish family.
(89.) The Ld. of Lusse, 1,000 ac., called Corgaghe. A bawn of clay and stone, 60 ft. sq., 10 high, 2 flankers, a good house within, thatched. Planted with British:
1 of 300 ac., 1 of 100, 1 of 330, 1 of 300, 1 of 195. Each has a house and garden plot. In toto, 10 families, with undertenants, making 26 men, whereof 5 have taken the oath. Good store of tillage.
(90.) Sir John Stewart, 3,000 ac., called Cashell, Kethin, and Littergall. Here is built a strong castle of lime and stone, a flanker at each corner, but as yet no bawn nor freeholders made. The Duke of Lennox is to answer the King. I saw the land well inhabited and full of people. What estates they have I know not, neither would he call the tenants together, but showed me a counterpane of one lease, and says that each tenant had the like.
(91.) Sir John Stewart aforesaid, 1,000 ac., called Lismolmoghan. Neither castle nor bawn, but land well inhabited with British tenants.
Precinct of Liffer, English undertakers.
(92.) Pet. Benson, 1,500 ac., called Shragh-miclar. A bawn of lime and stone, 100 ft. sq., 13 high, 4 flankers. In it a good house of lime and stone, in which himself, wife, and family, dwell. There is also a watermill. Planted upon this with British:
Freeholders, 5, viz.:--
5 of 120 ac. apiece.
Lessees for years, 10.
1 of 200, 1 of 120, 4 of 40 apiece, 3 of 25 apiece, 1 of 150, 4 of 11, 5 of 160 jointly, 24 families, with undertenants, making 68 men with arms, who have taken the oath. A village of 10 houses, and no Irish.
(93.) Wm. Willson, 2,000 ac., called Aghagalla. A large bawn and a castle, standing on a high mount, all thoroughly finished, he with his wife and family dwell therein. A village of 10 houses, well built. Planted with British:
Freeholders, 6, viz.:--
6 of 120 apiece.
Lessees for 3 lives, 14, viz.:--
4 of 200 jointly, 4 of 50 apiece, 2 of 200 jointly, 3 of 200 jointly, 1 of 66 ac. These 20 families have 50 other families under them, which dwell many together, and making 106 men, great store of tillage and no Irish.
Sir Thomas Cornwalle was first patentee.
(94.) Tho. Davies, holds from his brother, Robert Davies, 2,000 ac., called Corlackyn. A bawn of stone and clay, 2 flankers and stone house in it. Planted upon this, of British:
Freeholders, 4, viz. :--
1 of 220 ac., 1 of 120, 2 of 160 apiece.
Lessees for years, 28 :--
5 of 100 apiece, 6 of 75 apiece, 2 of 40 apiece, 4 of 30 apiece, 4 of 20 apiece, 1 of 25, 2 of 16 apiece, 4 of 11 apiece. 32 families dwell and have taken the oath. Divers undertenants make 54 men armed, and dwell together in villages, some of 12 houses, others less.
(95.) Capt. Mansfield, 1,000 ac. Killenegardon. Bawn finished, and a good stone house 3 stories high ready to be slated, he with his family dwell there. Near to this is a village of 9 houses, on a passage, commodious for service and good of the country. Planted upon this with British:
Freeholders, 2, viz. :--
1 of 260 ac. 1 of 200.
Lessees for years, 16, viz. :--
3 of 240 jointly, 1 of 220, 1 of 120, 1 of 124, 2 of 60 apiece, 3 of 62 apiece, 2 of 40 apiece, 1 of 6, 2 of 10 apiece. In toto, 18 families on land making with undertenants, 46 men with arms, and 9 of the principal have taken the oath.
Capt. Russell was first patentee.
(96.) Sir John Kingsmill, 1,500 ac., called Acarnie. A bawn of lime and stone 100 ft. sq., 2 flankers, two stories high with good lodging, and a very strong stone house, 3 stories high; himself, wife and family, dwell therein. Near is built a village of 30 houses, all inhabited with English. Planted with British:
Freeholders, 5.
1 of 200 ac., 1 of 120, 1 of 110, 2 of 100 apiece.
Leases for lives.
1 of 400 ac., 4 of 120 apiece.
Leases for years.
2 of 40 apiece, 1 of 10.
In toto, 13 families who have divers undertenants and make 36 men armed, all resident.
Sir Robert Remington, the first patentee.
(97.) Sir Raphe Bingley, 2,000 ac, called Tonafocies. A strong castle with 4 large towers, now 3 stories high, roof framed, but all at a stay through controversy with Sir Ro. Remyngton's heirs. Yet I found planted, of British,
Freeholders, 4.
2 of 200 ac. apiece, 1 of 120, 1 of 67.
