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Cammell Laird Shipyard, Birkenhea by Tom Wood


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Reference c12
Covering dates 1996
Held by Greater Manchester County Record Office
Extent 95 NEGATIVES AND CONTACT PRINTS.
Creators Wood, Tom, fl 1996

Contents:
In September 1995 the D.P.A. advertised a commission in the region of £2500 - £4000 on a subject of the photographer's own choice.
The commission was offered on the usual D.P.A. conditions regarding deposit, written documentation etc. Over 500 requests for further information and 139 applications were received. Three photographers were invited for interview in October 1995 - Lisa Woollett, Malcolm Hutcheson and Tom Wood.
It was decided to award the commission to Tom Wood. Tom's proposal centred on the Cammell Laird Shipyard in Birkenhead. Tom had been at work photographing in the shipyard since 1993. He stated clearly in his application, and reiterated in his interview that his central concern was to explore a new approach to representing the subject of people at work - and especially to move away from the stereotypical portrayal of people at work in a dockyard. Previous contact with Tom and his method of working convinced the interviewing panel that Tom was certainly capable of achieving exciting results in this direction.
Tom's work was already represented in the Archive in the Care in the Community project (C10) undertaken jointly with Open Eye and the D.P.A. This collaboration with Open Eye had not proved satisfactory. Open Eye lost the written record and transferred the work to the D.P.A. in considerable disorder. The D.P.A. therefore welcomed the opportunity to engage directly in a commission with Tom without the complications of a third party.
Tom worked on the commission in 1996. This part of his Cammell Laird project was shot throughout in colour.
Tom failed to maintain any written record during the progress of the current commission. The information contained in this catalogue was compiled after the completion of the commission during conversations with Tom about the work.
North West Arts Board made a grant of £1000 towards the funding of this commission.



Negatives  c12/1  [n.d.]

Contents:
The information that accompanies these photographs was compiled in May 1997 after Tom had completed work on the commission. Tom made comments while looking at the contact sheets and Audrey made notes. The sequencing of the negative sheets/contacts does not mirror precise chronological order. Though the order is loosely chronological, it is not exact.
I probably started photographing at Cammell Lairds about three years ago in 1993/4. I took photographs as the yard closed. I probably spent more time on it then than for this commission for the D.P.A. As the men left, I was doing shots of the abandonned work areas and portraits of the men - usually the week they were leaving. I gave them copies.

[no title]  c12/1/1  not dated

Contents:
General views of the yard, exploring where the docks meet the River Mersey. Good sky and ferry boats going by, but they do not make an interesting picture.

[no title]  c12/1/2  not dated

Contents:
From the previous work I had done I knew I wanted to photograph work in progress. I also knew I wanted to use a medium to large format camera and a tripod. This is not the usual way of taking men at work, but I wanted to explore that awkwardness. It would force me to work in a different way. It was something I was imposing on myself. I realised there were possibilities in that approach from the work I had already done. I wanted to produce work that was qualitatively different to any I had seen already. Man at work is a classic theme; the shipyard is a clichéd documentary topic. I was looking for a way of getting beyond the surface. Maybe with bigger negatives, with things abstracted more, colours richer, better tonal range... stopping the lens down so it still needs a longer exposure... I'm clearly creating problems for myself because it is more interesting to work in that way. I am not sure how it is going to turn out but I feel this is the way to approach it.
This sheet just looks awkward. Stiff and awkward. That was how I felt when I started.

[no title]  c12/1/3  not dated

Contents:
You could just throw this sheet away. River and dock. I am just walking round at the beginning using a very wide angle lens.

[no title]  c12/1/4  not dated

Contents:
Wandering around the yard. Relationship of yard to river. Nothing here is any good.

[no title]  c12/1/5  not dated

Contents:
Same as c12/1/4. I am now up in the crane - my one visit to the top of the crane. I felt that I did not know how to deal with virtually all the pictures I had taken around the yard, both three years ago and this time. I did not feel I was getting anywhere. I just wanted to get onto the boats really. I felt at the end that I might go back and tackle the landscape. Perhaps my new panoramic camera will solve this problem.

[no title]  c12/1/6  not dated

Contents:
In the dock yard. I was going there, shooting a couple of rolls and going home. Not satisfied. Not knowing how to do it.