Lessees for 3 lives.
Lessees for years, 11, viz. :--
1 of 300, 1 of 200, 4 of 120 apiece, 3 of 360 jointly, 4 of 100 apiece, 2 of 200 jointly, 2 of 120 jointly. In toto, 21 families, who with undertenants make 60 men with arms. Many dwell together and have taken the oath. Castle seated upon a river of Fyn, where is a ford, and the only passage into the country, and principal place for the King's service.
Sir Maurice Bartley was the first patentee.
(98.) Sir Raph Bingley, 2,000 ac., called Drummore and Luegagh. Bawn of brick and a house of stone thoroughly finished, himself and family dwell therein. Well seated for service and within a mile. Has made a village of 6 houses, a mill ready built, and more is building in a place a continual passage. Planted with British, who have taken the oath:
Freeholders, 7.
4 of 120 ac. apiece, 1 of 67, 1 of 60, 1 of 200.
Lessees for years, 12.
2 of 120 apiece, 4 of 67 apiece, 3 of 100 apiece, 3 of 40 apiece.
Cottagers, 10.
Each has a house and 6 ac., and common, for grazing a few cows.
In toto, 29 families, with undertenants, making 64 men with arms.
(99.) Sir Th. Goache, 1,500 ac., called Lismongan. A strong castle, [...] a trench cast up with a hedge upon it, environed by a small brook, in which there is a house of cagework, wherein, he with his lady and family, dwell. Materials ready for building of bawn and house; place very convenient for the king's service and good of the country. 6 good houses near, inhabited with English; this had long since been done, but that he was grievously troubled with sickness. Planted with British, who have taken the oath:
Freeholders, 4.
2 of 200 ac. apiece, 1 of 200, 1 of 70.
Leases for years, 9.
5 of 120 apiece, 1 of 70, 3 of 66 apiece.
Cottagers, 6, viz.:--
Each has a tenement and garden plot, with 4 ac., and common for cattle.
In toto, 19 families making 56 men with arms.
Sir Wm. Barnes first patentee.
(100.) Sir John Kingsmill and McWillson, [...] Mr. Willson 1,500 ac., called Monester. Bawn and house thoroughly finished, divers houses built near, all inhabited with English. Planted upon this, of British: 2 of 120 apiece, 3 of 100 apiece, 1 of 96 apiece.
Freeholders, 6.
1 of 140 ac., 2 of 120 apiece, 1 of 200, 2 of 40 apiece.
Each has a house and garden plot, with common for 4 cows.
Lessees for years, 6.
Cottagers, 5.
In toto, 17 families, with undertenants, making 46 men with arms. 11 of these have taken the oath.
Precinct of Killmacrenan, servitors and natives.
Captain Crayfood was first patentee.
(101.) Sir Geo. Marburie, 1,000 ac., called Littekenny. A bawn of lime and stone 60 ft. sq., 2 flankers, 12 ft. high, and standing waste. Near is built a township of 40 houses, wherein he dwells; all inhabited with British, making 50 men; a great market town, and stands well for the King's service.
(102.) Sir John Kingsmill, 1,000 ac., called Ballamalely. A bawn of stone and clay standing waste, and not one English man upon the land.
(103.) Sir Wm. Stewart, 1,000 ac., called Gortavaghie. A bawn of stone and clay 80 ft. long, 70 broad, and 14 high, a good stone house within, inhabited by a Scottish gentleman and family. 8 British families upon the land, who use tillage and husbandry, making 20 men with arms.
(104.) Sir Bazill Brooke, 1,000 ac., called Edonecarne. A round bawn of lime and stone, in it a house in building, in which dwells an English gentleman.
Sir John Vaugham was first patentee.
(105.) Sir Tho. Chichester, 1,000 ac., called Radonnell. A bawn of clay and straw with some stone amongst it, now fallen down and waste.
(106.) John Wray, 1,000 ac., called Carnegille. A good strong bawn of lime and stone, 40 ft. long, 15 high, 4 flankers, good lodgings, 2 stories high, a stone house length of bawn, 2 stories high, inhabited by an English gentleman and family. English undertenants. Stands in a good place for the King's service.
(107.) Arth. Corry, 1,000 ac., called Mons. A good bawn of lime and stone, 2 flankers, and a good house in it, inhabited by an English gentleman, wife and family. 6 English families, making 10 men armed.
(108.) Capt. Henry Hart, 1,000 ac., called Ballenis, and 256 ac. of concealment. A strong fort and a house in it, all of lime and stone, in which is an English family.