[no title]  c12/1/7  not dated

Contents:
There was one boat in the yard that particularly interested me - a Brazilian ship which the men called the "Flexy". The full name was obscured early on. "Flexservice 1" was probably its full name. It was in a terrible state of repair. I heard many comments from people saying thay didn't feel it was worth repairing. The metal on the decks was so thin etc. Rentokil was brought in to kill the vermin before the men could work on it. Repair work was being done just to patch the boat up so that it would last only another five years. It was generally declared to be the worst boat the men had worked on, and it had to be finished by Christmas. I really got to work on this boat from September. So, for once, I thought I would make this a priority. I liked it because it was a complete mess. Other boats seemed much cleaner. I thought it would keep things simpler to do this one boat. The men would get used to me - I already knew many of them from previous years. I was O.K. with the management. This was what I thought I'd do. I started using the 50 ml lens on the 6 x 9 format to get closer in. I wanted to try and deal with it all. I used that in combination with a 65 ml wide angle lens most of the time. A few were done on a standard lens, some with a 150 ml.
General shots on deck.

[no title]  c12/1/8 - 10  not dated

Contents:
Looking down into the boat. I'm looking at the metal, the fabric, the peeling paint, the welding, the joints, areas where bits are burnt off, sections cut out, wires everywhere. Whole sections of the boat were cut out so you can see the various deck levels.
I used different types of film for the sake of economy. When I started I tended to use what film I had in stock. So I had some date-expired Konica, but I also had free film from Jessops including Fuji Reala, so I used that. The negative film doesn't make much difference at this size as long as you expose correctly. The colour balance is being altered all the time due to long exposures and different lighting sources - tungsten or welding or fluorescent. At the same time I would use fill-in flash. This messes up the colour, but that's O.K.

[no title]  c12/1/11  not dated

Contents:
Just exploring the boat.

[no title]  c12/1/12  not dated

Contents:
All those pipes. The pipes carry the gas that fuels the welding and burning torches. As many as fifty to one hundred men are working on the boat and they all have to look after their own pipes.

[no title]  c12/1/13  not dated

Contents:
Looking down into the hold/belly of the ship. I played safe, I didn't go down at that point.

[no title]  c12/1/14  not dated

Contents:
General shots on the boat.

[no title]  c12/1/15 - 16  not dated

Contents:
I actually descended to the very bottom of the boat. It was basically a huge, cavernous area. It reminded me of pot holing when I was young. It's like another world down there. I think even the men were affected. It's like being down a mine, often working in very confined spaces. I used available light and long exposures though I had flash with me. Available light gives the wonderful colour; flash would have cleaned it up more. This orangey yellowness adds to the differentness; flash is a blue light. I gave exposures of several minutes depending on the film. 100 ASA may have 4 minutes plus an allowance for reciprocity failure; 400 ASA may have one minute. It's difficult to overexpose with longer exposures.
These first shots underground seemed more exciting than the ones taken on deck.

[no title]  c12/1/17  not dated

Contents:
Not of any real interest. Taken on another boat where there was just one man working. The portrait shows a man chewing on a stick - it's not a cigarette.
c12/1/13 & c12/1/15 I like the colour of the rust.

[no title]  c12/1/18  not dated

Contents:
On the same boat as c12/1/17.
Mark Lally has been assisting me going back through all my work looking for anything he feels should have been printed and has not been. Mark marked his selection with a cross in biro though I gave him a chinagraph. I do apologize for this. I mark with a chinagraph which can be rubbed out - a line through the whole sheet means I'm not interested at all; a tentative cross means it may be worth a work print.

[no title]  c12/1/19 - 22  not dated

Contents:
Back on the Flexy. General shots on deck. Of little interest.

[no title]  c12/1/23  not dated

Contents:
1,2,6 & 7
Men's mess room on the dock.
2
I think I like - not because it's a naked girl! It is better than the other ones taken outside showing the yard and river.

[no title]  c12/1/24  not dated

Contents:
Men's mess room and outside shots.

[no title]  c12/1/25  not dated

Contents:
Exterior shots of dock. Not very interesting.

[no title]  c12/1/26 - 27  not dated

Contents:
A rainy Sunday morning. Up to this point the boat has been in wet dock. But they moved it into dry dock. You can see the crane moving. At risk to my life I climbed on this precarious platform. The church that gets in the way is Birkenhead Priory. If you wanted a general view of the yard you would go to the top of that church. The graveyard for the Priory was situated on the land now occupied by the dock.