(109.) Sir Wm. Stewart, 1,000 ac., called Rumalton. A large and strong bawn, 80 ft. sq. and 16 high, 4 flankers, fair strong castle of same materials, 3½ stories high. A large town of 45 houses and 57 families, all British, some having estates for years. A church begun of lime and stone, built to setting on of roof. A watermill for corn. This is a market town, and stands well for the good of the country and the King's service.
(110.) Sir John Vaughan, 1,000 ac. [Sic in MS.] A bawn of lime and stone, 60 ft. sq., 12 high, 4 flankers, within is a stone house, inhabited by an English gentleman and family.
(111.) Capt. Paul Gore, 1,000 ac. [Sic in MS.] A bawn of lime and stone, 60 ft. sq., 2 flankers, 2 ft. high, a timber house of cage-work within it, inhabited by an English gentleman and family.
(112.) Lieut. Parkins, 172 ac., called Facker. Never had any more, and not bound to build.
Lieutenant Ellis was first patentee.
(113.) Nath. Rowley, 400 ac., called Lough-nemick. Upon this nothing built.
Lieutenant Brown.
(114.) Nath. Rowley, 528 ac., called Crancrasse. Upon this nothing built.
Lieutenant Gall.
(115.) Wm. Lynn, 108 ac., called Cororeagh, and 240 ac., called Lageonagh Larganrack. Nothing built on either.
Sir Richard Bingley was the first patentee.
(116.) Capt. Samford, 500 ac., called Castell-Doe. A bawn of lime and stone, 40 ft. sq., 16 high, a castle within it, very strong. He with his wife and family dwell therein, with 4 other English families on the land.
(117.) Sir Mulmorye McSwyne, 2,000 ac., called Moynt Mellan. A bawn of lime and stone, a good house, in which he dwells with his family. Has made no estates to his tenants, who use Irish ploughing.
(118.) McSwyne Bannagh, 2,000 ac., called Leamagh and Corragh. A bawn of lime and stone with a house in it, wherein he dwells with his family. Has made no estates, for his tenants will have no longer time but from year to year.
(119.) Tyrlagh Roe O'Boyle, 2,000 ac., called Caroghbleagh and Clomas. A good bawn, and a house of lime and stone, in which he, and his family, dwell. No estates, and tenants use Irish ploughing.
(120.) Donell McSwyne Faine, 2,000 ac., called Royndeherg and Caroocomony. A good bawn, and a house of lime and stone, in which he dwells with his family Tenants have no estate but from three years to three years, and these use Irish ploughing.
(121.) Walt. McRaughlin McSwyne, 896 ac., called Ballycany and Ragh. A fair bawn and a good strong house, all of lime and stone, with family dwelling in it, being a justice of peace and conformable to his Majesty's laws. A true subject since the first taking of Loghfoile.
COUNTY of TYRONE.
Precinct of Strobane, Scottish undertakers.
(122.) Earl of Abercorne, 1,000 ac., called Strobawne. A fair castle and very strong, but no bawn, a school house of lime and stone, also a church in building, walls about 5 ft. high, but has been at a stand ever since the late Earl died. Also about the castle is a town of 80 houses, many of lime and stone, strongly built, and many other good timber houses. In these 120 families, make 200 men, each having arms. 3 watermills for corn. Planted with British:
Freeholders, 6.
1 of 120 ac., 5 of 60 apiece.
Lessees for years, 6.
1 of 120 acres, 2 of 60 apiece, 3 of 40 apiece.
Townmen, 53.
Townmen 53. Each has a house and garden plot, with some land, mostly merchants and tradesmen with some cottagers.
In toto, 65 families of 180 men.
(123.) Earl of Abercorne, 2,000 ac., called Doaghlonge. Neither castle nor bawn built, but upon places 3 or 4 good houses of lime and stone by tenants. Planted with British:
Freeholders, 6,
1 of 260 ac., 1 of 120, 4 of 60 apiece.
Lessees for years, 14.
2 of 120 apiece, 6 of 180 jointly, 1 of 120, 2 of 60 apiece, 3 of 60 jointly. In toto, 20 families, with undertenants, making 106 men with arms.
Sir Th. Boid first patentee.
(124.) Earl of Abercorne, 1,500 ac., called Shean. A large bawn of lime and stone, 80 ft. sq., 4 flankers, as yet not thoroughly finished, also a large strong castle begun and to be finished this summer. Planted with British:
Freeholders, 3, Lessees for years, 10.
2 of 120 ac. apiece, 2 of 240, 2 of 120 apiece, 4 of 60 apiece, 2 of 30 apiece. In toto, 13 undertenants, making 100 men armed.
(125.) Sir Geo. Hamilton, 1,500 ac., called Largie, otherwise Cloghogenall. No more done upon the bawn and house than was done when Sir John Bodley surveyed it. Has made a village of 30 Irish coupled houses. Stands in a roadway and convenient place. Planted with British:
Freeholders, 4,
1 of 120, 3 of 60.
Lessees for years, 11.
1 of 120, 10 of 60. Each has a house and garden plot, with a small quantity of land to feed cows. These 27 tenants make 50 men armed.
(126.) Sir Geo. Hamilton, 1,000 ac., called Derrie Woone. A bawn of lime and stone, 60 ft. sq., 14 ft. high, 4 flankers, whereof 2 have very good lodgings. In them and near to the bawn is a village of 10 houses, inhabited with British. Planted with British:
Freeholders, 2,
2 of 120 ac. apiece.
Lessees for years 14.
4 of 60 apiece, 5 of 40 apiece, 1 of 30, 4 of 15 apiece. In toto, 16 families, with undertenants, making 43 men with arms.
(127.) Sir Claud Hamilton, dec., left this in charge with Sir Geo. Hamilton. Upon this 2,000 ac., called Eden and Killiny, is a bawn of lime and stone, 70 ft. sq., 14 ft. high, a good castle in it, strong and beautiful. Near the bawn are 6 small houses and others on the land, all of which are inhabited with British. Planted by promise upon this, of British:
Freeholders, 6.
4 having 120 acres apiece, 2 of 60 apiece.
Lessees for years, 14.
5 of 60 apiece, 9 of 30 apiece. 20 families, with undertenants, make 50 men. Have no estates, for the children are under age.
Sir James Haige was the first patentee.
(128.) Sir Geo. Hamilton and Sir Wm. Steward have jointly 1,500 ac., called Terremurrearth, otherwise Moynterlemy. Nothing at all built, but the Lord Abercorne and Sir Geo. Hamilton are bound in a bond of 1,000l. to Sir Wm. Steward to perform the buildings this summer. No British tenants, but I am told there are 8 British families, and the rest is inhabited with Irish natives.
James Clapham was the first patentee.
Sir Ro. Newcomen 2,000 ac., called Newton and Lislapp. Have newly come into it and rebuilt the castle, now 4 stories high, ready to have the roof set up, and two sides of wall of bawn finished, 16 ft. high, other two sides in progress. A good town building before castle, wherein are 14 houses, inhabited with English and Scottish tenants. Planted with British:
Freeholders, 4.
3 of 120 apiece, 1 of 6 apiece.
Lessees for years, 9.
2 of 180 apiece, 2 of 120 apiece, 4 of 60 apiece, 1 of 21.
Cottagers, 12.
Each a house and garden plot and common for grazing cows. In toto, 24 families, making 48 men armed.
(130.) Sir John Dromond, 1,000 ac., called Bellemagnegh. A bawn of lime and stone, 100 ft. sq., 4 flankers, in it a timber house of cagework, in which he dwells with his family [...] In a village a quarter of a mile off, are 10 houses. A watermill for corn, many tenants without estate. They, knowing that I was in the country, came and complained that for many years they could never get anything but promises, and for the most part are leaving. I desired the lady to show me their counterpanes; her answer was, that her knight was in Scotland, and that he could not come to them; but upon examination I find 30 British on the land.
Precinct of Eny (Omy), English undertakers.
This is the Countess' jointure.
(131.) Earl of Castlehaven, 3,000 ac., called Fuagh and Rarone. No building either of bawn or castle, nor freeholders. I planted some few English, but they have no estates; for since the old Earl died the tenants cannot have their leases made good unless they will give treble the rent paid, and yet must have but half the land which they enjoyed in the late Earl's time.
Lessees for years, 8.
1 of 120 ac., 6 of 60 apiece, 1 of 30. Cottagers, 3. Each has a small piece of land to keep cows. These dwell dispersedly upon their own land and cannot dwell together in a village because they are bound to dwell upon their own land or the lease is void. These 12 tenants can make no more men, and the rest is inhabited with Irish.
(132.) The said Earl has other 2,000 ac., called Brade. Nothing built.
Sir Fred. [Ferdinando] Audley first patentee.
(133.) Also other 2,000 ac., called Fentonagh. Upon this likewise nothing built.
Mr. Blunt first patentee.
(134.) Also other 2,000 ac., called Edergoole and Carnew Rachaw. A large house was begun, but is now plucked down and made but half so great, of 3 stories, and finished. The agent for the Earl showed me the rent roll of tenants on these 3 proportions, but the estates are so weak and uncertain, that all are leaving, in number 64, and each holds 60 ac., which they term a town land. The rest is let to 20 Irish gentlemen as appeared by rent roll, which is contrary to articles of plantation. These Irish men have under them about 3,000 souls of all sorts.