[no title]  c12/1/27  not dated

Contents:
Agfa Optima film. I noticed the colour of the film was very strong without being too gaudy.

[no title]  c12/1/28  not dated

Contents:
Back on board the Flexy. Not much to say about these.

[no title]  c12/1/29  not dated

Contents:
The dry dock once all the water has been let out. Not interesting as photographs.

[no title]  c12/1/30  not dated

Contents:
At the end of a day, if the light was nice, I would wander off to see if I could make a picture of the river and the dock. A couple of them are O.K.

[no title]  c12/1/31  not dated

Contents:
2 & 13
There are always shots looking down into the hold before I descended. See also c2/1/32/13.

[no title]  c12/1/32  not dated

Contents:
Nothing to say.

[no title]  c12/1/33  not dated

Contents:
Welding on deck.
18
I'm trying to get several people in shot with all the mess on the deck.

[no title]  c12/1/34  not dated

Contents:
Welding on deck.

[no title]  c12/1/35  not dated

[no title]  c12/1/36  not dated

Contents:
Cross sections of the boat with different floor layers and different bits welded on.
9
The man in white is discussing the work to be done. Three different floors all in the one shot.
18
I have gone inside. The air is thick with fine dust. I think they were burning, cutting things out; or, even worse, using a sander to level off an area. I had ventured in there without a mask. The guy told me to go and get a mask. The men are wearing breathing apparatus but they lifted them off immediately they had finished to get a bit of relief. I did not notice any ventilation in here. The PVC ventilation tunnels often emptied out on the deck.

[no title]  c12/1/37  not dated

Contents:
I have moved, closed in on c12/1/36/18, trying different angles. There is maybe a hint of dust in c12/1/37/15. But, due to the long exposures the light looks lovely - like a cathedral rather than a mine. But the air was thick with dust. The men were wearing masks.
But despite all that dust and the cramped conditions, it seemed easier for me to work. It was visually interesting; opportunities were presenting themselves. I was getting more excited when I was inside the ship and moving closer in.

[no title]  c12/1/38  not dated

Contents:
6
Looking back to c12/1/37.
7
I know this man well.

[no title]  c12/1/39  not dated

Contents:
I have gone back in again. I returned specifically to take c12/1/39/2 and c12/1/39/4.
2
This is unposed.
4
I asked him to pose for me.
All the stuff on the deck is really interesting but it doesn't make an image.

[no title]  c12/1/40  not dated

Contents:
Nothing to say about this.

[no title]  c12/1/41  not dated

Contents:
Nothing to say. I am looking down at the work that is going on.

[no title]  c12/1/42  not dated

Contents:
Shows wires and infra structure beneath roof and behind walls. I'm not really interested in this. I'm using a mixture of flash and available light. Sunlight is coming in; there is bright light from his torch and fill-in flash.

[no title]  c12/1/43  not dated

Contents:
More of the same. I'm moving inside the boat to the living quarters as they were left by the Brazilian crew prior to refurbishment. Individual cabins etc.

[no title]  c12/1/44  not dated

Contents:
General meeting place where the crew would congregate on the boat.

[no title]  c12/1/45  not dated

Contents:
Strange to have a photograph of footprints in snow.

[no title]  c12/1/46  not dated

Contents:
Nothing interesting.

[no title]  c12/1/47  not dated

Contents:
More welding.
9
My camera bag!

[no title]  c12/1/48  not dated

Contents:
2
A classic shot of a guy welding from behind. Old pin-ups still on the wall.
4
A guy has moved away and thrown down his gloves which you can see in mid air. I've probably fired the flash at that moment and the flash has caught the gloves. The whole negative is probably over exposed.

[no title]  c12/1/49  not dated

Contents:
Another visit lower than I have been for a long time.
13
Shows ventilation shaft, wires, pipes, rubbish, scrap, all kind of interesting. I go back in again later.

[no title]  c12/1/50  not dated

Contents:
9
I actually went down the hole shown in this picture.
12 & 14
This is what you see. A very, very small, cramped space with so much welding and so much dust. It probably took me an hour to get down there with the tripod and nothing to show for it!