(135.) Sir John Davies, 2,000 ac., called Gavetagh and Clonaghmore, also Castle Dirge and Castle Curlews. 2 strong and fair castles of lime and stone, but no bawn. Planted with British:
Freeholders, 4.
1 having 120 acres, 3 of 60 apiece.
Lessees for years, 12.
3 of 60 apiece, 2 of 60 jointly, 2 of 60 jointly, 3 of 30 apiece, 2 of 60 jointly. These 16 families, resident with undertenants, make 30 men. The rest is inhabited with Irish, in great numbers.
Precinct of Clogher, English undertakers.
(136.) Lord Ridgwade, 2,000 ac., called Portclare and Ballicilgrie. A bawn of lime and stone, 140 ft. sq., 4 flankers, a castle 3 stories high, and a house with bawn of lime and stone. Planted with British :
Freeholders, 2.
1 of 120 ac., 1 of 60.
Lessees for years, 9.
1 of 200, 1 of 180, 2 of 120 apiece, 4 of 60 apiece, 1 of 40 Lessees for years, 3: 2 of 80 apiece, 7 of 60 apiece. These 2 families with undertenants, make 50 men with arms. The said Lord has 315 ac., at Agher, for which he is to build a town and has performed, viz :--there are 15 houses, whereof 2 are of lime and stone, the rest of cagework and copples. Each of the principal burgesses have to their houses 2 ac., and single burgesses one ac., with common. The whole number of burgesses is 20.
(137.) Geo. Ridgwaye, gent., 1,000 ac., called Thomas Courte. Has a bawn of lime and stone, 80 ft. sq., 4 flankers, but no house in it. Planted with British: 1 freeholder of 120 ac. Lessees for 3 lives, 6: 5 of 120 apiece, 1 of 60. Lessees for years, 4: 1 of 60, 1 of 120, 1 of 40, 1 of 30. In toto, 11 families, making 26 men, with arms.
Mr. Turvyn was the first patentee.
(138.) Sir Gerrard Lowther 1,000 ac. A bawn of clay and stone, 2 flankers, 8 ft. high. This is let to Mr. Pringle, who dwells on the land in a poor cabin. What tenants there are I know not, for he refused to show them to me. He brought a list of 20 tenants. If they have any estates, the list does not mention, or what they hold. I passed over the land, and saw divers ploughing.
Captain Eney was the first patentee.
(139.) Lord Burleighe, 1,500 ac., called Laghmaguiefie. A bawn of 140 ft. long and 63 wide, 3 flankers 14 ft. high, a house within, and a castle begun, all of lime and stone, built to second story, inhabited by a Scottish gentleman. Planted with British:
Freeholders, 5.
1 of 220 ac., 2 of 200 apiece, 2 of 67.
Leasholders for years 10.
2 of 60 apiece, 3 of 200 jointly, 1 of 100, 4 of 66 apiece.
Cottagers in fee, 4. Each a house and garden plot and grazing on common for cows and garons. In toto, 19 families, with undertenants, making 60 men with arms.
Sir Francis Willabie was the first patentee.
(140.) John Leigh, 2,900 ac., in Fentonagh. A bawn of lime and stone, 2 flankers, and a good large stone house within it, in which he dwells. Near is a village of 8 houses. Planted with British:
Freeholders, 8.
3 of 120 apiece, 2 of 60 apiece, 2 of 45 apiece, 1 of 60.
Lessees for years 12
4 of 100 apiece, 2 of 66 apiece, 1 of 120, 3 of 60 apiece 2 of 40 apiece.
Cottagers, 21. Each a house and garden plot, and most of them 2 ac. commons. In toto, 41 families, making 48 men, who have taken the oath.
Edward Kingsmill was the first patentee.
(141.) Sir Wm. Stewart, 2,000 ac., in Ballenecoole and Balleranally. A large strong castle in building, of lime and stone, now 3 stories high, and when finished will be the fairest castle in the whole precinct. Is making a bawn 240 ft. length and 120 breadth, 4 flankers of clay and stone, and a village, now 9 houses and more building. Good store of tillage, all Irish put from the land. Planted with British:
Freeholders, 5: 1 of 180 ac., 2 of 120 apiece, 2 of 130 apiece Lessees for years, 9: 1 of 160, 2 of 120, 4 of 60 apiece, 1 of 20, 1 of 40.
Cottagers, 8. Each a house and garden plot, with commons.
In toto, 24 families, who, with undertenants, make 64 men armed.
Sir Anthony Cope first patentee. (142.) Sir Wm. Cope, Kt., 2,000 ac. in Derribard. A bawn of clay and stone, pointed with lime, 80 ft. sq., 2 flankers, a little house in it, all waste, and no Englishman dwelling on the land; all inhabited with Irish.
(143.) Wm. Parsons, 1,000 ac. in Balleneclogh. A bawn of lime and stone, 60 ft. sq., 13 high, 2 flankers, a large stone house 2½ stories, in which his brother, with wife and family, dwell. Planted with British:
Freeholders, 2: 2 of 120 ac. apiece. Lessees for 3 lives, 1 of 180.
Lessees for years, 8: 2 of 180 apiece, 2 of 120 apiece, 4 of 60 apiece. Cottagers, 3.
Each has a house and garden plot, with commons. In toto, 14 families, with undertenants, making 38 men armed, who have taken the oath, and most dwell in a village of 9 houses.
Precinct of Mountjoy, Scottish undertakers.
(144.) Sir R. Heyborne, 1,800 ac. in Carraghan. A bawn of clay and stone, walls not above 7 ft. high, a small house within, of lime and stone; near adjoining bawn, 10 small houses together, inhabited by British. Planted with British: Freeholders, 6: 1 of 660 ac., 2 of 240 apiece, 3 of 180 apiece. Lessees for years, 3: 1 of 180, 1 of 60, 1 of 30.
In toto, 9 tenants, with undertenants, making 12 men with arms.
(145.) Lord Uhiltree, 3,500 ac., in Revelin outra Eghera. No more done now than at last survey, castle thatched, and Lord absent. Near this castle are a great many poor Irish [houses] inhabited with British families. Planted with British tenants: Freeholders, 7: 2 of 180 ac. apiece, 5 of 120 apiece.
Lessees for years, 12: 5 of 120 apiece, 7 of 60 apiece. In toto, 19 tenants, with undertenants, making 80 men with arms.
(146.) Capt. Sanderson, 1.000 ac. in Tullylegan: A good bawn of clay and stone, 2 flankers, a good house of lime and stone; himself, with wife and family, dwell therein. About him are some houses inhabited with British. Planted with British; Freeholders, 5: 2 of 120 apiece, 3 of 60 apiece. Lessees for 3 lives, 8: 2 of 120 apiece, 2 of 60 apiece. Cottagers, 7, holding 120 ac. among them for 21 years. In toto, 17 tenants, making 36 men with arms.
(147.) Mrs. Linsey, late wife of Ro. Linsey, 1,000 ac. in Tullaghoge. A good strong bawn of earth, with a quickset hedge and a ditch, a timber house within, in which she and her family dwell. Planted with British: Freeholders, 2, of 120 ac. apiece. Lessees, 8, 1 of 120, 1 of 60, 6 of 120 jointly. Cottagers, 12, holding among them 120 ac.
In toto, 22 tenants, making 30 men with arms.
Barnard Linsey, first patentee.
(148.) Alex. Richardson, 1,000 ac. in Creighballe. A bawn of clay and stone, rough cast, 90 ft. sq., 4 flankers, and a timber house, where the family dwell. Planted with British: Freeholders, 2: 2 of 120 ac. Lessees for years, 4; 1 of 120, 2 of 120 jointly, 1 of 60. Cottagers, 11.
Each has a tenement, a garden plot, and commons for cattle.
In toto, 17 families, making 29 men armed.
Robert Steward first patentee.
(149.) And. Stewart, son to Lord Ucheltree, 1,000 ac. in Ballenekevan. In building, a small castle 20 ft. sq., now 2 stories high, bawn laid out to be 60 ft. sq., of that but one of the sides begun 8 ft. high, the workmen are hard at work, and have promised to make haste. Planted with British, viz.: Freeholders, 2: 1 of 240 ac., 1 of 120. Lessees for years, 8; 2 of 240 apiece, 3 of 120 apiece, 1 of 60, 2 of 120 jointly. In toto, 10 families, with undertenants, making 32 men with arms.
(150.) Dav. Kenedaie, 1,000, ac. in Horteville. A good bawn of lime and stone 80 ft. sq., 3 flankers, a house of timber within, in which he dwells, about the bawn 12 houses, inhabited by British. Planted with British; Freeholders, 2;2 of 120 ac. apiece. Lessees for years, 5; 1 of 180, 2 of 120 apiece, 2 of 60 apiece. Cottagers, 9. Each has a house and garden plot, and commons for cattle. In toto, 16 families, with undertenants, making 36 men armed.
Precinct of Dongannon, servitors and natives.
(151.) Lord Chichester, 1,140 ac. in Dungannon. A fort of lime and stone, 120 ft. sq., 4 half bulwarks, and a deep ditch about it 20 ft. broad and counter-scarped. A castle to be built by Capt. Banford, contracted to be finished this summer. Without the town are 3 English houses inhabited with Englishmen.