[no title]  c12/1/51  not dated

Contents:
2
I then changed the film, I think, and did one shot in the same place - I think. I have either knocked the tripod or the floor is vibrating (I'm balanced on wooden planks), because the image is blurred.

[no title]  c12/1/52  not dated

Contents:
More inside the ship. Trying different places; exploring around the ship.

[no title]  c12/1/53 - 56  not dated

Contents:
Extended sequence using a long lens. It changes the perspective. I was trying it just to see. I was looking down on the work. There was a discussion between workers and shipwrights over what appeared to be a hole in the ground. I took a lot of shots with varying degrees of success. These are all taken within an hour or so - which is unusual for me. I think it was because I did not know what I was doing with a long lens.

[no title]  c12/1/57 - 60  not dated

Contents:
Same situation. I am on deck on the same level using a wide-angle lens doing what I am more familiar with. The men are now cutting out a square hole. I carry on working around that deck. The situation was definitely exciting on that deck. The problem was how to frame it, where to stand. I got very close in some cases as in C12/1/59/18. Again I like the colour of the Reala film.

[no title]  c12/1/61  not dated

Contents:
More work on deck. I'm looking at electrical wiring and circuits in the boat up in the bridge/steering house area where all the controls are.

[no title]  c12/1/62  not dated

Contents:
As c12/1/61
9
Note the steering wheel through the gap. A sort of still life.

[no title]  c12/1/63 - 66  not dated

Contents:
I'm moving down into the hold/belly of the ship. I take photos looking down into it first, then I go down into this area. The snake-like thing is the extractor mechanism.

[no title]  c12/1/67  not dated

Contents:
I'm below the deck we were looking down into. I'm actually underneath the floor which is visible in frame c12/1/67/18. I'm crawling along a series of oval shaped openings or tunnels which criss-crossed the underside of the boat. I was really excited by these. I was doing long exposures with or without flash and making use of the light from the welding as well.

[no title]  c12/1/68  not dated

Contents:
Again, you feel very strongly as if you're working underground. It's very dark.
2
At the back of the picture there's an iron wall which gets cut out - when I go down later this partition is cut out.
6
Wall in place. Compare with c12/1/70/9 where the wall has gone.
15
A longish exposure, maybe half a minute or a minute, and I'm firing flash several times during that exposure. This opens out the shadow areas to expose the metal. I didn't know how it would turn out.
18
Taken without flash.

[no title]  c12/1/69  not dated

Contents:
2 - 14
Cutting a section out.

[no title]  c12/1/70  not dated

Contents:
The same situation but not necessarily all on the same day.

[no title]  c12/1/71  not dated

[no title]  c12/1/72  not dated

Contents:
At that point several men were welding all around. Walls were cut open. It was tall, like a cathedral. I went down there at least four times, perhaps half a dozen, on different days. It was an area they were working on for a long time.
There seemed to be a lot of burning and welding going on. The shipwright platers and the foremen platers would mark off where bits had to be cut out or welded in. Then the men would go in and do this donkey work with welding and burning torches. The pipes are called service lines. They were fed from one main tank of gas and oxygen. The men called it oxy. Occasionally the men would use individual bottles of gas.
A lot of the time I would be photographing using light from the men's torches, sometimes with fill-in flash; light from the tungsten bulbs hanging everywhere; but most importantly I liked to wait until someone nearby would light up their torch which would illuminate the area around. When first lit these torches gave very powerful light which was subsequently reduced. It transformed certain areas. See the difference, for example, when you compare c12/1/65/15 with c12/1/65/18.

[no title]  c12/1/73  not dated

Contents:
16
The man was doing some burning himself, but light is coming from behind me to the side giving the shadow of his legs against the door.
I really feel I've got something now. Earlier, in the confined space it seemed more satisfactory to photograph the welding and burning. The cathedral light, the sense of being underground - I don't know what it was. But I was pretty sure I'd got something - I can't always tell.

[no title]  c12/1/74 - 75  not dated

Contents:
Back doing rubbishy shots really. Probably gone out for air. General landscape shots late in the day.

[no title]  c12/1/76 - 77  not dated

Contents:
Overview of the structure of the boat. I'm high up on the boat looking down. There are floors going in - being lifted down - and people welding on deck.

[no title]  c12/1/78 - 79  not dated

Contents:
Using long exposures following this guy welding/burning in daylight. It doesn't work as well. I'm using a 150 lens which changes the perspective.