(152.) His Lordship is to build a town in Dungannon for which there is laid out 500 ac. Upon this is now built 9 fair stone houses, one with a stone wall about it, and 5 more now ready to have the roofs set up, also six strong timber houses, of good cagework, and other 6 framed and ready to be set up, and is contracting for the finishing. There are British tenants for these houses, when they are built, that dwell in the town in small cabins. Also a large church with a steeple of lime and stone, now ready to be covered. Besides these British within the town are 30 English families. There are 36 Irish which come to the church and have taken the oath.
(153.) Lord Ridgwane, 2,000 ac. in Large, A bawn of lime and stone 160 ft. sq., 14 ft. high, 4 flankers and a house in it of timber, 3 English families dwell near the bawn.
(154.) Sir Tobie Callfilde, 1,000 ac. in Balledonnell. Whereunto is added, besides what was certified by Sir Jonas Bodley, a fair house or castle, the front whereof is 80 ft. long 28 broad, 2 cross ends 50 ft. long and 28 broad, the walls 5 ft. thick at the bottom, and 4 at the top, good cellars, and the windows of hewn stone. Between the two cross ends is a wall 18 ft. high, and makes a small covert within the building, which is at this time but 13 ft. high; a number of men at work for the sudden finishing of it. A strong bridge over the river, of lime and stone, with buttresses, to this is joined a good watermill for corn, all built of lime and stone. This is the fairest building I have seen. Near unto the bawn is built a town in which are 15 English families, making 20 men, with arms.
(155.) Sir France Roe, 1,000 ac., in Manor Roe. A good bawn of earth 80 ft. long, and 60 ft. sq., with a quickset upon it, and deep ditch. Within a small house of brick and stone inhabited with British, who have estates for years, and have taken the oath.
(156.) Wm. Parsons, 1,000 ac., called Altedesert. A bawn of lime and stone, 70 ft. sq., 2 flankers, a house within, wherein dwells an Englishman with family, rest inhabited with Irish, for he has it as a servitor, and is leased for a certain number of years.
(157.) Sir Francis Ansley, 480 ac., called Clannaghrie. A bawn of sods, entrenched.
(158.) The Lord Winfald, 2,000 ac., called Benbarbe. A bawn of lime and stone, 120 ft. high, 2 flankers, in each a good house 3 stories high, inhabited by an English gentleman, with wife and family, a church in building 70 ft. long, 24 broad, with 8 large windows, ready to have the roof set up, also 20 English families on the land making 30 men with arms.
(159.) Tyrlagh O'Neale, 4,000 ac. A piece of a bawn, some 5 ft. high and has been so a long time, no estates to tenants, and all plough in Irish manner.
COUNTY ARMAGH.
Precinct of O'Neilan, English undertakers.
(160.) Wm. Bromlowe, 2 proportions, Dowcoran, 1,500 ac., and Ballenemonie, 1,000. Upon Ballenemony is a strong stone house within a good island, and at Dowcoran a very fair house of stone and brick, with good lime, a strong bawn of timber and earth with a palisade; in readiness, lime and stone, to make a bawn to be done this summer. A very fair town of 42 houses, all inhabited with English, and streets all clean paved; 2 watermills, and a windmill for corn, and a store of arms in his house. Planted with British:
Freeholders, 5; having 120 acres apiece.
Lessees for years, 52: 1 of 420, 1 of 300, 1 of 240, 3 of 200 apiece, 1 of 120, 13 of 60 apiece, 8 of 50 apiece, 6 of 40 apiece, 9 of 20 apiece, 1 of 100, 1 of 11, 1 of 5, 6 of 30 apiece. In toto, 57 families who have divers under them, all have taken the oath, good store of tillage, and no Irish.
(161.) Sir Oliver St. John, Kt., 1,000 ac., called Kernan. Two bawns of timber mounted very strongly, in each an English house of cagework, and 2 English families in them; near one bawn, 5 houses, inhabited with English, rest dispersedly, 3 or 4 families together. Planted with British:
Freeholders, 5: 5 of 120 apiece.
Lessees for years, 8: 2 of 120 apiece, 3 of 100 apiece, 2 of 60 apiece, 1 of 40. Cottagers, 4. Each has a tenement and a garden plot, with commons.
In toto, 13 families, with undertenants, making 30 men with arms, of whom 13 have taken the oath.
William Powell first patentee.
(162.) Mr. Obbyns, 2,000 ac., called Ballenevoran. A bawn of sods with palisade of boards ditched, within is a good fair house of brick and lime, himself dwelling therein; near 4 houses, inhabited with English. Planted with British: Freeholders, 5: 3 of 120 apiece, 2 of 100 apiece. Lessees for years, 15: 4 of 100 apiece, 2 of 60 apiece, 3 of 66 apiece, 2 of 40 apiece, 1 of 30, 3 of 100 jointly. These 20 tenants, with undertenants, make 46 men armed.