[no title]  c12/1/80 - 81  not dated

Contents:
Nothing to say.

[no title]  c12/1/82  not dated

Contents:
I'd photographed this particular welder in many different situations. He was a youngish man and always looked disapproving. Earlier on he'd been working in the same area as the man who appears as if in a coffin (See c12/1/39/2 and c12/1/39/4). This welder would take off his mask and light a fag. He and the other man had a conversation about Liverpool Football Club and I joined in. I saw him and felt able to go really close and take the pictures. He already knew me and knew what I was doing. I did not know this was going to be really special but it was just so clear. You can virtually see him doing it from the beginning. In frame 9 the circle is complete. He has lifted his torch away and the oval he has cut falls through underneath, which it is not supposed to do. You can see him pulling his torch away. A lot of the welders did not wear helmets but a sort of polka dot handkerchief which gives these lovely colours.
There was always a sense that this was serious work. There was no messing about. Most of the workmen doing the basic welding earned £7 per hour. Many told me stories that they would work seven days in a row just to get something finished off. They might have two days off, go for a drink on the Friday night and 7.00 a.m. the next morning, lying in bed, they would get a telephone call to come in. If they didn't, they would be laid off in the next round of cuts. These were good jobs they didn't want to lose. They were continually being laid off. They needed to take the money while they could. It was a dangerous place to work. A lot of these men were in their fifties, even late fifties. A lot of them had originally been made redundant from Cammell Lairds Shipbuilders. The younger skilled men who had been made redundant had moved away in search of work. So it was the older skilled men who were taken on by the ship repairers who had taken over the Cammell Laird name.

[no title]  c12/1/83 - 85  not dated

Contents:
Working at different points around the ship but without the sense of excitement I had before. I'm trying different things to see what might work. Doesn't look like I'm getting anything. Probably too general, not specific enough.

[no title]  c12/1/86  not dated

Contents:
A new piece of machinery going in.
c12/1/86/4
People working in a line. I'm trying top make a composition which pulls it together - but without success.

[no title]  c12/1/87 - 89  not dated

Contents:
I'm half way down the ship here. Photographs of men welding below deck and on platforms. A couple of interest.

[no title]  c12/1/90  not dated

Contents:
I'm following the man who goes round putting up scaffolding and ladders. I'm trying to do it with a long exposure. Maybe a couple are interesting.

[no title]  c12/1/91  not dated

Contents:
A final look down before work is completed.

[no title]  c12/1/92 - 94  not dated

Contents:
General shots around the ship. Nothing to say about them. General mess of cables and service pipes.

[no title]  c12/1/95  not dated

Contents:
Down in the engine room.

Contact Prints  c12/2  [n.d.]

[no title]  c12/2/1 - 95  not dated

Contents:
These are the contact sheets printed from the negatives in d12/1. These negatives were shot during the course of work on the D.P.A. commission in 1996.
For details and information about the individual images see under d12/1.

Negatives of Work Undertaken in the Cammell Laird Shipyard prior to the Commission  c12/3  [n.d.]

Contents:
Tom Wood deposited these negatives and their corresponding contact sheets on completion of the D.P.A. commission in May 1997. Once again the information that accompanies these negatives was compiled in May 1997. Audrey took notes as Tom made comments while looking at the contact sheets.
This body of material was shot at the Cammell Laird Shipyard in 1993 prior to the work on the commission. I went in there a couple of days a week for about six months. I probably spent about twice as much time on the work then, as I did on the D.P.A. commission.
I initially went into the yard in 1992. I worked then in black and white taking probably eighty to one hundred rolls. I was satisfied with virtually nothing from this work. I partly used black and white because I was exploring and getting little or nothing so it was economical. Most of the early work was taken in the yard with the cranes and docks. It was very difficult to bring it all together. It all looked really good but it didn't make a picture. All the time I was accompanied by a minder from VSL, a nice man, but it made things difficult. They were working then on warships and submarines and I was not allowed on these.
I heard they were closing down so I wrote to the director and he O.K.ed things. Earlier approaches to the men below him had been unsuccessful. Cammell Lairds had been a major employer in Birkenhead so I had always been aware of the yard being there.
I got there, and there was nothing and the weather was freezing. My minder died soon after his retirement.
I converted to colour in 1993. I was working then with Paddy Shenahan. Paddy was looking for an excuse to be away from his family, so would come up for a week at a time. He was using 5 x 4. We would work there everyday. He had a car so it made things easier. It was a discipline thing. By this time more men had left and it was even more deserted. I had no minder now. I could explore physically as well as photographically. I would go into the workshops. There were only a few men where once there had been dozens. Because there were only a few with little to do they wanted to talk. I tended to make portraits, very simple portraits, using a Mamiya RB 6 x 7 as well as my Mamiya Press 6 x 9, a range finder camera. So I used a long lens on the RB, 180 for the portraits. I could do a picture just of a head and nothing else and fill the frame. These guys would talk to me; they were probably leaving that week and I would make as honest a portrait as I could without any sentimentality. I used available light and usually a one second exposure.
I had tried to get into the yard in the 1980s but without success. But I only made phone calls. When I did go in, it was disappointing. Dead, the death of a shipyard. Loss of skill, generations of skill. They were the first to make iron ships; all the ships they built during the war; everything about the whole place and its history. There was sadness and bitterness. The men felt they were being sold down the river by the government. They were arguing for so long - the Campaign to Save Cammell Lairds. I really wanted to photograph people making ships, but this was just mickey mouse stuff. Most of the men were just hanging around waiting to go. So it was a disappointment, but I thought I must make something of it.
[The numbering sequence of these negatives preserve's Tom's original numbering. There are gaps in the sequence. There are a total of 32 negative sheets.]

[no title]  c12/3/40  not dated

Contents:
There's a whole history here and I thought I must be able to make something of it, but I was getting nothing - not even good record shots. So I started photographing things that had been there for twenty years. Pin ups from the 1970s or the still lives the men would make for themselves in their work spaces.

[no title]  c12/3/41  not dated

Contents:
Dartsboard and faded pin-ups.

[no title]  c12/3/42  not dated

Contents:
Around the yard. I was interested in the Norton scrap bins which were so hammered you could hardly read the word Norton. There were skips everywhere taking things away, valuable and not valuable, from the yard.

[no title]  c12/3/43  not dated

Contents:
18
The Fort Victoria. The men are leaving their shift. The sun has just come out softly, very low sunlight. Fine shadows on the side of the boat which you can see if you compare with frame 16.
28 & 31
I'm pleased with the pictures taken in the abandonned electricity generating place.

[no title]  c12/3/44  not dated

Contents:
Nothing to say.

[no title]  c12/3/45  not dated

Contents:
Boring portrait. More interesting are the men in their work room in their lunch hour. They just lay down and went to sleep. See also c12/3/63

[no title]  c12/3/47  not dated

Contents:
c12/1/47/16
These men came from Newcastle. They worked for the Ship Repair Company. They asked for a group portrait. This was the kind of stuff that came out of the boat or went into it.

[no title]  c12/3/48  not dated

Contents:
Dull portraits
Metal debris - an abstract of the stuff that was removed from the boat or was being put onto it.

[no title]  c12/3/49  not dated

Contents:
Boring still life. Generally unsuccessful portraits.

[no title]  c12/3/50  not dated

Contents:
Better.
9
I'm pleased with this frame. I like the matter of factness of it, the quality of his skin and his expression. In terms of portraits of blokes about to leave their job, or even forgetting that, I'm interested in it.
18
Long exposure of electrical circular saw moving to background of fading pin-ups.

[no title]  c12/3/52 - 53  not dated

Contents:
Abandonned workroom. Some portraits.

[no title]  c12/3/54  not dated

Contents:
Outside. See also c12/3/47.

[no title]  c12/3/56  not dated

Contents:
Exterior shots of yard using wideangle lens. Don't really work?

[no title]  c12/3/57  not dated

Contents:
Largely abandonned huge construction hall. Rope hanging down on purpose as a noose? Looks symbolic to me. So many things like that were around the yard at that time. Torn pin-ups.

[no title]  c12/3/58 - 59  not dated

Contents:
I did a little bit of work on a ship being repaired which shocked me because there was work going on in the yard. But it was Ship Repair Company work. I resolved once Cammell Laird was properly closed I would come back and photograph this basic ship repair of burning and welding and middle-aged men doing the work. That's where the seed was. Maybe I could do men at work, the clichéd shipyard, by using a large camera on a tripod with slow speeds to change that. I thought it might be the key on how to deal with it, as soon as I saw frame c12/3/59/2 with just that bit of movement and the gesture and hints in other frames such as c12/3/59/11 or c12/3/58/16 and 18. To see these blokes working in such a crude way ...