The Lo. Saye was the first patentee.
(163.) Mr. Cope, 3,000 ac., called Derrycrevy and Dromullie. A bawn of lime and stone, 80 ft. sq., 14 high, 4 flankers, in 3 of them he has built very good lodgings, 3 stories high, also two watermills and one windmill; near to bawn, 14 houses of timber, inhabited with English. Planted with British:
Freeholders, 6: 1 of 200 ac., 3 of 120 apiece, 2 of 60.
Lessees for years, 30: 3 of 120 apiece, 4 of 100 apiece, 2 of 80 apiece, 3 of 60 apiece, 1 of 55, 2 of 50 apiece, 2 of 40 apiece, 7 of 30 apiece, 2 of 25 apiece, 2 of 23 apiece, 1 of 44, 3 of 20 apiece, 2 of 11 apiece.
Cottagers, 7, viz.: 3 of 3 ac. apiece, 2 of 2, and 2 of 1 ac. apiece, with commons. 47 families, with undertenants, making 80 men with arms; 18 have taken the oath.
(164.) Ri. Roulstone, 1,000 ac., called Temore. A bawn of sods, with a palisade, moated, a little house in it inhabited by English family; near to bawn 9 houses, inhabited with English. Planted with British: Freeholders, 2, having 120 acres apiece. Lessees for years, 8: 6 of 100 apiece, 1 of 20, 1 of 12. In toto, 10 families, with undertenants, making 24 men with arms.
(165.) John Heron, 2,000 ac., called Aghivillan. Two small bawns of earth with palisade, and a small ditch; near each bawn 10 houses, inhabited with English. Planted with British: Freeholder, 1 of 180 ac. Lessees for years, 12: 1 of 120, 2 of 30, 3 of 20 apiece, 2 of 15 apiece, 3 of 10 apiece, 1 of 60. In toto, 13 families, with undertenants, making 26 men, with arms.
(166.) Wm. Stanhowe, 1,500 ac., called Kanna-Goolan. Nothing built, himself in England the past 7 years. 3 or 4 poor Englishmen upon the land, all of which is inhabited with Irish.
(167.) Fran. Sarrevill, 2,000 ac., called Mullalelish and Lagacorrye. A bawn of 180 ft. sq., of stone and clay, rough cast with lime, 4 flankers, and a good house of lime and stone in it, inhabited by an English gentleman, with his wife and family; near to bawn 12 houses, inhabited with English. Planted with British: Freeholders, 3: 1 of 150, 1 of 120, 1 of 100. Lessees for years, 12: 1 of 220, 5 of 100 apiece, 1 of 95, 1 of 80, 1 of 74, 4 of 60 apiece, 2 of 40 apiece, 1 of 12, 1 of 15, 1 of 30. In toto, 21 families, with undertenants, making 50 men with arms.
(168.) John Dillon, 1,500 ac., called Mullebane. A house begun some 3 years since, but not half finished, of brick and lime, and a very fair building, no bawn, great store of tenants, who have made 2 villages and dwell together. Planted with Irish: Freeholders, 3, his sons having 120 ac. apiece. Lessees for lives: 18, 3 of 100 jointly, 4 of 100 jointly, 2 of 100 apiece, 2 of 80 apiece, 1 of 70, 5 of 60 apiece, 1 of 50, 1 of 47, 2 of 30 apiece, 1 of 40, 1 of 30, 1 of 23, 1 of 20, 1 of 10. In toto, 29, with undertenants, making 40 men with arms.
(169.) Precinct of the Fewes, allotted to Scottish undertakers.
Hen. Atcheson, 1,000 ac., called Coolemalish. A bawn of clay and stone, 120 ft. long and 80 broad, 4 flankers, in this a house the one half of lime and stone, the upper part timber. Has planted a great number of tenants, no estates, but by promise, and yet they have been many years upon the land. There is nominated to me 2 freeholders and 17 leaseholders, all which were with me; they took the oath and petitioned for leases, which Mr. Atcheson seemed willing to perform presently, making 30 men with arms, good tillage.
James Craig was the first patentee.
(170.) John Hamilton, 1,000 ac., called Magharientrim. A bawn of stone and clay, 60 ft. sq., 12 high, 2 flankers. Planted with British: Freeholders, 2: 1 having 200 acres, 1 of 100. Lessees for years, 6: 1 of 120, 2 of 60 apiece, 1 of 96, 1 of 60, 1 of 50. Cottagers, 1