[no title]  c12/3/60  not dated

Contents:
This work was done using a long exposure, a large camera and a bit of fill in flash. A precursor.

[no title]  c12/3/61  not dated

Contents:
See c12/3/40.
6 - 10
Men in restrooms.

[no title]  c12/3/63  not dated

Contents:
See also c12/3/45.

[no title]  c12/3/65  not dated

Contents:
Nothing to say.

[no title]  c12/3/70  not dated

Contents:
Paula Yates and Blondie turning brown in the workshop.

[no title]  c12/3/71  not dated

Contents:
Parts being labelled. They were selling non-nuclear submarines very cheaply to Canada because they were putting their money into nuclear ones. Not very interesting as pictures.

[no title]  c12/3/76  not dated

Contents:
More portraits.

[no title]  c12/3/80  not dated

Contents:
A portrait of a man in goggles using the light from his torch. Longer range shot showing Cammell Lairds crucified by the Government - "I done all I could".

[no title]  c12/3/82  not dated

Contents:
The last apprentices to go through the yard. They were just about to qualify. Also pictures of them in their restroom. See also c12/3/85.

[no title]  c12/3/83  not dated

Contents:
Portraits of inspectors. They went to school together. Two men of identical age.

[no title]  c12/3/84  not dated

Contents:
The garage restroom. The whole room was full of pin-ups. Lots of rude ones as well, not just page threes. The whole ceiling was covered as well. The area by the sink was typical - lots of pin-ups everywhere. If the ones on the walls were fading, then the books on the tables were equally explicit. In a way it seemed like personalizing. In any factory you always get some. But there, in particular, it seemed important to get them on the wall. When any guy left then all the women who worked in the canteen and offices would go to the pub too.

[no title]  c12/3/85  not dated

Contents:
2
Available fluorescent light and closer to the way it really is - very dingy. No windows in shed/portacabin things. Horrible.
7
Flash.

[no title]  c12/3/103  not dated

Contents:
Nothing to say.

[no title]  c12/3/104  not dated

Contents:
Launch of the submarine Unicorn, the last ship to leave Cammell Lairds. Paddy was up on top. I'm down in a galley area with pipes and wires. The "Fuck" on the wall refers to the redundancies.

[no title]  c12/3/130  not dated

Contents:
A few men were left after the yard had closed to do maintenance work.
18
I always wanted to do a portrait of the guy in this frame. He never wanted to know. After he saw other pictures and because the yard had closed, he evetually relented. I took him on a 12 x 16 showing every line.

Contact Sheets printed from Negatives taken in the Cammell Laird Shipyard prior to the Commission  c12/4  [n.d.]

32 Sheets of Contact Prints

Contents:
These are the contact sheets printed from the negatives in d12/3. These negatives were shot in 1993 prior to work on the D.P.A. commission in 1996.
For details and information about the individual images see under d12/3. The numbering of the sheets follows the exact sequence of the numbering in d12/3.

Work Prints  c12/5  [n.d.]

Contents:
10 x 8 Colour Prints of the following:
c12/1/15/2
c12/1/15/9
c12/1/67/2
c12/1/67/4
c12/1/67/13
c12/1/67/18
c12/1/68/18 (2 copies)
c12/1/69/4
c12/1/70/2
c12/1/70/4
c12/1/70/8
c12/1/71/4
c12/1/72/4
c12/1/72/6
c12/1/82/2
c12/1/82/4
c12/1/82/6
c12/1/82/8

Administration Files  c12/6  [n.d.]

Contents:
The files included in this section cover the advertising of the commission, applications received and the general administration of the project.

File marked Letters Requesting Information  c12/6/1  not dated

File marked Unsuccesful Applicants A - C  c12/6/2  not dated

File marked Unsuccesful Applicants D - G  c12/6/3  not dated

File marked Unsuccesful Applicants H - M  c12/6/4  not dated

File marked Unsuccesful Applicants N - Z  c12/6/5  not dated

File marked Comments on Applications  c12/6/6  not dated

File marked General Administration  c12/6/7  not dated

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